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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ECON
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 81 of 81
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Textbooks:
Prin of Micro 5th ed. Taylor
Econ of Public Issues 14th ed. Miller

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Textbooks:
Prin of Micro 5th ed. Taylor
Econ of Public Issues 14th ed. Miller

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Kossoudji,Sherrie A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 is designed to help students understand the economic method through the study of the principles of microeconomics. By the end of the semester, students should understand basic concepts in economics (opportunity cost; comparative advantage; marginal utility and marginal productivity; human, financial, and physical capital; externalities; public goods, income distributions, etc.). More importantly, students will be able to use the basic tools of economics. That is, students will be able to solve basic economic problems (Why are airline tickets on the same plane different prices? Why does Verizon bundle products together? Why are fresh water rights at a premium right now? How does discounting relate to mortgage payments?)

Students who plan to continue in economics will have a solid grounding in basic theory and will be prepared for advanced classes. Students who will never take another economics class will be able to explain pertinent economic dilemmas to mom, dad, relatives, friends, and others they want to impress.

Please note that the midterm exam will be 6-8 PM on Feb 21.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Note: MIDTERM EXAMS will be from 8-10 PM on Feb 14, Mar 14, and Apr 17.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 100) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 101-109) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Leeds,Michael A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 200) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 201-209) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 108 — Introductory Microeconomics Workshop
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

Course meets weekly for discussion of current Wall Street Journal articles related to the week's ECON 101 topics, stressing the use and application of the microeconomics tools being learned in ECON 101.

Students will select a topic, open the discussion on their week's topic, keep a journal throughout the term on their topic and summarize their findings at the end of the term in a brief (2 page max) paper. This paper and journal will be turned in at the end of the term.

Workshop attendance is mandatory, and each student will be required to subscribe to the Wall Street Journal for the term. Evaluation of students will be entirely on the basis of their paper, journal, and attendance.

Students in ECON 108 MUST BE enrolled in ECON 101. Please email Jan Gerson (jgerson@umich.edu) if you are interested in enrolling for ECON 108.

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing and concurrent enrollment in ECON 101.

ECON 108 — Introductory Microeconomics Workshop
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

This section of ECON 108 focuses on economic analysis through service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching-learning process that involves students in the community for both service and learning reasons. The service this academic term will be at one of a number of local agencies where you will serve in capacities that are negotiated with the staff there. The learning will focus on observation and analysis at the service agency. As you serve in the agency, you will observe and actively analyze incentives, decision-making and the costs and benefits of the agency.

ECON 108 meets weekly for discussion. Written assignments include keeping a structured journal and an end-of-term paper summarizing your observations and analysis.

Students in ECON 108 MUST BE enrolled in ECON 101. Please email Jan Gerson (jgerson@umich.edu) if you are interested in enrolling for ECON 108.

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing and concurrent enrollment in ECON 101.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit is granted for a full-time internship of at least eight weeks that enriches a student's academic experience and/or allows a student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. Verification of the internship (after completion) must be provided by the student on company letterhead. Internship applications can be downloaded from the Economics homepage or obtained from the Economics Office. A student normally enrolls for Econ 299 during the Fall Term, after satisfactory completion of the summer internship.

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 036, IND

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 059, IND

Instructor: Wolfe,Janet C

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 299 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 087, IND

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

ECON 299 allows economics concentrators to receive credit (1 credit only) for a full-time internship of at least 8 weeks or equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies. To receive the credit, students must obtain approval for the proposed job or internship experience from an economics concentration advisor and must submit a letter on company letterhead from the job or internship supervisor confirming the satisfactory completion of the work described in the internship application.

ECON 299 MAY NOT be used to satisfy economics elective credits for an economics concentration. Internship credit is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ECON 299 is available only for declared economics concentrators with permission of an Economics Concentration Advisor. http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/uofm/content/econ/document/internship.html

Advisory Prerequisite: Economics concentrators, with permission of concentration advisor; application required.

ECON 309 — Experimental Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rigdon,Mary Lisa; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 109.

In this course you will learn economics principles by first participating in a classroom experiment, and then studying the related economic theory and applications. By participating in economic experiments you will be able to observe economic principles in action. Topics will include competitive markets, bargaining, monopoly, externalities, auctions, and others. Students who have taken ECON 109 are not eligible.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 310 — Money and Banking
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The role of money, banking, and finance in the economy. At the macroeconomic level, we study how monetary policy influences interest rates, prices, and overall economic activity.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 327 — Economics of Crime
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Economics and Crime uses the tools of economic analysis students learned in the introductory classes to examine the theory of criminal choice, crime markets, efficient allocation of law enforcement resources and other topics so that students may appreciate the power of economic tools to inform public policy discussion and debate.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 370 — Environmental and Resource Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Helfand,Gloria E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 471 or 472.

This course focuses on how basic economic concepts — supply, demand, and opportunity cost — can be used to understand and manage a wide range of environmental problems. Topics include the sources of market failure for environmental goods, externalities and policy approaches for their control, discounting and benefit-cost analysis, nonmarket valuation, and management of nonrenewable and renewable resources. The emphasis is on conceptual understanding rather than formulas or solution algorithms; students have to understand economic reasoning more than they will use math. The tests and much of the homework assignments are short-answer questions that require students to explain their reasoning. Lectures will cover key concepts; discussion sections and readings will provide reinforcement through examples and problem-solving. Students completing this course will have an improved understanding of the economics paradigm, the sources of environmental problems, and some ideas for their solution.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 001, LEC
The Economics of Waste (MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 1 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Porter,Richard C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

During the last quarter century, America has woken up to the fact that we have waste problems. As a result, waste of all kinds has become heavily regulated. In this course, the entire waste-scape is viewed — mining waste, agricultural waste, packaging waste, household trash collection, landfills, incinerators, litter, mandatory deposits (on beverage containers or on hazardous wastes), interstate and international waste trade, recycling (lots on this), hazardous waste, Superfund, low-level radioactive waste, and spent nuclear-reactor fuel.

This one-month, one-credit course will examine how federal, state, and local governments have undertaken the regulation of waste and what the effects of regulation have been on economic efficiency, health, and the environment.

There are three prerequisites: 1) Economics 101; 2) interest in learning how to analyze economic policy issues, especially those concerned with waste and recycling; and 3) willingness to recall and use algebra, graphs, and other tools of analysis that you studied in the introductory microeconomics course. (Be warned: In the past, students who had trouble with the theory in Econ 101 have found the theory in this course to be hard.) Each class (except the first and the last) will begin with a short quiz to ensure your attendance and careful prior reading of that day's textbook assignment (some 40+ pages per class). There will be no make-up quizzes except by prior arrangement. Following the quiz, since the textbook is the lecture, each class will be entirely discussion (and on some days, some lecturing on difficult parts of the text). The course grade will be: 50 percent comprised of the average of the seven quiz grades; 25 percent for the grade on a short paper, dealing with a specific real-world waste problem and its attendant policies (and requiring more legwork than library); and 25 percent of the grade on a last-class final exam stressing use of the economic analysis of the textbook.

The textbook ("The Economics of Waste" published by Resources for the Future Press 2002) is in the UM libraries, so prospective enrollees can see what they are getting into. A new paperback copy costs $28, but cheaper used copies are available online.

Note the course times carefully: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:10-5:25 pm, 4 January — 1 February ONLY

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 002, LEC
Growth, Inflation, and Depression (MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This course in applied macroeconomics combines theory, history, and statistics, focusing on the economic analysis of some outstanding historical episodes in the United States and Europe. The goal is not to establish chronology so much as to show how macroeconomic theory and simple statistical techniques can shed light on the causes of inflation, depression, and asset price fluctuations. Probable topics are: the Great Depression, the German hyperinflation, the stagflation of the 1970s, stabilization of inflation, macroeconomic determinants of stock price fluctuations, consumer confidence, and macroeconomic implications of oil price changes.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 003, LEC
Introduction to Health Economics

Instructor: Levy,Helen G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the economics of health and medical care. By the end of the quarter students should have the institutional knowledge and analytic tools needed to contribute to current public policy debates about health and medical care.

Feel free to review this example syllabus from the last time the class was offered.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 004, LEC
Theory of Games (MEETS JAN 4 — MAR 15 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Poker, chess and checkers may have more to do with economics than you think: many economic interactions share with these games a significant strategic dimension. To determine optimal courses of action, a participant in the market will often need to form conjectures about the behavior of others, and must always be cognizant of the fact that these others' actions are based on conjectures about her behavior as well.

The theory of games allows us deal with these sorts of complex decision-making scenarios. In this course we will look to develop insights into market behavior by studying and playing various market games. Far from a rigorous course in game theory, we strive to provide intuitive insights into the nature of economic games by playing through simple games in class, and analyzing the results. The games we consider will address issues a broad range of markets: examples include the oligopolistic oil market, the market for used cars and labor markets.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 398 — Strategy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 409 or RCSSCI/SOC 222.

This course is an introduction to the science of strategic thinking. Basics of non-cooperative game theory will be covered, and applied to a variety of topics. These topics may include collective action problems; situations involving adverse selection, signaling or moral hazard; strategic voting; auctions and bidding behavior; bargaining; and competitive markets.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON 401 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kühn,Kai-Uwe; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course deals with the theoretical analysis of consumers, firms, markets, and price determination. The analysis is rigorous, using the tools of algebra, geometry, and elementary calculus in constructing models. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. ECON 401 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is not recommended that ECON 401 and 402 be taken in the same term. Lecture and section both meet twice a week.

Overrides will be given after lecture the first day of class. If a section closes and a student drops that section, the section will reopen.

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 175, 176, 185, 186, 215, 295, or 296; with C or better

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102

ECON 402 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: House,Christopher L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

ECON 403 — Advanced Economic Theory
Section 001, LEC
Contract Theory

Instructor: Borgers,Tilman M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is about "contract theory." Contract theory describes how best to provide incentives to agents who pursue their own interest. Examples of practical problems to which contract theory can be applied include: the compensation of managers and workers; non-linear pricing; and the design of the menus of contracts that insurance companies offer to their customers.

This course will develop analytical models that address these and other applications. It will also mention some experimental or empirical investigations of the implications of these models. This course uses and develops the tools of microeconomic theory, and students are expected to be familiar with the material covered by ECON 401. Students should also be familiar with basic calculus, including differentiation and integration, and with elementary probability calculations.

The course is quite different from the version of ECON 403 that was offered in Fall 2006. It is similar, but not quite identical, to the version of ECON 403 offered in Winter 2006. There is no set textbook for this course, but the slides used in the lectures will be distributed to students through a coursetools website.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 404 — Statistics for Economists
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shin,Dong Gyun

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 405 or STATS 350, 265, 311, 350, 400, 405, or 412.

This is an introductory course in statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability theory, statistical inference, and multiple regression. Interpretation of statistical results is emphasized.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102 and MATH 115

ECON 405 — Introduction to Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shin,Yongyun

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect STATS 405/ECON 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the principles of statistical inference. Topics include probability, experimental and theoretical derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression. (Students are advised to elect the sequel, ECON 406.)

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116. Jrs/Srs may elect 405 concurrently with ECON 101 or 102. No credit granted if completed or enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

ECON 406 — Introduction to Econometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Solon,Gary Rand; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course, a continuation of ECON 405, is designed to help students understand empirical research in economics. Most of the course focuses on regression analysis, starting with the classical linear model and then proceeding to commonly encountered departures from the classical assumptions. Computer exercises are used to introduce students to the analysis of economic data.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 405 or STATS 426.

ECON 409 — Game Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nakajima,Daisuke

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course provides a rigorous introduction of game theory, which is the most important analytical tool in economics and other fields of social science. You will study how to analyze strategic situations (games), which can be static or dynamic and which may involve incomplete information, along with many examples such as oligopolistic markets, monetary policies, bargaining, repeated games, auctions, signaling in a labor market, reputation formations and so on.

MATH 217 is not at all needed to take this course. However, students should be familiar with basic calculus and logics. Knowledge of basic probabilities is helpful. The first one or two discussion sections will be devoted to reviewing these topics.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 217.

ECON 412 — Topics in Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC
Applied Macroeconomics and Monetary Theory

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is an advanced course in applied macroeconomics and monetary theory. It involves theoretical and empirical analysis of such phenomena as depression, inflation, stagflation, stock market fluctuations, and productivity slowdowns. Probably topics include the Great Depression, the German hyperinflation, the stagflation of the 1970s, stabilization of inflation, gold and bimetallic standards, macroeconomic determinants of stock price fluctuations, growth and development, consumer confidence, and macroeconomic implications of oil price changes.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 421 — Labor Economics I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Elsby,Michael William Leamington

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Analysis of the determination of the levels and distribution of skills, wages, employment, and income in a market economy. Applications of the theories of consumer choice, production, and investment in human capital to a wide range of real-world problems.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 431 — Industrial Organization and Performance
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Axel Zane

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will analyze the strategic interactions among firms and their effects on the social welfare. The topics will include the theory of firm, price discrimination, price/quantity competition, collusion, merger, entry deterrence, and antitrust laws. Selected news articles and antitrust cases will be used to illustrate some of the key concepts. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 453 — The European Economy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adams,William J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The structure, function, and performance of the European economy since World War II. Emphasis is placed on description and analysis of European economic integration. Topics include the origins and institutions of the European Community, creation of the customs union, unification of the internal market, implementation of common policies for agriculture and competition, monetary union, geographic enlargement, and progress toward social Europe. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions. Students who miss the first two days of class without permission will be dropped automatically from the course.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing

ECON 455 — The Economy of the People's Republic of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Poncet,Sandra

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the process of institutional change and economic development through the experiences of mainland China and Taiwan. Emphasis is on economic reforms in mainland China since 1978, including agricultural reforms, rural industrialization, reform of state-owned enterprises, international trade and foreign investment, fiscal and financial reforms, and regional inequality and poverty. Other topics: record of socialist planning in China; and China's entry into the World Trade Organization.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 461 — The Economics of Development I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Poncet,Sandra

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 360.

This course surveys contemporary economic thinking as to why some countries are poor and others are rich, and how underdeveloped economies function. The course is organized around twenty topic areas, or modules, that together provide comprehensive coverage of Development Economics. During the first part of the course, we will analyze the determinants of economic growth, focusing on proximate factors such as labor, capital and productivity. During the second part of the course, we will analyze economic problems and policies both domestic and international.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 472 — Intermediate Natural Resource Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Michael R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will use economics to study contemporary issues in natural resources and environment. Topics covered include: land use and urban sprawl; water allocation and pricing in the American West; endangered species conservation; nonrenewable resource depletion; energy futures; management of stock pollutants; and global warming.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-, or NRE 570; or graduate standing

Advisory Prerequisite: NRE 570 or Permission of Instructor

ECON 482 — Government Revenues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hines Jr,James R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 380.

This course provides an introduction to the economics of taxation and government finance. Topics covered include the theory of taxation, the analysis of tax policy, and the theory of government debt and budget deficits.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 001, LEC
Beyond Business Cycles

Instructor: Kimball,Miles S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Analyzes the medium-run and long-run response of the economy to technology shocks, preference shocks, and shocks to government policy (especially capital and labor taxes and government purchases). This class will satisfy the upper-level writing requirement, based on short weekly papers relating the theory in the class to current issues. The draft syllabus gives more detail.

Wolverine Access may list the class as CLOSED, but I expect to be able to admit everyone who wants to take the class, since many students may drop when they see how rigorous the class is. Please look carefully at the syllabus to see if this class is right for you, then just show up on the first day of class.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 002, LEC
Dynamic Economic Theory

Instructor: Smith,Lones A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This will be an analytically oriented course on dynamic economic theory. We will first study stochastic dynamic programming and perhaps other tools, and then apply them in economics to search theory, learning, etc.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 492 — World Economic History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Examines the causes and consequences of world economic development. Topics include: the effects of the agricultural and industrial revolutions, law, global integration, and finance on economic growth and standards of living.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 406

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 001, SEM
Applied Micro Modeling

Instructor: Salant,Stephen W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This seminar will illustrate how elementary microeconomic tools can be used to illuminate observed real-world phenomena and to evaluate alternative policy interventions. Each student will complete a problem set and writing assignment. In addition, students will be required — as part of a team of three — to investigate in depth a single local, national, or international topic. Students on the same team who want to use their project toward honors will be encouraged to focus on different aspects of the overall topic. Students will choose from a list of topics either suggested by the instructor or by students in the class. A preliminary list of suggested topics will be available at the first meeting and it usually evolves during the first weeks of the seminar.

Students interested in enrolling in ECON 495 must submit an application. Applications are available on Economics Department's website.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 002, SEM
Evaluation of Social Programs

Instructor: Smith,Jeffrey Andrew; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course will consider the evaluation of social programs, such as job training programs for the disadvantaged, marriage promotion programs and drug use prevention programs from an economic perspective. The first part of the course will consist of lectures that introduce the basics of econometric program evaluation. The remainder of the course will consist of seminar style presentations and discussions of academic papers and government reports.

Students will write a literature survey reviewing the evaluation literature on a specific program; in so doing, they will both learn how to write a serious analytic literature survey and learn about the particular program they choose to study.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 496 — History of Economic Thought
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course treats the development of economics from its origins to the near present. The aim of the course is to deepen understanding of some contemporary economic questions by examining how they have arisen and been answered and debated in the history of economic thought.

The first half of the course provides an overview of economic thought with the most attention paid to classical political economy from Adam Smith through Karl Marx, and to the neoclassical economics of W.S. Jevons, Léon Walras, and Alfred Marshall. The remainder of the course this term is devoted mainly to the history of macroeconomics beginning with John Maynard Keynes and through the twentieth century. The main textbooks for the course are The Ordinary Business of Life: A History of Economics from the Ancient World to the Twenty-First Century by R. Backhouse (Princeton 2002) and Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State by B. Snowdon and H. Vane (Elgar 2005).

The course situates the history of economics in broader contexts. Attention is especially focused on the scientific status of economic theories as well as on their relation to policy and normative questions.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-

ECON 498 — Honors Independent Research
Section 001, IND
Honors

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

This course is for undergraduates writing senior Honors theses. Each student's grade for the course and levels of honors achieved will depend entirely on the quality of the thesis, as evaluated by the thesis advisor with whom the student has arranged to work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to Honors concentration in economics. Permission of instructor.

ECON 499 — Independent Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the Economics concentration advisor.

ECON 502 — Applied Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Laitner,John P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course designed for students in the MAE program. Approximately one-third of the course is spent reviewing and elaborating on standard macro theory of the sort covered in an advanced undergraduate course. The remainder of the time is spent on applications of this theory to problems of stabilizing aggregate demand, unemployment and inflation, economic growth, and macroeconomics of open economies.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 402 or permission of instructor and Graduate standing.

ECON 503 — Econometrics for Applied Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shin,Dong Gyun

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An introduction to econometric methods and their use in policy analysis. Most of the course focuses on multiple regression analysis, beginning with ordinary least squares estimation and then considering the implications and treatment of serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, specification error, and measurement error. The course also provides an introduction to simultaneous equations models and models for binary dependent variables.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Permission of instructor

ECON 571 — Applied Econometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: DiNardo,John E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to econometric methods and their use in policy analysis. Most of the course focuses on multiple regression analysis, beginning with ordinary least squares estimation, and then considers the implications and treatment of serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, specification error, and measurement error. The course also provides an introduction to simultaneous equations models, time series analysis, models for binary dependent variables, and methods for longitudinal analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Graduate standing.

ECON 572 — Policy Models
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: DiNardo,John E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide a forum for learning about and discussing (primarily) micro-economic applications. It is intended for those students who have completed PubPol 571 or an equivalent. The goal of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to allow them to pursue their own research and to critically assess empirical work. Coursework will include problem sets and class presentations. We will also make extensive use of STATA.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 571 and Graduate standing.

ECON 600 — Math for Economists
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Silverman,Daniel Susman; homepage
Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

WN 2007
Credits: 2

This course offers an introduction to the mathematics used in contemporary economics. Topics covered include linear algebra and matrices, multivariable calculus, and optimization theory. The course also provides an introduction to differential and difference equations and dynamic programming. Students may place out of the course by exam. The course begins in late August, two weeks before the beginning of the Fall Term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and graduate standing. Highly recommended for students taking ECON 601/602 and required for all PhD students in ECON.

ECON 603 — Microeconomic Theory III
Section 001, LEC
Class meets Jan 4 — Feb 23 only. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course will cover the modern general equilibrium theory along with applications and extensions.

  1. Planning problems
  2. Prove the classical existence, welfare and core convergence theorems
  3. Examine non-convexities, properties of aggregate excess demand, smooth economies, the Arrow-Debreu model of contingent commodities
  4. Circumstances where competitive markets are inefficient: Externalities and Public goods; Coase theorem.

  5. General equilibrium under uncertainty, including incomplete markets. Equilibrium and Time.

  6. The theory will be accompanied by various applications.

Starr, Ross. General Equilibrium Theory: An Introduction, Cambridge, 1997. Mas-Colell, Andreu; Michael Whinston and Jerry Green, Microeconomic Theory, Oxford, 1995. Debreu, Gerard. Theory of Value, Yale, 1959.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Permission of instructor

ECON 604 — Microeconomic Theory IV
Section 001, LEC
Class meets Mar 5 — Apr 17 only. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Information and incentive economics, incentive adverse selection, signalling, and screening. Also addressed are the principal-agent model, introduction to contract theory, social choice theory, Arrow's theorem, social welfare functions, axiomatic bargaining, and mechanism design.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Permission of instructor

ECON 605 — Macroeconomic Theory I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Laitner,John P; homepage
Instructor: Stolyarov,Dmitriy L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

ECON 605 is the first half of the two-course macroeconomic theory sequence for Ph.D. students at Michigan. The course provides an introduction to short and long-run models and their methodology. Its focus, however, is long-run growth. It covers Solow's models, life-cycle saving, representative age models, and endogenous growth models. It considers models with and without money. And, it provides an introduction to real business cycle models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600. Graduate standing.

ECON 609 — Advanced Mathematical Models for Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kimball,Miles S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Covers advanced methods in optimal control, dynamic programming, monotone comparative statics and von Neumann-Morgenstern decision theory, preservations of properties under expectations and maximization, Boyd's symmetry theorem, and convex cone methods. The course emphasizes developing an intuitive understanding of the methods by proof-sketches, solved examples, and problem sets rather than fully formal proofs.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; ECON 600 or permission of instructor.

ECON 610 — Stochastic Dynamic Optimization in Economics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Stolyarov,Dmitriy L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course studies stochastic dynamic optimization in continuous time. The focus is on the optimal control of Brownian motion. The course first develops the mathematical apparatus necessary to calculate the expected present value of functions of general diffusion processes. It then investigates optimal stopping, smooth pasting, and optimal stochastic control. Applications include investment under uncertainty, optimal consumption of a durable good, and stochastic optimal growth.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600 — 604, 603 and 604 can be taken concurrently or permission of instructor

ECON 612 — Stabilization Policy
Section 001, LEC


Instructor: Shapiro,Matthew D; homepage
Instructor: Elsby,Michael William Leamington

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines selected issues in macroeconomics and monetary economics. The aim is to teach how theory, data, and econometric and historical analysis are used to study the behavior of the economy at the aggregate level. In recent years, topics covered have included theories of consumption and investment, the relationship between economic activity and asset markets, the determinants of labor supply in aggregate, theories and empirical analysis of the business cycle, and issues in open-economy macroeconomics.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 611. Graduate standing.

ECON 613 — Advanced Topics in Mathematics for Economics
Section 001, LEC
(Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Nakajima,Daisuke

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course is a formal introduction of probability theories, which is based on measure theories. Topics may include general frameworks of measure theories, the concepts of Independence, conditional expectations, martingale, convergence in distributions and Brownian motions. This course should also work as proof-writing practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600, 601-604 or permission of instructor

ECON 619 — Advance Theory I
Section 001, LEC
MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Current focus is on information economics, including informational herding, optimal learning, and experimentation (including models of informational herding, financial timing, and informational demand). We also explore dynamic search-matching models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600/permission of instructor

ECON 620 — Advanced Theory II
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course will examine some issues in mechanism design with a focus on applications such as (i) auctions, (ii) the provision of public goods, and (iii) voting. The course will be based on some classic articles in this field as well as some more recent papers. The focus will be on the knowledge that the mechanism designer is assumed to have about the agents for whom she designs an incentive mechanism. We shall also examine how the solution concept that the mechanism designer uses to predict how agents will respond to given incentives reflects her beliefs about the agents. Examples of solution concepts that are relevant here are dominant strategies, Bayesian equilibrium, and ex-post equilibrium. Finally, we shall examine how the mechanism designer's prior knowledge, and the solution concept that she uses, affects which incentive scheme she will identify as optimal.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600/permission of instructor

ECON 622 — Labor Economics II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Charles C; homepage
Instructor: Elsby,Michael William Leamington

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The first half of the course will cover models and evidence on training, turnover, labor market discrimination, and the effects of unions on wages and other outcomes.

The second half of the course will address the interface between labor and macro-economics. The main topic of discussion will be the theory of unemployment. Particular emphasis will be on modeling strategies that have been used in this literature, with an aim to expand the bag of tricks that students have at their disposal for their own research. To this end, there will be extensive use of the search theory approach to unemployment, and dynamic models of the labor market more generally.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 601, 603, 673, 674; and Graduate standing.

ECON 642 — International Finance
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tesar,Linda L; homepage
Instructor: Zhang,Jing

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a doctoral level course in international finance and macroeconomics. Topics covered in the course include the intertemporal approach to the current account, international business cycles, international risksharing and home bias, purchasing power parity, models of exchange rate determination, currency crises, financial frictions and sovereign default.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 605, 607, and Graduate standing.

ECON 663 — Topics in World Economic History I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will cover the evolution of economic institutions and the role of these institutions in the economic growth of Europe, Latin America, Asia and the United States. Topics include: The divergence of Asian and European growth rates between 1500 and 1800. The creation of modern fiscal and monetary institutions. The role of stock markets, banking systems and exchange rate regimes in historical economic development. Particular attention will be paid to the Great Depression and historical banking panics, stock market crashes and exchange rate devaluations. The course will explore the historical costs and benefits of the different monetary and fiscal institutions adopted by Europe, Argentina, Brazil, China, Japan, The United States, and Canada.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Intermediate economic theory/statistics

ECON 666 — Economic Development of Underdeveloped Countries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage
Instructor: Lam,David A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Advanced topics in development economics, including theoretical models of agricultural household labor supply, consumption, and production; policies regarding taxation, public expenditure, migration, population, and trade; theoretical and empirical analysis of income distribution.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600, 602-604, 671, and 672

ECON 672 — Econometric Analysis II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ng,Serena; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a graduate level course in econometrics. The pre-requisite is ECON 671. Knowledge of linear algebra is essential. The goal to provide you with a broad overview of modern econometric tools. This means understanding when to use what test, which estimator, and why.

Textbooks
* Davidson, R. and J. G. MacKinnon, (2003), Econometric Theory and Methods, Oxford University Press. [DM]
* Hayashi, F. Econometrics, (2000), Princeton University Press. [H]
· Wooldridge, J. Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, (2002), M.I.T. Press. [W]
· Greene, W. Econometric Analysis, (2003), Prentice Hall. [G]
· Johnston, J. and J. Dinardo, (1997), Econometric Methods, Mcgraw Hill. [JD] (*) primary (·) supplementary Evaluation: Mid-term 30% Final 30% 10 Problem Sets 40%

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 671.

ECON 675 — Applied Microeconometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Smith,Jeffrey Andrew; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to expose students to econometric techniques frequently used in applied microeconomic research. One way to think about the course is that it will introduce you to the tools in toolbox. The course will not go into great depth in regard to any particular applied econometric method, but will instead aim to provide the student with enough knowledge about each method to know when, and when not, to use it in their empirical research. Methods covered will include regression, matching, duration models, instrumental variables (and related parametric selection models), longitudinal methods and discontinuity designs.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 671 and 672

ECON 676 — Applied Macroeconometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kilian,Lutz; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to equip students with a working knowledge of methods used in macroeconometrics. Topics to be covered include the analysis of stationary AR and ARMA models, detrending and trend breaks, forecasting, unit roots and cointegration, structural vector autoregressions (model selection, identification, estimation, inference), predictability, causality and exogeneity, ARCH models and STAR models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 671 and 672; Graduate standing.

ECON 677 — Analysis of Time Series
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ionides,Edward L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Decomposition of series; trends and regression as a special case of time series; cyclic components; smoothing techniques; the variate difference method; representations including spectrogram, periodogram, etc.; stochastic difference equations, autoregressive schemes, moving averages; large sample inference and prediction; covariance structure and spectral densities; hypothesis testing and estimation and applications and other topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: STATS 426.

ECON 678 — Advanced Econometrics I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,Yoonseok

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This is a course in econometric theory introducing the statistical foundation of the nonlinear and nonparametric/semi-parametric models in econometrics. The course involves a development of the asymptotic distribution theory in depth. Selected current research topics will be also covered depending on time and interest.

The instructor recommends the following pre-requisites: ECON 600, 671 and 672 or their equivalents.

Advisory Prerequisite: STATS,MATH 417 and 425 or ECON 671,672, and 600.

ECON 684 — Government Revenues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Slemrod,Joel B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Provides a positive and normative analysis of alternative government revenue sources. The first part of the course explores theoretical analyses of the incidence, efficiency costs, and distributional effects, of alternative tax systems. The rest of the course examines the implications of existing tax law in the U.S., and commonly proposed revisions in the law, for the allocation of resources in the economy.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 601. Graduate standing.

ECON 696 — Introduction to Economic Research II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Solon,Gary Rand; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 751 — Computational Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Zhang,Jing

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course is an introduction to quantitative analysis of dynamic general equilibrium models in macroeconomics. It first introduces calibration techniques briefly and then focuses on solution methods. This course covers both linear methods (linear-quadratic and log-linearization) and nonlinear methods (value function iteration and finite elements). The relevant macro models in this class will be the production economy with a representative consumer, or with heterogeneous consumers under different market structures.

ECON 795 — Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A research seminar on topics in Russian and East European Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 812 — Seminars in Monetary Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Shapiro,Matthew D; homepage
Instructor: Kimball,Miles S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Monetary Theory are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 822 — Seminars in Labor Economics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Solon,Gary Rand; homepage
Instructor: Brown,Charles C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Labor Economics are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 832 — Seminar in Applied Micro Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kühn,Kai-Uwe; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Public Policy toward Business are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 842 — Research Seminar in International Economics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar in International Economics is devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate student, a University of Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 852 — Seminar in Advanced Economic Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can
Instructor: Smith,Lones A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Exposure to some fine papers on the frontiers of economic theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 860 — Seminars in Comparative Economic Development
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Comparative Economic Development are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 864 — Seminar in Economic History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar in Economic History is devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate student, a University of Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 876 — Quantitative Economics Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kilian,Lutz; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar in Econometrics is devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate student, a University of Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 882 — Seminars in Public Finance
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Davis,Lucas William
Instructor: Slemrod,Joel B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

The Seminars in Public Finance are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ECON 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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