< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ENGLISH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 340 of 340
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 001, REC
Visual Images

Instructor: Vogelius,Christa Holm

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Each day we come across a wide variety of images — advertisements in magazines, comics in the newspaper, paintings in the art museum, snapshots of our friends and families — images that make us buy things, feel a certain way, or remember certain events. In this section of ENGLISH 124 we will be reading and writing about works of literature that deal with looking at visual images. We will begin the course with a theoretical work, John Berger's "Ways of Seeing," and then move to some selections of poetry and short fiction. We will end the semester with Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray." Some of the questions we will ask ourselves include: What are the differences between written language and visual language? What is "lost in translation" when an image is interpreted as a written text, or vice versa? How can we talk about works which incorporate both text and imagery? We will be using these questions to push ourselves toward crafting persuasive and original academic essays.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 002, REC
Literature of Disaster

Instructor: Herold,Kirsten Fogh

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 003, REC
Observation, Imagination and Fact: Reality and the American Writer

Instructor: Berkley,Angela Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Tenements, factories, the stock market, crime, telephones, railroads, electricity, museums, newspapers, photography, department stores, and automobiles: how did American writers experience and describe these now-familiar elements of our society for the first time? The period of 1880-1920 in America was one of incredible technological, economic and social change, and writers like Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser depicted these changes with a vivid urgency. Some of these writers sought to expose the social problems of modern urban life; some praised the new opportunities it offered, and some did both. Yet despite their varying attitudes toward modernity, all of these writers shared an interest in portraying its ordinary, nitty-gritty details in an accurate and life-like manner. What can investigating these literary efforts to provide accurate portrayals of the modernization of American life during the early part of the 20th century teach us about reading critically and writing persuasively?

Despite any appearances or claims of accuracy and objectivity, each of the works we will be studying is a human creation, crafted and constructed not only by observation, but also by the imagination and logic of a writer. In this course, you will be called upon to interrogate these constructions of reality with your own writing. Throughout the course, we will focus on helping you find and develop your voice as an academic writer. In order to do this, you will be engaged in various kinds of writing throughout the term. You will keep a reading journal, tracking your notes, observations and ideas about the texts we read and our class discussions; you will also be writing three short essays (4-6 pages). For each of these essays, you will receive feedback from me and from your classmates at various stages of the writing process. We will focus on "macro" concepts like developing strong overall arguments and using textual evidence effectively, but we will also spend considerable time on "micro" issues of sentence structure, punctuation, grammar and vocabulary.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 004, REC


Instructor: LeGette,Casie Renee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In Western culture, we often think of the "self" as a separate, distinct thing of its own. But in this class, we'll try to think about the fact that each "self" is bound up with lots of other "selves" — mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, lovers, friends, enemies. This semester, we will be trying to answer the question: To what extent does our identity depend on our relationships with all the people that matter in our lives, for good or ill (or, more likely, both)? We'll read short stories by Tillie Olsen, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Sherman Alexie, and Charlotte Gilman, poetry by Walt Whitman, Robert Haydn, William Blake, e.e. cummings, and William Wordsworth, and a novel, Mama Day, by Gloria Naylor as we analyze and explore the ways identities are built from relationships of all kinds. And, most importantly, we will be writing; this is a serious writing class, with four carefully revised papers and multiple shorter writing assignments. You will have the opportunity to think closely about your own writing process, while learning to write complex, analytic, persuasive arguments about literature.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 005, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 006, REC
Childhood, Youth, and Adolescence in Literature

Instructor: Frever,Trinna

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore fictional, poetic, and/or cinematic works "for" young adults, as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Course texts may include works from J.D. Salinger, J.K. Rowling, and Carson McCullers.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language, audience, and genre. Is youth portrayed differently in works for youth, as opposed to works merely about youth? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis.

Graded components of the course will likely include:

Exploratory Paper Introductory Paragraph to Thesis Paper Thesis Paper Personal Response Paper Peer Reviews Short Papers/Impromptu Writing Proposal for Final Paper Bibliography/Citation Assignment Participation Final Thesis Paper Syllabus will be posted prior to the first day of class.

See you in January!

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 007, REC
point of view: achieving its ends

Instructor: Crymble,Phillip E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 008, REC
Place, Identity, and Belonging

Instructor: Williams,Kelly Diane

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In an essay about traveling between London, Africa, the United States, and the Caribbean, Caryl Phillips writes, "I recognize the place, I feel at home here, but I don't belong. I am of, and not of, this place." In a single sentence, Phillips raises a host of sentiments about the relationship between place and identity, between location and belonging. This course, "College Writing: Place, Identity, and Belonging," is designed to hone your critical thinking and writing skills by exploring a wide variety of texts, including poems, essays, fiction, and films, that deal with the themes of place, identity, and belonging.

Guiding questions for the course include: What locations are depicted and/or referred to in the text (home, classroom, city, nation, world, etc.)? Who belongs and who is excluded? Why? How does location affect categories of identity (race, gender, class, and sexuality)? Furthermore, how does identity shape a sense of belonging? What overall argument does the text make about place, identity, and belonging?

This course will accustom students to the process of writing analytical essays at the college level. You will complete rough and final drafts of several essays that you workshop with a peer group, as well as a number of shorter writings to be assigned throughout the term. Your essays will yield a total of 20-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester; in addition, you will submit some form of writing each week. Put simply, to become a better writer, you must do quite a lot of writing.

Texts may include the films *Bring It On* and *Harold & Kumar Go To White Castle;* poetry by Adrienne Rich, Langston Hughes, and Elizabeth Bishop; essays by Martin Luther King, Jr., David Sedaris, Caryl Phillips, and Barbara Ehrenreich; fiction by Jhumpa Lahiri, Sandra Cisneros, and Kate Chopin. (Note: film screenings may be scheduled outside of class time.) Texts will be available as a coursepack at Accu-Copy.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 009, REC
Literary Adaptation

Instructor: Harrison,Mary Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

When authors rewrite, adapt, and revise other authors' texts, they are not only writers but also readers and interpreters of literature. In this course, we will examine literary adaptations in fiction and in film (as well as the "original" texts they revise), in order to investigate our own process of reading and writing. How, for instance, can we compare writing an expository essay with creating a fictional or cinematic interpretation? By examining texts in "pairs," we will also be able to compare and contrast authors' use of form, narrative structure, style, and theme as well as discuss the cultural values and social context that inform each text.

We will begin the semester by reading a group of classic fairy tales and selected modern revisions. We will then read three pairs of novels and watch excerpts from film adaptations of each: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte and Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf and The Hours by Michael Cunningham, and Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and Bridget Jones' Diary by Helen Fielding.

Course requirements include active and *enthusiastic* participation in class discussion, careful preparation of class readings, and a series of writing assignments ranging in length from from 1 paragraph to 8 pages. We will have one required film screening outside of class.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 010, REC
Telling Stories, Retelling Histories

Instructor: Desai,Manan R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Our class aims to explore the relationship between literature and history, with particular emphasis on how form, structure and elements of style affect the way in which we understand the past. Throughout the semester, we will work through a diverse selection of texts, but focusing on three major works — Art Spiegelman's graphic novel saga, Maus I & II, Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist Slaughterhouse-Five, and Gü nter Grass's magic realist novel, The Tin Drum (Book One) — asking key questions of each: How does our understanding of history change in its infinite retellings? How might a fictional account of history arrive at truths that nonfiction can not? How do writers use major historical events both to make sense of the past and to animate the present? As we work through these questions, we will also make use our critical reading skills, dissecting both contemporary and historical newspapers, magazines, and news programs.

The major emphasis of this course is your writing, and so a majority of our class time will be dedicated to elements of composition: developing a thesis, sharpening an argument, using textual examples, and most importantly revising. All in all, we will both write about our readings critically and argumentatively, but also borrow from these writers elements of form and style.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Beringer,Alexander Joseph

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 012, REC
women's lives

Instructor: Echols,Jennifer Renee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this course, we will be reading literature written by women that provocatively addresses issues of women's lives. Throughout the term, we will be discussing and analyzing such topics as sexuality, body image, family, the politics of gender, and how ethnic, religious and other identities affect women's lives. We will be developing academic writing skills through the framework of these texts, and you will be producing four essays ranging from autobiographical writing to critical analyses of particular literary texts. Texts will include a short novel, short stories, non-fiction essays, and poetry.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 013, REC
Childhood, Youth, and Adolescence in Literature

Instructor: Frever,Trinna

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of English 124 will focus on the construction of childhood and adolescence in literature. To this end, we will explore fictional, poetic, and/or cinematic works "for" young adults, as well as literary works "for" adults that depict key moments in adolescent development. Course texts may include works from J.D. Salinger, J.K. Rowling, and Carson McCullers.

In addition to its thematic and personal importance, our attention to the construction of adolescence in fiction is designed to heighten our awareness of language, audience, and genre. Is youth portrayed differently in works for youth, as opposed to works merely about youth? What is the relationship between the writing style of these works and the topics they portray?

While these literary concerns will be at stake throughout the course, English 124 is designed fundamentally as a writing course. Emphasis will be placed on the thesis-centered persuasive paper that uses literary analysis.

Graded components of the course will likely include:

Exploratory Paper Introductory Paragraph to Thesis Paper Thesis Paper Personal Response Paper Peer Reviews Short Papers/Impromptu Writing Proposal for Final Paper Bibliography/Citation Assignment Participation Final Thesis Paper Syllabus will be posted prior to the first day of class.

See you in January!

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 014, REC
the American city.

Instructor: Miller,Caroline Leslie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts.

In particular, we will examine poetry, fiction, essays, and graphic narrative which portray urban space. Doing so will allow us to consider the many different ways that authors choose to approach a similar topic: the American city.

The focus of the course is your own writing. You will craft short responses to our readings, and we will take time in class to free-write and pre-write. You will submit four polished papers over the course of the semester. Your participation as a peer reviewer and workshop respondent is crucial to the course — your effort and response in these areas will compose a quarter of your final grade. By writing, and by responding to others' writing, this course will help you develop a set of strategies for approaching and understanding the type of critical writing required at the university level.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 015, REC
stylistically brilliant tales about people who don't always do the right things

Instructor: Umans,Kate Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many scholars have noted that, in Milton's Paradise Lost, the devil gets all the good lines. In this section of "Writing and Literature," we will examine some of the most stylistically brilliant tales that have been told about people who don't always do the right things — who, in fact, do some pretty unconscionable things. We will discuss the authors' goals in presenting these characters and where our sympathies lie as readers. We will start by reading a few short stories and poems and will then move on to several novels. Authors may include Angela Carter, Flannery O'Connor, Joseph Conrad, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, and Vladimir Nabokov. Assignments will be in the form of short responses, in-class writing, and several long analytical essays.

(Basic Description for ENGLISH 124: This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.)

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 016, REC
becoming human

Instructor: David,Ashley

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Let us begin from the premise that we are not born human, that we become human. Let us believe that art helps us become human because art teaches us how to love. And let us say that the art of poetry is particularly well suited to teach us these lessons because it offers us a heightened realm of emotion and experience while simultaneously requiring us to understand the logic of language. Now, let us imagine that we can fall in love with poetry. Our quest in this course will be to conduct a love affair with poetry as we explore what it might mean to become human.

Through this exploration, you will learn to read and write about poems and the issues they raise, and by implication to read and write well generally. Lessons and assignments will test and develop your critical thinking skills and your analytical writing capacity. Specifically, we will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts, and you will work closely with your peers and the instructor to develop your written prose. Readings from a variety of genres will be included, with a primary focus on literary texts.

No prior knowledge of poetry or literature (or love) is required, but a desire and an inclination to roll up your sleeves and work hard are highly advised. As with becoming fully human, we become good thinkers and writers (and we earn good grades) because we apply ourselves vigorously to the task.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 017, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 018, REC
The Literature of Disaster

Instructor: Herold,Kirsten Fogh

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 019, REC
Modernist writers who argued with the literature of the past

Instructor: Bustion,Olivia Futrall

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

ENGLISH 124 focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and with me to develop your prose. We will focus primarily on literary texts, and assigned readings will cover a variety of genres.

This course will prepare you to write for the academic community. We will focus on writers who argued with the literature of the past. Modernist writers (ca. 1887 — 1945) rebelled against tradition: many of them no longer saw the world as divinely governed, and they developed new techniques of writing to express this view. They abandoned simple stories with tidy endings that presupposed a single way of looking at the world. But while they rebelled against old values and attitudes, modernists turned to inherited cultural traditions (myths, religious stories, so-called "classic" texts) to give order to the chaotic reality of which they wrote.

Modernist writers experimented with the major components of writing: voice, style, genre, and audience. Just as they used different techniques to convey their ideas, you too will experiment with your written voice — writing in different genres and styles, for different audiences. We will grapple with a number of difficult issues: What are the implications of writing in different genres or forms? What are the implications of writing in different mediums and with different technologies (pen and paper, word processors, hypertext)?

In class, we will discuss both the assigned literary texts and your written responses to those texts. We will spend a major portion of class-time critiquing each other's work. You will write and revise drafts for every major assignment you do for this class in response to your classmates' suggestions.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 020, REC
Writing the Mind: Literary Psychologies

Instructor: Smith,Jonathan William

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres, with a primary focus on literary texts. Our primary goal will be to help you develop the analytical and stylistic skills that are fundamentally important to the college-level writer. We will be thinking together about how to approach each step of the writing process, from initial questions and observations of a text to the revision of your work. With devotion and effort, you will leave the course equipped to compose insightful and well-constructed essays.

Our analytic focus for this course will be the ways writers have represented the human mind in all its complexity. We will think about how words are capable (or incapable) of capturing thought, and consider how literature might be uniquely able to capture mental processes. We will also ask how literature not only represents the mind, but shapes it, as well; that is, how literature affects our personal patterns of thinking.

To think through these questions, we will study and write about shorter works by Emily Dickinson and Ernest Hemingway. We will also study two longer works: Dostoevsky's Crime and Punisthment and Shakespeare's Othello.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 021, REC
20th-century American literature of war

Instructor: Laskowski,Gene Lambert

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th century American literature of war (although we will start with a focus on the current war in Iraq). If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is the mindset that makes war part of our own thinking? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 022, REC
20th-century American literature of war

Instructor: Laskowski,Gene Lambert

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is an introduction to college composition using as its focus for discussion and writing 20th century American literature of war (although we will start with a focus on the current war in Iraq). If war heightens our own human dramas, highlighting our capacity for good and evil, heroism and humiliation, what can we learn about ourselves from reading remarkable works of war literature? What are the clichés of war (such as those used in the preceding sentence) and how do clichés about "the other" or about war or masculinity or patriotism function? Is it possible to formulate ideas of good and evil, heroism and humiliation that go beyond their movie-worn versions? For example, since war entails killing, how must we think about other people before we — you and I — can kill them? What makes a person into an enemy? What makes us into people capable of killing? Is the mindset that makes war part of our own thinking? Is war gendered? Why is war so often associated with masculinity and what are the nature and implications of the association?

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 023, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 024, REC
Forms of Confession: Self-Disclosure and Self-Discovery

Instructor: Komura,Toshiaki

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

From celebrity tell-alls, autobiography fads, Sunday confessions to psychotherapy, there seems to be, in us, a desire to tell our own stories, as a form of self-understanding — a form of self-disclosure and self-discovery. Literature has always been a hotbed of this practice, and in this course, we will read a selection of "confessional" literature across genres and time periods, such as "confessional" poetry of the 20th century (Plath, Sexton), classic fictional autobiographies (Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground), and contemporary American personal essays (Grealy, Ehrlich); we will examine the urges behind confession in these works and explore the ideas and life experiences that form and inform the interiority of an individual and of humanity. Some of the questions we'll ponder over the course of the semester include: where does our desire for self-disclosure come from? How does self-disclosure lead to self-discovery — how are the two related to one another? And what does it mean to "discover" oneself?

The writing assignments for this course will entail the standard ENGLISH 124 requirement (roughly four papers of about 5-7 pages), along with short informal writings and journal assignments in response to the assigned readings, in which you may, if you wish, do a bit of your own "confession." We will guide ourselves through the process of writing as an act of discovery in itself — exploring meaning in the making, analyzing our thoughts in action — and learn to become independent writers through extensive workshops and revisions.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 025, REC
stylistically brilliant tales about people who don't always do the right things

Instructor: Umans,Kate Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many scholars have noted that, in Milton's Paradise Lost, the devil gets all the good lines. In this section of "Writing and Literature," we will examine some of the most stylistically brilliant tales that have been told about people who don't always do the right things — who, in fact, do some pretty unconscionable things. We will discuss the authors' goals in presenting these characters and where our sympathies lie as readers. We will start by reading a few short stories and poems and will then move on to several novels. Authors may include Angela Carter, Flannery O'Connor, Joseph Conrad, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, and Vladimir Nabokov. Assignments will be in the form of short responses, in-class writing, and several long analytical essays.

(Basic Description for ENGLISH 124: This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.)

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 026, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 027, REC
point of view: achieving its ends

Instructor: Crymble,Phillip E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 028, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 029, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 030, REC
stylistically brilliant tales that have been told about people who don't always do the right things

Instructor: Umans,Kate Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many scholars have noted that, in Milton's Paradise Lost, the devil gets all the good lines. In this section of "Writing and Literature," we will examine some of the most stylistically brilliant tales that have been told about people who don't always do the right things — who, in fact, do some pretty unconscionable things. We will discuss the authors' goals in presenting these characters and where our sympathies lie as readers. We will start by reading a few short stories and poems and will then move on to several novels. Authors may include Angela Carter, Flannery O'Connor, Joseph Conrad, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, and Vladimir Nabokov. Assignments will be in the form of short responses, in-class writing, and several long analytical essays.

(Basic Description for English 124: This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.)

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 031, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 032, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 033, REC
place and politics

Instructor: Boulay,Charlotte Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Writing is a skill you will use for the rest of your life and throughout your college career. In this class we will practice writing several different types of argumentative and analytical essays while focusing on the themes of both place and politics. How does our environment shape our attitudes and our political views? How do the place we're from and our memories and feelings about that place fit into our ideas about our place in the world, both politically and in terms of our individual identity? These are questions we will attempt to answer by looking at the ways other authors deal with these issues in novels, poetry, and non-fiction essays. This course focuses on developing a broad range of writing skills for use both in college and afterward.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 034, REC
point of view: achieving its ends

Instructor: Crymble,Phillip E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The films, political manifestos, essays on cultural history and other documents we will examine in this course all work in one way or another to present and defend a particular point of view. As we progress through the term we will concentrate not only on what a given text appears to be arguing but also on how that text works to achieve its ends.

This course has been designed with cumulative learning in mind. As we progress through each week's focus of study, you will see how the readings build into and out of one another. Students will be required to write three substantial essays, and each essay will grow out of a series of pre-draft assignments.

ENGLISH 124 — College Writing: Writing and Literature
Section 035, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course studies the intersection between critical thinking and persuasive writing, and, using literary texts as the point of reference, takes as its goal the development of the student's skill at writing cogent expository and argumentative prose.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC
Identifying with/ Celebrating Diversity

Instructor: Pinder,Randall Alphaeus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Think of the best party or gathering you can imagine. Is it a room filled with clones, moving in unison to repetitive music, talking about the same topics with unvarying perspectives? Or is it an occasion of diversity, one where a variety of faces and shapes dance to unique internal beats, bringing multiple experiences and opinions, each movement and thought fresh and intriguing? Well, if you prefer the latter type of gathering then this section of ENGLISH 125 is right for you. In it, you will explore, discuss and critique issues of diversity and identification intelligently and respectfully with your peers.

Also, you will improve your critical reading, writing, listening and thinking skills. We will read and view a variety of texts and explore a number of issues and writing styles that will enhance your university experience and prepare you for communication outside of the university. Your writing assignments will help you to identify and explore a central position, and present it in a coherent, well-developed response. Additionally, you will develop your research skills and learn to use and document sources.

Group discussion, drafting, peer editing, workshopping, conferencing and hard work are essential to successful completion of this course. Come and join the party! Basic ENG 125 Course Description This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Basic ENG 125 Course Requirements • Producing 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose, and other (often ungraded) writing at the instructor's discretion. • Composing major essays that must move through several stages of revision with the help of your instructor and peers. • Meeting the instructor for at least one 20-minute individual conference. • Using acceptable citation practices appropriately.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 003, REC
power of language and literacy

Instructor: Davila,Bethany Townsend

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section, in particular, focuses on the power of language and literacy. Learning to use literacy as a tool will help you in your classes and in your personal and professional endeavors. This course is designed to guide you as you develop your literacy skills through a rich exploration of language. You will have the opportunity to practice critical reading and writing on a regular basis and in a collaborative learning environment. Class meetings will often be devoted to group work and will focus on the interplay of author, text, reader, and context or community.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Hancock,Suzanne Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"Writing is a concentrated form of thinking. I don't know what I think about certain subjects, even today, until I sit down and try to write about them." Don DeLillo

Writing can be a profoundly empowering means of communication. As DeLillo states above, writing can be an important means of discovering how you feel about the world around you. This course is an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will read a wide range of writing and discuss it both in terms of style (as a model for our own writing) and content (to help us discover what matters most to us).

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Stubbs,Whitney Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The office of First and Second Year Studies says that ENGLISH 125 "focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines." (FSYS, A Guide to English 124 and 125, pg 20).

I submit to you the following: the ability to express yourself effectively in writing is the single most important skill that you will acquire in college. No, I take it back. In life. People who can communicate clearly write the best grant proposals, job applications, academic essays, emails, love letters, etc. Though not all essays begin as explicitly persuasive (when you sit down to begin writing, you might not even know your own aims), writing is at bottom an attempt to get what you want. You may want people to laugh, to understand your perspective, to interrogate their own assumptions, to rethink their stance on an issue, and/or to trust you; but whatever your goal, you are trying to manipulate people with your words.

In this course, we will focus on crafting essays (personal and analytic) with a clear sense of purpose, an awareness of audience, a complex understanding of all sides of an issue, and the kind of technical elegance that makes a reader want to trust a writer. We will do at least the following: read a lot of published essays, engage in the occasional in-class writing assignment, dedicate an enormous amount of class-time to (constructively) critiquing one another's work, and revise our own essays beyond recognition. Expect to be writing more or less constantly, but also, except to like some of it. By the end of the semester, you will each be the proud owner of at least 25-30 pages of really polished prose.

(Disclaimer: I am what some people consider a Grammar Fascist. I believe that a mastery of the technical aspects of formal writing endows the author with credibility necessary to gain/maintain a reader's trust. I *will* waste as much class time as I have to on this stuff. You've been warned.)

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Griffiths,Brett Megan

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Introduction to English Composition focuses on the rhetorical strategies and research skills students need to succeed in their academic endeavors. This course is also a themed course examining the ramifications of "literacy" throughout academic, professional, and pupular cultures. Students will have an opportunity to explore their personal interests by engaging in dialogue between common and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Jackson,Korey Brokaw

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This First-Year Composition course is designed to provide the student with a roadmap for creating effective writing. To this end, classes are stuctured linearly: beginning with research and data collection techniques, moving on to the organizational outline and drafting process, and ending with techniques for proofreading and polishing a final draft. We will use this general roadmap in a number of particular ways, focusing on a number of different kinds of writing. These include: travel narrative, critical review, and argumentative writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 008, REC
Finding Voice in the Global Community

Instructor: McBee Orzulak,Melinda Joy

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Through the processes of reading, writing, and editing, this course will explore what it means to live a global community. Writing will serve as a way to generate, revise, and articulate thoughts as we explore a variety of questions: How do we define others and ourselves within the context of community? Since language is often a location of power, how do silence and naming contribute to global conflicts? How do we communicate to affect change within these larger communities?

In this section, writing will be considered as both a student activity and as an object of study. Communicating knowledge in a variety of academic contexts is crucial to academic success. Therefore, exploring issues of grammar, usage, mechanics, and style will be central to this course. Students will be expected to engage actively in a workshop style class, which requires openness to giving and receiving feedback. Students will engage in all stages of the writing process, including prewriting, peer review, editing, revising, and self-evaluation.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 009, REC
Who's Afraid of a Double Negative?: Thinking Critically about Language

Instructor: Hakala,Taryn Siobhan

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The study of grammar needn't be dry and pedantic, and the thought of writing needn't strike fear in your hearts. This course will challenge you to think about the English language and the process of writing in entirely new ways. We will explore the ways in which the English language functions both structurally and socially: How do we know that slithy in Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky is an adjective even though it's not in the dictionary? Who says I can't split an infinitive? What will happen if I do? What is Standard English and how did it come to be? And who gets to decide what Standard is? We will think critically about language use and consider the ways in which style is aesthetic, rhetorical, and political. We will approach writing as a process, not just a product, and you will spend considerable time revising your prose. You will learn that you needn't have all the answers when you sit down to write — in fact, you shouldn't. We will work collaboratively on a daily basis to develop skills in close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing within the supportive community of the class.

Requirements: Four revised essays (ranging from 3 to 7 pages), several short written assignments, weekly quizzes, and one presentation.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Keel,Ursula

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This course will help you become better writers. We will look at the form and style of academic essays and learn about various genres of writing. In the course of the term, you will also train to read critically and dissect and analyze argument and in turn develop and enhance your own thinking and writing skills. You will write assignments of various lengths designed to increase your awareness of the mechanics and the process of writing. These assignment will prepare you for the kind of writing you will do in many of your college classes. The class will also require your participation in small and large group workshops and you will learn not only to think critically about your own writing, but also to give other students suggestions on improving their writing. Readings cover a wide array of topics, from serious social issues such as the presentation of space, race and gender to more light-hearted humoristic writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Adler,Peggy Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The pulse of this writing workshop is your voice. In order to explore the art of writing you must begin with what you value, what moves you, how you communicate, how you listen, and how you observe. What you have that no other writer has is your own way of phrasing, your own way of seeing, your own history that shapes your lens. This class is designed to give you the structure and tools you need to realize your own intentions and to reach your audience. Revising is the most important thing we do as writers, and we will spend the majority of our time doing so. Essays are a place for you to think, and by doing so on the page — allowing your ideas to dictate your essay's form — you can interest even those who disagree with your point of view.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 012, REC

Instructor: Swanson,Fritz Garner; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. The goal for this course is to introduce you to writing at the college level. We will be focusing on reading strategies, close reading, analysis, thesis development, paper drafting and re-writing.

Over the course of the academic term, each student will have one paper workshopped by the entire class. All discussion in the class will focus on paper writing and paper development, reinforcing the notion that writing a good paper is an integrated component of reading intelligently.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 013, REC

Instructor: Spiher,Sabrina Megan

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this class students will learn how to write basic academic papers in several styles, with a focus on clear structure and argument, and good grammar and syntax.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 014, REC

Instructor: Hancock,Suzanne Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"Writing is a concentrated form of thinking. I don't know what I think about certain subjects, even today, until I sit down and try to write about them." Don DeLillo Writing can be a profoundly empowering means of communication. As DeLillo states above, writing can be an important means of discovering how you feel about the world around you. This course is an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will read a wide range of writing and discuss it both in terms of style (as a model for our own writing) and content (to help us discover what matters most to us).

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 015, REC

Instructor: Palmer,Chris Collin

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is an introduction to the craft of written argument. Students will practice writing and critiquing a variety of arguments, both academic and political, formal and informal. A number of rhetorical and linguistic strategies will be discussed — particularly the ways in which grammatical choices influence rhetorical effectiveness. Other topics will include: logical fallacies; voice and style; adapting arguments for different audiences; and writing for different academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 016, REC

Instructor: Karczynski,David Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The office of First and Second Year Studies says that ENGLISH 125 "focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines." (FSYS, A Guide to English 124 and 125, pg 20).

In this course, we will focus on crafting essays (personal and analytic) with a clear sense of purpose, an awareness of audience, a complex understanding of all sides of an issue, and the kind of technical elegance that makes a reader want to trust a writer. We will do at least the following: read a lot of published essays, engage in the occasional in-class writing assignment, dedicate an enormous amount of class-time to (constructively) critiquing one another's work, and revise our own essays beyond recognition. Expect to be writing more or less constantly, but also, except to like some of it. By the end of the semester, you will each be the proud owner of at least 25-30 pages of really polished prose.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 017, REC

Instructor: Brooks,Shanesha R F

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Learning how to write well is one of the most challenging tasks we face as we enter the world of academia. In fact, it is a task we keep facing even at the more advanced of our academic trajectory, since there is no fixed body of knowledge we can master in order to become good writers, and since each piece of writing we produce may teach us something new about ourselves as writers. It can be a frustrating and daunting process, but it does not have to be. Learning how to write may also be a fascinating journey of re-encountering ourselves and the world around us, of finding new relations between ourselves and the world, and new ways to express these relations. This course is designed to support students in taking their first steps of this journey.

How do you become a good writer? You write. And then you write some more. This would be our basic pre-supposition. Thus, the writing load in this course would be intensive. You will be asked to produce approximately 20-25 pages of polished, revised prose. You will have the opportunity to experience different modes of academic writing and to engage various topics and issues through writing. My hope is that each writing assignment in this course will stimulate you to explore some of the most fundamental questions about writing: How can my writing make my experience significant to others? How do I make my private thoughts public in a meaningful and interesting way by putting them on paper? How do my opinions become a convincing written argument? Throughout the course we will investigate these questions together and separately, in the hope of finding, not definite answers, but the writers within us.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 018, REC

Instructor: Hancock,Suzanne Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

"Writing is a concentrated form of thinking. I don't know what I think about certain subjects, even today, until I sit down and try to write about them." Don DeLillo Writing can be a profoundly empowering means of communication. As DeLillo states above, writing can be an important means of discovering how you feel about the world around you. This course is an opportunity for each of you to develop your individual voices as writers while developing essay-writing skills in a variety of styles to help meet your college writing needs. To accomplish these skills, we will read a wide range of writing and discuss it both in terms of style (as a model for our own writing) and content (to help us discover what matters most to us).

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 019, REC

Instructor: Olsen,Joshua

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 020, REC

Instructor: Michaels,Jennifer Lucille

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many of my previous students have asked me, "Why is it that even after acing my high school English classes, I still have to take ENGLISH 125?" There are many answers to this question, but perhaps the most important is that college writing has different structural expectations than high school writing. Whereas the five-paragraph, intro/three support points/conclusion structure worked well on the SAT/ACT and for many high school assignments, the organizational demands for college essays are very different. Although we will certainly discuss grammar, sentence-level concerns, and other aspects of writing, a major focus in our class will be learning how to tailor your essay's structure to better organize and express your thoughts.

As in all other sections of ENGLISH 125, be prepared to revise 18-20 pages of writing this semester and to do regular course reading. Be prepared to do even more non-revised writing, and to collaborate with your classmates and with me to improve your writing and the writing of your classmates. Be prepared to push yourself to new levels of analysis and specific detail.

In terms of what makes this ENGLISH 125 slightly different from the rest, consider the following: 1. In this particular class, assignments are weighted so that assignments from early in the assignment are worth less than assignments from later in the semester. If your writing improves during the semester, that will be reflected in your final course grade. 2. We workshop in small student groups, not with the entire class all at once. Small group workshops give you the chance to work with a consistent group of students that will become very familiar with your writing style and can offer you valuable advice to improve your writing. 3. We'll spend some time talking about how writing in other departments (like Economics, the sciences, and the professional schools) differs — or is similar — to writing in ENGLISH 125. The goal of this class is to help you develop writing skills that will assist you in ALL of your college courses — not just ENGLISH 125.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 021, REC

Instructor: Tachtiris,Corine Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of the way we present ourselves in writing, how it both shapes and reflects our identities or allows us to create personas, including an academic one. This course also aims to help students cultivate a sense of pride and investment in their work as discussants, readers (of class assignments and their peers' papers), and writers.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 022, REC

Instructor: Wetherington,Ann Laura

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

We'll be using the book Everything's An Argument, as well as selected readings on CTools (from writers such as Jane Burka and Robert Cialdini,) to discuss navigating the University and developing cultural literacy about academia.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 023, REC

Instructor: Park,Ji-Hyae

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is designed to introduce students to college-level writing through interaction with a variety of texts. We will examine texts from a wide range of genres — essay, film, comics, poetry, and autobiography — in order to survey the various modes of expression that you will encounter in liberal arts courses. In the first half of the course, we will consider the issues involved in representing the self to others through forms that have their own dynamics, rules, and histories.

Our study of autobiographical forms of expression will benefit our understanding of themes that we will pursue in throughout the semester: the identities and roles of individuals as they attempt to navigate through various systems and structures neither created nor controlled by them, the dynamics of their interaction with those "other" than themselves (other people, spaces, institutions, forms, and concepts), and the outcomes of these exchanges. As we will discover over the course of the semester through our analysis of the readings, as well as the writing that we produce, literature, even language, is one of these systems that we must learn to navigate.

The skills that we garner from our study of self-representation will prepare us for the second half of the course, which is devoted to the analysis of the cultural phenomenon of Fahrenheit 911. We will not examine the movie, and the hype surrounding it, in terms of political ideology but, rather, genre and perspective. Our work in the first half of the course, which concerns the intersection of the personal and the political, will enable us to take up the challenge of critical analysis without devolving into polemics.

Although the reading load may seem light, particularly at the beginning, you will be expected to read these texts very carefully. Therefore, whatever is lacking in amount of pages read will be compensated by your own written interpretations of these works based on your close analysis of each and every text. Everyone assumes that they know how to read, but college courses demand critical readers — readers who read not only for comprehension, but to examine the forms and structures of expression, as well as consider its purposes and uses, in order to construct their own interpretations.

The writing requirements for this course are very demanding, especially at the beginning of the semester. When you examine the schedule, you will notice that there is something due at nearly every class session: these shorter assignments will either require you to respond thoughtfully to the respective reading for the day and/or to work on various skills or stages involved in the writing process. Indeed, the rationale for the smaller assignments is to break the process of writing into smaller tasks that will build up to the paper. Although from the first day you will be examining texts closely and formulating your own interpretations, we will tackle the process of writing step by step.

Texts may include but are not limited to Langston Hughes's "Theme for English B, "Jorge Luis Borges's, "Borges and I," Audre Lorde's Zami (selections), Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson's Reading Autobiography (selections), Selections from Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, Art Spiegelman's Maus II: And Here My Troubles Began, Joe Sacco's Palestine, Bill Nichols's Introduction to Documentary, Fahrenheit 911, Grizzly Man, and Control Room.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 024, REC

Instructor: Martinez,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Course Description:

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Section Description:

College-level writing calls for clear, concise prose and focused critical analysis, but it also calls for originality, creative thinking, and a strong individual "voice." The best academic essays are sophisticated and thought-provoking, but they balance analytical work with a human voice, an attention to the details of prose in English, and a fluid, conversational logic that draws the argument forward. In this course, we will work toward that perfect balance of poetic language and academic analysis.

The college states that ENGLISH 125 should teach Michigan students to:

• Produce complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. • Read, summarize, analyze, and synthesize complex texts purposefully in order to generate and support writing. • Demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different rhetorical situations. • Develop flexible strategies for organizing, revising, editing, and proofreading writing of varying lengths to improve development of ideas and appropriateness of expression. • Collaborate with peers and the instructor to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing, set goals for improving writing, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals.

We will approach these goals from several angles, beginning with personal narrative, moving into description and argument, and finishing with a longer, individual research project. In the first part of this course, you will have many opportunities to practice and perfect your own style of interesting, grammatical prose. You will be responsible for one 4-5 page expository essay and one 3-4 page descriptive essay, in addition to various shorter writing assignments.

In the second part of the course, we will expand our writing horizons to the kind of thesis-driven, argumentative essay that appears on nearly every university syllabus. Keep in mind that this is not your basic five-paragraph essay! We will start by considering the argumentative structure of newspaper editorials, then we will apply the basics of persuasion to cultural critique and academic research projects. During this time, you will be responsible for one 2 page editorial essay, one 5-6 page cultural critique, and a final 6-8 page research paper in the style of your anticipated major.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 025, REC

Instructor: Cobler,Anya Leah

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Introduction to college writing. In this course, we will hone our expository writing skills. That is, by the end of this course you should be able to effectively respond to any number of academic writing prompts or assignments; emphasis will be on creating logical, strong arguments [though not necessarily for a research paper] with evidence to support your claims, no matter what the assignment. Classtime will consist of discussion of writing/reading assignments, grammar lessons, workshop of your papers, etc. Outside reading, as well as writing will be expected of you: the point of a large part of our world's communication should be to express something clearly and as truthfully as possible, while effectively adressing the appropriate audience, and this course should prepare you to do just that.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 026, REC

Instructor: Arellano,Stephen B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

The aim of this course is to make students more comfortable with academic writing. Since college writing demands lengthy and complex papers, the process of writing will be emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to workshop their work in progress and revise drafts.

The reading and discussion of a variety of texts (printed, oral, and visual; theoretical, professional, and creative) will aid students in the process of constructing viable arguments and in developing personal style. Students will be asked to critically assess their own goals and progress and encouraged to find their own balance between the personal and the public in their writing. The class will also address theoretical questions connected with the ethics and politics of writing.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 027, REC

Instructor: Hartsock,Katie Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 028, REC

Instructor: Knuth,Aric David

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a first-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays. This course is designed to make you a better writer by focusing on 1. the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and usage, 2. different models and rhetorical tools for you to use in building your own ideas and analyses in the essays you write, and 3. the workshopping of your own and your peers' work to practice being a thorough editor and reviser of draft material. You will do lots of writing in this class, since *practicing* writing is one of the best ways to *learn* about writing. You will also read some published essays by professional writers, since reading others' writing and thinking about how it works and has been put together can teach you things about writing that no class or writer's manual can teach you. And you will do a lot of writing about writing — one of the only ways to raise your level of awareness about how language works to communicate accurate messages to your readers. Check this site later in the month to find out about required texts for the course. And in the meantime, please don't email me with questions that might otherwise wait for the first day of class.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 029, REC

Instructor: Husain,Taiyaba Kulsum

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Welcome to ENGLISH 125.029. This is an intensive writing course that will focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. You will work closely with your peers and your instructor to develop your written prose. Readings will cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 030, REC
Language & Identity

Instructor: Del Torto,Lisa Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

Writing is a cornerstone of intellectual development; it can help us to organize our thoughts, to think analytically and critically, to present our evaluations, to understand and solve problems, to communicate our points of view, and to understand others' points of view. Regardless of the career or life path(s) you choose, you will be required to write in various genres throughout your life, and to be able to organize your thoughts, arguments, and evaluations through writing. Those who demonstrate good writing are likely to perform well in their courses and careers, and to submit successful applications for jobs and for graduate or professional school programs.

The primary goal of this course is to help to train you to produce prose that is organized, clear, coherent, convincing, and sophisticated. You will learn to develop and use your voice as a writer through a series of formal and informal writing assignments and through reading and reviewing others' writings.

Readings for this course center on issues of language, particularly how language and society interact with one another and what language means to individuals and to groups. While the course focuses on your writing, we will also be reading quite a bit about spoken language and its importance in issues of identity, including gender, sexuality, ethnicity, race, age/life stage, and regional and national identity. These will be the themes to which you will respond in your writing assignments and class discussions. Thus, your success in the course depends a great deal on completion and understanding of the assigned readings. We will also work with media examples, primarily from popular film and television, to further our understanding of the relationships between language and identity and to provide more material for your written assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 031, REC

Instructor: Pruitt,Christopher James

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This section of ENGLISH 125 emphasizes writing in the real world. Whether you plan to be a chemist, business manager, or rocker writing will play a role in your career. We will examine various types of writing that you will encounter after you leave the University of Michigan and you will try your hand at these forms. This is an intensive writing and reading course; you can expect to write and read everyday for this class. Assignments may include, but not limited to, online responses, journal entries, short essays, and a longer research paper for the end of the semester. To aid you throughout the semester, we'll discuss and practice our writing skills through peer critiquing, critical class discussions, and brief exercises in grammar. A diverse array of reading topics from The Writer's Presence will also serve to provide models for our writing goals. I look forward to working with all of you.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Lee,Sharon Heijin

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to execute college-level writing and as such, focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students will work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings will cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. Students will learn how to compose solid and thoughtful arguments in an elegant and sophisticated manner — skills that will be invaluable not only to the academic experience but in the "real world" as well. In other words, students will learn how to articulate ideas and opinions — arguments — vis-à-vis written prose. To that end, we will dissect the vital parts of "good writing" (paragraphs, theses, etc.) so that students will be able to leave this course with a "tool box" of writing skills that they can take with them, not only on the rest of their college journey but into their professional lives and beyond.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 033, REC

Instructor: Rose,Haywood Augustus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 034, REC
MADNESS IN CONTEXT: FINDING A VOICE IN THE ACADEMIC CONVERSATION

Instructor: McGlynn,Karyna Emerson

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this class we will forego the finger exercises and boilerplate essays of your typical "freshman comp" class. You will not be assigned the "Compare & Contrast" Essay, the Personal Essay, nor the Persuasive Essay. Rather, the goal of this class is to help you find "a way in" to the academic dialogue — a way of going about your reading, research, thinking, and writing, that will serve you throughout your academic career. We will not only be addressing the craft of writing/researching the college paper, but also the theories behind it. We will learn to utilize the nuts and bolts of writing for academia, while continuing to question the notions behind those methods. In other words, we will be demystifying the skills of literary inquiry and research. Through the reading of primary texts and critical articles, you will study how literary scholars pose questions, conduct inquiry, make arguments & construct their theses. In this class you will become more than a "freshman comp student." Rather, you will become a true scholar as you learn how to join the academic conversation by posing your own interpretive problems, doing appropriate research, diving into postmodern literary theory, and, finally, writing a formal, documented critical argument.

Most of the class will involve learning to find problems and questions in our texts (perhaps where they don't even seem to exist!), then learning how to grapple with those problems & questions articulately in our writing. We'll be in the habit of posing questions like these: How does knowledge of a text's biographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts, as well as our knowledge of our own contexts as readers, shape the way we read and interpret a text? How does a text reflect, participate in, and help produce its culture? How are both writers and readers "constructed" by their historical context?

By the end of the semester you should possess a working knowledge of the following: MLA style, academic database research, thesis construction, strong marginalia, dominant modes of literary theory & criticism (and how they are used in academia to discuss primary texts).

Your work in this class will include reading three primary texts (Bartleby, the Scrivener, The Yellow Wallpaper, and The Secret Sharer), choosing which text to focus your research on, and then reading a number of secondary critical texts as way to focus & direct your research. You will be turning in short "problem finding" essays (about 3 pgs) every week, but these will be in service of the larger project and ultimate goal of the class: one 10-12 page paper that you will present ("academic conference" style) to your peers at the end of the semester. This may seem daunting now, but by the end of the winter term, you should suffer no dearth of material or ideas.

Once you've chosen your primary texts, you will be broken up into research & workshop groups. You will work with these peers for the rest of the semester — helping one another sort through research material, making recommendations, looking for holes in each other's arguments, engaging in lively debates, etc.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 035, REC
Disability

Instructor: Rieth,Marcus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many people are categorized as people with disabilities. Some of these disabilities are visible, others are invisible, and most of them are stigmatized in one way or another. All of them challenge the concept of normalcy that we, as a society, create in our everyday interactions.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will explore the concepts of deviance, normalcy, and their relation to disability and our lives in general. Apart from developing our writing abilities, we will gain a comprehensive overview of the issue of disability, which we will do by examining representative texts from the field of disability studies and other sources outside the field.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practice each one of these skills. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, we will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, active participation, and a body of work with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 036, REC
036 & 037 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP office for a Permission.

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 037, REC
036 & 037 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP office for a Permission.

Instructor: Zimmerman,Enid J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 038, REC

Instructor: Swanson,Fritz Garner; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. The goal for this course is to introduce you to writing at the college level. We will be focusing on reading strategies, close reading, analysis, thesis development, paper drafting and re-writing.

Over the course of the semester, each student will have two papers workshopped by the entire class. All discussion in the class will focus on paper writing and paper development, reinforcing the notion that writing a good paper is an integrated component of reading intelligently.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 039, REC
Landscapes &Language: Composition Exercise in Writing the Environment. MCSP Section (Community Service). MCSP students only.

Instructor: Cooper,George H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course is taught in conjunction with LocalMotion, a Detroit area non-profit organization whose purpose is to raise public awareness about the links between environmental toxins and illness. Public awareness of any issue depends upon appropriate uses of language and persuasion: in other words, rhetoric. In pursuit of understanding how such rhetoric works, we will read a variety of writers whose goals has been to raise public awareness of the environment, among them, Aldo Leopold, Sandra Steingraber, Rachel Carson, and Wendell Berry. And to complement that reading, students will write a variety of essays with regard to the literal, social, and political lay of landscapes.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 040, REC

Instructor: Rose,Haywood Augustus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 041, REC
Composition and Writing: Below the Surface: The Hidden World

Instructor: Kearns,Josie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 042, REC


Instructor: Weisberg,Ori

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Ancient Greek and Roman educators prized the art of using language effectively and persuasively almost above all others. They called this art rhetoric. The practice of this art was considered crucial for the intellectual and moral development of individual citizens, as well as absolutely necessary for the successful operation of their civilizations. Rhetorical theory does not end with ancient thinkers. Medieval, renaissance, modern, and postmodern thinkers have expanded and developed its concepts and applications. But ancient principles and methods still form the basis for how we form and engage verbal and written arguments today. In this course, we will study facets of ancient rhetoric in order to sharpen the ways in which we employ language and analyze arguments in a variety of subjects and genres. This course will be of particular interest for students of classics, history, literature, and politics. But it will serve students with a wide range of academic and vocational goals in developing clarity in composition and analytic ability as readers and writers in college and beyond.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 043, REC

Instructor: Knuth,Aric David

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a first-year composition course devoted to the writing and revising of several different kinds of essays. This course is designed to make you a better writer by focusing on 1. the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and usage, 2. different models and rhetorical tools for you to use in building your own ideas and analyses in the essays you write, and 3. the workshopping of your own and your peers' work to practice being a thorough editor and reviser of draft material. You will do lots of writing in this class, since *practicing* writing is one of the best ways to *learn* about writing. You will also read some published essays by professional writers, since reading others' writing and thinking about how it works and has been put together can teach you things about writing that no class or writer's manual can teach you. And you will do a lot of writing about writing — one of the only ways to raise your level of awareness about how language works to communicate accurate messages to your readers. Check this site later in the month to find out about required texts for the course. And in the meantime, please don't email me with questions that might otherwise wait for the first day of class.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 044, REC

Instructor: Rose,Haywood Augustus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and their instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of genres and academic disciplines.

The primary goal of this course is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. We will develop these skills through a range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression such as media, visual art, music, and film. Because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 045, REC

Instructor: Patterson,Joanna Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 046, REC
College Writing: Consuming and Producing College Texts

Instructor: Koch,Mark D

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How critically do we read, evaluate, and interpret the thousands of texts that are a part of our daily consumption of culture? How deliberate are we as we produce the gestures, signs, messages, and the many other written texts that we use every day to engage in the world? How do these texts that we consume inform — or perhaps even determine — those that we produce?

In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at those texts that we consume and those we produce–those that we read and those that we write–in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them and their relation to each other. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, most all of them which are concerned with contemporary consumer culture and most all of which will serve as a theoretical basis for the paper assignments. We will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing.

Course work will include six formally graded papers (totaling about twenty-six pages) written in the following modes: description, illustration by example, comparative analysis, causal analysis, policy argument, and interpretive analysis. Additional non-letter-graded writing will include response papers, commentaries on peer essays, and various short exercises. Dutiful attendance, reading, and class participation are required.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 047, REC

Instructor: Bakopoulos,Natalie H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this section of ENGLISH 125 is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. In short, this course is designed to help you to learn to write well at the college level, regardless of your field of study. After all, as we will talk about from day one, good writing is good writing. We will work to develop writing skills through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Writing is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. By learning to identify and evaluate the craft elements and prose strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own pieces of writing. Of course, the most important part of a piece of good writing is its significance. No matter how well crafted a line, how beautiful a transition, good writing has to say something, show us a new way of seeing something, and we will also examine different ways authors imbue their work with relevance and meaning. Each of you bring something unique to the classroom; each of you has a unique voice. Voice gives life to writing, whether creative or scholarly, by imbuing it with individuality and texture and by allowing you to interpret culture through your own identity. Writing, after all, is a process of filtering. But voice is not only a way to explore identity and significance. Awareness of an appropriate voice can lead you to consider the concept of audience and to realize that you may have many different voices; a personal narrative calls for a different voice, say, than does an analysis of a foreign film or a scientific challenge. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate and examine the different aspects of our contemporary culture, and how these investigations might lead to an authentic voice.

ESSAYS, IN-CLASS EXERCISES, SHORT ASSIGNMENTS, AND READINGS If I had a dollar for every person who told me, "I have a great idea for a novel/screenplay/essay, if I only could write it," I would be a rich, rich woman. There is a strange assumption that having the great idea is all that writing takes, and once you have it, writing is a piece of cake, just a matter of getting those brilliant ideas down on paper in whatever order they come. In a sense, perhaps, the idea is part of it, but I wish writing were this easy. Writing is a craft, an art, and a skill. Writing is not a piece of cake. It takes work, thought, and lots and lots of revision. Writing is a process. Sometimes, we don't know how we feel about a topic until we begin to write about it. Writing helps us work out different issues in our heads, to reflect, to analyze, to answer questions. First and foremost, there's no way around it: the best way to improve your writing skills is through practice, and lots of it. You should expect to work very hard in this class. You should expect in-class writing exercises that respond to and reflect on our readings. Several short essays will be assigned to help develop your skills of observation and reflective thought. The major essay projects that you will complete as the class progresses will be based on the various forms of writing we will explore this semester. When trying to communicate your ideas, technical skills count, too. The most compelling, provocative ideas are only well served if they are articulated well, and proper grammar and punctuation can make all the difference. Secondly, we become better writers through reading. A writer who claims he or she doesn't read is probably, well, a very limited writer. I hope this class will expose you to a wide range of styles. I hope that our discussions of the published work will be as helpful to your writing as our in-class workshops and my comments on your work. In many classes you might have been in, you may have used the readings as prompts for essays: analyzing a character or theme or comparing or contrasting a certain element in two different works. Here, while we will surely be paying attention to theme and character, among many other things, the readings we will examine will serve more as models for the essays I will ask you to write. Finally, we will also be reading some craft essays: different writers' thoughts and ideas about the actual process, art, and craft of writing. A myth exists, perhaps, that good college writing involves using million-dollar words or always writing in a high diction, that is, writing in a way that "sounds smart." Rather, I think good college writing is not about sounding smart, per se, but about sounding authentic. I'd like you, as writers and students, to be able to think through complex ideas, to challenge comfortable assumptions, and to write like you mean it. If you don't believe in what you're writing, or if you're using meaningless, convoluted phrases or giant words just to sound impressive, you most likely will come up with a very boring, stilted, or unimpressive essay. Write what you believe. Believe what you write. Say it clearly. Write like you mean it.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 048, REC

Instructor: Bakopoulos,Natalie H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary goal of this section of ENGLISH 125 is to help you learn to write clear, compelling, and sophisticated prose. In short, this course is designed to help you to learn to write well at the college level, regardless of your field of study. After all, as we will talk about from day one, good writing is good writing. We will work to develop writing skills through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Writing is an organized way of thinking, and our engagement with the subject matter will be focused primarily on issues of style, craft, and execution. By learning to identify and evaluate the craft elements and prose strategies used by other writers (both published authors and your own classmates), my hope is that you will begin to employ them more effectively in your own pieces of writing. Of course, the most important part of a piece of good writing is its significance. No matter how well crafted a line, how beautiful a transition, good writing has to say something, show us a new way of seeing something, and we will also examine different ways authors imbue their work with relevance and meaning. Each of you bring something unique to the classroom; each of you has a unique voice. Voice gives life to writing, whether creative or scholarly, by imbuing it with individuality and texture and by allowing you to interpret culture through your own identity. Writing, after all, is a process of filtering. But voice is not only a way to explore identity and significance. Awareness of an appropriate voice can lead you to consider the concept of audience and to realize that you may have many different voices; a personal narrative calls for a different voice, say, than does an analysis of a foreign film or a scientific challenge. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate and examine the different aspects of our contemporary culture, and how these investigations might lead to an authentic voice.

ESSAYS, IN-CLASS EXERCISES, SHORT ASSIGNMENTS, AND READINGS If I had a dollar for every person who told me, "I have a great idea for a novel/screenplay/essay, if I only could write it," I would be a rich, rich woman. There is a strange assumption that having the great idea is all that writing takes, and once you have it, writing is a piece of cake, just a matter of getting those brilliant ideas down on paper in whatever order they come. In a sense, perhaps, the idea is part of it, but I wish writing were this easy. Writing is a craft, an art, and a skill. Writing is not a piece of cake. It takes work, thought, and lots and lots of revision. Writing is a process. Sometimes, we don't know how we feel about a topic until we begin to write about it. Writing helps us work out different issues in our heads, to reflect, to analyze, to answer questions. First and foremost, there's no way around it: the best way to improve your writing skills is through practice, and lots of it. You should expect to work very hard in this class. You should expect in-class writing exercises that respond to and reflect on our readings. Several short essays will be assigned to help develop your skills of observation and reflective thought. The major essay projects that you will complete as the class progresses will be based on the various forms of writing we will explore this semester. When trying to communicate your ideas, technical skills count, too. The most compelling, provocative ideas are only well served if they are articulated well, and proper grammar and punctuation can make all the difference. Secondly, we become better writers through reading. A writer who claims he or she doesn't read is probably, well, a very limited writer. I hope this class will expose you to a wide range of styles. I hope that our discussions of the published work will be as helpful to your writing as our in-class workshops and my comments on your work. In many classes you might have been in, you may have used the readings as prompts for essays: analyzing a character or theme or comparing or contrasting a certain element in two different works. Here, while we will surely be paying attention to theme and character, among many other things, the readings we will examine will serve more as models for the essays I will ask you to write. Finally, we will also be reading some craft essays: different writers' thoughts and ideas about the actual process, art, and craft of writing. A myth exists, perhaps, that good college writing involves using million-dollar words or always writing in a high diction, that is, writing in a way that "sounds smart." Rather, I think good college writing is not about sounding smart, per se, but about sounding authentic. I'd like you, as writers and students, to be able to think through complex ideas, to challenge comfortable assumptions, and to write like you mean it. If you don't believe in what you're writing, or if you're using meaningless, convoluted phrases or giant words just to sound impressive, you most likely will come up with a very boring, stilted, or unimpressive essay. Write what you believe. Believe what you write. Say it clearly. Write like you mean it.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 049, REC

Instructor: Swanson,Fritz Garner; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. The goal for this course is to introduce you to writing at the college level. We will be focusing on reading strategies, close reading, analysis, thesis development, paper drafting and re-writing.

Over the course of the semester, each student will have two papers workshopped by the entire class. All discussion in the class will focus on paper writing and paper development, reinforcing the notion that writing a good paper is an integrated component of reading intelligently.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 050, REC

Instructor: Pomerantz,Sharon J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a class about your ideas, and how to express them in essay form. For each assignment, we will read and talk a lot about the construction of different kinds of essays — personal, compare/contrast and argumentative — but the specific subjects you write about will be guided by your own interests and passions.

Often we don't know what we think about a subject until we start to write our thoughts down. The first draft of an essay is part of the process, but rewriting and re-editing is what, in the end, will make your compositions stronger. Anyone can learn to be a better writer by reading and studying the work of great writers, and by writing, revising, rethinking and redrafting with diligence. You will also get to know each other and learn from your colleagues through the peer and large group writing process.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 051, REC
College Writing: Writing as a Physical Act

Instructor: Talpos,Sara Kathleen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section takes its title from the opening pages of The Practical Guide to Writing, which maintains that writing is, in part, a physical act, a skill that can be learned and improved by reading, writing, and revising as much as possible and by receiving critical feedback from others. Good writing is also interconnected with good reading, so we will discuss assigned readings together with an eye toward what choices go into writing an essay and how they affect the final product. An essential component of this course is the workshop, where we will read and critique each other's papers. The goal of the workshop is to provide a variety of viewpoints and suggestions from which the author may draw when revising his or her paper. This requires participation from everyone.

Required Texts:

1. Coursepack (available at Dollar Bill) 2. The Practical Guide to Writing with Additional Readings, 8th ed. Editors: Barnet and Stubbs (available at the Michigan Union Bookstore, Ulrich's, and Michigan Book and Supply)

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 052, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 053, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In an effort to fulfill these objectives, in this particular section of 125 we will study the rhetoric of migration, culture, displacement, and change, and the way those phenomenon have affected our lives as well as specific communities in our world. Amidst modernity and its resulting mobility and globalization, questions of place, identity, community, belonging, and change become central to understanding our world. They beg questions such as: How do place and change influence who we are? Do we "carry" identities and places with us, or do we change in new contexts? How are these questions particularly influenced if we are marked by others in certain ways because of where we come from? Finally, how do we confront these issues in out own and others' lives? The writing and reading of our own and others' narratives are powerful venues through which to approach these questions.

To foster these explorations, we will start close to home: ourselves. We begin with an examination of your own perceptions, and the things you have observed and experienced in your own lives, particularly the transition and change of place that you undergo by entering college. Next, we will move to a look at people and migrations within our society and our world, in an effort to explore the effects and rhetoric of place and culture or lack thereof, specifically focusing on displaced and minority communities in the Americas. Finally, we will return and re-view our own ideas having critically explored the larger context of the world. The processes of thinking, revising, and assessing self and others, in an effort to continuously evolve and become better, are crucial as we grow as both writers and human beings. These processes aren't easy, and we will approach this class as the opportunity for the continual practice that being a critical writer, reader, and citizen require. This class is designed to give you that practice and to encourage you to approach the reading and writing processes in more analytical and creative ways than you may have in the past.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 054, REC
College Writing: Consuming and Producing College Texts

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

How critically do we read, evaluate, and interpret the thousands of texts that are a part of our daily consumption of culture? How deliberate are we as we produce the gestures, signs, messages, and the many other written texts that we use every day to engage in the world? How do these texts that we consume inform — or perhaps even determine — those that we produce?

In this course we will take a rigorous analytical look at those texts that we consume and those we produce–those that we read and those that we write–in the hope of challenging some of our safe and easy assumptions about them and their relation to each other. By clearing away these assumptions, not only will our writing become sharper and stronger, but the enhanced capacity for critical thinking should lead us to develop more detailed, more interesting, and more original expository and argumentative essays.

We will look at a wide range of professional essays, most all of them which are concerned with contemporary consumer culture and most all of which will serve as a theoretical basis for the paper assignments. We will also spend a good bit of time examining writing from within our class. By engaging in peer editing, reading both classic essays and the discourse of contemporary culture, and writing and rewriting pages of carefully considered prose, students will gain knowledge and skills for further academic writing.

Course work will include six formally graded papers (totaling about twenty-six pages) written in the following modes: description, illustration by example, comparative analysis, causal analysis, policy argument, and interpretive analysis. Additional non-letter-graded writing will include response papers, commentaries on peer essays, and various short exercises. Dutiful attendance, reading, and class participation are required.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 055, REC

Instructor: Martinez,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 056, REC
Can We Handle the Truth? : Memory and Writing

Instructor: Dickinson,Hannah Andrews

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All sections of ENGLISH 125 focus on creating complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop their writing, and readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

In your college career — whether you're training to be a physicist or a poet — you will be required to read thoughtfully, think critically, and write clearly and convincingly. This course is designed to introduce you to college writing by giving you tools with which to approach your future reading, writing, and thinking tasks. A theoretically rich topic like ours allows us to read texts in a variety of disciplines, connect what we read and write with our own experiences in life and writing, and to write in a variety of academic modes.

In this section of ENGLISH 125 we will consider the relationship between memory and writing through a variety of lenses. We'll examine the role of personal memory in narrative: In what ways does memory have an effect on writing? Does writing influence our memories? We'll also study the ways in which cultural, national and family memories are constructed and mediated. To do this, we'll look closely at physical representations of memory like monuments and memorials, as well as textual memories expressed in variety of modes including graphic novels, documentaries, and essays. Finally, we'll consider the various understandings of memory within specific disciplines to broaden our knowledge of the ways we all (re)collect memories and translate them into text.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 057, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Every day you encounter a whirlwind of products, media, fads, and traditions that are based on ideals presumed readymade for the populace, ideals that are often supported by assumptions about what you, the consumer, needs or desires. By combining a close examination of popular culture with the challenging task of creating successful college essays, this class sets out to achieve two goals at once. In addition to offering you the tools to write well for a variety of academic contexts, this class will also encourage you to form a healthy habit of questioning your relationship with popular culture. And as good writing often begins with a good question, this attitude of inquiry will also be the basis of our approach to writing. While we wrestle with the less familiar topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, invention, writing in the disciplines, and citing sources, we will also question our writing habits and our ideas of how to create viable theses. In this way our discussion of popular culture and our engagement with academic writing will go hand in hand, both driving our intellectual curiosity and allowing us to engage with the formal world of college writing from a more familiar, and often captivating, angle.

Over the course of the term, you will write four main essays, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will also require some research presented in an annotated bibliography. You will also be assigned shorter pieces which will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of college writing. We will discuss grammar as a set of standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and in-class exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing throughout the term, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these ideas will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 058, REC
Composition and Writing Below the Surface: The Hidden World

Instructor: Kearns,Josie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 059, REC
Disability

Instructor: Rieth,Marcus

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many people are categorized as people with disabilities. Some of these disabilities are visible, others are invisible, and most of them are stigmatized in one way or another. All of them challenge the concept of normalcy that we, as a society, create in our everyday interactions.

In this section of ENGLISH 125, we will explore the concepts of deviance, normalcy, and their relation to disability and our lives in general. Apart from developing our writing abilities, we will gain a comprehensive overview of the issue of disability, which we will do by examining representative texts from the field of disability studies and other sources outside the field.

Good writing is a process combining engaged, complex thinking, close reading of sources and last, but not least, technical competence. Thus, we will thoroughly practice each one of these skills. By examining the notion of the normal body, revealing assumptions in the politics of social and physical space, sexuality, language, access to resources, and public policy decisions concerning the body, we will further your abilities through a wide range of methods: readings, discussions, writing exercises, peer critiques, and responses to other forms of expression. Apart from learning how to organize essays of varied lengths or how to use and quote outside sources correctly by completing a variety of writing exercises and projects in and out of class, this section should also help you develop an authentic and mindful voice as an individual. Basic course requirements are, among others, active participation, and a body of work with at least 25-30 pages of revised prose and other writing assignments.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 060, REC

Instructor: Durgin,Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section of ENGLISH 125 encourages you to create your own theme for the course, particularly in the second half of the semester. As well as making the university writing requirement applicable to the work you ultimately wish to do here at UM, this section is designed to help you become flexible enough as a critical reader and academic writer to inhabit various rhetorical situations and discourse communities.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 061, REC
HSSP section. HSSP students only admitted to this section.

Instructor: Modey,Christine Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 062, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In this class we will explore ideas about place & displacement, geography & travel, as a way of developing our writing and thinking skills. Come excited to explore the places around you and the geography of your own mind.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 063, REC

Instructor: Pomerantz,Sharon J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This is a class about your ideas, and how to express them in essay form. For each assignment, we will read and talk a lot about the construction of different kinds of essays — personal, compare/contrast and argumentative — but the specific subjects you write about will be guided by your own interests and passions.

Often we don't know what we think about a subject until we start to write our thoughts down. The first draft of an essay is part of the process, but rewriting and re-editing is what, in the end, will make your compositions stronger. Anyone can learn to be a better writer by reading and studying the work of great writers, and by writing, revising, rethinking and redrafting with diligence. You will also get to know each other and learn from your colleagues through the peer and large group writing process.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 064, REC

Instructor: Chang,Jason C

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

The primary objective of this course is to prepare you to write effectively. Together, we will study what it means to create the complex, analytic, and well-supported arguments so important in a university setting. Extensive practice and careful examination of the writing and revision processes will contribute to your academic success at the University of Michigan as well as your successful communication outside the classroom — interpersonally, as community members, and professionally. We picture the act of writing as solitary, but our written work can have a powerful impact on society and on our relationships with other people.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 065, REC

Instructor: Metsker,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Every day you encounter a whirlwind of products, media, fads, and traditions that are based on ideals presumed readymade for the populace, ideals that are often supported by assumptions about what you, the consumer, needs or desires. By combining a close examination of popular culture with the challenging task of creating successful college essays, this class sets out to achieve two goals at once. In addition to offering you the tools to write well for a variety of academic contexts, this class will also encourage you to form a healthy habit of questioning your relationship with popular culture. And as good writing often begins with a good question, this attitude of inquiry will also be the basis of our approach to writing. While we wrestle with the less familiar topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, invention, writing in the disciplines, and citing sources, we will also question our writing habits and our ideas of how to create viable theses. In this way our discussion of popular culture and our engagement with academic writing will go hand in hand, both driving our intellectual curiosity and allowing us to engage with the formal world of college writing from a more familiar, and often captivating, angle.

Over the course of the term, you will write four main essays, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will also require some research presented in an annotated bibliography. You will also be assigned shorter pieces which will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of college writing. We will discuss grammar as a set of standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and in-class exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing throughout the term, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these ideas will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 066, REC

Instructor: Thomas,Chad Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

All ENGLISH 125 courses focus on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines. In this course, we will work to develop the critical thinking, reading, writing, and argumentation skills necessary to produce effective, confident, competent college writing. Throughout this semester, you will work on how to read and write critically by interrogating both communal and individual identity. In order to meet the objectives stated above, you will write several papers, including narrative, persuasive, comparative, and argumentative essays. These assignments draw from a variety of sources, including (but not limited to) personal belongings, photographs, paintings, drawings, sculpture, film, advertisements, women's and men's magazines, published essays, and cultural artifacts. Specifically, in this class, we will focus on:

How to better understand ourselves and the world around us. How to become a more informed and analytical thinker. How to become a more effective and critical reader. How to become a clearer and stronger writer. How to form an arguable thesis and fully develop it. How to use clear textual examples as support for a thesis.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 067, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 068, REC
College Writing: Place, Identity, and Belonging

Instructor: Williams,Kelly Diane

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

In an essay about traveling between London, Africa, the United States, and the Caribbean, Caryl Phillips writes, "I recognize the place, I feel at home here, but I don't belong. I am of, and not of, this place." In a single sentence, Phillips raises a host of sentiments about the relationship between place and identity, between location and belonging. This course, "College Writing: Place, Identity, and Belonging," is designed to hone your critical thinking and writing skills by exploring a wide variety of texts, including poems, essays, fiction, and films, that deal with the themes of place, identity, and belonging.

Guiding questions for the course include: What locations are depicted and/or referred to in the text (home, classroom, city, nation, world, etc.)? Who belongs and who is excluded? Why? How does location affect categories of identity (race, gender, class, and sexuality)? Furthermore, how does identity shape a sense of belonging? What overall argument does the text make about place, identity, and belonging?

This course will accustom students to the process of writing analytical essays at the college level. You will complete rough and final drafts of several essays that you workshop with a peer group, as well as a number of shorter writings to be assigned throughout the term. Your essays will yield a total of 20-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester; in addition, you will submit some form of writing each week. Put simply, to become a better writer, you must do quite a lot of writing.

Texts may include the films *Bring It On* and *Harold & Kumar Go To White Castle;* poetry by Adrienne Rich, Langston Hughes, and Elizabeth Bishop; essays by Martin Luther King, Jr., David Sedaris, Caryl Phillips, and Barbara Ehrenreich; fiction by Jhumpa Lahiri, Sandra Cisneros, and Kate Chopin. (Note: film screenings may be scheduled outside of class time.) Texts will be available as a coursepack at Accu-Copy.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 069, REC
College Writing: Writing as a Physical Act

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

This section takes its title from the opening pages of The Practical Guide to Writing, which maintains that writing is, in part, a physical act, a skill that can be learned and improved by reading, writing, and revising as much as possible and by receiving critical feedback from others. Good writing is also interconnected with good reading, so we will discuss assigned readings together with an eye toward what choices go into writing an essay and how they affect the final product. An essential component of this course is the workshop, where we will read and critique each other's papers. The goal of the workshop is to provide a variety of viewpoints and suggestions from which the author may draw when revising his or her paper. This requires participation from everyone.

Required Texts:

1. Coursepack (available at Dollar Bill) 2. The Practical Guide to Writing with Additional Readings, 8th ed. Editors: Barnet and Stubbs (available at the Michigan Union Bookstore, Ulrich's, and Michigan Book and Supply)

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 070, REC

Instructor: Martinez,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 071, REC
Composition and Writing Below the Surface: The Hidden World

Instructor: Kearns,Josie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

A study of rhetoric, both as a body of principles, and as a practical art, emphasizing the writing of expository and argumentative essays.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 072, REC

Instructor: Hinken,Michael Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will prepare students to communicate ideas clearly and persuasively on the page, which is an integral part of being an educated person. By reading and responding to essays on a variety of topics — from social issues such as race, class and gender in America to the media and contemporary culture — students will interact with ideas and further explore those ideas by formulating their own opinions and developing them in four major essays. Specifically, students will learn stategies of drafting and revising, along with how to define a thesis, or organizaing idea, and then how to develop and support ideas in various rhetorical situations, from arguing a position, to justifying an evaluation, to proposing a solution, to speculating about causes. In each case, different writing skills will be emphasized. For example, students will learn how to write for a specific audience, define a purpose, generate and support a logical argument with examples and evidence and how to appeal to other perspectives using counterarguments and rebuttals. In addition, we will examine strategies to improve sentence-level proficiency, so students can write with precision and flourish. The ultimate aim of the course will be to produce a final essay representing a culmination of these aspects of good writing, an essay that demonstrates a mastery of writing, research and independent thinking skills.

Throughout the semester, students will collaborate with each other in the invention, drafting and revision process and also have the opportunity to work together in a workshop setting, gaining an understanding that writing is revising. And, moreover, by completing a variety of writing assignments, students will ultimately learn that writing is like a muscle — the more you use it, the stronger it gets.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 073, REC

Instructor: Metsker,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Every day you encounter a whirlwind of products, media, fads, and traditions that are based on ideals presumed readymade for the populace, ideals that are often supported by assumptions about what you, the consumer, needs or desires. By combining a close examination of popular culture with the challenging task of creating successful college essays, this class sets out to achieve two goals at once. In addition to offering you the tools to write well for a variety of academic contexts, this class will also encourage you to form a healthy habit of questioning your relationship with popular culture. And as good writing often begins with a good question, this attitude of inquiry will also be the basis of our approach to writing. While we wrestle with the less familiar topics of college academic writing, such as pre-writing, rhetoric, audience, persuasion, invention, writing in the disciplines, and citing sources, we will also question our writing habits and our ideas of how to create viable theses. In this way our discussion of popular culture and our engagement with academic writing will go hand in hand, both driving our intellectual curiosity and allowing us to engage with the formal world of college writing from a more familiar, and often captivating, angle.

Over the course of the term, you will write four main essays, each of which will be workshopped, revised, and turned in for a final grade. The final essay will also require some research presented in an annotated bibliography. You will also be assigned shorter pieces which will help you transition into the longer essays by engaging with individual components of college writing. We will discuss grammar as a set of standards that reflect a static image of a living language, and you will work in groups to create your own grammar lesson. To help with your engagement with discussions and skills acquisition, you will also keep a writing journal, which will contain reading questions, free-writes, vocabulary notes, and in-class exercises. The goal of this class is for you to challenge yourself by exploring complex ideas in your writing throughout the term, without being overwhelmed by the new skills, attitudes, and ideas these ideas will inevitably require and ultimately produce.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 074, REC
The Meaning of Disaster

Instructor: Dean,Margaret L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This writing course focuses on the creation of complex, analytic, well-supported arguments that matter in academic contexts. Students work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop their written prose. Readings cover a variety of different genres and academic disciplines.

When disasters happen, people are left to try to make sense of them, and we often turn to writers for answers. Personal accounts and arguments responding to disasters can be found in many cultures, time periods, and prose styles, but they have certain uncanny things in common — they try to document the individual stories that make up a disaster, they grapple with the question of how survivors can go on in a disaster's wake, and they search for the value in some lessons learned.

This class will explore writing — mostly nonfiction — dealing with disasters in Japan, Russia, Indonesia, New York, and the Gulf Coast. Students will write four essays and participate in an online discussion.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 075, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

This course will prepare students to communicate ideas clearly and persuasively on the page, which is an integral part of being an educated person. By reading and responding to essays on a variety of topics — from social issues such as race, class and gender in America to the media and contemporary culture — students will interact with ideas and further explore those ideas by formulating their own opinions and developing them in four major essays. Specifically, students will learn stategies of drafting and revising, along with how to define a thesis, or organizaing idea, and then how to develop and support ideas in various rhetorical situations, from arguing a position, to justifying an evaluation, to proposing a solution, to speculating about causes. In each case, different writing skills will be emphasized. For example, students will learn how to write for a specific audience, define a purpose, generate and support a logical argument with examples and evidence and how to appeal to other perspectives using counterarguments and rebuttals. In addition, we will examine strategies to improve sentence-level proficiency, so students can write with precision and flourish. The ultimate aim of the course will be to produce a final essay representing a culmination of these aspects of good writing, an essay that demonstrates a mastery of writing, research and independent thinking skills.

Throughout the semester, students will collaborate with each other in the invention, drafting and revision process and also have the opportunity to work together in a workshop setting, gaining an understanding that writing is revising. And, moreover, by completing a variety of writing assignments, students will ultimately learn that writing is like a muscle — the more you use it, the stronger it gets.

ENGLISH 125 — College Writing
Section 076, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Many of my previous students have asked me, "Why is it that even after acing my high school English classes, I still have to take ENGLISH 125?" There are many answers to this question, but perhaps the most important is that college writing has different structural expectations than high school writing. Whereas the five-paragraph, intro/three support points/conclusion structure worked well on the SAT/ACT and for many high school assignments, the organizational demands for college essays are very different. Although we will certainly discuss grammar, sentence-level concerns, and other aspects of writing, a major focus in our class will be learning how to tailor your essay's structure to better organize and express your thoughts.

As in all other sections of ENGLISH 125, be prepared to revise 18-20 pages of writing this semester. Be prepared to do even more non-revised writing, and to collaborate with your classmates and with me to improve your writing and the writing of your classmates. Be prepared to push yourself to new levels of analysis and specific detail.

In terms of what makes this section slightly different from other ENGLISH 125 sections, here's a taste: 1. The assignments are weighted so that assignments from early in the assignment are worth less than assignments from later in the semester. If your writing improves during the semester, that will be reflected in your final course grade. 2. We workshop in small student groups, not with the entire class all at once. Small group workshops give you the chance to work with a consistent group of students that will become very familiar with your writing style and can offer you valuable advice to improve your writing. 3. We'll spend some time talking about how writing in other departments (like Economics, the sciences, and the professional schools) differs — or is similar — to writing in ENGLISH 125. The goal of this class is to help you develop writing skills that will assist you in ALL of your college courses — not just ENGLISH 125.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Jewish Encounter with America

Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Is America the Promised Land or a cultural waste land? In this first-year seminar, we will explore how a series of Jewish writers have grappled with this complicated question, from the period of the great migration from Europe up to the present. The writers we will study include Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, Philip Roth, and Cynthia Ozick. Among the specific questions we will address are the following: How does Jewish identity transform in the New World? How do ideas from the religious traditions of Judaism get translated into new forms? What kind of stories do Jewish writers tell about the past and what sort of future do they envision? We will also consider the Jewish response to such phenomena as the backlash against immigrants in the 1920s, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. Requirements include short response papers and a term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Language, Literature and Personal Identity

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our language provides us with the means by which we define ourselves, our world and our place in our world. Just as powerfully our language also function to keep us in our place. We will begin our term-long examination of this dilemma with a close study the language we use in our everyday lives, paying close attention to how language functions to enable us to establish and maintain relationships. We will extend our analysis to close readings of three important novels which demonstrate the literary use of language in exploring human identity. Written work will include weekly two-page essays which will become the basis of two longer papers, one of which will be based on a text of your choice. The assigned texts include Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice; Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God and E.M. Forster's Maurice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The American Short Story — 20th Century Origins and Evolutions

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course examines the development of the American short story over the course of the twentieth century, touching on the works of both major and under-read writers. In addition to examining these authors' fictional techniques, we will also be investigating the ways in which authors stole from and argued with one another as well as how the popular understanding of the short story changed over the course of the century. Reading will be substantial. Requirements include two essays (one short, one long) as well as reading responses and one small presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 001, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This Creative Writing course will focus on two creative genres: poetry and prose non-fiction. Because the class meets three days a week, one day will be dedicated to the discussion of exemplary texts from the genre (published work by established authors), and the other two days will be dedicated to workshopping student work.

Students should be prepared to invest significant time in composing and revising their creative work. This is not a class is "personal expression" as such. Rather, it is an engagement with the discipline of writing for a literary audience. Although the instructor does not intend to grade with a strict sense of "literary merit," he will grade based on consistent, demonstrated engagement with the process of the course. A final portfolio of work will serve as the major graded assignment. It should demonstrate significant writing quality but should also offer evidence of meticulous drafting and consideration of critique from peers and from the instructor.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Trommer,Karen Christine

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Creative writing of fiction and poetry entails paying close attention to the world around you, and bringing your attention to the page when you sit down to write. We will consider both the craft of writing — the technical skills a writer employs when composing — and the art of writing, in which a writer brings his or her unique vision to a story or poem. We will work as a group to train our ears, eyes, and understanding to record the delights of the world as we experience it.

The course is built around close readings of contemporary short stories, short shorts (those little intermediaries that hover between stories and poems), and poems both formal and innovative. We will use these primary texts as the basis for our own writing, investigating what we can learn from writers who have been slogging away at the hard work of writing well. We will discuss the stylistic elements that make each writer distinctive and further explore these elements in frequent short writing exercises. Students will learn the conventions employed in successful short stories and poems and the benefits of breaking from convention when necessary.

Workshopping each other's work will be a significant part of class as we develop a critical vocabulary and approach to reading works-in-progress. Students will participate in thoughtful, constructive workshops of peers' stories and poems and respond to critiques of their own work with attentive, imaginative revisions. Discussions and workshops are essential to the course, and regular participation and attendance are critical.

By the end semester, students will be expected to produce a polished final portfolio consisting of at least five poems and twenty pages of prose that reflect their efforts in revision and attention to the nuances of language and voice.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Creative energy is contagious! This semester, you'll be exposed to a variety of poets and fiction writers — from other beginning writers like yourselves to accomplished artists — as you: collaborate with students from this section, attend public readings, and welcome practicing writers to our classes. In addition to inspiring you to create your own poems and stories, this course is designed to reveal, in part, the invisible community of writers to which you will belong. While you develop a sense of what the wider community of readers and writers values in poetry and fiction, our class itself will represent a community of writers who will help each other develop and improve their work.

Central to such work will be your willingness to take risks with the subject matter — mining your imagination and personal experiences — and to strive for complexity in your writing. Beyond this, you will be challenged to recognize how your writings, at their mature best, not only engage us with image and dramatic tension, but also have the power to deepen our experience of our fellow humans and ourselves.

To these ends, you will read, write, and rewrite a great deal. In-class writing exercises will help you generate new material and sharpen your skills. Discussions of peer and published work will examine language and technique and will invite you to consider the following sorts of questions. Where does entertainment end and art begin? How do you balance autobiography and invention in your work? What is the inherent value of the process of writing? What's involved in moving from the private sphere of creating work to the public sphere of presenting it? And what, after all, is the community's role in the solitary act of writing?

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Perrine,Mika Shanti

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

FINDING A VOICE: AN INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING The goal of this course is to introduce you to the range of voices and styles found in contemporary fiction and poetry and to enable you to discover and hone your own distinctive voice as a writer of prose and poetry. You will be expected to read and discuss assigned work by published authors, participate in in-class exercises, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers, and produce a mid-term portfolio of prose and a final portfolio of poetry. Your portfolios should reflect your efforts in revision and your attention to the nuances of language and voice. This is a workshop. Your participation in class is vital to the workshop as a whole. Attendance is mandatory.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 005, REC

Instructor: McCarroll,Christina Anne

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Using the workshop model, we'll read fiction and poetry and write our own. What are the gifts and limits of story? How do we alight on moments that change everything? How do we make insights come to life — and keep breathing — on the page? We'll investigate the possibilities of each form and learn by reading and discussing one another's work alongside the prose and poetry of published authors.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Hetzel,Tina Alexandra

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This winter term, you will write new works of poetry and short prose fiction. We will use readings by established authors to investigate what makes a successful piece of writing tick; the readings will serve as a basis for lively class discussions, as craft models and as launch pads to ideas. You will produce new writing, workshop (both peer group and whole class), and revise. This course will emphasize imagination, clarity and discovery. It will require time and determination.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Mun,Nam Hee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

The goal of this course is to teach the serious beginning writer the art and craft of writing. Now, some people believe that fiction or poetry can't be taught. I will admit that the ability to write well is partly an innate talent — like the ability to play football well or sing well — however, I firmly believe that good writing is mostly the product of practice and patience, combined with a true-blue love of words and sentences.

The course will be divided into two sections: fiction and poetry. We will study the "rules" for both genres and then read numerous examples of how established writers break them. Although we will dissect and discuss various published works throughout the semester, the core of the class will consist of peer-to-peer workshops, in which student-work is commented upon with respect and intelligence. In addition to readings and workshops, we will concentrate on specific craft issues, such as transforming personal experience into a narrative worth reading or tapping into the imagination when personal experience is inadequate to tell the best story. I will encourage everyone to "step outside of themselves" and notice the world around them. This might entail working with found objects to discuss perspective or noticing street signs to understand the objective correlative or pretending to be CIA operatives and eavesdropping on conversations to learn about dialogue. All of these explorations should come in handy during the in-class writing exercises, which I hope will inspire you (or at the very least loosen you up) for the writing you will do at home, of which you will do plenty.

This course will require dedication, perseverance and a lot of reading and writing time. Hopefully, you will find all of your efforts worthwhile, especially when you submit, at the end of the term, a writing portfolio you yourselves are proud of.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 008, REC

Instructor: James,Cyan Rochelle

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Class will consist of selected readings, and on the workshop model of examining student work. We will focus on the poetry collections, novels, and short story collections of primarily contemporary writers. We will also learn from films, nonfiction writers, genre-benders, and other sources. Class is discussion-based, and students are expected to participate readily, and to write a fair amount.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Lazarin,Danielle

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course is an introduction to the writing of poetry and fiction. In addition to completing weekly written exercises, students will be expected to thoughtfully read and respond to the work of professional writers, as well as that of their peers during regular workshops. By the end of the term, you will have revised 5-7 poems and 2 stories. The course requires that you regularly push your own boundaries, experimenting with techniques and voices that may be outside of your comfort zone.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: McCollough,Aaron S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This Creative Writing course will focus on two creative genres: poetry and prose non-fiction. Because the class meets three days a week, one day will be dedicated to the discussion of exemplary texts from the genre (published work by established authors), and the other two days will be dedicated to workshopping student work.

Students should be prepared to invest significant time in composing and revising their creative work. This is not a class is "personal expression" as such. Rather, it is an engagement with the discipline of writing for a literary audience. Although the instructor does not intend to grade with a strict sense of "literary merit," he will grade based on consistent, demonstrated engagement with the process of the course. A final portfolio of work will serve as the major graded assignment. It should demonstrate significant writing quality but should also offer evidence of meticulous drafting and consideration of critique from peers and from the instructor.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 011, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 012, REC
Stories and poems

Instructor: Shilling,Michael John

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Stories and poems; what are the tools, strategies, and techniques that make them stunning and life-changing, or laughable and lame? Take this class and find out. We'll read the masters of both forms — some famous, others obscure — and write a bunch of stuff. Then we'll workshop said stuff. There will be guest stars. I think it will be fun.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 013, REC

Instructor: Brown,Michelle Chan

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course focuses on the intensive reading and writing of fiction and poetry. Our work will center around once-weekly peer-critique workshops and intense engagement with masters of the genres. We will concentrate on poetry for the first half of the semester, exploring everything from the sonnet to more experimental forms.

During the fiction portion of the class, we will read short stories and one short novel and write several short stories.

Authors range from Shakespeare to Ben Lerner, Chekhov to Junot Diaz. Students will be expected to write every week and work towards compiling a final portfolio of poetry and fiction. Students will also prepare a class presentation on one poetry/short fiction collection of their choice. Finally, students will learn to become careful and generous readers of one another's work.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 014, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 015, REC

Instructor: Olsen,Joshua

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 016, REC
The HitchWriter's Guide to the Galaxy*

Instructor: Proux,Lauren Rochelle

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

A writer's work relies on the realities of the world, yet a writer must also disconnect from the expected in order to enter the imaginative realm. This course will serve as a guide into those creative worlds of poetry and short fiction. The class will be comprised of discussions on craft as well as a workshop in which we will conscientiously critique each others' work. In order to illuminate certain concepts, specific 20th century writers will be studied. Students will develop their own imaginations as well as a critical eye for the written word. As a result, the students will learn to view the world with perceptive eyes and write accordingly, creatively or otherwise. At the term's end, students will turn in writing journals and a final, polished portfolio of poetry and short fiction.

*Altered from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 017, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 018, REC
writing what you (don't) know

Instructor: Sonnenberg,Brittani L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this class we will explore the notion of "writing what you (don't) know."

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 019, REC

Instructor: Mock,Samuel Felton

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course will serve as an introduction to the art of writing poetry and fiction. Through the complementary use of workshop and craft discussion, students will explore the range of their own writing while studying the work of other authors. As a class, we will be interested not only in sharing and improving our work, but also in addressing larger issues that surround creative writing as a dynamic art. Most importantly, we will discuss the nature and use of language and experiment with its possibilities. In addition to writing their own poetry and fiction, students will be responsible for weekly readings and other creative assignments.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 020, REC
Pretty Words Made a Fool Out of Me (Season 2)

Instructor: Edwards,Joshua Blake

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this class, we'll read and write poems and prose that deal with the "world" in all its grandeur and difficulty. William Blake, Denis Johnson, and international writers will be central.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 021, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Introductory creative writing course in which students compose pieces in fiction, poetry or drama.

ENGLISH 223 — Creative Writing
Section 022, REC

Instructor: Bakopoulos,Natalie H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course, ENGLISH 223, is for people who love to read and write and who are also willing to devote time and energy to this endeavor. The goal of this course is to develop and improve your writing and to introduce you to the writers who have and are influencing their respective genres, and also to provide you with a thoughtful, enthusiastic community of writers. Whether you're English majors or Engineering students, bound for professional school or graduate school or simply yet have no idea, for this class, I'm asking you to think of yourselves as writers. We will focus primarily on contemporary short fiction and drama. You will be required to read and discuss assigned work by published authors, participate in in-class exercises and discussions, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers, and produce a final portfolio of revised written work. No piece of writing comes out perfect the first time; sometimes, it takes drafts and drafts and drafts to get a piece to reach its full potential. And even then there's more work to do. Much of our class time will be devoted to rigorous and respectful peer workshopping. We'll also be completing lots of in-class exercises and discussing published plays, screenplays, and stories, either in their entirety or closely examining certain sections. At the conclusion of the course you'll have a final portfolio of revised writing (drama and prose), but I truly hope that each and every one of you will leave with more than that: I hope you will have gained a love of language, a greater appreciation for the power of image and story, and a desire to continue writing and reading. I look forward to meeting you!

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Fulcher,Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We will examine the origins and approaches to modern argument, beginning with Aristotelian oral and written models and ending with a discussion of how visual components and simultaneity of media have both adopted and complicated these classic rhetorical approaches to persuasion. Recommended for students of visual, written or musical arts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 002, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 003, REC
Rethinking, Recontextualizing, and Reimagining

Instructor: Chamberlin,Jeremiah Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The primary goal of this course is to teach you to write clear, well-reasoned, and well-crafted arguments. In this class, we will stress analysis and the use of evidence to develop work that is thoughtful, insightful, and unique. The type of writing that this class fosters is not argumentative insofar as "taking sides," however. This is a limited and, ultimately, flawed view of what sophisticated argument consists of. Rather, good argument embraces complexity and engages both the reader and writer in shared intellectual discourse.

The title of this class, "Rethinking, Recontextualizing, and Reimagining," is taken from a line in Frank Cioffi's essay "Argumentation in a Culture of Discord." Cioffi urges his readers to see the argumentative form as one that embraces "more nuanced, more complex, and more problematic" positions rather than ones that are simply "black and white" or "right and wrong." The writing we study, and the work you will be asked to produce, will follow this more constructive model, while still maintaining rigorous academic standards. For what matters in any piece of writing, particularly argumentative writing, is giving the reader a new way of seeing the world.

However, because writing is an organized way of thinking, our engagement with the subject matter will be focused not only on the issues, but also on style, craft, and execution. By learning how an argument works, we can more fully understand why it works, and thereby implement those techniques in our own writing.

Finally, be prepared to share your ideas not only in the classroom, but also on the page. A large portion of the course will be spent engaged in rigorous and respectful peer workshop.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 004, REC
aspects and forms of argument

Instructor: Scheidt,Donna Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We tend to think of argumentative writing as being logical and appealing to reason. This is certainly a part of argument, and an important one at that. Yet how is it that arguments also move us to anger, tears, or action? Why is it we sense that one writer is trustworthy or credible, whereas another one turns us off? These aspects of argument have been known from the time of Aristotle as "logos", "pathos", and "ethos." In this course we will examine these qualities of argument, as well as various types of argument. Argumentative writing occurs in a variety of forms beyond the academic essay, and we will likely be analyzing and possibly working in a number of such formats (e.g., blog, power point presentation). My aim is to explore these aspects and forms of argument with you in the context of current topics (e.g., the balance between security and privacy; the extent to which it is appropriate to grant property rights in bodies and their parts, words and ideas).

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 005, REC
origins and approaches to modern argument

Instructor: Fulcher,Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We will examine the origins and approaches to modern argument, beginning with Aristotelian oral and written models and ending with a discussion of how visual components and simultaneity of media have both adopted and complicated these classic rhetorical approaches to persuasion. Recommended for students of visual, written or musical arts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 006, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Berggren,Anne G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, we will analyze a variety of arguments to see how the authors engage audiences, use evidence, and apply persuasive techniques. The forcus, however, will be on students' writing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 008, REC
Restricted to CSP students. Please see department for Permission.

Instructor: Taylor III,Charles Lavelle

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, you are assumed to have learned the basics of grammar and citation formats, as well as how to assemble a coherent argument. Here you will learn how to develop more sophisticated arguments, and how to present effective theses while avoiding logical pitfalls. With those goals in mind, we will discuss ways to make use of the "Four Classes of Argument," and to eliminate the most damaging "Logical Fallacies."

My Argumentative Writing course differs from most, I think, in that we make such extensive use of discussion. I try to get students to recognize how Standard Essay Form (intro/body/conclusion) is part of every meaningful communication transaction, including simple conversations, advertisements, and print and broadcast news reports. Learning to recognize the format in a variety of situations helps students to acquire a comfort with the patterns of organized expression, with the result that they are able to control and refine their own writing. Our discussions about these, and other concepts, gives students the chance to brainstorm collectively, and to enter the writing process through a communicative medium with which they are more at ease.

The extra time outside the classroom that CSP instructors receive allows me to meet with students within a flexible appointment schedule. I find that fixed office hours can accommodate the schedules of only a relatively small number of students, while the latitude available within our program affords the opportunity to offer them a much wider range of meeting options. More contact means more chances to walk students through the process of revising, that so-important aspect of writing with which many of them seem least comfortable.

I require four papers for my course, and insist that two of them be submitted in at least two drafts. Students also receive at least two opportunities to workshop their papers: one mandatory and one optional. Many of them have told me that the work-shopping component — intimidating at first — has turned out to be the most helpful aspect of the course. I sometimes incorporate an overall theme for the term, and often give to students who request it permission to deal with multiple facets of a single topic over more than one paper. This freedom has helped some to think in complex ways about issues for which only a single point of view might have been evident at first.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 009, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Boulay,Charlotte Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this argumentative writing course we will practice writing strong argumentative papers based on evidence. Students will learn how to successfully use different kinds of rhetorical strategies, investigate claims, question beliefs and assumptions and will use research and discussion skills in their writing. We will use workshops to improve student writing and we will be reading various diverse non-fiction texts to learn from other good writers.

Imagination and originality are highly valued in this class, as is the willingness to consider opposing viewpoints and a curiosity about current events and graphic texts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 011, REC
love and its many discontents

Instructor: McDaniel,Raymond Clark

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Love. Illusion? Idea? Emotion? Mistake? It's wonderful stuff, love, except when it isn't. This section of Argumentative Writing will address love and its many discontents, so as to examine how we come to believe what we believe, how we can interfere with that process, and how the texts we read and produce result in the most intimate ideological and emotional consequences. Class readings will include cultural, scientific and philosophical treatises on This Thing We Call Love, and via the strategic dissection and reassembly of these ideas, students will learn how to argue about everything and anything. By semester's end, your mind will be mighty, your heart will be bruised, and all who encounter you will regard you with awe and envy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 012, REC
Restricted to CSP students. Please see department for Permission.

Instructor: Taylor III,Charles Lavelle

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 013, REC
"Arguing for Leadership

Instructor: Laskowski,Gene Lambert

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This introduction to argumentative writing is based on assumptions about both argument and leadership: (1) An argument entails differing points of view. An argumentative essay explores such differing viewpoints, understanding their strongest points, in an effort to arrive at a defensible conclusion. (2) Leadership entails the ability identify what the issues are in a given situation and to listen to differing points of view about those issues.

These basic definitions are at the core of this course. One conclusion should be clear: THIS IS NOT A COURSE IN PERSUASIVE WRITING where you learn to express more persuasively opinions that you already hold. It is a course in argumenta-tive writing where you will learn and practice the kind of thinking you're going to have to do to succeed/lead in just about any profession: identify issues, listen to the strongest positions of differing points of view about those issues, and evaluate those points of view via the lens of critical thinking.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 014, REC
questions about citizenship

Instructor: Feigenbaum,Paul T

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This year LS&A has dedicated both Fall and Winter semesters to issues of citizenship, and this course will be linked to that theme. We will discuss and do a lot of writing (both formal and informal) about what it means to be a citizen today, as well as thinking about what civic role students can and should play in local and national communities. Students will observe and analyze local civic activities such as a city council or school board meeting, and we will think about the ways politicians use various media (or the media uses them) to shape their images. Toward the end of the semester students will make some intervention of their choice into the public sphere — possible examples include setting up a blog on a political issue of interest to them, writing a charter for a new student organization, or making a presentation at a City Council meeting.

In the process of addressing these questions about citizenship, we will determine and negotiate our standards for effective argumentation, and write about that experience. This process will include discussions about what an effective argument is, as well as various attendant questions including, but certainly not limited to: What are the standards for judging the quality of an argument? How might these standards differ depending on the context in which the argument is made, as well as the audience? What must be present (and what absent) in an argument in order to be considered effective? This course depends on student involvement and contributions. Your ideas, analyses, creativity and ability to help one another will determine the tone and direction of the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 015, REC

Instructor: Hinken,Michael Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

If you're paying attention, you'll find arguments all around. A political speech, an op/ed piece in the Ann Arbor News, a CD review posted on pitchforkmedia.com — all these may be familiar. However, consider what elements of argument may exist in less familiar places — a Far Side cartoon, your favorite poem, your favorite painting, the menu at Bob Evans, the movie poster for United 93, the homepage for theonion.com, Letterman's nightly monologue, the cover of your textbook. Living in the Information Age, which is largely defined by the ubiquity of media, means that you encounter more arguments — and arguments of a greater variety, subtlety and sophistication — than any previous generation. Therefore, understanding the nature and variety of appeals aimed at your heart, your conscience, your reasoning becomes of paramount importance. In this course, you will have an opportunity to explore components of argumentation through study and practice. Specifically, you will learn the following: how identify and construct various types of arguments and understand their respective purposes; how to recognize and use appeals to reason, emotion and character; strategies for analyzing arguments; how to identify and avoid logical fallacies; how to use figurative language to persuade; what counts as evidence; and more. Learning strategies of argumentation will help you identify methods of persuasion common to political discourse, advertising and other arenas; furthermore, by applying strategies of effective argumentation, you will be better equipped to present your own ideas in a convincing and appealing way.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 016, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 017, REC

Instructor: Lamberton,L Jill

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this writing-intensive "argumentative writing" course, we will study some of the theories of persuasion first outlined by ancient Greek and Roman rhetoricians. In both in-class and home work assignments, we will repeatedly ask what can and should be persuasive in a given case, in a given encounter between writer, audience, and idea. The reason we will do this is based upon the ancients' assumption that the power that resides in language is available to anyone who is willing to study rhetoric and work at the craft of argument.

Acquiring and perfecting your persuasive skills can give you a lot of influence in today's world. Think of it this way: when you make an argument, you make a contribution to a collective understanding of an idea or situation. When people listen to or read your argument, they may find clarification for their own thinking on a given topic. Presenting persuasive arguments is a way to shape the thinking and actions of others, for good or for ill. Because arguments can lead people to action, and because actions have the potential to be good or bad, in this course we will focus extensively on the ethics of an argument as well as its content.

The requirements for this course include weekly reading and weekly writing assignments, in addition to three longer persuasive papers. Please click on "Syllabus" in the side bar to read the more detailed course requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 018, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 019, REC

Instructor: Cardenas,Maritza Elena

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to introduce students to the various methodologies and strategies available in argumentative writing. Students enrolled in this class will learn how to identify, critique, and apply the three central argumentative models — Classical, Rogerian, Toulmin, to various texts including: non-fiction prose, fictional narratives, films and material culture. In addition, students will also learn how to use "appeals of logos", "pathos", and "ethos" in their writing to construct more persuasive arguments. By highlighting the ways in which arguments can be found in "everything" and "everywhere", students in this class will acquire an understanding of how arguments impact and structure their day to day lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 020, REC
Section 020 and 021 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP Office for a Permission.

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 021, REC
Section 020 and 021 are restricted to CSP students. Contact the CSP Office for a Permission.

Instructor: Tessier,Randall L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 022, REC

Instructor: Knuth,Aric David

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to make you a better writer by focusing on 1. the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and usage, 2. different rhetorical strategies for successful argumentation, and 3. the workshopping of your own and your peers' work to practice being a thorough editor and reviser of draft material. The course culminates in individual study of a US Supreme Court case of your choosing.

You will do lots of writing in this class, since *practicing* writing is one of the best ways to *learn* about writing. You will also read some published essays by professional writers, since reading others' writing and thinking about how it works and has been put together can teach you things about writing that no class or writer's manual can teach you. And you will do a lot of writing about writing — one of the only ways to raise your level of awareness about how language works to communicate accurate messages to your readers. Check this site later in the month to find out about required texts for the course. And in the meantime, please don't email me with questions that might otherwise wait for the first day of class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 023, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 024, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 025, REC

Instructor: Gunsberg,Benjamin Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

These days, the word "argument" often brings to mind notions of confrontation and heated debate between two parties, each of whom is intent on challenging their opponent's mind. But classical thinkers, writing over two thousand years ago, had a much more robust understanding of argument: for them, arguments were means of inquiry, ways of exploring and testing out ideas and interrogating one's own beliefs.

Thinkers like Aristotle and Cicero recognized that individuals needed tools to craft logical and compelling arguments, so they taught their students rhetoric — the practice of discovering the appropriate argument for any situation. "Rhetoric," as contemporary rhetoricians Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawee have noted, "helped people to choose the best course of action when they disagreed about important political, religious, or social issues."

Ancient rhetoricians also acknowledged that argument can alter peoples' convictions and even, on occasion, move them to action. The old children's rhyme about "sticks and stones" simply isn't true — words do hurt. Words also, however, heal. Language, in short, can be used in powerful ways, and learning the art of rhetoric involves learning how to control that power.

In this course, we will study the theories that ancient and contemporary rhetoricians developed in an attempt to learn how to craft effective and powerful arguments of our own, not simply as a means of confronting opponents but also as a means of inquiry, a means of discovering and building knowledge about ourselves and the world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 026, REC

Instructor: Fulcher,Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We will examine the origins and approaches to modern argument, beginning with Aristotelian oral and written models and ending with a discussion of how visual components and simultaneity of media have both adopted and complicated these classic rhetorical approaches to persuasion. Recommended for students of visual, written or musical arts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 027, REC

Instructor: Pomerantz,Sharon J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

As the title suggests, this class will explore the different ways we use argument in our personal and public lives. We will look at different ways to structure written arguments; what constitutes an argument — sometimes a personal story, for instance, is in itself an argument — and how to use other people's arguments to strengthen your own. Though this is a writing class, a big part of what we will do here involves reading and interpreting different kinds of essays by other writers — both those of published authors and the work of your classmates — because I believe that students learn and come to understand what is good writing, first and foremost, by reading. We will also look at articles that discuss controversial topics; these articles are not necessarily arguments, but may raise questions and inspire argument. Expect to read approximately 50-77pages per week. This is a class where it can only help you to be opinionated!

I highly recommend that students taking this course try to read a daily newspaper, either on-line or in hard copy. You can read the New York Times on-line every day for FREE by signing up at Nytimes.com. Some of the best ideas for arguments will come to you via periodicals. It is hard to argue about anything if you don't know what's going on in the world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 028, REC

Instructor: Beitler III,James Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The word "argument" in our culture often brings to mind notions of confrontation and heated debate between two parties, each of whom is intent on changing their opponent's mind. But classical thinkers, writing over two thousand years ago, had a much more robust understanding of argument: for them, arguments were means of inquiry, ways of exploring and testing out ideas and interrogating one's own beliefs.

Thinkers like Aristotle and Cicero recognized that individuals needed tools to craft logical and compelling arguments, so they taught their students rhetoric — the practice of discovering the appropriate argument for any situation. "Rhetoric," as contemporary rhetoricians Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawhee have noted, "helped people to choose the best course of action when they disagreed about important political, religious, or social issues."

Ancient rhetoricians also acknowledged that argument can alter peoples' convictions and even, on occasion, move them to action. The old children's rhyme about "sticks & stones" simply isn't true — words do hurt. Words also, however, alleviate hurt. Language, in short, can be used in powerful ways, and learning the art of rhetoric involves learning how to control that power.

In this course, we will study the theories that ancient and contemporary rhetoricians developed in an attempt to learn how to craft effective and powerful arguments of our own, not simply as a means of confronting opponents but also as a means of inquiry, a means of discovering and building knowledge about ourselves and the world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 029, REC
Education

Instructor: Morris,Karen Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this section of ENGLISH 225, we will focus on the theme of Education. As students and a teacher, we are surrounded by the educational system everyday, but it is easy to gloss over the details of education, the assumptions behind it, and the role of those people who make up the educational system — students, teachers, community. In this course, I hope that we can examine something that is such a large part of our lives.

Possible avenues of discussion include: Who has the right to an education? What is a quality education? What is the purpose of education? Does the current educational system need to be fixed? How? What responsibilities do teachers have in the educational process? What responsibilities do students have in the educational process? Readings may include the following authors and writings: Jonathan Kozol Brown v. Board of Education Theodore Sizer Paulo Freire San Antonio v. Rodriguez Foucault Horace Mann E.D. Hirsch Maria Montessori

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 030, REC

Instructor: Hutton,Elizabeth Bachrach

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

All good writing is, in one way or another, provocative — it seeks to move its reader in a new direction, to propose a new perspective, to outline a new set of problems. As this upper level writing course will illustrate, writing that is explicitly argumentative is explicitly provocative.

Our course work, then, will emphasize the singularity of each writer's point of view, and will focus on the production of writing that not only convinces, but that also shakes up, however subtly, the status quo — precisely, thoughtfully, thoroughly and originally. Through a variety of small and large writing assignments, we will craft essays that range from the single-minded persuasion to the more even-handed dialogue; from the evaluative to the more objectively analytical; and from the personal to the more largely political. Lively engagement with ideas and with each other will be required, as will strong opinions and a willingness to work outside your habits.

Readings will include Plato's Symposium, Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel Persepolis, and a selection of shorter essays — some classic, some more contemporary — from the Norton Reader.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 031, REC

Instructor: Frever,Trinna

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The term "argument" is often maligned in contemporary culture, used synonymously with "fight," and implying aggression, confrontation, or rudeness. Yet argument is also a form of expression that has a long and distinguished history, as well as a set of well-documented structures and strategies. It is the latter type of argument that will be explored, analyzed, and undertaken here in Argumentative Writing.

In this course, we will expand on the composition skills acquired in English 124/5, emphasizing writing with advanced argumentative strategies and rhetorical techniques. We will analyze the construction of arguments in verbal, written, and visual forms, and create written arguments that both reflect on and utilize the techniques studied. We may also spend time discussing common logical fallacies, accurate interpretation and use of statistical data, the concept of "discourse" and "discourse community," and the relationship between cognitive processes and written structure. Texts will range from Aristotelian commentaries to contemporary advertisements, television, and film.

Drawing on the premise of our course text, _Everything's an Argument_, we will ponder whether everything, indeed, is an argument.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 032, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 033, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Instruction in composition with weekly papers and overall review of style and arrangement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 034, REC

Instructor: Reddy,Sheshalatha

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We often construct or deconstruct arguments without even realizing it. In this class, we will study texts that try to persuade either by stating their arguments explicitly (such as scholarly articles and editorials) or by couching them implicitly (such as poems, movies, and advertisements) and write pieces that do the same. By paying close attention to our own use of rhetoric (which the Oxford English Dictionary defines as "the art of using language so as to persuade or influence others" and/or "the body of rules to be observed by a speaker or writer in order that he may express himself with eloquence"), this class aims to make us self-aware of our own argumentative processes.

The aim of this class is to improve your argumentative skills in and through writing. We will therefore use the texts we study (which may include essays, newspaper articles and opinion pieces, interviews, stories, poetry, film, and/or art) to formulate ways of discussing, considering, and critiquing through both oral and written forms. There will be weekly reading assignments and writing assignments through the semester. Graded coursework includes papers and projects, numerous short assignments designed to lead up to those papers and projects, active participation in both full-class discussions and in small groups and workshops, and mini-presentations. A willingness to write, rewrite, revise, and rethink (your assumptions, premises, and conclusions) is prerequisite for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 226 — Directed Writing
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Barron,Paul Douglas

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The aim of this course is to provide students (who may have diverse professional goals) a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of professional writing. You will have the opportunity to become experienced in all the stages of the writing process — including planning and development, drafting and revision, collaboration, and research. In the creation of professional documents you will find it necessary to make choices about audience and purpose, rhetorical strategy, organization, ethical and legal considerations, document design, and style. Written assignments are designed to prompt you to produce some of the following sorts of documents you might encounter in business and industry: letters, memos, emails, job application materials, proposals, reports, instructions, manuals, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Sassi,Kelly Jean

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Technical communication is the study and practice of how best to convey information to multiple audiences with different goals and needs. In this class you not only learn how to research, organize, and present information, but also how to write effectively, participate in group collaboration, and use various technologies to support your communication efforts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Harp,Nicholas Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The aims of this course are twofold: to improve the stylistic and mechanical craft of your writing, and to introduce you to the genres and forms of professional written work. Students will study not only the "black and white" format of an array of business documents (proposals, memos, reports, letters, resumes) but also the unique preparations and stylistic expectations of these genres. In the interest of improving essential writing skills and preparing you for future schooling, we will also devote time to the type of personal statements graduate and professional schools require in their application process.

Regular written assignments will require students to create sample documents for a range of professional settings; occasional readings and discussions will increase our understanding of audience, rhetoric, and style. Students should expect individual as well as collaborative work, regular written and reading assignments, and one group presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Thomson,Heather E

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This is an intensive writing course focused on the process of creating effective prose in professional contexts. Though "professional writing" may sound formulaic (and there are, indeed, certain formats and patterns to learn), there is still a lot of room for creativity, critical thinking, and decision-making as you produce various texts. Notions of audience and purpose will be especially important, and assignments for this course will allow you to practice and experiment with writing a wide variety of texts. Work will be done both individually and in groups; attendance and participation are mandatory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 005, REC

Instructor: David,Ashley

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This intensive writing course focuses on the process for communicating effectively in professional contexts. Students will work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop project-based assignments relevant to the work world. The philosophical heart of the course is the notion that thinking critically and writing well in professional contexts will greatly enhance your success — whether your field is biotechnology, investment banking, antique imports, medicine, arts, or education — and further, that good thinking and writing result from sound and repeatable processes.

In your work to secure an understanding of successful communication practices for business, you will be required to read and discuss assigned readings, participate in in-class exercises and group projects, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers in a workshop setting, and produce a portfolio of work that demonstrates a thoughtful engagement with the material and cumulative learning over the course of the semester. Participation and disciplined study are essential, and attendance is mandatory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Barron,Paul Douglas

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The aim of this course is to provide students (who may have diverse professional goals) a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of professional writing. You will have the opportunity to become experienced in all the stages of the writing process — including planning and development, drafting and revision, collaboration, and research. In the creation of professional documents you will find it necessary to make choices about audience and purpose, rhetorical strategy, organization, ethical and legal considerations, document design, and style. Written assignments are designed to prompt you to produce some of the following sorts of documents you might encounter in business and industry: letters, memos, emails, job application materials, proposals, reports, instructions, manuals, and oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 007, REC

Instructor: David,Ashley

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This intensive writing course focuses on the process for communicating effectively in professional contexts. Students will work closely with their peers and the instructor to develop project-based assignments relevant to the work world. The philosophical heart of the course is the notion that thinking critically and writing well in professional contexts will greatly enhance your success — whether your field is biotechnology, investment banking, antique imports, medicine, arts, or education — and further, that good thinking and writing result from sound and repeatable processes.

In your work to secure an understanding of successful communication practices for business, you will be required to read and discuss assigned readings, participate in in-class exercises and group projects, thoughtfully critique the work of your peers in a workshop setting, and produce a portfolio of work that demonstrates a thoughtful engagement with the material and cumulative learning over the course of the semester. Participation and disciplined study are essential, and attendance is mandatory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 008, REC

Instructor: Rubadeau,Patrice Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Texts:
The Business Writer's Companion, 8th Edition; Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, Walter E. Oliu
The American Heritage College Dictionary, 4rd Edition, hard cover
CTools documents

In Professional Writing, we will talk about the differences between academic discourse and business writing, keeping in mind that the two most important points of academic writing — audience and purpose — also apply here. To achieve the result you want from a business communication, you will need to know your audience and your purpose, and you will need to design your documents with your audience and purpose in mind. Class discussions and peer evaluations of your drafts will help you produce effective documents.

This course will focus in part on professional examples and in part on student writings, which will be discussed in small-group workshops. I do not plan to lecture at any great length, and you will not have to laboriously scribble notes during each class. Rather, we will have a semester-long discussion about writing and, more importantly, about rewriting — the key to successful writing.

Because the class has a workshop component, be prepared to talk (when it's your turn, of course). Your participation in class discussion is vital. Vigorous (that is, helpful and friendly) discussion is not only fun but also a relatively painless way to learn. From our discussions, we (and I do mean we because I will be learning from you, my students) will learn not only about writing well but also about how our opinions and our styles of writing affect others in ways we might not previously have considered.

The requirements for the class include various professional documents, collaborative-writing assignments, and several presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Harp,Nicholas Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The aims of this course are twofold: to improve the stylistic and mechanical craft of your writing, and to introduce you to the genres and forms of professional written work. Students will study not only the "black and white" format of an array of business documents (proposals, memos, reports, letters, resumes) but also the unique preparations and stylistic expectations of these genres. In the interest of improving essential writing skills and preparing you for future schooling, we will also devote time to the type of personal statements graduate and professional schools require in their application process.

Regular written assignments will require students to create sample documents for a range of professional settings; occasional readings and discussions will increase our understanding of audience, rhetoric, and style. Students should expect individual as well as collaborative work, regular written and reading assignments, and one group presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Rubadeau,Patrice Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Texts The Business Writer's Companion, 8th Edition; Gerald J. Alred, Charles T. Brusaw, Walter E. Oliu The American Heritage College Dictionary, 4rd Edition, hard cover CTools documents

In Professional Writing, we will talk about the differences between academic discourse and business writing, keeping in mind that the two most important points of academic writing — audience and purpose — also apply here. To achieve the result you want from a business communication, you will need to know your audience and your purpose, and you will need to design your documents with your audience and purpose in mind. Class discussions and peer evaluations of your drafts will help you produce effective documents.

This course will focus in part on professional examples and in part on student writings, which will be discussed in small-group workshops. I do not plan to lecture at any great length, and you will not have to laboriously scribble notes during each class. Rather, we will have a semester-long discussion about writing and, more importantly, about rewriting―the key to successful writing.

Because the class has a workshop component, be prepared to talk (when it's your turn, of course). Your participation in class discussion is vital. Vigorous (that is, helpful and friendly) discussion is not only fun but also a relatively painless way to learn. From our discussions, we (and I do mean we because I will be learning from you, my students) will learn not only about writing well but also about how our opinions and our styles of writing affect others in ways we might not previously have considered.

The requirements for the class include various professional documents, collaborative-writing assignments, and several presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 229 — Professional Writing
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Goodwin,Valerie Tiniece

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course focuses on meeting the writing demands of professional writing, namely in the business world. While the class emphasizes writing, it is also attentive to the influence of technology on the genre, and relies heavily on the use of computers (the class is held in a computer classroom).

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 001, REC
coming of age story

Instructor: George,Jacqueline

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course, we will consider the history of the coming of age story, which has become a staple of popular books and movies (think Dead Poets Society, Good Will Hunting, or Garden State). Coming of age stories are so familiar that, at best, some readers take them for granted and, at worst, some readers dismiss them as naïve or simplistic. In this class, we will look at coming of age stories more critically by considering their forms, narrative structures, styles, and themes, as well as the cultural values and social contexts that inform them.

We will develop techniques for analyzing fiction that reveal the complex, interesting, and sometimes surprising elements of novels and short stories. Our driving questions of the course will include the following: What does it mean to come of age? How does the coming of age story, or bildungsroman, represent the process of growing up? How do notions of maturity and adulthood change across time, place, race, and gender?

The course syllabus will span a wide era, from the 18th century up to and including the 21st century, allowing us to consider the changes in the bildungsroman across time. We will read works from a variety of European and American authors, including (but not limited to): Charlotte Brontë, Eudora Welty, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Zora Neale Hurston, Sherman Alexie, and Jonathan Safran Foer. We will also consider how the coming of age story has been represented in film and in literature for young people.

Course requirements will include weekly readings, class participation, 1-2 page weekly response papers, two 5-7 page critical papers, an annotated bibliography, and a class presentation.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 002, REC
Let's Burn this Place Down or at Least Go Get a Drink

Instructor: Bunn,Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this section of English 230 — "Let's Burn this Place Down or at Least Go Get a Drink" — we will read some of the best-written novels and short stories of the past century in order to better understand how fictional characters deal with dissatisfaction they feel in their lives. Why does Tyler Durden fight in "Fight Club"? Why do the Lisbon girls commit suicide in "The Virgin Suicides"? Why does Sonny have the blues in "Sonny's Blues"? These are just a few of the questions we will attempt to answer while also considering the ways that real people — you and I — cope with the moments of dissatisfaction we feel. This is a chance to read (and talk about) beautiful writing involving characters who grapple with what it means to be human, and for us to see what we can learn from their struggles.

You don't need to be an English major or creative writer to take this course. The only prerequisites are a desire to better understand why we act the ways we do, and a desire to discuss great fiction in class.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 003, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

An intensive study of prose fiction, American, English, and Continental, usually including representative short stories and novels of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 004, REC
Time Travel in Short Fiction and Novels

Instructor: Ambrose,Laura Anne

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What does it mean to time travel? How might we understand journeys through time as enabling new perspectives on the past, on the role of memory, and on our own narratives of history? The literary world, in particular, has produced a wealth of textual material in response to the idea of time travel; various works of Utopian literature, the Gothic, fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, post-modern literature and historical fiction all seem to invoke or respond to notions of temporal journeying. While H.G. Wells called the very concept a "sociological fable," his own turn of the twentieth century literary "invention", The Time Machine, played a critical part in nurturing the climate of thinkers, writers, and scientists interested in the possibility of traveling through time. In this course, we will explore the ways in which various novelists and short story writers have utilized "time travel" in their work — both as a thematic center and a narrative device. In addition, we will consider the evolution of each genre (short fiction and novels) alongside larger conceptual questions of time, science, myth, history, and narrative.

Throughout the term, we will read a number of short stories such as Washington Irving's tale of the alcohol-induced travels of Rip Van Winkle, Henry James's ghost story, "The Jolly Corner," as well as others by Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, Jorge Luis Borges, and Barry Lopez. Novels like Alan Lightman's Einstein's Dreams, H. G. Wells's The Time Machine, and Octavia Butler's Kindred will also prove central to our investigation of both how and what it means to time travel. Some additional questions that will inform our discussion of these texts may include: How do vivid memories produce an experience akin to that of time travel? In what ways does time travel allow writers to offer critical perspectives on their communities — past and present? How might time travel fiction present an argument to its readers on the importance of understanding history anew? Are there particular narrative forms that resemble, enable, or seem to respond to chrono-journeying? How do these formal elements contribute to or affect the story at work? How might the World Wide Web and its collapsed sense of time and space resemble elements of time travel? Course requirements include regular entries in an active reading journal, participation in online discussion threads, a group presentation based on online discussions, several 2-page response papers (response papers will not be due on weeks with other written assignments), three longer assignments (5-page argumentative paper, 6-7 page argumentative paper, and a 3-page creative assignment), and five in-class quizzes (2 announced in advance). In addition, students will be responsible for composing peer-review responses for the two longer paper assignments. Active participation and regular attendance is required.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 005, REC
A Usable Present: 21st Century American Fiction

Instructor: Mrozowski,Daniel J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What can fiction tell us about America in the first decade of the 21st century? In a crowded field of blogs, 24-hour news channels, Youtube, Netflix, Playstation, satellite radio, TIVO, and Ipods, what particular pleasures and pains can we find in short stories and novels? This class will examine works of American fiction from the last six years in order to introduce two objects of study: the forms of current fiction and the shapes of contemporary America itself. To find these objects in the bright and noisy neon garden of culture, we'll foreground the categories themselves: what is a "novel?" How is it different from a "short story?" Why label either of them "American?" What is useful about these categories? To answer these questions, we'll look for the problems, themes, questions and values emphasized by current writers; we'll trace the relationships between fiction and the historical moments in which it is written; and we'll debate the choices writers make in point-of-view, plot, characterization, setting, and symbolism. We may read novels by Philip Roth, Marilynne Robnson, and Ha Jin; we may consider short stories by Louise Erdrich, Jim Shephard, and Edward P. Jones. Assignments may include weekly one-page responses, two analytic essays, and a book review.

ENGLISH 230 — Introduction to Short Story and Novel
Section 006, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

An intensive study of prose fiction, American, English, and Continental, usually including representative short stories and novels of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Makman,Lisa Hermine

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This class introduces students to a range of literary genres and interpretive methods. Students will begin to develop a critical vocabulary related to some of the key practices and debates that define the discipline of English. They will also develop an awareness of the rigors and potential pleasures entailed in reading, discussing, and writing about a variety of literary texts. The topics to be discussed include genre, literary movements, the relationship between literature and history, the concepts of "high" and "low" art, the borderlines between literary and visual arts, and the transposition of stories between different languages and different media. Among the works to be discussed are Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Conan Doyle's The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Satrapi's Persepolis, and Rushdie's Haroun and the Sea of Stories. The course prepares students for the English concentration as well as any work in the humanities that involves the interpretation of texts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Marshall,Brenda K

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Our method throughout the semester will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] Literature?" Through close readings of novels, plays, a short story, and the occasional poem, we will work to develop a critical vocabulary appropriate for literary studies. Analysis of secondary sources (assigned essays) will allow us to identify various theoretical and interpretive strategies. We will be reading a number of literary "classics" (William Shakespeare's King Lear, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway) in conjunction with modern or contemporary novels that "revisit" these "classics" (Jane Smiley's One Thousand Acres, Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, and Michael Cunningham's The Hours, respectively). We will bring our semester-long discussion of intertextuality to a close with Ron Hansen's novel, Atticus, as we analyze the ways in which our interpretation of this novel is complicated and enhanced by preceding literary works such as Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana.

Students will write two short (one-page) papers, two longer papers, and will be responsible for one in-class presentation.


Estimated Price of books: $120

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Marshall,Brenda K

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Our method throughout the semester will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] Literature?" Through close readings of novels, plays, a short story, and the occasional poem, we will work to develop a critical vocabulary appropriate for literary studies. Analysis of secondary sources (assigned essays) will allow us to identify various theoretical and interpretive strategies. We will be reading a number of literary "classics" (William Shakespeare's King Lear, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway) in conjunction with modern or contemporary novels that "revisit" these "classics" (Jane Smiley's One Thousand Acres, Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, and Michael Cunningham's The Hours, respectively). We will bring our semester-long discussion of intertextuality to a close with Ron Hansen's novel, Atticus, as we analyze the ways in which our interpretation of this novel is complicated and enhanced by preceding literary works such as Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana.

Students will write two short (one-page) papers, two longer papers, and will be responsible for one in-class presentation.


Estimated Price of books: $120

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Najita,Susan Y; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course introduces students to key terms and practices in the study of literature. In this section of 'What is literature?' we will combine the study of various literary genres such as poetry, short story, novel, play, and film with an introduction to critical approaches to literary analysis. We will read Whitman, Blake, Keats, Cisneros, Joyce, Wharton, Morrison, and Mann and view the films Bladerunner and Death in Venice. We will familiarize ourselves with issues relating to form, gender, sexual and ethnic identity, colonialism, and commodity culture.

Expectations: 3 papers, weekly quizzes, presentations, enthusiastic participation, and regular attendance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What is literature?
And what defines a work as "American" or not?

Before we can even begin to consider these impossibly huge questions, we'll have to examine what we mean by the very words "American" and "literature."

What isn't literature?
Is this an important distinction?

Our discussions will lead us to consider a series of related questions.

  • What does it mean to interpret literature?
  • How can we use readings of literary works to make arguments?
  • Why do we read literature according to national traditions and genres?
  • What are the real and imagined boundaries of "America"?
  • What are the relationships among the U.S. nation and the poetic, rhetorical, and fictive "Americas"?

We'll approach these questions through an extraordinary set of texts— novels, stories, poems, drama, graphic novels, and film — written by "American" authors of diverse origins. The syllabus may include works by Charles Chesnutt, Ralph Ellison, Milt Gross, Jessica Hagedorn, Edward P. Jones, Tony Kushner, Jonathan Lethem, Herman Melville, John Sayles, Chris Ware, and Walt Whitman. Course requirements include three short essays and two exams as well as active participation in discussions. Registered students must attend the first two class meetings or contact the professor in order to remain in the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 006, REC
U.S. Fiction and the Practice of Close Reading

Instructor: Sanchez,Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This section of "What Is Literature?" will focus upon U.S. fiction and the practice of close reading (detailed analysis of a text's language and structure). We will read a range of short stories and novels from the 19th century to the present day, including works by Jhumpa Lahiri, Ana Castillo, Ralph Ellison, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Assignments will consist of several short essays and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 007, REC
Telling Stories: the Art of Narration

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

We will want, in this class, to think about how authors, these ingenious writers, get their characters to "speak" to us as we read. For example a character in Margaret Atwood's, ALIAS GRACE stimulates us to consider that: "when you are in the middle of a story it isn't a story at all, but only a confusion; a dark roaring, a blindness, a wreckage of shattered glass and splintered wood; like a house in a whirlwind…." Maybe she is right, maybe the middle of telling a story is like the middle of an experience in life: we can't always know the significance til we move away from the center of that experience. Whatever we may discover, our work will depend on the process of critical analysis that allows us to understand how these contemporary authors are able to organize what Atwood calls "confusion" into meaningful coherence.

We will mainly be reading and discussing 20th-Century literature, and although the final reading list is still to be determined, the following authors will be considered for inclusion: Margaret Atwood, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, John Irving, Michael Cunningham, Laura Kasischke, Isabel Allende, and Jeffry Eugenides. I will be sending out the syllabus during winter break.

Requirements: short, exploratory essays throughout the semester with a longer analytical essay at the conclusion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 008, REC
What is Literature: Race and Narrative

Instructor: See,Maria S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

An introduction to narrative theory, critical race theory, and feminist cultural analysis alongside literature mostly by U.S. writers of color, this course focuses on the construction and distortion of three basic aspects of narrative — perspective, sequence, and setting — in order to analyze a variety of writers' experimentation with visual, temporal, and spatial order. As we will pay much attention to the visual aspects of the texts at hand, our emphasis on narrative prose will form the basis for more wide-ranging discussions and analyses of other mediums such as visual art, museum exhibitions, and film and video.

Possible authors include: Fae Ng, Jessica Hagedorn, Sigrid Nunez, Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Nella Larsen, James Weldon Johnson, Edith Maude Eaton, Kate Chopin, Mark Twain, Lonny Kaneko, Peter Ho Davies, Jamaica Kincaid.

Workload: several short responses, two essays, and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 009, REC
Honors

Instructor: Hartley,Lucy

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

This course will introduce students to major works of the twentieth century, which have been important in breaking new ground for the study of literature; for example, Eric Auerbach's Mimesis, Northrop Frye's Anatomy of Criticism, Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish, Jacques Lacan's On Feminine Sexuality, and Edward Said's Orientalism. We will discuss the nature of literature — its scope and limitations — and evaluate different models of literary analysis in order to consider the following questions: How do we interpret? What is the purpose of interpretation? What value can we place on our interpretation (or critical analysis)? How do we understand power? How do we deal with (read and intepret) desire? What happens when we historicise knowledge?

Each class will begin with an oral presentation, which sets the agenda for discussion and identifies key questions and/or problems for analysis and group work. Students will write weekly response papers (except during the week when they are giving a presentation); and two formal essays of 5-6 pages will also be required. Class attendance is important and will form part of the final grade.A detailed reading list will be available in December (before the end of the Fall semester); however, it will help your preparation to read Terry Eagleton's Literary Theory: An Introduction, 2nd ed. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1996).

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 239 — What is Literature?
Section 010, REC
American Stories

Instructor: Williams,Kelly Diane

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course serves as a gateway course for prospective English concentrators. Traveling across and between time periods, genres, themes, and ideas, we will explore literary works (ranging from a slave narrative to poetry) written by a diverse group of American authors over the past 150 years. This anti-chronological approach is designed to help us generate creative connections and juxtapositions among texts that will, in turn, help shape our larger ongoing discussion about what it means to "do" literary studies. Over the course of the semester, we will think not only about what constitutes "literature," but also about why and how we read it. In order to interrogate the status of literature — and to consider the milieu in which narratives are produced and ultimately understood — we will work to situate the literature we read in a variety of cultural and critical contexts.

At the end of this course, students will be able to: identify and apply various theoretical approaches to literature, including (but not limited to) the method of close reading outlined by New Criticism, the contextual issues considered by New Historicism, and the use of gender as a category of analysis promoted by Feminist Literary Criticism; draw on a growing critical vocabulary of literary terms and key debates in literary studies in both discussion and writing; identify and analyze the qualities of various literary genres; position their ideas and arguments within the larger, ongoing critical conversations within the discipline; and, perhaps most importantly, to gain an appreciation for the rigors and pleasures of reading, discussing, and writing about literature.

Texts will be available at Shaman Drum bookstore on State Street. If you choose to purchase your books elsewhere, you must be sure to acquire the same editions that I have chosen for the class (I have included publisher and ISBN [International Standard Book Number] information below). There will also be a coursepack containing short stories, poems, and literary criticism available at Accu-Copy on William St. near Cottage Inn Restaurant. In addition, we will view the film Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle in class.

Texts: M. H. Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms (Heinle, ISBN 1413002188) Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark (Vintage, ISBN 0679745424) Sandra Cisneros, The House on Mango Street (Vintage, ISBN 0679734775) Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex (Picador, ISBN 0312422156) Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Penguin, ISBN 0140437959) Kate Chopin, The Awakening (Penguin, ISBN 0142437328) Carlos Bulosan, America Is in the Heart (University of Washington, ISBN 029595289X) Nella Larsen, Passing (Penguin, ISBN 0141180250) Tony Kushner, Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia On National Themes (Theater Communications Group, ISBN 1559362316)

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Cureton,Richard D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of the poetic symbolism, rhetoric, language, and rhythm to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Poems, Poets, Poetry by Helen Vendler. For the latter, we will use a coursepack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Durgin,Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic tools required to read poetry critically, and hence with deeper appreciation for the variety of forms and purposes we assign to it. Most of the course is spent practicing close reading and listening skills through examples from Elizabethan, Romantic, and Modern periods to the varieties of contemporary poetic practice. However, we will reserve our final unit to focus on the emerging field of digital poetry. This is a reading-, writing-, and participation-intensive course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Gregerson,Linda K

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

We live in a period of immensely rich poetic production in the United States: men and women of widely divergent cultural backgrounds, aesthetic persuasions, and registers of "voice" are producing lyric poetry of unprecedented variety and abundance. But how is a reader to find foothold among the hundreds of literary magazines and book publications that clamor for attention? How to negotiate between private pleasure (and solace and reflection) on the one hand and this jubilant (and contentious and contradictory) marketplace of verse on the other? How to find a listening post midst all this noise? This course is not conceived as an historical survey, but we will spend approximately half the term examining poems from another period of intense lyric production — the 16th and 17th centuries in England — because these poems provide a particularly vivid introduction to the resources, and resourceful violations, of traditional poetic form. In the second half of the term, we will read and discuss and listen to a group of recent American poems, ones I think are particularly good at suggesting the variety of contemporary pleasures, good too at constructing the margin of silence that poetry, like other forms of music, requires in order to be heard. From this modest, two-pronged historical perspective, we will explore some highly immodest questions about poetic form: How does it make meaning? How does it sound? What is its relationship to human imagination?

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Smith,Macklin

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in some fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at — and hear — poems, we'll consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene including song and hip-hop. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry and an Anthology, both in coursepack format. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Powers,Lyall H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Poetry at its best is a mode of human communication, both vocal and scriptural, the aim of which is not the imparting of information per se — like "Directions" on a soup can or "Instructions" for an erector set — but rather intellectual and emotional engagement with some important human concern like love, folly, death, fun, etc. We will begin by looking at kinds of poems and how they work — like learning the rules and techniques of basketball or chess or dancing (and other pleasurable activities); then we will look at the range of treatment given those "human concerns" in poems written over the centuries. We will consider particularly how poems communicate what they want to engage us in and entertain us with. We will discuss these matters in class, write about them in a few short exercises (2 pp. each) and a couple of little essays (5 pp. each), and commit some good poetic example (say 50 lines) to memory. The course has little practical use: it just helps you understand human creatures (including yourself) and how they interact with each other — merely educational. Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter ed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 007, REC

Instructor: White,Gillian Cahill

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course, students analyze a variety of poems written in English from the 16th century to the present in order to become skilled readers and to address such questions as:

  • What is poetry?
  • What makes it a distinct literary and social practice?
  • What kinds of knowledge does it produce?
  • Who speaks in a poem?

We closely study a range of poetic conventions and techniques — sound, forms, meter, lineation, allusion, and figurative language — that contribute to what a poem seems to say, and explore the literary-historical contexts in which certain poetic techniques and themes have emerged, flourished, and/or passed out of favor. Our chief readings will come from a standard poetry anthology, but will include hand-outs as well. All students will be expected to attend class regularly, and to engage actively in both class discussion and the assigned readings. Written work consists of a series of short papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 008, REC

Instructor: Taylor,Karla T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course aims to teach you how to read poetry with pleasure and understanding. We will read poems from several modes (lyric, narrative, and dramatic), genres (e.g., sonnets, and dramatic monologues), and traditions from some of the earliest poetry written in English to some written in the 21st century. Its broadest goal is to foster greater understanding of the ways in which formal patterns help to shape the meanings we can discover in the poems we read. Reading, writing, and other assignments will be aimed toward helping you

  1. to recognize formal patterns (of sound, words, syntax, rhythm, meter and others), figures of speech, voice, and more;
  2. to develop the skill of reading closely, with attention to these aspects of poetry and their effects on meaning; and
  3. to acquire a technical vocabulary for talking and writing about poetic form and meaning.

Written assignments will include frequent short responses, several short interpretative essays, and a journal.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Durgin,Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic tools required to read poetry critically, and hence with deeper appreciation for the variety of forms and purposes we assign to it. Most of the course is spent practicing close reading and listening skills through examples from Elizabethan, Romantic, and Modern periods to the varieties of contemporary poetic practice. However, we will reserve our final unit to focus on the emerging field of digital poetry. This is a reading-, writing-, and participation-intensive course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 240 — Introduction to Poetry
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Bankowski,Geoffrey Martin

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course will explore the many complexities of poetry. This includes its physical and emotional causes and effects, and also the extensive technical elements and how the use of them has evolved (or not) over the centuries. Central to our efforts is a desire to develop your enjoyment of poetry while strengthening your ability to think critically about a great variety of poems. We will read many, many poems, and through class discussion and journal writing will develop a vocabulary and understanding that will allow you to better analyze, evaluate, and write clearly about poetry. And with this, our goal will be to produce discussions and essays that show the mind in motion and that go beyond the intelligence and skill of academic exercise to say something interesting and complex and useful about your subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prerequisite for concentrators in English and Honors English.

ENGLISH 245 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

ENGLISH 270 — Introduction to American Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Beauchamp,Gorman L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course will cover some of the classic works of American fiction: The Scarlet Letter, Billy Budd, Huckleberry Finn, Daisy Miller, The Red Badge of Courage, The Awakening, The Age of Innocence, The Great Gatsby, As I Lay Dying, and Their Eyes Were Watching God. There will be frequent short informal writing assignments, two 4-5 page papers, and two exams.

Approximate book cost: $70.

ENGLISH 280 — Thematic Approaches to Literature
Section 001, LEC
Chicago in Literature

Instructor: Kowalski,Rosemary Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In 1893, Chicago was host to the World's Columbian Exposition, an event celebrating the 400th anniversary of Columbus's arrival in North America. Located on the shores of Lake Michigan, "The White City," as the Fair came to be called, marked the emergence of Chicago as a world-class metropolis. Though "world-class," the town has a reputation as something else, too: a rough, tough, working-man's town, the "City of the Big Shoulders" to quote Carl Sandburg's famous phrase. Chicago is the subject of and setting for a number of writers who explore the above iconic images as well as other seemingly paradoxical features which have most recently been captured in Erik Larson's study, The Devil in the White City. We will be looking at these writers and examining their interpretations of this city and its people. Authors may include Theodore Dreiser, Nelson Algren, James T. Farrell, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Stuart Dybek, Sandra Cisneros, Sara Paretsky, and, of course, Larson. We'll also be looking at some poets (Carl Sandburg and Gwendolyn Brooks), a playwright (David Mamet), and at least one film ("The Untouchables") The class is primarily discussion, so all students are expected to fully participate every day. Requirements include weekly reading responses, a short and long paper.

ENGLISH 280 — Thematic Approaches to Literature
Section 002, LEC
Arab American Literature

Instructor: Hassouneh,Rima Saudi

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course focuses on the literature written by Arab-Americans over the last century, including short stories, novels, poetry and autobiographies. We will explore the themes of this literature as they engage with American literary and cultural traditions. We will also consider the various contexts and conditions in which this literature was produced. To some extent, this means thinking of how literature by Arab-Americans articulates with and "negotiates" the myths and ideals by which America has defined itself historically and till the present. We will get a partial sense of this when we compare Arab-American experiences and writings to those of other racial-ethnic groups in America, like Latina/os, Asian-Americans, Native Americans, and African-Americans, to whose identities experiences and ideals of migration and travel, democracy and freedom, belonging and sense of "home," and self-advancement have been central. Requirements for the course include: in-class attendance, frequent short response papers, an oral presentation, a midterm essay, and a final exam.

ENGLISH 280 — Thematic Approaches to Literature
Section 003, LEC
Native American Literature: The Great Lakes

Instructor: Noori,Margaret Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to be an introduction to Native American Literature with an emphasis on the literature of the Anishinaabe, a tribe based in the Great Lakes Region. We will examine the historical and contemporary traditions of one group in the context of Native North American Literature as a whole. Along with reading stories, plays and poems, we will learn how the Ojibwa language and Anishinaabe music and art are connected to the storytelling tradition.

ENGLISH 299 — Directed Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 305 — Introduction to Modern English
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Curzan,Anne Leslie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course introduces the systematic study of language and will give you entirely new ways to think about the English language you see and hear all around you. The course covers the many levels of structure working in language — from sounds to words to sentences to discourse — as well as the ways speakers learn and change language over time. Discussions will also focus on the social issues tied up in language, including attitudes toward dialects, the teaching of Standard English, language and gender, bilingual education, and national language policies. The focus of much of the course will be words — how they work structurally and socially. We will address questions such as: Why isn't pfigr a possible English word? Is it syllabi or syllabuses? When could boys be girls because girl meant ‘child'? Words are one of the primary building blocks of language and by studying how they work, we can gain insight into the structure and meaning of language, as well as into the social and political power we wield with words. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, three short papers, a midterm, and a final. No background in linguistics is required; the critical prerequisite for the course is genuine curiosity about the details of language.

Advisory Prerequisite: Recommended for students preparing to teach English.

ENGLISH 308 — History of the English Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 or Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 313 — Topics in Literary Studies
Section 001, LEC
Science Fiction

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams.

ENGLISH 313 — Topics in Literary Studies
Section 010, LEC
Jane Austen

Instructor: Pinch,Adela N

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

"I'd rather be reading Jane Austen" declares a popular bumper sticker. Take this course and find out why!

This course, which satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English Majors, provides an in-depth study of all six masterpieces of fiction by one of the most popular English-language novelists of all time. We will explore the stylistic innovations that make Jane Austen such an important figure in the history of the novel as a literary form. We will study her novels in relationship to their historical context (the French Revolution, changing roles of men and women) and in relation to some of the other great writers who were her contemporaries (Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Frances Burney, Evelina, Ann Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest). Lectures will also utilize multimedia to situate Austen's novels in relation to the visual arts, music, and dance of her time, as well as to analyze excerpts of recent film versions of her work.

Texts will include Austen's Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion (all Oxford UP editions, please), as well as a course pack containing excerpts from Austen's unpublished writings and other historical documents. Students will have an opportunity to conduct independent research into documents from Austen's life and times.

There will also be one 8-10 page paper, a take-home final exam, and frequent quizzes.

This course satisfies the Pre-1830 and New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 313 — Topics in Literary Studies
Section 015, LEC
Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, HU

In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

ENGLISH 315 — Women and Literature
Section 001, REC
On Being a Heroine in Twentieth Century Fiction

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course begins where my earlier course on fictional heroines of 19th century literature left off, although taking the earlier course is not a requirement for taking this one. The lot of the great heroines in 19th century fiction can be summarized in the frequency of courtship and marriage plots. Many social and economic factors prompted so many great writers of that time to portray their culture through this focus. How better to depict the uneasy relationship between the sexes! And how better to indicate the limitations imposed by the culture on roughly half its population than to demonstrate through repetition the narrowness of women's options. Even the most financially and psychologically independent of heroines, who insist they don't have to marry, do. That in most instances, the authors portray these choices as disastrous provides both the drama of these novels and their critique of the culture. But everything changes in the 20th century, right? Feminist movements bring women's right to vote and opportunities for advanced education and with these changes, women begin, in Toni Morrison's words, "to wrest choice from choicelessness." Yet, curiously, despite expanded choices, courtship and marriage plots continue to structure 20th century fiction that feature heroines. We will read Kate Chopin's The Awakening, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, Virginia Woolf's. Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse, a Ernest Hemingway and Milan Kundera short stories, Toni Morrison's Sula, Edith Konecky's Allegra Maude Goldman, Monica Ali's, Brick Lane, short works by Jhumpa Lahiri, Gish Jen, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Grace Paley, and Michael Cunningham's The Hours. . Using the heroine's place in these plots as our point of reference, we'll explore what constitutes a heroine and heroic action in 20th century fiction. Requirements: a 10-12 page annotated bibliography on some aspect of women in 20th century fiction, a 5-6 page essay, and a take-home final exam, regular attendance and active participation in class discussion.
This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement.

ENGLISH 315 — Women and Literature
Section 002, REC
American Women Writers

Instructor: Sanchez,Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course will provide a survey of women writers in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present, combining well-known authors with those who are not as well-known as they should be! We will also read works that range across fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Authors may include: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson, Zora Neale Hurston, Ana Castillo and Jhumpa Lahiri. Assignments will consist of weekly writing responses, two essays and a final exam.

This course meets the New Traditions and American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 315 — Women and Literature
Section 003, REC
Intersections: Fictions and Feminisms of the African Diaspora

Instructor: Sweeney,Megan L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Building on the idea of "intersections," this course will explore how works of fiction can contribute to an understanding of feminisms, and how various feminist perspectives can contribute to an understanding of fictional texts. Focusing on a wide range of fiction and essays by African American women, we'll examine the intersecting, often contradictory roles that race, gender, sexuality, class, and nationality have played, throughout U.S. history, in shaping how others have defined Black women and how Black women have attempted to construct their own identities through writing and creative expression. We'll situate African American women's fiction in relation to the development of feminist theory in the U.S., paying particular attention to intersections and points of tension between various forms of African American feminisms, and between the histories and aims of African American and Euro-American feminisms. As points of transnational comparison, we'll also discuss some fiction and essays by women from Senegal, Zimbabwe, and Ghana.

Addressing a spectrum of issues — including artistic expression, sexuality, violence committed by women and against women, welfare, imprisonment, religion, and genital circumcision — we'll reflect on the difficulties and possibilities entailed in trying to link women's experiences across racial, national, sexual, and class divides. We'll also consider how various texts complicate or unsettle the boundaries of categories such as "Black," "African American," "female," feminism," "authenticity," and "culture." Furthermore, we'll think about how Black women's fictional texts sometimes serve as forms of feminist theory themselves by analyzing women's varied experiences; by interrogating the political, historical, economic, social, and cultural forces that reinforce inequalities; and by imagining — and thereby helping to foster — a world in which all women can lead healthy, fulfilling lives.

Please be prepared for a challenging yet highly rewarding engagement with the course materials. Course requirements will include brief weekly writing assignments, three critical analysis essays, a group presentation, and active participation in class discussions. Registered students must attend the first two class meetings in order to remain in the class.

Required Texts:

  • Coursepack of required readings [available at Accu-Copy: 518 East William St.]
  • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself (1861)
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
  • Toni Morrison, Sula (1973)
  • Toni Morrison, Paradise (1998)
  • Gayl Jones, Eva's Man (1976)
  • Pearl Cleage, What Looks Like Crazy on an Ordinary Day (1998)
  • Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter (1983)
  • Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1988)
  • Ama Ata Aidoo, Changes: A Love Story (1991)

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 003, LEC
Imagining Wild America

Instructor: Knott Jr,John R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The course will examine a series of interrelated questions about how we imagine and live with wild nature in America, including evolving cultural attitudes toward wildness and "wilderness"; the work of managing wildness (as in Yellowstone National Park); efforts to preserve or restore wild nature; understandings of place; and the porousness of boundaries between nature and culture. Texts will include selections from Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and contemporary nature writers; Gary Snyder's The Practice of the Wild and selected poems; poetry by Mary Oliver; James Welch's evocation of Plains Indian life in his historical novel Fool's Crow; Terry Tempest Williams' Refuge; and T.C. Boyle's futuristic A Friend of the Earth. Assignments will involve a combination of paper and journal writing and a final examination.


This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 004, LEC
The Beat Generation

Instructor: Neeman,Ziv

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The course will focus on seminal works by Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs that defined the loose amalgamation of writers, artists and bohemians during the late 1940s and 1950s that came to be known as the beat generation. In order to situate their texts historically and culturally, we will examine American cold war culture and consider the ways the beats, in their life and writings, transgressed, criticized, reflected, and in some cases maintained the cultural norms and politics of the period. Questions about sexuality, gender, race, and ethnicity, as well as the emergence of the postwar counterculture, will be central to our discussion. We shall also consider the relation of the beats to some of the other important artistic movements of the period (yet to be chosen) such as bebop (jazz), abstract expressionism, method acting, or experimental film. Other beat writers we will read include: Gregory Corso, John Clellon Holmes, Leroi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Diane di Prima, and Joyce Johnson. Students in the course will write two short papers and a longer research paper. Although this is a lecture course, its size will allow class discussion; therefore, student participation is expected.


This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 317 — Literature and Culture
Section 005, LEC

Instructor: Gere,Anne Ruggles; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3
Reqs: HU

Literary readings aimed at recreating the sense of a specific culture (e.g., English Renaissance, Beat Literature, Revolutionary Ireland, Post-Colonial Africa (English-speaking). Actual content and emphasis varies from term to term. Consult the Schedule of Classes for information about each term's offerings.

ENGLISH 319 — Literature and Social Change
Section 001, LEC
1859 — A Revolution in Culture?

Instructor: Hartley,Lucy

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Five remarkable books were published in 1859, namely, Charles Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities; John Stuart Mill's On Liberty; George Eliot's Adam Bede; Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species; and Samuel Smiles's, Self-Help. Was this simply an historical coincidence or were there common concerns that linked these very different books together? This course asks precisely this question, considering the extent to which the books offer narratives of the modern subject, both as cultural category and rhetorical figures, while at the same time exploring the ways in which they address the philosophical problem of how to create an individual. Thus, we will discuss the nature and limits of individualism as expressed in different disciplinary genres (politics, fiction, science, and self-help) and imaginative forms (treatise, novel, experiment and manual).

There will be formal lectures, especially at the beginning of the course, but classes will focus on student participation via oral presentations, group work, and creative exercises, all of which will enable you to set the agenda for discussion and identify key questions and/or problems for analysis and debate. Requirements will include two short papers and an exam; and class attendance is important and will form part of the final grade.

A detailed reading list will be available in December, but the following books will be essential for your preparation: Amanda Anderson, Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001); Nancy Armstrong, How Novels Think (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005); Gillian Beer, Darwin's Plots: Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eloit, and Nineteenth-Century Fiction (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983); Lauren Goodlad, Victorian Literature and the Victorian State: Character and Governance in a Liberal Society (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003); John Kucich, Repression in Victorian Fiction (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987).

ENGLISH 319 — Literature and Social Change
Section 002, LEC
Theatre and Social Change

Instructor: Harris,Emily C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Detroit, Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Lapeer, at Henry Ford and Cooley High Schools in Detroit, or at one of five juvenile facilities.. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

ENGLISH 321 — Internship
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

The English department believes that English is one of the most versatile concentrations you can choose as an undergraduate at Michigan. We understand, too, that a number of our concentrators receive opportunities to work in various internship placements, especially over the summer months, putting their skills as writers and speakers to work in placements outside the classroom. Most businesses and organizations that allow internships require that the students receive some academic credit for their work (the students are not hired as regular employees of the company), and the English department is pleased to offer students one upper-level credit that can be counted toward an English concentration. The stipulations and requirements are as follows:

  • You must be a declared English concentrator to receive internship credit from our department.
  • You can only count one internship credit towards your English concentration.
  • This credit counts as elective credit; it cannot be used to fulfill the Department's distribution requirements.
  • You must apply for the internship at least three weeks before beginning your internship.
  • To receive credit for the internship, you will register for English 321 in the term following your internship (this is typically done in the fall following spring or summer internship work).
  • You are also required to submit a brief (c.5 pages) essay describing the kind of work you performed in your internship and talking a little bit about what that work meant to you. You should also include contact information for your internship. If you do not write up a description of your internship work for the department, you cannot receive credit for your work.
  • We ask that, when you have completed your internship, the organization for which you interned also submit a brief letter to the Department describing your work.
  • We are compiling a library of successful internship placements. If it is appropriate, we will be contacting the organization for which you did your internship and asking them if they would be willing to accept other interns from our department on a case-by-case basis.

You may pick up a registration form for internship credit at the main office of the English Department, 3187 Angell Hall. This form is also available on-line from our download forms section.

The English Department is delighted that you are thinking of ways to put your communication skills to work in situations outside the classroom. Best of luck to you.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in English.

ENGLISH 321 — Internship
Section 033, IND

Instructor: Curzan,Anne Leslie

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

The English department believes that English is one of the most versatile concentrations you can choose as an undergraduate at Michigan. We understand, too, that a number of our concentrators receive opportunities to work in various internship placements, especially over the summer months, putting their skills as writers and speakers to work in placements outside the classroom. Most businesses and organizations that allow internships require that the students receive some academic credit for their work (the students are not hired as regular employees of the company), and the English department is pleased to offer students one upper-level credit that can be counted toward an English concentration. The stipulations and requirements are as follows:

  • You must be a declared English concentrator to receive internship credit from our department.
  • You can only count one internship credit towards your English concentration.
  • This credit counts as elective credit; it cannot be used to fulfill the Department's distribution requirements.
  • You must apply for the internship at least three weeks before beginning your internship.
  • To receive credit for the internship, you will register for English 321 in the term following your internship (this is typically done in the fall following spring or summer internship work).
  • You are also required to submit a brief (c.5 pages) essay describing the kind of work you performed in your internship and talking a little bit about what that work meant to you. You should also include contact information for your internship. If you do not write up a description of your internship work for the department, you cannot receive credit for your work.
  • We ask that, when you have completed your internship, the organization for which you interned also submit a brief letter to the Department describing your work.
  • We are compiling a library of successful internship placements. If it is appropriate, we will be contacting the organization for which you did your internship and asking them if they would be willing to accept other interns from our department on a case-by-case basis.

You may pick up a registration form for internship credit at the main office of the English Department, 3187 Angell Hall. This form is also available on-line from our download forms section.

The English Department is delighted that you are thinking of ways to put your communication skills to work in situations outside the classroom. Best of luck to you.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in English.

ENGLISH 321 — Internship
Section 045, IND

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

The English department believes that English is one of the most versatile concentrations you can choose as an undergraduate at Michigan. We understand, too, that a number of our concentrators receive opportunities to work in various internship placements, especially over the summer months, putting their skills as writers and speakers to work in placements outside the classroom. Most businesses and organizations that allow internships require that the students receive some academic credit for their work (the students are not hired as regular employees of the company), and the English department is pleased to offer students one upper-level credit that can be counted toward an English concentration. The stipulations and requirements are as follows:

  • You must be a declared English concentrator to receive internship credit from our department.
  • You can only count one internship credit towards your English concentration.
  • This credit counts as elective credit; it cannot be used to fulfill the Department's distribution requirements.
  • You must apply for the internship at least three weeks before beginning your internship.
  • To receive credit for the internship, you will register for English 321 in the term following your internship (this is typically done in the fall following spring or summer internship work).
  • You are also required to submit a brief (c.5 pages) essay describing the kind of work you performed in your internship and talking a little bit about what that work meant to you. You should also include contact information for your internship. If you do not write up a description of your internship work for the department, you cannot receive credit for your work.
  • We ask that, when you have completed your internship, the organization for which you interned also submit a brief letter to the Department describing your work.
  • We are compiling a library of successful internship placements. If it is appropriate, we will be contacting the organization for which you did your internship and asking them if they would be willing to accept other interns from our department on a case-by-case basis.

You may pick up a registration form for internship credit at the main office of the English Department, 3187 Angell Hall. This form is also available on-line from our download forms section.

The English Department is delighted that you are thinking of ways to put your communication skills to work in situations outside the classroom. Best of luck to you.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in English.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 001, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

To enroll in this course, students need to, 1) get on the waitlist. 2) submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, Room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Thursday, January 4th 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the ENGLISH 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 002, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

To enroll in this course, students need to, 1) get on the waitlist. 2) submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, Room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Thursday, January 4th. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the ENGLISH 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 003, SEM
Poetry

Instructor: Goldstein,Laurence A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This is a poetry section; we will spend the academic term, in the workshop and in tutorials, discussing the craft and techniques of verse. There will be assigned exercises, but for the most part each student will work independently to develop the voice and style(s) most congenial to his or her talent. Students will keep a journal devoted mainly to their reading of poems and essays about poetry. One anthology and one book of literary criticism will provide opportunities for conversations about contemporary poetics. Active participation in class discussion is an essential requirement for this course. Enrollment is based on your portfolio. Students must submit a 10-15 page portfolio by noon on January 4 to 3187 Angell Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 323 — Creative Writing
Section 004, SEM
Fiction

Instructor: Orringer,Julie E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In this workshop course you will study the craft of fiction writing and practice it in your own work. We will look beneath the surface of the stories we read, approaching them from the perspective of practicing writers, rather than as literary critics or scholars. We will read published fiction to examine the construction of character, the movement of narrative, the use of point of view, setting, dialogue, and language, and we will undertake exercises to explore elements of craft. Beginning the third week, we will read and discuss student stories and novel excerpts, drawing upon the points of craft we have examined in class. You will complete two stories and put one of them through a thoughtful revision. Novel excerpts are acceptable as well. Once we begin workshopping, you will be expected to make careful, detailed line-edits on your peers' work and write a page or so of helpful comments for each piece. You will complete at least five writing exercises. You will also read one novel or short story collection of your own choosing, and will write a brief response to the book, to be handed in at the end of the course as part of your final portfolio.

Enrollment is based on your portfolio. Students must submit a 10-15 page portfolio by noon on January 4 to 3187 Angell Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing; submission of portfolio and application required.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 001, SEM
All Things Considered

Instructor: Kowalski,Rosemary Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

We write well when we write about subjects that interest us. We also write well when we write about subjects in which we have a fair amount of expertise. With these ideas in mind, this course, to a large extent, will be determined by the students in it. It will, of course, have page limits, deadlines, grades?, but the class readings and the paper topics will be decided by the students (with a lot of feedback and advice from me and other members of the class). Come prepared to state your special interest(s), suggest at least one substantial text (essay, book or film) for the class to read on that interest from which all of us can learn and profit, and propose a sequence of essay assignments for yourself and your area(s) of interest. Be prepared to do a lot of writing and revising of your work and to have your work reviewed by others in the class.


ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 003, SEM
Life-Stories

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

This course engages students in the practice of writing life-stories. Students read a range of autobiographical essays while developing their own versions of the form; smaller assignments culminate in a larger personal essay due by the course end. In addition, students facilitate life-writing exercises with a group of fifth-graders in a Detroit school; involving five trips total, from the 4th through the 9th week of the term, the school visits take place on Fridays (students choose either a morning or afternoon session; either way, the course requires a Friday time commitment). In class and in writing, students reflect deeply on this community work and their life-writing experiences, and comment on parallel essays by writers such as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How might differences in race, gender, ability, and sexual preference inform life-stories? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? How do writers shape the material of their lives into essay form? Course grade is based on a reflective journal of responses; three (4-page) analytical papers; three (4-page) personal writings; and the larger 10-page personal essay due by the course end; the final paper may be drawn from prior personal writing; it also goes through multiple drafts and is peer-reviewed by the class at large. Course readings are from a collection of personal essays (such as Phillip Lopate's or Dinty Moore's), and/or a supplementary course packet (estimated cost $50).

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 004, SEM
THE DWARF, THE DEMON, AND THE DIVIDED SELF

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during winter break. The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 005, SEM
THE DWARF, THE DEMON, AND THE DIVIDED SELF

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during winter break. The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 006, SEM

Instructor: O'Keeffe,Patrick P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 007, SEM
The Art of the Personal Essay

Instructor: Adler,Peggy Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

In this seminar, you will work to bring to the page what no other artist has: your own way of phrasing, your own way of observing, your own history that shapes your lens. What do you remember most vividly? What do you most vividly forget? Where does the line blur between fact and fiction, and how can you walk this line as a tightrope, mining deeper truth? As writers, you will be asked to use writing as a shovel, excavating meaning in your lives. This class functions as a workshop with an emphasis on revision, and is designed to give you the and tools you need to realize your own intentions and reach an audience. We will read as writers; contemporary essays are our texts, including works by Joyce Carol Oates, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Judith Ortiz Cofer, Amy Tan, John McPhee, David Sedaris, and many others. Because workshops are based on the responsibility we have to each other as writers, punctuality, attendance and participation are essential to your success in this class in which you will write four revised essays, exploring different forms of personal narrative.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 008, SEM

Instructor: Harp,Nicholas Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course, in advanced essay writing, pushes past the familiar academic genres of position papers and literary analysis and calls for students to develop significant works of narrative non-fiction (or creative non-fiction). Simply put, this writing style combines the obligations of essay writing (research, economy, accuracy) with the craft of literary writing (narrative, metaphor, and emotional resonance).

Using discussion, workshops, in-class exercises, and a variety of written examples, we will explore an array of techniques useful for creating and amplifying these works. Students should expect to write and revise (work through subsequent drafts) three essays of increasing length, complete and comment on regular readings, and be prepared to discuss each other's work in a demanding but spirited forum.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 009, SEM

Instructor: Ralph,Alexander Luria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 010, SEM

Instructor: Cicciarelli,Louis A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 011, SEM

Instructor: Talpos,Sara Kathleen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 012, SEM

Instructor: Hinken,Michael Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 326 — Community Writing and Public Culture
Section 001, REC
Community Work

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE
Other: Theme

This course asks that students work at and to some extent write for an area non-profit organization, at the same time they reflect deeply in writing and in discussion about the meaning of this work. Community assignments may involve contributing to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, brochure, or fund-raising letter — all of which will be peer-reviewed in draft form by the class itself. In our meetings, we will discuss issues raised at our community sites and by the related, assigned readings — such as our motives for taking on this work, our respective roles as insider/outsider; the new listening, interactive, and organizational skills that may be required; and our community partner's often differing set of goals and identities. The course provides a way of thinking about community work and social justice not just as service but as interrogating one's own background as well as the professions themselves. How is knowledge produced, both in the university setting and in the non-profit agency? How do we form meaningful and mutually beneficial relationships with our community partners? How might we contribute to the formation of public culture? Readings that approach these issues from a variety of angles (social, historical, personal, statistical) will be available in a course packet (estimated cost $40). In addition to keeping a work log and community journal, students write four (4-page) analytical papers, a fact sheet, a mini-grant proposal that includes research, an organizational analysis, and a (8-page) paper that places the student work within the larger context of social issues encountered at the community site.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 124 or 125.

ENGLISH 326 — Community Writing and Public Culture
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3
Reqs: CE

This course asks that the student work at and to some extent write for an area non-profit organization, while reflecting deeply in writing and in discussion about the meaning of this work. Community assignments may involve contributing to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, or brochure, all of which will be peer-reviewed in draft form by the class itself. We will also discuss issues raised by our sites and by the related, assigned readings — i.e., our motives, insider/outsider roles, and the new skills and identities encountered at our community sites. The course provides a way of thinking about community work and social justice not just as service but as interrogating both our own motives and background, as well as the professions themselves. How can / do we ourselves contribute to the formation of public scholarship and public culture? How is knowledge produced, both in the university setting and in the non-prof? Who is responsible for the ways things are (perceived), as well as how we would like them to be?

In addition to keeping a weekly reflective journal, students will do a brief interview, an organizational analysis, a group oral report, a model 'mission statement' and 'fact sheet' related to their community site, and some modest research that leads to a larger paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 124 or 125.

ENGLISH 331 — Film Genres and Types
Section 001, LEC
Westerns

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

For decades Westerns were Hollywood's most popular genre, appealing not only to Americans but to people world wide. This extraordinary popularity fell off in the United States in the 1970s largely due to the effect of the Viet Nam war on our notions of heroism and of good and evil. The 1990s, however, showed a renewed interest in Westerns — two won Academy Awards for best picture during that decade: Dances with Wolves (1990) and The Unforgiven (1992) — and Westerns continue to be made with some regularity.

Some of Hollywood's greatest films have been Westerns and every important Hollywood male star appeared in them: Gary Cooper, Henry Fonda, John Wayne, James Stewart, Clint Eastwood, Kevin Costner. In this course we will view and analyze many of the classic Westerns: Stagecoach, The Ox-Bow Incident, Red River, Shane, High Noon, One-Eyed Jacks, The Wild Bunch, Once Upon a Time in the West, Tombstone, to mention just a few. We will also read the novel, All the Pretty Horses.

In class we will first critique these films as dramas — their stories, characters, and structures. We will also consider why it is that Westerns have and continue to captivate people, young and old, urban and rural, American and foreign. We will also examine the Western's concept of heroism and masculinity as well as the role women have played in Westerns — and trace how both male and female roles have changed over the decades.

Films will be shown on Tuesday nights at 7:00pm. There will be two papers, a midterm and final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 236 or SAC 236

ENGLISH 340 — Reading and Writing Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Moss,Thylias

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the Reading and Writing of Poams: products of acts of making in which poetry is reconfigured as a dynamic system according to principles of Limited Fork Poetics: the study of interacting language systems in which language systems include all visual systems (including text as a visual form), all sonic systems, all tactile systems, and all olfactory systems.

In Limited Fork Poetics, poetry becomes a dynamic system where there is no permanence as structure forms and reforms on every scale according to varying time scales simultaneously. We study communities of interaction and write what occurs in those systems or the subsystem(s) of our focus in simultaneously active visual, sonic, and tactile communities.

We will study and make products that explore both the wild and stable outcomes that are possible in Limited Fork Poetics. We will read a variety of texts from a variety of fields of inquiry in order to inspire thought about how dynamic possibilities can impact our entire existence and not just writing. We will supplement our exploration of conventional texts will a number of internet resources including iTunes University on ctools and three Limited Fork podcasts at the iTunes Music store. Students will learn to make digital poams and will have opportunity in the final composite project to depict digital forms of making as well as three dimensional forms.

Come to this course open to possibilities which perhaps can transform thinking. Students are free to opt for convention, if willing and able to do so, after the conclusion of the course.

ENGLISH 349 — American Theatre and Drama
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The study of principal American dramatists, and principal events and issues in the American theatre, mainly in the 20th century.

ENGLISH 349 — American Theatre and Drama
Section 002, REC
U.S. Drama in the twentieth century.

Instructor: Brater,Enoch

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. Drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U/S. culture in American Drama and American Drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays of Miller, Williams, and Hellman. Topics of class discussion will focus on: the emergence of a nativist theater tradition, the role of ethnicity, the situation of the female playwright, the conflict between commercial and artistic values, and the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage. Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shepard, Fornes, Lanford Wilson, Kushner, Hwang, Suzan-Lori Parks, and August Wilson.

ENGLISH 367 — Shakespeare's Principal Plays
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Worthen,William B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will consider Shakespeare's plays from a range of perspectives: in the context of early modern literary and cultural history; as documents in the history of ideology, notably the ideologies of identity; and as designs animating dramatic performance in the early-modern theater, in subsequent theaters, and (glancingly) in a range of media today. We will develop a series of key terms for the analysis of drama, and consider how the plays conceive Shakespeare's theater as a site of theoretical inquiry. The course will be paced at roughly one play per week, in addition to a substantial critical/theoretical reading that will mark the point of departure for our discussion of the play. Plays to be chosen from the range of Shakespeare's career, and will include early and late comedies, a history cycle, several major tragedies and romances. Several papers, midterm, final examination. I will order the Norton Complete Works, but any recent edition of Shakespeare's plays will be fine.


This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 368 — Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
Section 001, LEC
Revenge Plays from Kyd to Webster

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

WN 2007
Credits: 4

A study of major dramatic works from the revenge tradition that flourished on the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage and included many of the most popular plays of the period. We will read plays by a number of Shakespeare's contemporaries and a select few Shakespearean plays which will highlight the energetic dialogue between playwrights and acting companies of the period. Designed along the lines of ENGLISH 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to ENGLISH 367. Plays will be read intensively as theatrical and literary works, and also will be considered in relation to complex social and political issues of the period. Among the plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi. Approximate book cost: $100 (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 370 — Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Section 001, REC
Masterworks of Middle Ages & Renaissance

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course will be an intensive study of some representative masterworks of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in England. While dealing with these texts analytically, we will also explore them in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. Readings will include a substantial selection from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales [in Middle English; learn to read it and dazzle your friends], Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, some medieval plays, Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, a selection of Renaissance lyric poetry [e.g., Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell], and a Jacobean play by Jonson. We may throw in a play by Shakespeare, depending on the class's familiarity with his canon. The class, which meets 4 hours per week, will be part informal lecture [particularly when we deal with the context and background of these works] and part discussion [mostly when we focus on the texts themselves]. Each student will write two essays of approximately five pages each, a one-hour in-class essay at midterm and a final examination.

satisfies the Pre-1600 and Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

book cost approximately $50 for new copies; less for used.


ENGLISH 370 — Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Section 002, REC
Early English Poetics

Instructor: Smith,Macklin

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course doubles as a survey of the best medieval and early Renaissance poetry in English and an investigation of poetic form. Our immediate focus will be on style, on the craft of poetry. Diction, syntax, line-shaping, sound, and meter will be our windows into matters of character and theme. After a brief survey of prose authors to 1600 (to include Margery Kempe, Juliana of Norwich, and several Elizabethan stylists), we will concentrate on Beowulf and other Old English verse, and works by Chaucer, Langland, Spenser, and Shakespeare. At every stage, we will compare our early works with selections from those beyond our period. Our readings will be organized by verse form as well as by chronology, so as to gain an understanding of the history of our native four-beat meter (from Beowulf to hiphop), accentual-syllabic couplets (Chaucer through Browning), blank verse, and stanza forms ranging from song quatrains to sonnets. Readings typically will be brief, but students should come prepared to engage in poetic analysis and to read Chaucer and Langland in their Middle English originals. Students willing to read closely and slowly can hope to attain an accurate appreciation of the artistry of early English poetry.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.


ENGLISH 370 — Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Section 003, REC
Dramas of Community and Conflict (Honors)

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Honors

This course will examine the Medieval and Renaissance theatrical traditions in England, studying religious and secular plays, the social and historical contexts that produced them, and the conditions under which they were initially performed. Corpus Christi plays, based on Biblical narratives, were performed throughout the city streets, weaving through the communities they at once entertained and produced with their performances; morality plays, where the best actor in a small company played the villain or Vice character, traveled from town to town; Elizabethan popular drama of the Renaissance, by contrast, was challenged by civic authorities and established itself outside of their legal reach, on the margins of London and its jurisdiction. We will examine this rich tradition (or set of traditions) as literary texts and theatrical works of performance, seeking to understand how they reinforced or challenged the presumed norms of their own times through the medium of play and virtual reality. Textbook costs will be approximately $100-150; books will be available at Shaman Drum. There will be a midterm, a final, and short essay assignments.

This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Koch,Mark D

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course will survey selected texts from two of the most turbulent and formative centuries in the history of the English-speaking world with a particularly keen eye on political and social change. We will begin with a consideration of key literary, political, philosophical, and religious ideas during the mid-seventeenth century and how they reveal the imminent tension and upheaval in English society.

With ambition, transgression and rebellion as a common theme in our texts, we will study most of John Milton's epic Paradise Lost within the context of this civil turmoil as well as John Dryden's Absalom and Achitophel. Next, we will explore several works about the individual and national ambitions of colonialism in the New World, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, the fourth part of Jonathan's Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and Alexander Pope?s poem Windsor Forest. We will continue our survey by reading John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (a satiric, riotous play), Samuel Richardson's Pamela (oft consider the first fully realized novel), and Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield (a classic novel of sentiment). There will be a consideration of the link between Sentimental literature and Romanticism, and a close look at certain poems by William Blake, William Wordsworth, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as well as Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.

Course work will include three formal papers, numerous response papers, two exams and dutiful attendance, reading, and participation.

This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Honors

This course considers literature written within the context of one of the most turbulent and fertile stretches of Western cultural development, as individuals and communities attempted to define their identity in terms of religious commitment, the human ability to reason, the human ability to feel, or nation.

Authors whom we shall read include Defoe (Roxana), Dryden, Pope, Swift, Voltaire, Blake, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Shelley, Austen, Tennyson, Whitman, and Douglas. An especially exciting feature of this class will be the chance to note the emergence of American voice(s) within the cacophony and euphony of works written in English.

The class will ask attentive and wide reading, lively class discussion, and, in all probability, two essays, a midterm and a final examination.

This class fulfills the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 371 — Studies in Literature, 1600-1830
Section 003, REC
Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature

Instructor: Faller,Lincoln B

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The historical period to be covered in this course ranges, approximately, from the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660 with the coronation of Charles II to the departure from office in 1742 of Robert Walpole, England's first modern prime minister. The syllabus will include plays (some of the best English comedies date to this period), poetry (the greatest poets between Milton and Wordsworth are Dryden and Pope), and some longer prose narratives that anticipate but are not quite novels. Our readings will represent and engage with — often ironize, caricature, and satirize — a number of contemporary cultural concerns: the rise of a bourgeois or at least "middling class" sensibility, the aspirations and emerging voices of women, the social and political roles of writers, the growing awareness of and increasing curiosity about multiple worlds beyond Europe. They will also document, in various ways, the development of peculiarly modern (and definitely non-Romantic!) modes of subjectivity and self-presentation. Authors to be read will include John Dryden, George Etherege, Aphra Behn, William Wycherly, Thomas Otway, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, John Gay, Alexander Pope, Penelope Aubin, George Lillo, Mary Wortley Montagu, and Eliza Haywood. The course will require weekly response papers, some in-class presentations, a short paper at mid-term, and a longer paper at the end of the semester. No prior knowledge of the period or its literature is required.

This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 372 — Studies in Literature, 1830-Present
Section 001, REC
What was Modernism?

Instructor: Beauchamp,Gorman L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course will explore Modernism — the style/movement that dominated the "high" art of the first decades of this century. While we will read a few poems (Eliot, Yeats) and glance briefly at some of the art and music, the focus of the course will fall primarily on fiction. Works to be read include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Mann's Death in Venice, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Course grades will depend on two essay exams, and frequent short, informal writing assignments. Regular attendance is essential.

ENGLISH 383 — Topics in Jewish Literature
Section 001, LEC
THE YIDDISH CLASSICS AND MODERNITY

Instructor: Norich,Anita

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What do we know about modern Yiddish culture? What are its origins and how did it develop? Who were its major writers and what were the themes, social structures, literary forms of primary concern to them? In this course we will answer these and other questions by reading the fiction of three writers: Sh.Y. Abramovitch (also known as Mendele Moykher Sforim, the "grandfather" of Yiddish literature), Sholem Aleichem, and Y.L. Peretz. Their short stories and novels are considered the classics of modern Yiddish literature and offer a provocative introduction into the Eastern European Jewish milieu in which they wrote and the historical, political, social and economic transformations of the late 19th-early 20th century. We will also consider some of the adaptations made of their work in Yiddish and English drama and film (including Fiddler on the Roof), and some of the changes made when their stories and novels were brought to an American audience.

All readings will be in English translation. No knowledge of Yiddish is required for this course.


This course fulfills the New Traditions Requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 385 — Topics in African Literature
Section 001, LEC
South Africa: Apartheid and After

Instructor: Wenzel,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In South Africa, the past sixty years have seen the legislation of institutionalized racism in the policy known as apartheid; decades of protest and repression; and the emergence of popular movements in South Africa and abroad that compelled the apartheid state to enter a process of negotiation that would ultimately lead to its own demise in the democratic election of 1994. Throughout this tumultuous and often violent history, writers and other artists bore witness to life under apartheid; faced censorship, banning, and exile; and debated the ways in which culture could be a "weapon of struggle." The years since the election of Nelson Mandela reflect the possibilities and difficulties of a young democracy, including the remarkable national drama of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and new struggles against an HIV/AIDS pandemic and the stubborn legacies of the apartheid era.

This course traces the multiple, profoundly important roles that cultural production has played in the consolidation of apartheid, as well as its demise and aftermath. Our texts will include novels, short stories, memoirs, plays, poetry, and films, with some attention to other visual culture and music as well. Assignments will include short essays and at least one exam.

List of possible texts:

  • Coetzee, Disgrace
  • Duiker, Thirteen Cents
  • Fugard, Sizwe Bansi Is Dead
  • Gordimer, July's People
  • Krog, In the Country of My Skull
  • La Guma, A Walk in the Night
  • Magona, Mother to Mother
  • Mda, Ways of Dying
  • Mpe, Welcome to our Hillbrow
  • Ndebele, Fools and Other Stories
  • Paton, Cry, the Beloved Country
  • Serote, To Every Birth its Blood
  • Wicomb, You Can't Get Lost in Cape Town

Readings from the magazines Drum and Staffrider

Films: Amandla!, Forgiveness, Yesterday, Zulu Love Letter

This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 200

ENGLISH 387 — Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carroll,Amy Sara

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course considers the relationship between Latino/a literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production. A variety of topics is addressed in the study of such Latino/a literatures of the US as Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American.

ENGLISH 388 — Pacific Literary and Cultural Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Najita,Susan Y; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This is a course for students who want to develop their abilities in critical and creative reading, thinking, and analysis. It is an interdisciplinary course that navigates film, fiction, poetry, novels and histories in order to engage with some of the critical processes at work in the modern world. From sunlit beaches, swaying palm trees, and happy tourists to tropical rainforest and menacing natives, the islands of the Pacific have been relentlessly depicted. Perhaps more than any other region of the globe, the Pacific has been "experienced" beforehand through the image-making of Hollywood, television, and advertisement. The huge success of films such as Whale Rider, The Piano, Lord of the Rings, and Once Were Warriors builds upon the early images of the region in films such as Blue Hawaii, Mutiny on the Bounty, and South Pacific. This course puts such texts into dialogue with the extensive body of historical and literary representations. What connections and contradictions emerge when we read popular culture in relation to fictional representations by authors such as Hermann Melville and Jack London, and indigenous authors such as Patricia Grace, Albert Wendt, and Keri Hulme? What other histories and experiences are obscured or misrepresented in these popular representations, including the emergence of indigenous self-determination movements, nuclear testing and U.S. military supremacy, and the multi-ethnic societies which emerged as a result of colonization? To answer these questions, we will read texts from a range of perspectives: EuroAmerican authors (Melville, London, Cook), indigenous Pacific islanders (Hulme, Wendt, Grace, Figiel, and Hau'ofa), as well as non-natives (Yamanaka and Murayama). Requirements include quizzes, 7-8 page paper, final exam, and presentation.

ENGLISH 401 — The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 001, SEM
Fictions of India

Instructor: Wenzel,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

"Fictions of India" is meant to suggest several avenues of inquiry: most literally, we'll be sampling some of the prose fiction that has emerged from the Indian subcontinent in the 20th century. But a number of these fictions might suggest that India itself is a "fiction" — a made, or made-up, thing. How do authors imagine the Indian nation, and, thus, in some sense, bring it in to being? The course title should also remind us of the contingencies of our reading list, which will necessarily produce a partial, skewed, or "fictional" sense of "India" and "Indian fiction," since the South Asian literary tradition is thousands of years old, with at least 14 extant languages. Even if we were to limit ourselves to 20th-century fiction written in English, we couldn't begin to "cover the bases."

We'll begin by reading prose condensations of the two major epics in the Indian tradition, Ramayana and Mahabharata. Like the 20th century prose fiction that will constitute the majority of our reading list, the epics are involved in imagining the subcontinent as an integral community, and their plots and narrative strategies get recycled in later cultural production in rather fascinating ways.

Not only the English language, but English literature itself played a significant role in the British colonization of India; questions of language have been no less crucial during the rise of Indian nationalism and the post-Independence era. We'll read some of the key statements in the ongoing debate about English in India, and in addition to fiction written in English, we'll also read some translated fiction in order to get a sense of the ground of these debates. Readings in political and literary history, and postcolonial theory, will help to construct contexts and concepts for our discussion. Assignments will likely include short essays, an oral presentation, and an exam.

This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Book costs (at new prices): $60-100

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 002, SEM
Regional Writing in America: "Local Color"

Instructor: Howard,June M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

How much does place matter — in writing and reading literature, and more generally in culture and society? Everything that exists has to be somewhere; what vocabulary lets us talk precisely about that fact — should we make a distinction between place and space, for example? In our modern world, what are the connections and contrasts between the regional and the national, the local and the global?

This class will examine "local color" writing, a popular and critically admired form in American literature from roughly 1870 to 1920. Then we will consider recent fictions in which place plays a crucial and often explicit role. Ways of imagining gender, race, class, nationality, politics, spirituality, nature all become visible through these works' representations of land, community, and mobility. We will ask what it meant that representations of the rural became intensely interesting to readers in the urbanizing United States of the late nineteenth century, and what it means that regionalism has revived in the globalizing U.S. of the early twenty-first century. Throughout, we will explore broad questions about the nature and significance of place.

Authors to be read include Hamlin Garland, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, and Fae Myenne Ng. Many of these authors are relatively little known today, but they are extremely rewarding to read. The instructor will present perspectives from history, anthropology, philosophy, and art history, and occasional interdisciplinary readings will be assigned. Mainly, however, the class will proceed by discussion. Students' responsibilities will be to read, contribute to on-line and in-class conversations, make an oral presentation, and write several papers.

This class satisfies the American literature requirement. Book cost: TBD

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 003, SEM
Literature and the Computer: From Cold War Fiction to Internet Textuality

Instructor: Neeman,Ziv

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will explore the shifting intersections between literary formations and computing technology. The course will proceed chronologically, focusing on five literary-technological constellations: cold war science fiction from the 1950s and early 1960s; experimental works by William S. Burroughs and his collaborators that foreground the issue of programming; computer generated poetry; cyberpunk fiction; and internet/ new media texts. No special knowledge of computers or science and technology is required; however, the course is interdisciplinary in scope and will include the study of the technoscientific and cultural history of computing. In addition to literary works, we will watch one or two films, study selections from key early technical texts, as well as critical and popular texts that will provide theoretical, historical and cultural contexts for our readings. Students in the course will write two short papers and a longer research paper, and participation in class discussion is expected.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 004, SEM
Contemporary American Poetry and "the Personal"

Instructor: White,Gillian Cahill

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In his introduction to Contemporary American Poetry, Alfred Poulin asserts that one of the most notable differences between modern and contemporary American poetry is that "the latter is more personal and intimate." He almost immediately withdraws the claim, arguing that poems can't ever really be personal, because they call attention to themselves as fabrications. In this seminar, we explore and test the limits of both Poulin's claims:

  • What does or doesn't make a contemporary poem "personal?"
  • What does that word imply — private, truthful, shocking, sincere, bodily, emotional, beyond interpretation, testimonial?
  • What ideas about writing, reading and experience does the question of a poem's personality assume?

We start with T.S. Eliot's famous modernist imperative — that a poem is not a record of emotion or personality, but an escape from these — and consider some mid-century and contemporary departures from and recastings of it, as well as their historical and sociological contexts. Likely readings include Allen Ginsburg's Howl, work deemed to be "confessional" (by Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, John Berryman, Anne Sexton), as well as poems by Adrienne Rich, Sharon Olds, Frank Bidart, Rita Dove, Louise Glü ck, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Lyn Hejinian. We also read prose writings by poets and theorists (among them Frank O'Hara, Roland Barthes, and Michael Foucault) that are pertinent to our topic.

Students will write weekly one-page response papers, a mid-term paper of about 10-12 pages, and take-home final exam. Short presentations may also be assigned. The lion's share of the readings will appear in a course-packet or on e-reserve; students will be asked to buy a few collections of poetry.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 005, SEM
"‘One Nation Under A Groove?" Afro-American Expressive Culture, 1970-1979

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will examine representative works of art that were produced by blacks in America during roughly the ten year period following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and what many have viewed as the end of the Civil Rights Movement. Looking at literary texts, popular music, and films in particular, as well as critical and journalistic commentary which they spawned, we will investigate responses to the opportunities and challenges faced by Blacks following the revolutionary decade if the 1960s. As implicit and explicit responses to (among other things) increasing numbers of Blacks entering into the educational, artistic, political, and economic mainstream, the literature, music, and film created during the 1970s reflected — and reflected upon — sometimes-volatile arguments taking place nationally over the meanings and practices of blackness in cities and regions throughout the United States. By looking critically at a selected number of texts and the debates in which they participate about class, gender, history, racial and national identity, family, romance, and other issues, our goal will be to consider the struggles to make or remake "the race" during the first decade in American history in which Afro-Americans were guaranteed equal rights under the laws of the world's model democracy. Course requirements: a five page essay, a midterm examination, a final (10-15 page) research essay, frequent short writing exercises, and active class participation.

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 007, SEM
Old English.

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 008, SEM
Primo Levi and the Memory of the Holocaust

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Students wishing to elect this experimental course must also ATTEND ENGLISH 483.001, Primo Levi and the Memory of the Holocaust. Please register for this section of 407 only. Do NOT register for 483.001. This opportunity will be limited to 25 students. All will attend the Primo Levi course: then, in this three-credit hour course, each student will join with a discussion-partner, in what is known as the havruta model. Special readings and performances, and special topics associated with them, will be offered, and students will engage in simultaneous discussion of these with the havruta partner. Writing for this special section will include two essays of modest length (c. 7 pp.) and a final writing project, in lieu of an examination, which will include assessment of the model of learning employed.

Special topics to be addressed will be the experience of women and other minorities in the Holocaust, and will include discussion of such works of response to Levi as that of Paul Steinberg, Speak You Also.

ENGLISH 408 — Varieties of English
Section 001, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors — Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in ENGLISH 407 (reading Old English), ENGLISH 407 is not a prerequisite.]

ENGLISH 416 — Women in Victorian England
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zemgulys,Andrea Patricia

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focusing on the later Victorian and Edwardian periods in England (from about 1870-1920), this course will examine how women's lives were shaped by 'separate spheres' ideology — a set of powerful and rationalizing ideas that grew middle-class England in the Victorian period by preserving house and home as the 'proper' sphere of women, and preserving business and political life as the 'natural' sphere of men. We will explore topics ranging from marriage and household economy, to slum-reform, shopping, and the campaign for voting rights. Readings will include secondary sources in the history of the period, primary sources by political and social reformers (Octavia Hill and J.S. Mill), a cookbook, and several novels (by George Eliot, George Gissing, and Virginia Woolf). Students will be expected to write two papers, eight paragraphs, and two exams.


Approximate textbook cost: $80.


This course fulfills New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Literature and the Law

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.

Book cost: under $100 for new copies and course pack; less for used.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Graphic Narrative

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

Untitled Document

Graphic Narrative is a general term for Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Manga, Bandes Dessinées, Novelas Em Quadrinhos, Sequential Art, and even the Bayeux Tapestry. This seminar enrolls both advanced undergraduates (in ENGLISH 417 Senior Seminar, 4 credits) and graduate students (in ENGLISH 549 Contemporary Literature, 3 credits). We will use both primary and secondary readings to explore the modern history and theory of the field, the sociology of the field, and a rich assortment of excellent examples of many literary types within the field.

The written work consists of a daily reading journal, a shorter essay (1500-2400 words, which is approximately 5-8 double-spaced pages of text depending on font size and margins and excluding included images) and a longer essay (3000-4500 words, which is approximately 10-15 pages). In all three assignments, students are expected to consider both the form and the content of the materials read and to strive for insights that go substantially beyond the discussion in class. The shorter essay should be on a graphic (not chapter) children's book, and the longer essay should be either on some general aspect of graphic narrative (e.g., the use of framing, the use of thought bubbles, the use of color, the techniques of visual allusion, palimpsest, collage, the varieties of irony, the relations between drawing style and meaning, the handling of a specific theme, the uses of a specific image, cultural constraints on meaning, etc.) or on some aspect of the work of a single important graphic narrative artist, series, or genre. These essay projects require reading beyond that in the syllabus and consultation with and permission of the instructor. In the reading journal, students are expected to record

  1. any extrinsic details potentially relevant to a critical discussion of the work (including at least type of work, name and nationality of writer and/or illustrator, date and place of publication, publisher, format),
  2. observations as one reads, including page references and quotes (which may need to include photocopies), and
  3. conclusions and/or hypotheses and/or questions that seem noteworthy after reviewing (a) and (b) and perhaps the work as well.

The journals should be hand-written with two-inch margins all around because these journals will be exchanged at the beginning of each class meeting, read by a fellow student, and the contents commented on in the margins. The journal should be kept in a spiral-bound notebook into which can be glued copies of graphics if needed. Students should use these journals not only as a record of their reading of syllabus materials but also of any other course-related materials, and as a place to keep class notes and to record and sometimes work out essay topic ideas. When the journals are submitted at the end of the term, they should be accompanied by a printed, double-spaced, two-to-three page self-analysis of the worth (both educational and in terms of grade) of the journal to the student. The course grades will be based on participation (25%), journal + self-analysis (25%), children's book essay (20%), general essay (30%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Great American Novel

Instructor: Blair,Sara B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is designed to think about the novel in America: more specifically, how the novel, as a literary form and a cultural institution, has taken part in significant debates about the meanings of culture and citizenship over the course of the nation's history. Beginnings with the context of antebellum American and associated debates about slavery and ranging up through fiction in the contemporary U.S., we'll consider a number of novels whose matter and manner of telling stories raise questions about enfranchisement and belonging, political representation and self-representation, social being and the art of the novel. This not a survey of American novels; rather, we'll focus on an unusually small number of texts in order to make intensive exploration of the historical and aesthetic contexts to which they respond. More broadly, the course is designed to help students sharpen and develop particular skills: use of archival materials; engagement with literary critical traditions; close literary analysis.

Our texts will be drawn from among such nominees for the status of "great American" novel as: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Henry James, The Golden Bowl; William Faulkner, Light in August; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Susan Choi, American Woman; Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex.

Requirements will include a writing portfolio, comprised of four 5-7 page essays and exercises for developing them; discussion leading with other class members; and a final project or exam.

Please note: all students interested in enrolling must attend the first two class meetings. For further information, please contact sbblair@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 004, SEM
U.S. Language Politics and Literature

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course approaches literature and literary theory from the perspective of language politics. We'll read and discuss historical documents and literary criticism on the symbolic importance of language mixture and invention in literature and in national culture. We'll consider the literary significance of questions such as:

  • Is there an official language of the United States? What is a language "standard"?
  • How are languages and speech forms racialized?
  • Are there legitimate and illegitimate (forms of) languages?
  • Who or what lends prestige to certain forms of language and denies it to others?
  • Why are bilingualism and multilingualism often viewed as threatening?
  • What do vernacular speech forms convey and conceal?

We will read a range of historical and theoretical readings about language policy and literary cultures. These issues raised by these readings will inform our discussions on twentieth-century U.S. short stories, novels, films, and the literary politics of language. Course requirements will include brief reading responses, in-class presentations, and two essays (one short, one long). Students must attend the first two class meetings or contact the professor in order to remain in the class.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Writing from Life — Baldwin, O'Connor, Cheever, and Maxwell

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the interaction of life and art in the works of four twentieth century writers, James Baldwin, Flannery O'Connor, John Cheever, and William Maxwell. In addition to examining — and in some cases trying on — these authors' fictional techniques, we will also be investigating the ways in which the circumstances of each writer's life found themselves translated into, or excluded from, the fiction he or she produced. Reading will consist of fiction, essays, autobiography, biography, letters, and journals. Requirements include one finished short story in the style of one of the four authors, one major analytical essay, and reading responses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 423 — The Writing of Fiction
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: O'Dowd,Patricia T

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to seniors and Graduate students; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 423 — The Writing of Fiction
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Delbanco,Nicholas F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

ENGLISH 423 is an advanced-level course in the writing (and reading) of short fiction. The primary focus of the course will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published stories. Students will be required to write two complete stories (2500-5000 words) for the workshop, and revise both by the end of the term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and occasional short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will usually consist of three to four stories each week.

Required text: Course pack

Admission: Applicants should bring a brief sample of fiction (5-10 pages) to the first meeting.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to seniors and Graduate students; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 426 — Directed Writing
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

As a privilege for students who have displayed academic excellence and who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Department of English offers course credit for independent study. Independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated and capable students to pursue a rigorous course of study that is not accommodated elsewhere in the curriculum.

Independent study proposals require advance planning. Each must be developed in consultation with a full-time member of the English Department faculty who will serve as a faculty mentor for the project, and subsequently must be approved by the Undergraduate Chair of the Department. Interested students should begin consulting with their mentors during the semester before the proposed independent study in order to develop a feasible course. Only those proposing a carefully structured and intellectually viable course of study that is not already offered in the undergraduate curriculum should submit applications. Independent study requires that students design their own courses, create their own syllabi, and work closely with faculty mentors. Supervising professors must donate a great deal of time and effort, so students applying for independent study should be similarly committed to the project. Students must be in residence in order to undertake independent study projects. A three-credit independent study should involve at least one hour of student-faculty contact plus an additional eight hours of work per week. It is also possible to elect two or four credit hours with appropriate changes in workload.

Professors normally do not supervise independent studies during terms when they are on leave, nor do they supervise them on subjects which fall outside of their areas of specialization, or on subjects covered by regular course offerings. A limit of six credit hours of independent study may be accumulated in the English department. Independent study projects cannot be used to fulfill Department program requirements or College distribution requirements.

Please keep in mind, if you are planning on doing your independent study in writing (ENGLISH 426) and have already taken and applied a writing course to your English concentration, the credit will not count toward your 27 credits. You are allowed to use only one creative or expository writing course toward the concentration whether it is independent study or a regular ENGLISH course (ENGLISH 301, 323, 325, 423, 425, etc.)

To apply:

  • Pick up an Independent Study Application at the English Department office at 3187 Angell Hall.
  • Complete Part I of the independent study application and attach a statement addressing each of the questions posed there along with a copy of your transcript.
  • Part II of the application must be completed by the supervising faculty member.
  • Submit both parts of this proposal to the Undergraduate Secretary in 3187 Angell Hall.

Once a decision is made regarding your proposal, you will be notified either by phone or by email. All decisions on proposals submitted by the above due dates will be made by the Drop/Add deadline.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR.STD./P.I.

ENGLISH 428 — Senior Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Taylor,G Keith

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

This course is a thesis tutorial exclusively for undergraduate students who are in their last year of the Creative Writing Subconcentration and have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223, 323, and 423/429. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 429 — The Writing of Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Goldstein,Laurence A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course operates as a workshop in which students discuss:

  1. poems by fellow students and
  2. the poems of distinguished authors, mainly contemporary, as we find them in a required anthology, handouts, poetry readings, and elsewhere.

Students will report orally on each other's work, keep a journal of readings on the subject of poetry, and meet regularly with the instructor for individual tutorials. Grades are based on the quality and quantity of work, as well as class participation. Permission of instructor is required for enrollment. Leave a portfolio of 5-8 poems for the instructor during the week before class begins.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

ENGLISH 430 — The Rise of the Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Faller,Lincoln B

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The narrative form we call the English novel developed over the course of the eighteenth century in a series of brilliant formal, imaginative, and intellectual experiments. We will read some of the most remarkable of these experimental narratives, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688), Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), Samuel Richardson's Pamela (1740 ), Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749), Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-67), Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813). In reading these works we'll be concerned with a variety of matters aesthetic and cultural, including the elaboration of action into plot; the development of authorial voice and authority; the shaping of reader response; the representation of individual consciousness amid other interacting and competing subjectivities; the use and implications of setting. We'll also be interested in these novels' representation and critique of cultural values and social practices, including their depiction of gender and class relations and, to the limited extent it concerns them, the representation of racial difference; the operations of the law, including its treatment of crime; the distribution and exchange of property; along as well with their treatment of themes large and small like love and marriage, death, good and bad manners, what it means to have justice done or to lead a 'good life.' Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be a midterm exam and a final exam, as well as an end-of-term paper or other equivalent project.

ENGLISH 431 — The Victorian Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature — 1837-1901 combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorian novelists put all of these elements together and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring readers back for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day — e.g., the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. Most intriguing is the complicated relationship this fiction had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code were liable and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. We will immerse ourselves in the pleasures and oddities of this fiction as we read Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton, Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, George Eliot's Middlemarch, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, R.L. Stevenson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and end with Oscar Wilde's The Portrait of Dorian Grey, thus providing wide range of Victorian concerns for our discussions. Requirements include a 10-12 pp. annotated bibliography, a 5-6 pp essay that comes out of the research for the bibliography, and a take-home final exam, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussion.

ENGLISH 432 — The American Novel
Section 001, LEC
The American Novel Then and Now

Instructor: Blair,Sara B

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The cultural offices of the novel in the US — its ambitions to explore questions of citizenship, collective identity, the powers of art, and more — have changed significantly as the nation has evolved from fledgling republic and house divided to world industrial power and beyond. Consistently, however, novelists have explored analogies between the elastic, sprawling form of the novel and the real and symbolic space of America, often by revisiting the fictions of their predecessors. This course will focus on varied experiments with the novel as a literary and cultural form, uniquely enabled to probe America's animating myths, histories, and ideals. Rather than work chronologically or in the mode of a survey, we'll work with textual pairings intended to emphasize novelists' interests in rethinking the history of their form, reinventing its expressive possibilities to register (and even shape) the life of the nation. Our pairings will likely include:

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin and Richard Wright, Native Son;
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter and Philip Roth, The Human Stain;
  • Herman Melville, "Benito Cereno" and Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man;
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby and Bharati Mukherjee, Jasmine.
In addition, we'll work with brief critical readings that account for the novel as a changing literary genre. Some of our key questions:
  • How do these novels map or imagine America (e.g., its free and slave states, territories, urban centers, farmland, ghettos)?
  • What kinds of narrative voices, formal structures, and story-telling do our texts devise to make sense of American experience?
  • In what ways do they remember or revise earlier novels so as to create fiction that changes our ideas about what counts as history?
  • And what claims do they make for art or culture as a shaping force in the creation of American identity and collective life?

Course requirements will include weekly responses to our readings, two essays, and a final exam.

Please note: all students interested in taking the class must attend both of the first two meetings.

This course satisfies the American literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 434 — The Contemporary Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Harty,Richard Ryan

WN 2007
Credits: 4

We will read roughly a dozen novels, nearly all by living American or British writers. Our primary aim is to understand how these books were built — what decisions did the authors make, and why? We will examine use of character, plot, structure, point of view, etc. We will also consider the influence of genre fiction on the literary novel, and will question how well these authors satisfy Ezra Pound's injunction to "make it new." Possible authors include Phillip Roth, Richard Yates, Zadie Smith, Stephen King, Nicholson Baker, Dennis Johnson, Marjane Satrapi, Art Spiegelman, Kazuo Ishiguro, Mary Gaitskill, and J.M. Coetzee. Class meetings will be built around lecture and discussion. Reading responses and analytical papers will be assigned.

ENGLISH 441 — Contemporary Poetry
Section 001, LEC
poems written in English after World War 2

Instructor: Clune,Michael W

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will read a range of poems written in English after World War 2. We will investigate the diversity of responses in this period to such basic questions as what poems are, what kinds of knowledge they convey, what forms of relationship they imagine, what kind of space they open up. Poets studied include Sylvia Plath, Jack Spicer, Amiri Baraka, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Merrill, Derek Walcott, John Ashbery, Lyn Hejinian, and Franz Wright. Written work will consist of short weekly response papers, and three longer papers of 4-6 pages. Texts will include a course pack and several volumes of poems, $60-80 total cost.

ENGLISH 444 — History of Theatre II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

ENGLISH 444 — History of Theatre II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

ENGLISH 448 — Contemporary Drama
Section 001, REC
Community Performance

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Applied Theatre, New Genre Public Art, Community-Based Performance, Participatory Arts, Community Dance, Theatre for Social Change or Engaged Art: these are all terms that relate to performance practices outside conventional stage aesthetics. In this course, we will look at a range of case studies, and try to ascertain how issues of aesthetic access, empowerment, reciprocity, ethics, voice and site work in specific community performance examples. Practice will be very much part of our work: be prepared to move, and write, and act. At the end of term, students will be participants and performers in the Anarcha Project, where we will investigate connections between black and disability cultural history through performance means.

As part of the assessment for this course, you will generate a research file, write essays, collaborate with others in short performances, and write a response to the Anarcha Project work.

ENGLISH 465 — Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class is an introduction to the work of the most influential literary figure of the English Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer, and it focuses on his major work, the Canterbury Tales, a complex exploration of late medieval literary traditions and the communities and institutions with which they were affiliated. Embracing narratives about politics and social class, sex and marriage, religious practices and differences, women's status, and more, the Canterbury Tales helped to establish literature as an important forum for thinking about social life at the beginning of the English literary tradition. After learning to read and pronounce Chaucer's Middle English, we will proceed to a close analysis of the tales, attending to the literary and the historical contexts they engage.

Course requirements include active participation, quizzes, informal in-class writing, and two essays.

This course satisfies the pre-1600 requirement.

ENGLISH 467 — Topics in Shakespeare
Section 001, SEM
Shakespeare and Film

Instructor: Hodgdon,Barbara C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores "Shakespeare and film," concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We will be reading plays by Shakespeare, watching films and videos based on those plays, and considering problems and issues connected with the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. We shall be looking at early as well as recent Shakespeare films (in English and in other languages) and at films that stick close to conventional conceptualizations of "Shakespeare" as well as films which move towards erasing Shakespeare. Transposing different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical) to cinema/video produces a phenomenon whose cultural meanings — meaning as Shakespeare and meaning as film — will be the subject of our investigations. Plays of the season will include Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Taming of the Shrew, Henry V as well as others. Screening lab required. Grade based on two papers (8-10 pages each, 60%); short responses (20%); attendance and participation (20%). Course pack, approximately $50.00.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

This section does not require permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior course work in Shakespeare is recommended. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 470 — Early American Literature: Key Texts
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Crane,Gregg David

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will survey a wide variety of literary texts from the colonial period through the early republic, including poetry by Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor, sermons by Jonathan Edwards, captivity and slave narratives, portions of the Federalist Papers, and early American novels. There will be two papers and two tests as well as weekly reading quizzes.

ENGLISH 472 — Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts
Section 001, REC
OTHER AMERICAS: U.S. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL FICTION IN THE MID-20th CENTURY

Instructor: Wald,Alan M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In 1962, a little-know radical writer named Michael Harrington created a national sensation with his book The Other America. The title referred to all the victims of the social and economic structures in the ghettos, barrios, sweatshops and migrant shelters. Behind Harrington's work stood a long tradition of literary radicalism seeking to give voice to the experiences of the same population through fiction, poetry, and drama. We will explore key texts of that tradition of 20th century literature, along with writings that also address political persecution, sexism, and homophobia. Among the readings are likely to be Agnes Smedley's Daughter of Earth, Henry Roth's Call It Sleep, John Steinbeck's In Dubious Battle, Richard Wright's Native Son, Jo Sinclair's The Changelings, Ann Petry's The Street, Arthur Miller's Focus, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony. Requirements include class participation, two essays, several short writing assignments, mid-term and final term reviews.


The course fulfills the American Literature Requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 473 — Topics in American Literature
Section 001, REC
American Adolescence

Instructor: Makman,Lisa Hermine

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this class, students will explore the emergence of new conceptions of adolescence in nineteenth and twentieth-century American literature. We will study works by writers such as Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, J.D. Salinger, Susan Hinton, Maya Angelou, and Sandra Cisneros alongside the work of theorists such as G. Stanley Hall, Margaret Mead, Erik Erikson, and Carol Gilligan. Films to be viewed include Rebel without a Cause and American Beauty. We will discuss ways in which conceptions of youth have changed since adolescence was first defined as a developmental stage, and we will consider factors that have conditioned these shifts. Topics to be considered include sex and gender, working-class culture, "identity crisis," rites-of-passage, and young adult literature. Requirements: Response papers, research paper, midterm, and final.

This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 479 — Topics in Afro-American Literature
Section 001, REC
Toni Morrison's Word-Work: Exploring the Actual, Imagined, and Possible

Instructor: Sweeney,Megan L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

When she received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993, Toni Morrison stated that, for her, the vitality of language lies in its ability to portray "the actual, imagined and possible lives of its speakers, readers, [and] writers. . . . It arcs toward the place where meaning may lie." Morrison's emphasis on the actual, the imagined, and the possible, and her description of language as reaching toward new meanings, serve as helpful entry points for understanding her work as a novelist, cultural critic, and public intellectual. In all of Morrison's writings, a healthy tension exists between her keen awareness of existing reality, and her radical openness to imagining and creating new realities, meanings, and ways of being.

As we read each of Morrison's eight novels, we will analyze the development of themes, formal strategies, and figurative language in her work, and we'll explore the social and political contexts that have shaped her narratives and to which her narratives respond. Our discussions will also address Morrison's engagements with the African American and American literary traditions, as well as the reception of her work over time, from critics' early dismissals of her writing, to the celebration of her novels on Oprah's Book Club. Furthermore, we'll discuss some of Morrison's literary and cultural criticism, which addresses topics such as race and the imagination, immigration, the O.J. Simpson case, and the Anita Hill/ Clarence Thomas hearings. In exploring issues and themes that emerge in Morrison's work — including history, gender, economics, race, community, motherhood, love, violence, and justice — we will also consider the ways in which novels can function as forms of theory.

Please be prepared for a challenging yet highly rewarding engagement with Morrison's writings. Course requirements will include brief weekly writing assignments, three critical analysis essays, a group presentation, and active participation in class discussions. Registered students must attend the first two class meetings in order to remain in the class.

Required Texts:

  • Coursepack of required readings [available at Accu-Copy: 518 East William St.]
  • The Bluest Eye (1970)
  • Sula (1974)
  • Song of Solomon (1977)
  • Tar Baby (1981)
  • Beloved (1987)
  • Jazz (1992)
  • Paradise (1998)
  • Love (2003)

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH/CAAS 274 and CAAS 201 and/or ENGLISH 320/CAAS 338 strongly recommended.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 001, REC
e.e. cummings

Instructor: Cureton,Richard D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of e.e. cummings, one of the great artists and personalities of the 20th century. cummings is primarily known for his poetry, but he was also a significant painter, playwright, novelist, critic, and aesthetician. During the course, we will study cummings' complete poetic corpus (of almost 1000 poems), one of his novels, The Enormous Room, his fairy tales, his three plays, and some of his criticism, including his famous Charles Eliot Norton (non-) lectures. For his life. we will read Richard Kennedy's biography of cummings, Dreams in the Mirror. For his visual art and aesthetics, we will read Milton Cohen's POETandPAINTER, which explores cummings' sketches, painting, and artistic ideas. Requirements for the course will be a midterm exam, one medium length paper (5-10 pages) during the semester, and one longer paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 002, REC
William Faulkner

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In 1953, Faulkner wrote: "Beginning with Sartoris I discovered that my own little postage stamp of native soil was worth writing about and that I would never live long enough to exhaust it, and by sublimating the actual into apocryphal I would have complete liberty to use whatever talent I might have to its absolute top." This course will give you the opportunity to explore that indeed immense talent working over its native soil of Mississippi. We will focus on the period from 1929 to 1942, the long decade of Faulkner's greatest achievements, reading: The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, The Hamlet, and Go Down, Moses. We will look at a number of his short stories in their original places of publication, namely The Saturday Evening Post and Harper's. We will also screen a few of the films he collaborated on as a writer: Today We Live, To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, and The Southerner. The extensive collection of Faulkner materials at the Special Collections Library at Hatcher will give us the resources to trace Faulkner's manuscript changes, view the evolution of his book publications, and read extensive criticism. You will produce a short written response to each of his novels, and produce a longer, researched analytical paper (8-10pp) at the term's end on a theme of your choosing. Of interest to us throughout the course will be: Faulkner's narrative practices, the epistemology of the reader, the meaning of land and property, how ‘race' is rendered as a detective story, and of course, ‘the south' as both "vanquished" cultural periphery and traveling show.

This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 003, REC
Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

ENGLISH 483 — Great Works of Literature
Section 001, LEC
Primo Levi

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived nearly a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of the twentieth century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes several brief reading reports (2 pages each) and a final exam. For a three-credit hour related course on Primo Levi, with enrollment restricted to 26, and using materials and methods of conversation special for this term, see the course description for ENGLISH 407.007.

ENGLISH 483 — Great Works of Literature
Section 002, LEC
An Honors Mini-Course on Contemporary Poetry. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Yaeger,Patricia Smith
Instructor: Mattawa,Khaled Ahmad

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This course will focus on contemporary poets who define new conceptual, political, and aesthetic territories. They differ radically from one another in subject matter and personae: a Muslim immigrant woman, a gay male whose life was touched by AIDS, a male postcolonial Nobel Laureate, and a female poet exploring natural theology. Passionate about their subject matter as well as their craft, Mohja Kahf, Mark Doty, Derek Walcott, and Louise Gluck present diverse visions for contemporary poetry's abilities to embrace their different vision and a poet's necessary skill at addressing multiple audiences and constituencies.

The class will meet on the following days: Friday, January 19, 2-4pm; Friday, January 26, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 9, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 16, 2-4pm.

Students will be graded on the basis of their participation in class and final group presentations.


ENGLISH 484 — Issues in Criticism
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Soni,Vivasvan

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Tragedy is one of the oldest literary genres, with its roots in the democratic experiments of ancient Greece. Yet it also remains one of the most important literary genres today. Not only does it inform aesthetic production of all kinds, from movies to theater to novels, but it also shapes the way we perceive our world. We speak of a tragic life or a tragic event just as we speak of a tragic film, and the way in which we interpret 'tragic' in each case transforms our perception of lived reality. At its most basic, tragedy wrestles with some of the fundamental problems of human existence: the meaning of suffering, our ethical response to suffering, our possibilities for happiness. In addition, tragedy is one of the most explicitly politicized literary genres, both formally and in terms of its thematic content. Thematically, tragedies themselves are often concerned with the relation between the individual and the community and the reciprocal responsibilities of that relationship. Formally, since tragedy is a communal ritual, the very experience of watching tragedy is a political one. Yet theories of tragedy have conceived the political possibilities of tragedy very differently, from those who find in it a nascent democratic sensibility, to those who see it as the expression of an aristocratic high culture.

In this class, we will read both classical and contemporary theories of tragedy, paying close attention to the changing ways in which theorists have understood the ethical and political value of tragedy. Not only will we develop a more sophisticated understanding of an important literary genre, but we will also acquire a familiarity with a variety of critical approaches to literature and learn how each one addresses literary problems differently. We will read some of the most important texts in the history of literary criticism (Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Poetics, Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy ), and explore a variety of contemporary theories, such as Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, postcolonial theory.

Here are some of the questions we will seek to answer by examining theories of tragedy: How does ancient tragedy differ from modern tragedy, and how is individual subjectivity conceived differently as a result? Why does tragedy come to serve as a model for modern psychological subjectivity? What is the political function of Greek tragedy, and how does this change in the modern state? Why does the tragic hero function as a model of political resistance to established norms? What are the different ways in which tragedies place ethical demands on us? Why is tragedy so much better suited to understanding complex ethical situations than moral philosophy is?

It is my hope that through this class we will become attuned to the political and social relevance of literary texts, and we will learn to be attentive to the subtle ways in which literary paradigms determine our own ethical and political responses to our world.

ENGLISH 496 — Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis
Section 001, SEM
HONORS

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

This course meets once a week for an hour. It is designed to help the cohort of thesis writers with the kind of problems that are likely to arise in the late phases of thesis composition. While ENGLISH 496 is a comparatively informal continuation of ENGLISH 492, students are required to attend these sessions. The course is taught by a number of the faculty working in the Honors program, who take turns guiding each week's meeting.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 497 — Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Modern Wars and Modern Memory

Instructor: Whittier-Ferguson,John A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

"I was just thinking of a good title for an art book. From Bismark to Hitler" Stein writes in Paris France. It is a title that would have made terrible sense to anyone reading Stein's account of her adopted country, first published in England in the summer of 1940, as Paris fell to the Germans and the French signed an armistice agreement with their conquerors. In this same book Stein notes wryly that "there is a great deal of war-time in history." Her grim observation certainly captures the truth for anyone living in the twentieth or the twenty-first centuries, and it will be the business of this course to investigate what it means to live and write in a time of war.

It is a truism worth careful investigation that wars profoundly affect art and culture. We will not only seek to discover more fully just what this general assertion means; we will also study the writings around a number of different conflicts, trying to get some comparative sense of the ways we might compare and distinguish these writings and these wars from one another.

Michael Herr, toward the end of Dispatches, his book about the U.S. war in Viet Nam, tells us that war cannot ever be left behind: "Those who remember the past are condemned to repeat it too, that's a little history joke." Clearly, to bring war and writing together is to consider the ways wars are remembered and forgotten by those who have lived through them. Readings in this course will often revolve around issues of memory and memorialization, and we will be working throughout the term with a selection of the continually growing body of work concerning social and individual memory.

One of the more general aims of this course is to investigate the uses and abuses of words, disciplines, and categories of understanding that permeate the field of literary and cultural studies today: history and historicist understandings of culture; the vexed category of the political; popular culture and the status of the documentary; memory and trauma studies. We will read relevant critical and theoretical texts on these subjects each week.

Authors that we are likely to study will include but not be limited to Tim O'Brien, Frederick Manning, Erich Maria Remarque, Wilfred Owen, Charlotte Delbo, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, and Michael Herr. Students who are interested in focusing on visual materials (photographs, paintings, film) will have opportunities for that work. Modern wars have also been media events, and the nature of reporting and propaganda might be a subject for students' projects. A number of recent histories of wars have attempted to address more fully the experience of those wars for peoples other that the citizens of the United States and the most militarily powerful European combatants. There will be room for students to choose work in these areas that have traditionally been less fully studied by Anglo-American history as well. Course requirements will include in-class reports, a presentation of work in progress, and a final, extensive research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 498 — Directed Teaching
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENGLISH 499 — Directed Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR.STD./P.I.

ENGLISH 501 — Old English
Section 001, SEM
Old English.

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English.

ENGLISH 502 — Old English Literature
Section 001, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 3

After a brief review of the fundamentals, we will begin to translate a number of ancient and fascinating Old English poems.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 501. Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 503 — Middle English
Section 001, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers, and contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 508 — Discourse and Rhetoric
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Portnoy,Alisse Suzanne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 506. Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 526 — Literature and Culture
Section 001, SEM
The Rise and Fall of American Literature

Instructor: Howard,June M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

When and where was "American literature" invented? What role do academies — from elementary schools to graduate schools — play in defining and redefining it? Given powerful challenges to the practice of writing literary history in national terms, should we even be using the category — and if not, what will we substitute?

In this course we will examine the intellectual and institutional history of American literary scholarship, engaging both examples and critiques of its intertwined projects of nation-building and discipline-building. We will also discuss the field's current state and its future. Specific concerns include:

  • the cultural politics of national literatures, and of ‘literature' as an object of study;
  • the nature of claims about literature, history, and literary history;
  • the conceptual foundations of disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity;
  • the canon debates, and arguments for desegregated, multilingual American literature(s);
  • the relation of American literary studies to English Departments, Ethnic Studies, American Studies, Women's Studies, and other interdisciplines;
  • the classroom teaching of American literature;
  • the development of colleges and research universities in the United States, and the nature of the academic profession.

The class will, in other words, take an interdisciplinary approach to a particular case in the production of knowledge. It should be useful for anyone wishing to reflect critically on the history of the research university and the practices that produce and legitimate academic discourses. It is specifically designed to offer graduate students in English and American Culture the opportunity to examine the origins of their own situation.

The class is designed as an inquiry into its topic, not the presentation of a set of claims, and our meetings will proceed primarily by discussion; it should be possible to incorporate topics not mentioned above but of urgent concern to participants. Students will have considerable latitude in designing the topics for their term papers, to enable them to make connections between the course materials and their individual professional orientation and research interests.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 528 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

ENGLISH 529 — Topics in Drama
Section 001, LEC
Methodologies in Modern Drama

Instructor: Brater,Enoch

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in drama. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 535 — Contemporary Poetry
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: McDaniel,Raymond Clark

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on poetry written in English from 1945 to the present. Some experience of modern poetry written in the first decades of this century would be very useful, but is not essential.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 548 — Literature of the Modern Period
Section 001, REC
Introduction to Modernism

Instructor: Whittier-Ferguson,John A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on literature of the modern period. Specific topics vary by term and by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 549 — Contemporary Literature
Section 001, REC
Graphic Narrative

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Untitled Document

Graphic Narrative is a general term for Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Manga, Bandes Dessinées, Novelas Em Quadrinhos, Sequential Art, and even the Bayeux Tapestry. This seminar enrolls both advanced undergraduates (in ENGLISH 417 Senior Seminar, 4 credits) and graduate students (in ENGLISH 549 Contemporary Literature, 3 credits). We will use both primary and secondary readings to explore the modern history and theory of the field, the sociology of the field, and a rich assortment of excellent examples of many literary types within the field.

The written work consists of a daily reading journal, a shorter essay (1500-2400 words, which is approximately 5-8 double-spaced pages of text depending on font size and margins and excluding included images) and a longer essay (3000-4500 words, which is approximately 10-15 pages). In all three assignments, students are expected to consider both the form and the content of the materials read and to strive for insights that go substantially beyond the discussion in class. The shorter essay should be on a graphic (not chapter) children's book, and the longer essay should be either on some general aspect of graphic narrative (e.g., the use of framing, the use of thought bubbles, the use of color, the techniques of visual allusion, palimpsest, collage, the varieties of irony, the relations between drawing style and meaning, the handling of a specific theme, the uses of a specific image, cultural constraints on meaning, etc.) or on some aspect of the work of a single important graphic narrative artist, series, or genre. These essay projects require reading beyond that in the syllabus and consultation with and permission of the instructor. In the reading journal, students are expected to record

  1. any extrinsic details potentially relevant to a critical discussion of the work (including at least type of work, name and nationality of writer and/or illustrator, date and place of publication, publisher, format),
  2. observations as one reads, including page references and quotes (which may need to include photocopies), and
  3. conclusions and/or hypotheses and/or questions that seem noteworthy after reviewing (a) and (b) and perhaps the work as well.

The journals should be hand-written with two-inch margins all around because these journals will be exchanged at the beginning of each class meeting, read by a fellow student, and the contents commented on in the margins. The journal should be kept in a spiral-bound notebook into which can be glued copies of graphics if needed. Students should use these journals not only as a record of their reading of syllabus materials but also of any other course-related materials, and as a place to keep class notes and to record and sometimes work out essay topic ideas. When the journals are submitted at the end of the term, they should be accompanied by a printed, double-spaced, two-to-three page self-analysis of the worth (both educational and in terms of grade) of the journal to the student. The course grades will be based on participation (25%), journal + self-analysis (25%), children's book essay (20%), general essay (30%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 549 — Contemporary Literature
Section 002, REC
James Baldwin and the Black Novel, 1950-1990

Instructor: Zaborowska,Magdalena J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This weekly seminar, open to graduate and upper-level undergraduate students from American Culture, CAAS, and English begins with questioning the placement, if not entrapment, of James Baldwin's works in the Black male tradition of the "big three" writers, that is, along with Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison. Although the trinity of the male masters of the Black novel seemed to define the African American literary 1950's and the following three decades, the works of Gwendolyn Brooks, Anne Petry, Paule Marshall, Audre Lorde, Gloria Naylor, and Toni Morrison created a powerful counter-tradition that developed throughout the same period. As we shall see while reading Baldwin's Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953) and If Beale Street Could Talk (1974), this Black and queer transnational writer's works have much in common with the novels by these Black women, a perspective that challenges reading him as perpetually stuck in an Oedipal conflict with Wright. Far from feminizing Baldwin and essentializing Black women's literature, or segregating gendered and racialized readings, this class examines Baldwin's works in a trans-gender dialogue with women writers, with whom he shares the focus on space and place, life cycles of birth and death, and importance of the feminine and maternal as sources of artistic creativity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 572 — Workshop in Writing Fiction
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Delbanco,Nicholas F

WN 2007
Credits: 6

ENGLISH 572 is an advanced level workshop course in the writing (and reading) of fiction. Individual classes will consist of discussion of original student work, and occasional assigned reading. We will consider the aims of individual writers along with the effects of stories on readers and examine/practice the various mechanisms by which these are achieved (plot, character, dialogue, point of view, etc.).

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only. ENGLISH 571 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 575 — Workshop in Writing Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Taylor,G Keith

WN 2007
Credits: 6

The aim of this course is to help everyone develop and improve as poets. The methods for engendering new, ambitious poetry will vary, but they might include any of the following: completing catalyst assignments suggested to me by aspects of your own work; reading assigned poetry; writing in response to selected works; composing an ars poetica; experimenting with form and content; reading in fields other than literature; and engaging with aesthetic questions pertinent to the national conversation.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; ENGLISH 574 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 577 — Independent Study-Creative Writing
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-term MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 579 — Creative Writing-Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Moss,Thylias

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students from any field of inquiry to the reading and writing of Poams: products of acts of making in which poetry is reconfigured as a dynamic system according to principles of Limited Fork Poetics: the study of interacting language systems

in which language systems include all visual systems (including text as a visual form), all sonic systems, all tactile systems, and all olfactory systems. LFP has interest in exploring any act of making in any area for its aesthetic potential and its reconfiguration as a poam.

In Limited Fork Poetics, poetry becomes a dynamic system where (ultimately) there is no permanence as structure forms and reforms on every scale according to varying time scales simultaneously. We study communities of interaction and write and/or in some other visual and/or sonic and/or tactile way document what occurs in those systems or the subsystem(s) of our focus in simultaneously active visual, sonic, tactile, and olfactory communities. The impact of this thinking on poetry's assumptions including assumptions about page, metaphor, rhyme, access, ownership, and space will be considered as the class becomes a community of makers and simultaneously takes on the responsibilities of being a community of makers.

We will study and make products that explore both the wild and stable outcomes that are possible in Limited Fork Poetics. We will read a variety of texts from a variety of fields of inquiry in order to inspire thought about how dynamic possibilities can impact our entire existence and not just writing and related acts if making. We will supplement our exploration of conventional texts will a number of internet resources including iTunes University on ctools and three Limited Fork podcasts at the iTunes Music store. Students will learn to make digital poams and will have opportunity in the final composite project to depict digital forms of making as well as three dimensional forms.

Come to this course open to possibilities which perhaps can transform thinking.

Students are free to opt for convention, if willing and able to do so, after the conclusion of the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 627 — Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature
Section 001, SEM
Rhetoric, Law and Culture

Instructor: White,James Boyd

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the ways in which literary and legal texts and other texts from the public arena can be read together in mutually illuminating ways. The object is to work out a method of criticism by which this can be done. Our readings will have a triple focus: upon the language and culture in which (and through which) the writer works (this is a species of cultural criticism); upon the art by which he reconstitutes this language in her composition (this is a species of aesthetic and literary criticism); and upon the ethical and political relation the text creates with its reader, among its readers, and with those other people, not readers, about whom it speaks (this is a species of ethical and political criticism). The texts read vary from year to year. White, When Words Lose Their Meaning, is required reading. Several short papers will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 632 — Topics in Drama
Section 001, SEM
Performance Theory

Instructor: Worthen,William B

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will take as its starting point a familiar way of thinking about a familiar kind of performance: the stage performance of scripted drama. When we talk about a dramatic performance, we typically talk about the performance of something: I saw the Royal Shakespeare Company production of Antony and Cleopatra or the Berliner Ensemble production of Arturo Ui. What do we mean by that "of"? We surely can't mean "the text," since there are so many different texts used, even used up, in the process of making the performance. In what sense is our understanding of performance — now, in what Michael Joyce calls, puns fully intended, "the late age of print culture" — still linked to the transmission of writing, and to what extent do language-based models of performance enable and frustrate the analysis and understanding of performance, aesthetic or otherwise? Indeed, while "dramatic theatre" notions of performance perhaps have difficulty specifying the theoretical and ideological work of writing relative to performance, "performance studies" notions of performance generally regard "text-based" performance as insidiously, even oppressively overdetermined.

This course will attempt to chart an introduction to modern "performance theory" by charting several interrelated institutional and disciplinary trajectories: conceptions of dramatic and theatrical performance (involving some discussion of developing notions of dramatic genre, theories and practices of directing, actor training); textuality and its (mis?)representation of/in performance; performativity and its (mis?)uses; writing/performing ethnography; "performance studies" as practice, (anti)discipline, and institution. Although the specific reading/coverage of the course will depend in some part on students' backgrounds and interests, some readings will be more or less essential: you could expect to read work by Foucault, Derrida, Brecht, Artaud, Schechner, Turner, Conquergood, Phelan, Butler, Roach, Taylor, McKenzie, McGann;; we would be likely to touch (at least) on plays by, say, Ibsen, Beckett, Smith, Parks, as a means of being sure that we do in fact have a common language of dramatic/theatrical practice, and depending on the background and interests of the students we could read much more; performances/videos/films will be used as sites for working through theoretical problems in the idiom of performance — Bill T. Jones's still/here, Jennie Livingston's Paris is Burning, perhaps a Shakespeare or Beckett film, some form of immersive gaming perhaps, and of course some live performance as well.

Reading for the course will average roughly one book or several essays per week; texts of plays or recorded performances will also be part of regular preparation. Ideally, each student will make one or more presentations of the reading to initiate discussion. Writing will consist of a draft article (that is, of writing conceived as an article, with a specific audience — say, a specific journal — in mind), submitted at the end of classes, 20-30pp. Students more than encouraged to develop topics relevant to the (emergent?) direction of dissertation research. Possible weekly or bi-weekly short written responses as well.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 640 — Studies in Genre
Section 001, REC
Gender, Politics, Autobiography

Instructor: Smith,Sidonie A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 641 — Topics in the Medieval Period
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Tinkle,Theresa L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in literature of the medieval period. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 642 — Topics in the Renaissance
Section 001, SEM
Religion & Empire: Early Modern Atlantic.

Instructor: Gregerson,Linda K
Instructor: Juster,Susan M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Religious passions and conflicts drove much of the expansionist energy of post-Reformation Europe and provided both a rationale and a practical mode of organizing the dispersal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people from Europe to the Americas. During the formative period of European exploration, settlement and conquest of the Americas, from roughly 1500 to 1700, Europe's Christians, confronting the new and unfamiliar, were forced to explain and defend the old, often in novel and startling ways. This course will look at the dynamic expansion, fragmentation, and dispersal of religious communities and ideas in the 16th and 17th centuries through four interrelated categories: translation (the process of rendering familiar beliefs and texts in a new idiom); dissent (the challenge of defining and maintaining boundaries between the authorized and the unauthorized); diaspora (the experience of exile and estrangement); and transplantation (the rooting of the sacred in alien environments). All of these themes highlight the tremendous instability that the wars of the Reformation and imperial expansion introduced into organized religious life in the 16th and 17th centuries, on both sides of the Atlantic, and the creative adaptations of belief, practice, and community life that followed in the wake of these seismic events. Our texts will include major literary and historical documents of the period as well as important scholarly interventions. We are eager to convene this course as an intensive interdisciplinary conversation and we welcome students from American Culture, Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Sociology, Romance Languages, Art History, and other related disciplines, as well as those from our home departments of History and English. This course is sponsored by the Atlantic Studies Initiative and also satisfies the MEMS (Medieval and Early Modern Studies) proseminar requirement

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 651 — Topics in Colonial and Republican American Literature
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in colonial and republican American literature. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ENGLISH 653 — Topics in Twentieth Century American Literature
Section 001, SEM
Reparative Fictions

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We will survey the critical history of a genre in American Literature of the 20th century, and explore interdisciplinary frameworks for understanding its significance; there will be a substantial amount of secondary reading. The class will proceed primarily by discussion, and students will have considerable range in designing their written projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 675 — Creative Writing Project — Thesis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Pollack,Eileen K

WN 2007
Credits: 6

One academic term of independent work on completion of the thesis for the MFA. Students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 675 — Creative Writing Project — Thesis
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Howe,Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 6

One academic term of independent work on completion of the thesis for the MFA. Students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Advisory Prerequisite: MFA students only; ENGLISH 571 or 574 and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 822 — Seminar: Critical Theory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Soni,Vivasvan

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar in critical theory. Specific topics vary by term and by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 841 — Seminar: An Historical Period
Section 001, SEM
Wom Lit Culture in Med England

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Seminar on a historical period.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 842 — Seminar: An Historical Period
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Zemgulys,Andrea Patricia

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar in topics in an historical period. Specific topics vary by term and by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 851 — Seminar: American Literature
Section 001, SEM
African American Literary Left

Instructor: Wald,Alan M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

"African American Writers on the Left" is a seminar sponsored by the English Department that will meet once a week to dialogue about the complex interaction of African-American creative writers with left-wing political movements. Readings will span the era of Great Depression radicalism of the 1930s to the advent of Black Power and the New Left in the 1960s. These are decades when "social protest" was the predominant theme of African American culture; realism, naturalism, and modernism were often infused with "noir" techniques; gender and masculinity were intensively explored; and a "Black Marxist" sensibility was very much present. We will cover many of the key texts and authors African American Literature that are crucial for any Ph. D. examination list in U.S. literature: Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Lorraine Hansberry, Gwendolyn Brooks, and so forth. We may also view films and documentaries about the Black radicalism/Black Arts. Requirements can be adapted to the needs of individual members of the seminar, but will include a short essay for diagnostic purposes; a longer research paper; and collaboration in seminar presentations. Contact: Prof. Alan Wald, awald@umich.edu The following books have been ordered for the seminar at Shaman Drum Books; however, I have not yet received confirmation that all are available.

James Smethurst, THE BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT (U. of North Carolina Press, 2005) Jean Toomer, CANE (Liveright, 1975) Richard Wright, LAWD TODAY (Northeastern U., 1963) Richard Wright, BLACK BOY (Harper Perennial Classics, 1998) Langston Hughes, THE BEST OF SIMPLE (Hill and Wang) Ann Petry, THE NARROWS (Beacon, 1988) Frank London Brown, TRUMBULL PARK (Northeastern U. Press, 2005) Lorraine Hansberry, LES BLANCS: THE COLLECTED LAST PLAYS, 1994 Gwendolyn Brooks, SELECTED POEMS (Harper Perennial, 1999)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 862 — Seminar: Authors
Section 001, SEM
Wordsworth and Coleridge

Instructor: Pinch,Adela N

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar on authors. Specific topics vary by term and by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program.

ENGLISH 992 — Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have a GSI Award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 340 of 340