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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = COMPLIT
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 22 of 22
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 001, REC
Childhood

Instructor: Davis,Mandy Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is designed to help students become better critical and analytical writers, especially by thinking about the importance of words. One way we'll do this is through exploring the theme of childhood, particularly how it translates across times and cultures and experiences. From autobiographical accounts of former slaves in nineteenth century America and contemporary Native American writers to a fictionalized account of the Rwandan genocide to Romantic poets, we'll see how others write about childhood. If even the word "childhood" brings to mind, brings to the page, such a variety of ideas, we can begin to see the challenge (and the fun) of dealing with language. Emphasizing the importance of language will also allow us to explore the role of translation: the very meaning and task of translation (can we talk about "translating" a book into a film?, as well as the significance of the voice of the writer and translator and of cultural context (of the writer, the translator and the intended audiences), and how these relate to us as readers and writers. Altogether, these overlapping themes should also challenge us to think about how conventions of writing can inspire creative analytical thinking.

Some authors include Frederick Douglas, Sherman Alexic, Thierno Mone'nembo, William Wordsworth and Jamaica Kincaid. As a writing intensive course, grades will be derived primarily from essays, responses, translations and participation/commitment.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 002, REC
Cabals, Clues and Conversions

Instructor: Rowland,John Francis

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"Eureka!" "I've seen the light!" "It's all so clear now…" In literary and visual texts from the Iliad to the X-Files, there is a central moment of discovery in which a character suddenly comes to a profound realization and then immediately leaps into action.

In this course, we will look closely at stories, films, and other writing from a range of places and times, all featuring experiences where ideas or revelations lead into and justify action. These moments will range from paranoid revolutionary acts in stories by Dostoevsky and Pynchon to humorous religious conversions like in Nathaneal West's

This course is designed to focus on writing, and every student will write four papers: a critical essay on one of the assigned texts, a comparison of two texts from different epochs, an analysis of the relationship between theory and practice, and a newspaper editorial or personal essay on the student's individual experience. The instructor will work closely with students to improve their basic writing skills, especially their ability to organize arguments and express them clearly. All of the readings and most of the class discussion will be directed toward helping students think through problems, puzzles, and relationships as engaged writers and not merely as casual readers or spectators.

COMPLIT 122 — Writing World Literatures
Section 003, REC
Metamorphoses and Reflections.

Instructor: Ferrari,Sebastian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will trace the development of the figure of metamorphosis from ancient Rome to contemporary Latin America. We will be looking at how the idea of metamorphosis has evolved and been translated into various cultural contexts. In the same vein, we will also be following the use of mirrors, reflections and uncanny doubling in poetry and short stories. Readings will include selections from Ovid, several parables and short stories by Franz Kafka, Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman," George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," and short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortázar.

This course is designed to help you develop your analytical skills, both as a reader and a writer, and to further your knowledge of literature and other artistic forms.

COMPLIT 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Culture of Criticism, Criticism of Culture

Instructor: Seo,Joanne Mira

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, FYSem

This course will examine the function of criticism in society and how criticism is disseminated through cultural production. We will focus on the poets and critics of democratic Athens (criticism of poetry in the thought of Plato and Aristotle and its relationship to their political philosophies, Aristophanes as a political poet) and compare them with the works of more recent cultural critics such as Robert Warshow, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, as well as contemporary cultural products such as films and novels. To what extent can cultural criticism define and analyze areas beyond the arts, and how do cultural products such as poetry, literature and film critique contemporary culture?

Students will be evaluated on attendance, class participation, the presentation of group work, and brief writing assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 241 — Topics in Comparative Literature
Section 001, SEM
Waking from Amnesia: The Politics of Memory

Instructor: Hong,Seunghei

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

What is the role of the literary imagination in keeping memory alive? Is there such a thing as "the story" of a past event? Who is authorized to tell it, and how? Which agencies are involved in the activity of remembering? What is remembered? How does pain further complicate memory?

In this course we will investigate how experiences of pain are remembered and narrated. Focusing on narratives that complicate the seemingly transparent relationship between memory, history, and the "I" who recounts it, we will seek to understand how memory and experience shape each other and how these in turn shape the texts that "story" our lives. Through our study of works, reflecting diverse languages, cultures, genres, and points of view, we will examine issues of individual vs collective memory, bearing witness, remembering/forgetting, while mindful of tensions between ethical and aesthetic imperatives, and the perils of representing the unrepresentable. We will also pay particular attention to the ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender intersect with memory to discuss questions of authenticity, authority, representation, identity, and meaning.

Texts will range from autobiographies to oral testimonies, from poems to novellas, and from films to photographs. They may include:

  • Elie Wiesel's Night,
  • W.G. Sebald's Austerlitz,
  • Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior,
  • Joy Kogawa's Obasan,
  • Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La frontera,
  • Rigoberta Menchú's I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala,
  • Michel Gondry's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and
  • Christopher Nolan's Memento.

Students will be expected to complete weekly readings, several short critical response papers, and two longer papers. Active participation, open-mindedness, and sensitivity towards varying opinions will be also critical ingredients towards making this a successful class.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMPLIT 240

COMPLIT 241 — Topics in Comparative Literature
Section 002, SEM
Build Your Own Utopia

Instructor: Kesler,Corina

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

If you ever wanted to improve the world around you, and you did not know where or how to start, this class is for you: "Build Your Own Utopia" is an interdisciplinary course designed to help students clarify and evaluate their ideals as they improve reading, writing and discussion skills. We will read the works of several well-known utopian and dystopian authors (Plato, More, Swift, Bellamy, Skinner, Huxley, Orwell, Zamyatin, Piercy, Resnick, LeGuin, Callenbach, Stanley Robinson) along with the founding documents of some intentional, such as Oneida and Owenite, communities. We will also watch several feature and documentary movies on the topic (such as 1984, The Beach, The Amish, The Shakers, Gattaca). Working individually and in small groups, students will use the assigned readings, the Internet and personal experiences to gather the theoretical information necessary for building/creating a "literary" utopia or "an intentional community". The final projects will consist of utopias created by the students themselves, presented to the class during the final part of the course, and posted on the official class website.

The course work consists of several short quizzes, two 5-6 page papers, a short presentation, a take home final, and the final project.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMPLIT 240

COMPLIT 350 — The Text and Its Cultural Context
Section 001, SEM
Citizenship: Intersection of Art and Politics

Instructor: Igsiz,Zehra Asli; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

What is the relationship between art and politics? How do the intersections of these two realms make us think about conceptualizations of citizenship in different contexts? Consider hip hop artists releasing new video clips calling on their audience to vote just weeks before the elections; documentary filmmakers receiving subpoenas for the use of their documentary as evidence in court; films and books calling attention to critical issues as diverse as genocide, euthanasia, death penalty, and racism; prestigious awards distributed to cultural products about critical issues; censoring and/or challenging certain works of art with critical edge or considered a "threat" to the society…

In this course, we will be analyzing a wide range of materials including music, visual arts, film, and literature about/ from different geographic and political contexts. These cultural products raise questions about the boundaries between life and art and how these boundaries make us think about concepts of citizenry, but also ethics and value in art forms. While keeping these questions in mind, we will approach politicization of art, of cultural products in terms of their content, function, representation, and reception. We will use some theoretical texts to develop models of thinking about citizenship and different aspects of art and politics.

There will be regular responses to the materials covered in class, several term papers, and a final project.

Some cultural products we may examine include: Excerpts from Plato's Republic; fragments from MTV: Behind the Music and Michael Moore's Bowling for Columbine on Marylin Manson's alleged influence on the school shootings in Columbine; some songs by Eminem; Peter Cohen's documentary on Nazi concepts of beauty and art Architecture of Doom; George Orwell's 1984; Bosnian-British filmmaker Jasmin Dizdar's Beautiful People.

COMPLIT 372 — Literature and Identity
Section 001, SEM
Me, Myself, and I: Multiple Selves and Literature

Instructor: Igsiz,Zehra Asli; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What does it mean to have doubles of characters in literary works? Why would different authors resort to creating doubles, split characters, transformed selves that become doubles, or even make references to themselves in their works?

In this course, we will analyze the binaries such doubles tend to create as good and evil, real and ideal, real and imaginary, East and West, writer and protagonist, but will also attend to the grey zone in between and question different possibilities of comparison that these doubles provide us. While considering how the creations of multiple selves function in different literary works and films, we will also use different conceptualizations of doubles for questioning different forms of comparison. Together with our texts, we will use a variety of theoretical pieces to help us develop models of thinking comparatively and about comparative literature.

Some stories we might read are:

  • Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde;
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Double;
  • Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray;
  • Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis;
  • Orhan Pamuk's The White Castle;
  • Jorge Luis Borges' "Circular Ruins" and "Borges and I";
  • Julio Cortázar's The Night Face Up;
  • Paul Auster's City of Glass;
  • Anton Shammas' Arabesques.

And finally movies by:

  • David Fincher The Fight Club based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel and
  • Krzysztof Kieślowski's The Double Life of Véronique
    (La Double vie de Véronique/Podwójne życie Weroniki).

In this course, there will be regular short responses to the materials covered in class, several term papers, and a final project.

COMPLIT 490 — Comparative Cultural Studies
Section 001, SEM
Conflict of Interpretations

Instructor: Clej,Alina M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course proposes to familiarize students with different, and sometimes conflicting ways of reading and representing stories and events. We will discuss well-known cases, such as Shakespeare's The Tempest, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, as well as the various interpretations or translations these works have received over time in different cultural settings. This exploration will allow us to better understand the production of cultural works — Shakespeare's Tempest and Conrad's Heart of Darkness, for instance, are themselves complex literary interpretations of other texts and historical events — and their reproduction and diffusion through re-writing, translation, and transposition in a different medium (e.g., film).

Literary works include:

    Shakespeare, The Tempest;
  • Aimé Césaire's A Tempest;
  • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre;
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea;
  • Conrad, Heart of Darkness;
  • Nabokov, Lolita, and
  • Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Teheran.

We will also discuss cinematic interpretation of these works, such as:

  • Peter Greenway's Prospero's Books,
  • Francis Coppola's Apocalypse Now, and
  • Stanley Kubrick's Lolita.

Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and participation in class discussion, keeping a regular reading and viewing journal, a midterm assignment, and a final paper. Students from all disciplines are welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMPLIT 492 — Comparative Literary Theory
Section 001, SEM
Reading and Writing Critical Theory

Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What does it mean to be "critical" in our mode of thinking and why is it important or even desirable? In this seminar we will examine the modern imperative to be critical — to be alert, vigilant, incisive, analytic, skeptical, objective, comparative. We will take a look at various historical moments in the Western critical tradition and focus on the process of undergraduates.

This is a seminar open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Your careful preparation for, and active participation in, each seminar meeting is essential. Although the reading sequence may suggest a broad historical survey, the actual reading will be highly selective.

Course Requirements:

  • Weekly or bi-weekly critical, reflective, analytic, and/or imaginative paper focusing on the reading.
  • One class paper on any topic relevant to the course, and suitable for a 20-minute oral presentation.
  • Seminar presentation of the class paper.
  • Critical response paper, commenting on other presenters.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMPLIT 492 — Comparative Literary Theory
Section 002, SEM
Torture

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Early in 2005, to help in the planned revision of Norway's animal protection law, a scientific study funded by the Norwegian government found that worms squirming on a fishhook feel no pain, nor do lobsters and crabs cooked in boiling water. Norway might have considered banning the use of live worms as fish bait if the study had found they felt pain. We don't know what the inarticulate worms and lobsters thought about the whole matter, but we do know that Vice-President Dick Cheney, speaking with a talk show host later in October of 2006, appeared to embrace the suggestion that a "dunk in water" might be useful to get terrorism suspects to talk. "Water-boarding," the "professional" term for dunking, is a torture technique banned under international law. Earlier in October, President Bush had signed a bill outlawing the torture of detainees, but "quietly reserved the right to bypass the law under his powers as a commander in chief," as The Boston Globe put it.

As a reflection on LSA Theme Year on the Theory and Practice of Citizenship, this seminar is meant to encourage good, engaged citizens to think and care and write about the pain and the torture of others, despite the inadequacies of language. Elaine Scarry wrote that "physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it, bringing about an immediate reversion to a state anterior to language, to the sounds and cries a human being makes before language is learned." Through theory, fiction, films, plays, memoirs, testimonies and legal documents, we will examine the ways in which language can(not) articulate the unmaking of the body of worms, lobsters and, especially, humans, through torture and pain — conceptualized, inflicted and narrated.

Students will be asked to write one 5-page essay, triggered by the weekly readings, and to present and discuss it in class; and to submit a substantial term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COMPLIT 496 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMPLIT 495 and Honors concentration in Comparative Literature. Permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 498 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 601 — Contemporary Theory
Section 001, SEM
Preparation for Pre-lim Exam in Comparative Literature

Instructor: Prins,Johanna H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

As the second part of a two-part introductory sequence to Comparative Literature, this course is especially designed for (and limited to) second-year students who are preparing for the Preliminary Exam. The course will focus on a range of methodological and practical topics, including the drafting of a reading list and rationale for the exam, the development of theoretical paradigms and research methods, and practice in submitting and presenting conference papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 698 — Directed Reading in Comparative Literature
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 731 — Seminar in Literary Movements and Periods
Section 001, SEM
Hebrew Modernism 1900-1930: Tradition, Modernity, Language, Space

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

The literary works of Hebrew Modernism were created during the early decades of the twentieth century, mainly in the urban centers of Eastern and Central Europe, before Hebrew was solidified as a vernacular in Mandatory Palestine. The formation of Hebrew Modernism is one of the most puzzling chapters in the history of Hebrew and Jewish literature. Many crucial questions concerning Hebrew Modernism remain open: How did modernist Hebrew fiction and poetry arise before the language became a vernacular? What poetic and historic shifts enabled its development? What are the modernist elements, and what (if anything) is specifically Hebrew or Jewish in this literary project? What are the relations between Hebrew and Yiddish Modernism, and the various movements of European Modernisms (Decadence, Impressionism, Expressionism, Naturalism, Stream of the Consciousness Narrative, etc.)? How to understand Hebrew Modernism in the contexts of the competing political and ideological movements of Jewish Nationalism, Zionism and Socialism? What is the place of traditional/religious Jewish texts and language in the formation of Hebrew Modernism? The seminar will deal with some of these questions by exploring the main works of Hebrew literature in the last decade of the 19th century (the fin de siècle) and the first three decades of the 20th century. We will read Hebrew fiction and poetry as well as theoretical and historical writing about Modernism in general (Adorno, Benjamin, Raymond Williams, Richard Sheppard) and Hebrew Modernism in particular (Kurzweil, Miron, Harshav, Kronfeld). Special attention will be given to the ways in which Hebrew modernist writers were engaged in "radical reinvention of Jewish traditions," as well as shifting perceptions of gender and erotic desire, space and place, geographical and metaphorical journeys, the Diaspora as a mental place, etc.

Reading knowledge of Hebrew required. If you are interested in the seminar, please contact Prof. Shachar Pinsker (spinsker@umich.edu).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 741 — Seminar in Major Authors
Section 001, LEC
Spinoza

Instructor: Colás,Santiago; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In recent decades, the writings of Spinoza have grown increasingly influential in the fields of political philosophy and literary and cultural theory and criticism &38212; particularly where these are concerned with the relationship of culture to social issues. Not only such diverse Marxist thinkers such as Louis Althusser and Antonio Negri, but poststructuralists such as Gilles Deleuze have helped to spur this resurgent interest in the texts of Spinoza and in the uses to which his thought has been and might be put. Ecocritics as well have found inspiration in the works of Spinoza, partly through the work of Arne Naess, Norwegian philosopher and founder of the so-called "deep ecology" movement. In this course, students will have the opportunity to examine first hand this contemporary resurgence of interest in Spinoza, but to do in the context of a slow and intensive reading of some of Spinoza's principal texts: The Ethics, The Theologico-Political Treatise, and The Political Treatise, along with, perhaps, short selections from other works and correspondence. The aims of the course will be to familiarize students with the texts of this thinker, to deepen their understanding of his relevance to important contemporary thinkers, and to investigate the potential value of his thought for students' own original research.

Participants will be required to read carefully each week's assignment from Spinoza, to prepare short writing assignments related to the reading, to lead one week's discussion of that material, and to present to their fellow participants an outside text on Spinoza (by Althusser, Negri, Deleuze, et al.).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 780 — Seminar: Studies in Form and Genre
Section 001, SEM
Comparative Poetics and Lyric Theory

Instructor: Prins,Johanna H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this graduate seminar, we will consider a variety of recent approaches to theorizing lyric poetry. Students will draw on their own areas of linguistic, literary, historical, and creative expertise in order to think comparatively about reading lyric and lyric reading.

Throughout the semester we will combine focused reading of particular poems (selected by students in the seminar) with a broader perspective on the critical traditions that shape our reading of lyric poetry today. We will keep in mind a series of related questions: Why do modern critics tend to read lyric poetry as a form of/for personal utterance, and what are some alternatives to the assumption of voice, speaker, subjectivity in lyric reading? Can we even assume the existence of "the lyric"? How might we define lyric theory by turning to historical poetics? Where do idealist and materialist readings of lyric diverge or converge? What are the various genres, media, technologies, discourses, and institutions for the transmission and circulation of lyric?

Our critical readings on lyric are likely to include Beyond New Criticism (ed. Hosek and Parker), How to Read a Poem (Terry Eagleton) , Ends of the Lyric (Timothy Bahti), Dickinson's Misery: A Theory of Lyric Reading (Virginia Jackson), Invisible Listeners (Helen Vendler), Poetic License (Marjorie Perloff), Toy Medium (Daniel Tiffany), Summa Lyrica (Allen Grossman), Poetry and the Fate of the Senses (Susan Stewart), Poetry's Touch (William Waters), Reading the Illegible (Craig Dworkin).

Requirements for this seminar: regular attendance and active class participation; submission of weekly discussion questions; one oral presentation (connecting a theorist with a specific lyric text); a review of a book on poetics; a final paper (20 pages) written in several drafts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 791 — Seminar in Literary Theory
Section 001, SEM
African Paris: Histories and Literature of Race and Rethinking Negritude in Imperial France

Instructor: Diouf,Mamadou; homepage
Instructor: Ekotto,Frieda

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The goals of this course are to provide students with an overall view of race from a literary and historical perspective, and to offer students a context from which to study race relations outside the United States. While there are many courses which are taught on the topics of race in History and in CAAS, the curriculum still lacks courses that talk about race from the melding of a literary and a historical perspective. This course is designed to address this lack by examining the phenomenon of Negritude in the early part of the twentieth century to consider how literature and history can be imperative to the shaping of our consciousness of race. We believe that a course centered on Negritude is essential to extending the Race and Ethnicity required courses to include perspectives on race outside of the United States, as well as to understanding the important role culture played as a tool to articulate race as well as to combat racism. This course also seeks to intervene into a discussion on debates on globalization, multiculturalism and postcolonial studies, and to provide a concrete foothold for upper-level undergraduates to segue into these larger issues.

The phenomenon of Negritude will be extremely important in helping to bring discussions of race relations to an international level. Negritude was an Afro-European literary and cultural phenomenon of the early twentieth century. Negritude was one of the many ways in which black people from the French Empire first began to articulate notions of "Blackness", a way of conceiving of a kind of subjectivity that would transcend the deep divisions between Arabs, West Indian Africans, continental Africans and other members of the Black Diaspora and allow them to come together and find a new form of self-respect. They carved in Paris, the imperial metropolis, an imperial public sphere to sustain a conversation between imperial subjects — in particular but not only among Blacks — about citizenship, nationalism, universalism, modernity and race. Their goal: locate and/or reconcile African modes of thought, traditional African Humanism and a complex recreation of universalism.

This course will be taught by two faculty members, Frieda Ekotto, who holds appointments with Romance Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, affiliated with CAAS and Mamadou Diouf, who holds a joint appointment with CAAS and History.

This class will be taught seminar style, and students will be required to lead class discussion at least once a semester, and this will constitute a considerable amount to their grade. This means that the student will have to master the text for the day s/he has signed up for, and to pose important questions that the text introduces for the discussion, to field questions as well as to encourage class participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 791 — Seminar in Literary Theory
Section 002, SEM
Reading and Writing Critical Theory

Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

What does it mean to be "critical" in our mode of thinking and why is it important or even desirable? In this seminar we will examine the modern imperative to be critical — to be alert, vigilant, incisive, analytic, skeptical, objective, comparative. We will take a look at various historical moments in the Western critical tradition and focus on the process of undergraduates.

This is a seminar open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Your careful preparation for, and active participation in, each seminar meeting is essential. Although the reading sequence may suggest a broad historical survey, the actual reading will be highly selective.

Course Requirements:

  • Weekly or bi-weekly critical, reflective, analytic, and/or imaginative paper focusing on the reading.
  • One class paper on any topic relevant to the course, and suitable for a 20-minute oral presentation.
  • Seminar presentation of the class paper.
  • Critical response paper, commenting on other presenters.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

COMPLIT 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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