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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = EEB
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 33 of 33
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
EEB 300 — Undergraduate Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Intended primarily for juniors, including Honors students, who wish to pursue independent research or study at an intermediate level in an area of biological science. The student may ask an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to direct the research project and supervise related readings. The project may take the form of an investigation of new problems in the field or laboratory, a detailed investigation of primary sources (a literature survey), development of new procedures or programs, design of a classroom experiment, etc. A final paper is required and must be approved by the research advisor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Eight credits of biology and 3.0 grade point average in science; permission of faculty member in EEB.

EEB 302 — Teaching Experience for Undergraduates
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduates participating in this course are responsible for:

  1. aiding regularly assigned Graduate Student Instructors;
  2. providing tutorial help for undergraduates enrolled in the course;
  3. meeting regularly with discussion and laboratory sessions; and
  4. participating with Graduate Student Instructors in instructional activities.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EEB 320 — Rivers, Lakes, and Wetlands: Introduction to Aquatic Ecosystems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wiley,Michael J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Introduces fundamental physical/chemical/biological concepts and basic techniques necessary for the study of aquatic ecosystems. Covers physical-chemical processes, overview of aquatic fauna and flora, and surveys major types of aquatic ecosystems including rivers and streams, lakes, wetlands, oceans. Interactions between the hydrological cycle and the landscape provide the basic theme around which ecosystem presentations are organized. Laboratory sections present basic taxonomic materials during the first half of the course; during later half lab sessions will focus on field trips to representative environments and on the collection of biological specimens for required individual collections.   

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in BIOLOGY or permission of instructor.

EEB 335 — Biodiversity Research Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kurdziel,Josephine P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

A critical component of science is transmitting the results of scientific research to the greater scientific community. If the results of research are not made available to other scientists, they never enter into the great debate, and the research may as well never had been conducted. For this reason, it is important to learn how to communicate research to other scientists, and to evaluate the research of others. Research presentations are one of the major avenues scientists use to transmit information (publication in peer-reviewed journals is another).

We have two goals in EEB 335. First, you should learn how to extract critical information from a research seminar. Second, you should learn the characteristics that distinguish a good seminar from a bad seminar. To accomplish these goals, you will attend one seminar each week. You will then write up a short summary of the seminar, and discuss the seminar in discussion the following week.

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162

Advisory Prerequisite: Recommended grade of at least B in BIOLOGY 162

EEB 335 — Biodiversity Research Seminar
Section 002, DIS

Instructor: Kurdziel,Josephine P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

A critical component of science is transmitting the results of scientific research to the greater scientific community. If the results of research are not made available to other scientists, they never enter into the great debate, and the research may as well never had been conducted. For this reason, it is important to learn how to communicate research to other scientists, and to evaluate the research of others. Research presentations are one of the major avenues scientists use to transmit information (publication in peer-reviewed journals is another).

We have two goals in EEB 335. First, you should learn how to extract critical information from a research seminar. Second, you should learn the characteristics that distinguish a good seminar from a bad seminar. To accomplish these goals, you will attend one seminar each week. You will then write up a short summary of the seminar, and discuss the seminar in discussion the following week.

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162

Advisory Prerequisite: Recommended grade of at least B in BIOLOGY 162

EEB 341 — Parasitology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: OConnor,Barry M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

An introduction to the study of parasitism, with special reference to the evolution of the parasitic habit. Lecture and laboratory.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 or equivalent

EEB 400 — Advanced Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed EEB 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of EEB 300 for more information.)

Advisory Prerequisite: 12 credits of BIOLOGY, 3.0 average in science, and permission of instructor in EEB.

EEB 401 — Advanced Topics in Biology
Section 001, LEC
Introduction to Evolution and Development [evo-devo].

Instructor: Wittkopp,Patricia Jean

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Development systems are the product of evolution and shape the paths of future evolutionary change. This course, intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, provides an introduction to the new field of evolution and development, or "evo-devo." After reviewing fundamental principles in developmental and evolutionary biology, we will read and discuss primary literature papers investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for evolutionary change. Specific topics will include regulatory evolution, the diversification of body plans, and the evolution of novel features. Grades will be based on participation in class, written assignments, and a group presentation.

Prerequisite: BIO 305 (Genetics) or permission of the instructor. For more information, please go to the class homepage.

Textbook: From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design, 2nd edition, S.B. Carroll, J.K. Grenier, and S.D. Weatherbee, Blackwell Publishing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section.

EEB 420 — Plant Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Qiu,Yin-Long

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course aims to give students an advanced and updated perspective of plant evolution. It begins with an introduction on phylogenetic concepts, and then gives an update on phylogeny of photosynthetic life forms: eubacteria, archaea, algae, and land plants. The main parts of the course are to discuss evolution of plants in three perspectives: evolutionary genomics, evolutionary developmental biology, and evolutionary ecology.

Evolutionary genomics will cover both organellar and nuclear genomes. For organellar genomics, the theories of endosymbiotic origins of mitochondria and plastids, as well as those theories of origins of algae via secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis, will be presented. For nuclear genome evolution, the following aspects will be covered: the composite origin of the genome at the beginning of eukariotic evolution; roles of transposons and introns in genome evolution in eukaryotes in general; the role of polyploidization in plant genome evolution; and syteny in angiosperm genomes.

The evo-devo part will be devoted to gaining an understanding of how chemistry, physiology, morphology, and ecology of plants have evolved, and to aspects of chemical defense adaptation to different physical environments; development of different mating systems; and evolution of different pollination and seed dispersal strategies.

Finally, interaction of plants and their biotic and abiotic environments will be examined from a historical and phylogenetic perspective. For plant-other organism interactions, three types are to be looked at: positive, neutral, and negative (all from the plant's perspective). The part on change of abiotic environment will focus on evolution of substrate, atmosphere, and geography.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 and 230/EQ

EEB 450 — Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nussbaum,Ronald A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Reqs: BS

Lectures on the evolution, behavior, ecology, and life history of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory exercises and field trips emphasize identification, life history, adaptations, and field methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162.

EEB 470 — Microbial Diversity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Dunlap,Paul V; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course describes the biological diversity of bacteria, which are members of the Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea, examining the evolutionary origins of microbial life; the metabolic roles extant bacteria carry out in maintaining the biosphere; their physiological adaptations to the environment and to environmental extremes; and modern phylogenetic approaches for their identification and evolutionary analysis.

Textbook: Brock Biology of Microorganisms, 11th edition by Madigan and Martinko. Prentice Hall, 2006.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing; BIOLOGY 207 and at least one 300 level course in the Biological Sciences

EEB 472 — Plant-Animal Interactions
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course covers basic concepts dealing with the ecology of plant-animal interactions and coevolution. Topics include such interactions as behavior, pollination, seed dispersal and predation, and various mutualisms. Readings are from the current literature.

Background in ecology and evolution is required. There are lectures and discussion. Grades are based on paper, oral presentations, and discussions.

Textbook: None. Readings from the current literature will be used.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 281.

EEB 473 — Aquatic Ecology Project Lab
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage
Instructor: Adams,Heather Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit is granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 484.

This course introduces students to field and laboratory techniques in aquatic sciences. The Limnology Laboratory is open to 12 to 15 students. Several field trips to local lakes and streams during both ice cover and open water conditions will enable students to master sampling and measurement techniques for acquiring physical, chemical, and biological data. Laboratory work will include chemical analyses of lake water, and taxonomy and counting methods for aquatic biota, including phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusks, insects, and aquatic macrophytes. In addition, the course teaches students about the use of automated data acquisition technology and experimental methods applicable to lake plankton communities.

The course is appropriate for undergraduates who have completed or are taking BIOLOGY 483 (Limnology), or for graduate students with a general background in physics, math, and chemistry and an interest in aquatic systems. For more information, go to http//www-personal.umich.edu/~gwk/teaching.

Advisory Prerequisite: A course in ecology.

EEB 483 — Limnology: Freshwater Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Freshwater ecology is the study of environmental and ecological aspects of inland lakes and streams (also called "Limnology"). Some of the topics covered in this course are: the origin of lakes; the importance of physical and chemical properties; the geochemical cycling of different elements such as carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen; the ecology of aquatic bacteria, phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, macrophytes, and fish; the pollution and eutrophication of lakes; the recent concepts in stream ecology; paleolimnology; food-chain dynamics; energy flow; and experimental investigations using whole lakes.

Lectures are designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of limnology in an ecological and ecosystem context, in addition to presenting up-to-date information from the current literature. Grades are based on exams and problem sets. This course fills concentration requirements in Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology (CMB), and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB), and the prerequisites are a course in chemistry, biology, and math or physics (or permission of the instructor). Go to the course home page for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or Graduate standing, with background in PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY, or water-related sciences.

EEB 487 — Ecology of Fishes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diana,James Stephen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Ecology.

EEB 487 — Ecology of Fishes
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Diana,James Stephen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Ecology.

EEB 490 — Population and Quantitative Genetics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kondrashov,Alexey

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course will systematically treat the foundations of population genetics. First, the five factors affecting dynamics of within-population genetic variability will be introduced: mutation, selection, mode of reproduction, population structure, and genetic drift. After this, we will consider interactions of these factors and will discuss applications of formal models to understanding processes in real populations. An inverse problem of inferring parameters of mutation, selection, and drift from the dynamics of a population will be addressed briefly. Finally, we will review quantitative genetics and the issue of evolution of the basic properties of populations, such as mutation rates and modes of reproduction.

Evaluation will be based on six assignments and one term paper.

Textbook: J.H. Gillespie, Population Genetics: A Concise Guide, 2nd edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 305.

EEB 497 — Community Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Werner,Earl E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course will provide an opportunity for in-depth examination of current theory and empirical research in community ecology. Emphasis is on the analyses of processes and mechanisms that generate and maintain patterns in community structure over space and time.

Specific topics include the mechanisms of species interactions; the direct and indirect effects of these interactions such as competition, predation, and mutualisms; the temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the environment; the contrasting and interacting paradigms of niche-assembly and dispersal-assembly of community structure; metacommunity ecology; the role of history on different time scales; and the consequences of community structure for ecosystem processes.

Examples will be drawn from a variety of ecological communities and organisms. A background in ecology (BIOLOGY 281 or equivalent) is necessary, and EEB 481 is strongly recommended. Readings will be from the original literature, and the course will consist of both student-led discussions and lectures.

Advisory Prerequisite: A course in Ecology.

EEB 516 — Principles of Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Knowles,Laura Lacey; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course explores various topics in evolutionary biology, with an emphasis on conceptual principles and generalizations. Fundamental principles are discussed in relation to topics of active contemporary research and controversy. It includes lectures and discussion on major principles in population genetics, molecular and phenotypic evolution, speciation, evolutionary developmental biology, phylogenetics, and macroevolution. The course is broadly relevant to many other fields, from conservation biology to genomics. The course is not a replacement for other EEB courses (e.g., population genetics or molecular evolution).

There will be readings from Futuyma plus about two papers or other readings per lecture. Grades will be based on one midterm exam and one final exam (during exam week).

Textbook: Evolution, D.J. Futuyma.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 305.

EEB 595 — Tropical Biology: An Ecological Approach
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Vandermeer,John H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Reqs: BS

Principles of tropical ecology. Lectures, seven weeks in the field for directed study, and individual research in contrasting tropical environments of Costa Rica.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY,Graduate standing and four courses in biology. Information and application forms available from Professors Vandermeer or Wagner.

EEB 601 — Readings in Investigative Biology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Individual work and reading for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 700 — Advanced Study in Biology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

An introduction to research methods in biology, requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and the writing of a report.

Advisory Prerequisite: 16 hours in Biology, Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 730 — Advanced Zoological Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

An introduction to the research methods in zoology requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and writing of a report.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 755 — Special Studies in Botany
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 16

Students who wish to carry on independent study in some specific discipline within the field of botany may elect this course. Each student must arrange with an appropriate faculty member to have his or her study supervised. An independent study project may involve library, laboratory, or field research or any combination of these.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 001, SEM
MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.

Instructor: Zhang,Jianzhi

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 002, SEM
PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS.

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 003, SEM
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY.

Instructor: Kling II,George W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 004, SEM
PREPARING FUTURE FACULTY IN THE SCIENCES.

Instructor: Rathcke,Beverly J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 005, SEM
LIAMAS AND OTHER TROPICAL SUBJECTS.

Instructor: Burnham,Robyn J

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 800 — Biology Seminars
Section 006, SEM

Instructor: Dick,Christopher William

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A graduate seminar course providing opportunity to discuss current work and new developments in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

EEB 801 — Supervised Teaching
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 2

Seminars, demonstrations, and orientation for college teaching in biology. Available for all pre-candidate teaching assistants.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Appointment as Teaching Assistant in Biology.

EEB 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

EEB 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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