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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = EDUC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 11 of 11
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
EDUC 118 — Introduction to Education: Schooling and Multicultural Society
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gere,Anne Ruggles; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

Education affects the lives of everyone in this country. As future professionals, voters, teachers, parents, and leaders, students at the University of Michigan will help shape the quality of life in the United States, and education will matter — a lot. This course will introduce students to the role of education in today's world. Topics will include the implications for schooling our increasingly diverse population; principles of how kids learn; ways schools facilitate student achievement (or not); and the changing nature of literacy in the information age. In addition to readings and discussions, there will be opportunities for hands-on experiences and interactions with K-12 students in schools.

EDUC 390 — Community Service and Language, Education, and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Axelson,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage
Instructor: Bogart,Pamela Susan Hickam

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This course will employ an academic service learning framework in preparing for and reflecting on this experimental practice. Students will receive training and supervision in teaching English as a Second Language and discuss issues as they emerge from the practica and the readings. Likely themes include lesson planning, task design, individual learner differences, and socio-cultural factors in teaching ESL. In addition, students will meet with the instructor in small groups based on site placement twice per month. No experience in teaching ESL or knowledge of the field is required although students with a background in applied linguistics, language education or second language immersion experiences are preferred. Students assist in a local ESL classroom or tutoring program for at least four hours per week or 48 hours during the academic term.

EDUC 462 — Instruc Simulations
Section 001, LAB
Arab-Israel Conflict

Instructor: Stanzler,Jeffrey Adam

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This class is based on a computer-mediated simulation that engages middle school and high school students in exploring the Arab-Israeli Conflict through participating in it themselves. Students in high schools in Michigan, elsewhere in the US, and even outside the U.S. could be interacting with one another, and with you, over the course of the term. University student "mentors" (that's you) facilitate this diplomatic simulation (in which we create a scenario that becomes the "reality" of our world) and serve as gatekeepers, pushing the students to act in ways that are in keeping with the beliefs/constraints that the person they are portraying would hold and operate under. There is a complex structure in place for them to communicate with others, to issue press releases and otherwise express their interests and trade influence, and finally to introduce possible new actions into the simulated world. All of this is done with the support and with the assistance of the mentors.

Fundamentally, the exercise is an attempt to give students a tangible window into the diplomatic process, with it's slow, thorny inner-workings. This course, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (AIC) simulation itself, are based on the idea that the most meaningful learning often happens when one is actively engaged in a purposeful activity. By participating in AIC as a mentor, we hope that you will get a chance to think deeply about (among other things) how people learn to take diverse perspectives, what it takes to foster thoughtful discourse, and the nature of diplomacy itself.

AIC is also a project in the School of Education, and part of its purpose is to develop new ways that technology can support meaningful learning experiences with high school students. Within the context of the seminar, then, we start with a basic grounding in the history of the conflict, and then move on to figuring out how to let that grounding inform your ongoing efforts to both support and challenge the student participants.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

EDUC 462 — Instruc Simulations
Section 002, LAB
Place out of time

Instructor: Stanzler,Jeffrey Adam
Instructor: Fahy,Michael A

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Enables students to apply their academic training and experience in advisory and control roles of ICS (Interactive Communication Simulations). "Hands-on" instruction in and application of computer conferencing, role-play simulations, negotiation, and policy making are offered. Simulation topics vary each term.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

EDUC 580 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

EDUC 708 — Cogn&Instr Classrm
Section 001, REC
Foundations in Teaching & Learning

Instructor: Miller,Kevin F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Situated at the intersection of teaching, learning, and subject matter, this course supports understanding of basic theories of learning and development, and the role of psychological and educational theory in the: (a) design of curriculum, (b) conduct of teaching, (c) assessment of learning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Educ. 606 or equivalent.

EDUC 715 — Spec Topic Ed&Psych
Section 001, SEM
Longitudinal and Developmental Methods

Instructor: Cortina,Kai Schnabel; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This class introduces traditional and more recently developed multivariate methods for the statistical analysis of change. Starting with theoretical considerations about the concepts of "stability" and "change", particularly in the social sciences and psychology, we will apply different statistical models to real data sets. A deeper understanding of what statistical technique to use given a specific research question will be the focus of this seminar. Reading assignments include nontechnical method papers and chapter and published journal article in which techniques were applied. Cost for the students: $50-$100

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EDUC 716 — Education Psychology Advanced Proseminar
Section 001, SEM
Education Psychology Advanced Proseminar: Advanced Issues in Education for Psychologists

Instructor: Blumenfeld,Phyllis C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

(Program students are required to sign up for three credit hours.) An advanced seminar on issues in education perspectives for psychologists. It is primarily for third- and fourth-year program students and is a required course. The seminar is designed to identify and review issues critical to "educationalists": researchers, those concerned with issues of training, policy specialists, and practitioners. The major focus is to become broadly conversant with the range of issues associated with the study and practice of education and to use this knowledge to analyze and reflect upon those issues. Participants will be encouraged to relate their scholarly interests to matters of practical significance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Combined Program student standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 764 — Public Policy in Postsecondary Education
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bastedo,Michael Nelson

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines contemporary higher education public policy issues and provides a general introduction to the policymaking process in the United States. It illustrates the creative tension that characterizes the American federal system and the interplay of different levels and branches of government as they formulate and implement higher education policy. The course will focus on state policy issues as well as on federal higher education policy. Special attention will be given to the topic of affirmative action and public policy. The course will include presentations by guest speakers who will address current issues relating to public policy and higher education. The course has two parts. The first consists of readings and class discussions about public policymaking in general and major higher education policies in particular. The second part consists of in-depth policy analysis briefings that will be conducted by the students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EDUC 791 — Foundations of Teaching and Learning
Section 001, SEM
Foundations in Teaching & Learning

Instructor: Miller,Kevin F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Situated at the intersection of teaching, learning, and subject matter, this course supports understanding of basic theories of learning and development, and the role of psychological and educational theory in the: (a) design of curriculum, (b) conduct of teaching, (c) assessment of learning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or permission of instructor.

EDUC 817 — Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Xie,Yu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar considers methodological issues that arise in research in the social sciences. Themes arise from ongoing research projects at the UM. Visiting researchers provide a brief account of their aims and data before defining the methodological challenges for which they desire discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501.

 
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