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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ENVIRON
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ENVIRON 102 — Extreme Weather
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Samson,Perry J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: NS

This course provides an introduction to the physics of extreme weather events. The course uses weather disasters and threats to illustrate the physical laws governing the atmosphere.

We examine solar eruptions, ice ages, climate change, monsoons, El Niño, hurricanes, floods, droughts, heat waves, thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornados, and other extreme atmospheric events to illustrate the basic physical laws that produce these events. Participants are expected to apply these principles to a series of homework assignments including hands-on weather forecasting and analysis of storm events.

Required resources for this course include:

  1. An on-line subscription to XamPREP: Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens with
  2. (Optionally) A hard-copy version of Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens (it's redundant but some really prefer to also have the traditional paper copy), and
  3. A copy of Extreme Weather by Chris Burt.

ENVIRON 105 — Our Changing Atmosphere
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Penner,Joyce E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course considers the science needed to understand human-induced threats to the atmospheric environment, with special emphasis on the global changes that are taking place, or are anticipated. We will discuss the greenhouse effect (and its impact on climate), ozone depletion, the polar ozone holes, and urban air pollution. Some basic meteorology will be presented, including how climate changes might affect the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes. Students will have access to real-time weather information via computer. This lecture course is intended for non-science concentrators, and there are no prerequisites. Grades will be based on three one-hour exams (no final exam) and homework.

ENVIRON 111 — Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit for seniors.

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid, interconnected changes now occurring in the Earth system — its climate, human population, resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II — Human Impacts guides students in learning about our natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-supported introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, our impacts on land, air, and water resources, modern energy and climate policy and pressures on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is suitable for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I, its companion course on the physical processes. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning skills, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty. This course is one of three core courses required for the Global Change Minor.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly lab exercises, course participation, a web poster project, midterms, and a final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn, among other topics, about:

Human Population Growth Its History and Social Influences Detection of Global Environmental Change Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Human Impacts on Resources Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources Energy and Climate Issues Urban and Industrial Environments Deforestation and Desertification Biodiversity Achieving Sustainable Development Economics of Development International Treaties and Government Our Common Future Models of the Future

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

ENVIRON 119 — Introductory Geology Lectures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted if completed or enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 120. No credit granted if completed both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

GEOSCI 119 is a basic single-term course in introductory geology concentrating on the evolution of the Earth in physical and chemical terms. Reference to the interaction of the external biosphere — atmosphere — hydrosphere with the earth's interior is an essential component of the course.

Topics covered include:

  • plate tectonics: continental collision and fragmentation
  • tsunamis, earthquakes and volcanoes
  • evolution and extinction: dinosaurs and the fossil record
  • glaciers, global warming and climate change
  • geologic time

Lectures three hours per week. A separate discussion section for one hour each week is scheduled for review and discussion of topics covered in class.

To also enroll in the Intro Geology Lab, register for any section of GEOSCI 118. The GEOSCI 118 laboratory provides a practical study of minerals, rocks, fossils and geologic maps. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in both GEOSCI 119 and 118, since the lab sessions complement the lectures and discussions.

NOTE: GEOSCI 119 plus 118 replaces GEOSCI 117.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak, second edition, W.W. Norton & Company, New York. ISBN: 0-393-92502-1

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON or GEOSCI 118 for the lab

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 001, SEM
Uncommon Ground: Introduction to Environmental Literature

Instructor: Anderson,Marjorie Caldwell

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

How do different writers represent landscape? How do writers and readers understand the role of the natural world in human culture? What are the relationships between urban and rural environments? These questions inform our work together, the core of which is class discussions, reading, and writing. Authors include Mark Twain, Norman Maclean, Willa Cather, Barry Lopez, and Annie Dillard.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 002, SEM
Emerging Diseases

Instructor: Foufopoulos,Johannes; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem, Theme

In this seminar we look beyond the fright created by the popular media and examine the societal, economic, and ecological factors that drive the appearance of new diseases. We learn not only about the fascinating biology of emerging pathogens but also how various processes interact to produce an outbreak.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 160 — Habitats and Organisms: Terrestrial Ecosystems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Witter,John A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Introduces students to fundamental principles of terrestrial ecology and ecosystem management. Gives examples of common habitats in North America, emphasizing the vegetative components. Another focus is on various types of organisms that comprise these terrestrial communities. Finally, examines current threats to the health of terrestrial ecosystems and challenges present in ecosystem management.

The lecture component will introduce students to the fundamental principles of terrestrial ecology through four thematic areas: Basic Concepts, Organisms, Habitats and Ecosystems, and Key Issues in Ecosystem Management. The first thematic area, Basic Concepts, introduces students to important foundation ideas in ecology through case studies of current, prominent issues such as the Healthy Forest Initiative and oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Ideas covered in this section include definitions of important terms such as species and habitat, descriptions of biomes, importance of photosynthesis, productivity, nutrient cycling, energy flow, and change in ecosystems such as succession, recruitment, and disturbance. In the second thematic area, Organisms, we discuss biodiversity and the infinite variety of life on earth. Specific examples include white-tailed deer populations in Michigan, the incredible diversity of structure and function in insects, and biology and ecology of aspen — which is the world's largest organism due to its clonal nature. Habitats and Ecosystems, the third thematic area, emphasizes habitats of North America, along with stressing the importance of the vegetative component of habitats and ecosystems. The final thematic area, Key Issues in Ecosystem Management, examines current threats to the health of terrestrial ecosystems and the challenges presented in ecosystem management. The discussion component is a hands-on experiential learning setting for the students. It concentrates on critical thinking skills; exercises such as tree measurements, mapping, and designing a space in the urban landscape; and focused discussions on organisms, habitats, ecosystems, and management situations.

Three exams comprise 55% of the course grade; nine discussion section exercises comprise 35% of the course grade; participation comprises 10% of the course grade.

ENVIRON 201 — Ecological Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Webb,Paul W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course explores principles and concepts underlying issues of use and management of natural resources in lectures and discussions. Ecological principles are explored in the context of human behavioral, ethical, socio-economic and institutional factors, emphasizing the necessity of interdisciplinary approaches. Topics include biodiversity, endangered species, population, exploitation practices, tropical deforestation, agriculture, air and water pollution, energy production and use, and waste disposal, at local to global scales. The Great Lakes Basin is used as a local laboratory source of examples, successes and failures in addressing ecological issues. An important part of the course is a project in which students can explore their own particular interests within this subject area.

Evaluation is based on a mid-term and a final exam, performance on several small projects and one larger final project, and a participation in the class. Exams will include short-essay answers. The final project will include a public display.

Books and materials are estimated to cost approximately $150.

ENVIRON 206 — How the Earth Works: The Water Cycle and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 119, or 120. Those with credit for GEOSCI 109 may only elect GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206 for 1 credit.

This course describes behavior of earth materials in the surficial environment. Water is the main transport agent in the geological cycle; its unique properties and exchange rates among oceans, lakes, rivers, and groundwater are one focus. Interaction between water reservoirs and physical and chemical weathering of soils, sediments, and rocks also are discussed. Impact of humans on the surficial environment is a unifying theme because we can affect hydrologic and geochemical cycles. No special background required. Two lectures per week. Evaluation based on exams and participation.

Required text: The Blue Planet, by Skinner, Porter & Botkin.

ENVIRON 209 — Introduction to Physical Geography: The Earth System
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Blum,Joel D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 144. Those with credit for GEOSCI 111 may only elect GEOG 201/GEOSCI 201 for 3 credits.

This introduction to physical geography emphasizes the nature and dynamics of the earth system including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and solid earth, and their interactions. Topics include seasons, heat balance, global warming, ozone destruction and circulation, moisture, precipitation, clouds, groundwater, ocean circulation, waves and tides, plate tectonics, landform evolution and soil development, the biosphere, climate evolution, and global change.

ENVIRON 211 — Social Sciences and Environmental Problems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Helfand,Gloria E; homepage
Instructor: Zint,Michaela T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course will introduce students to the range of social sciences and will show how the insights gained from these sciences can help us understand and address environmental problems. The first part of the course will provide an overview of the social sciences. As part of this overview, the perspectives of anthropology, communication/education, economics, political science, sociology, and psychology will be used to examine the causes of and solutions for environmental problems. The second part of the course will focus on two current environmental issues and will explore how the concepts and tools from the social sciences are, or can be, used to address these problems.

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

The oceans of earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 256 — Culture, Adaptation, and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course explores anthropological approaches to human relationships with their environments and resources. We will examine diverse conceptions of culture and nature, and time and space, and the interaction between contemporary global forces, indigenous societies, and their ecosystems. Particular interest for complementary materialist and culturalist analysis of human-environment relationships, through cultural anthropology case studies of hunting and gathering, pastoralism, farming, commerce, colonialism, modernization, and globalisation issues. We will read several short books about different people, places, and environmental problems (E.E. Evans-Pritchard's "The Nuer"; Colin Turnbull's "The Forest People"; Joe Kane's "Savages"...). These books will not only provide case studies, but will also show us the way cultural anthropology has changed over the years, expanding its range of theories, descriptive practices, and audience on matters of culture, adaptation, and environment. There will also be a selection of articles about the ideas and concepts that are relevant for analyzing changing human-environment relationships, emphasizing today's interactions between economic growth, environmental change, and human health.

Frequent film clips and screenings will complement the readings, and assignments/exams will be largely writing, in short answer and essay form.

ENVIRON 281 — General Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zak,Donald R; homepage
Instructor: King,Aaron Alan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381.

The course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations, and communities of both plants and animals. Course topics include the roles of physical and biotic factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms; the dynamics of population growth; species interactions including competition, predation, mutualism; the structure of ecological communities; ecological succession; and applications of ecology to problems of environment and resource management. BIOLOGY 281 is a suitable prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in ecology.

There will be lectures and discussions. Three exams will constitute the main basis of evaluation.

Textbook: Elements of Ecology, Smith and Smith. 6th edition.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 and a laboratory course in Chemistry

ENVIRON 284 — Environmental Geology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 148. Those with credit for GEOSCI 147 may elect GEOSCI/ENVIRON 284 for only 3 credits.

Environmental Geology examines the interactions between today's human society and our dynamic planet. It begins with geologic materials and processes, and goes on to specific topics that include soils, ground water, natural hazards (volcanism, landslides, earthquakes, floods), land surface and sea level, pollution and global warming, energy resources and waste disposal.

Previous experience in geological or environmental sciences is not required. The course includes two, 1.5 hr lectures and one discussion period (in which homework exercises are discussed) per week. Evaluation is by means of class participation, exercises, and two exams.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:
Geology and the Environment, 4th Edition
Bernard W. Pipkin (University of Southern California), Dee D. Trent (Citrus College), Richard Hazlett (Pomona College)
Publisher: Brooks Cole; 4th edition (March 30, 2004)
ISBN: 0534490514
Laboratory manual: TBA

ENVIRON 300 — Special Problems and Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study covering different resource issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 301 — Nature, Culture and Landscape
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diamond,Beth

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

to This course examines human landscape interventions throughout Western history within a series of spatial archetypes that embody various layers of the human/nature dialectic. Focus is on the interplay of cultural beliefs, values, social realities and artistic expressions within the medium of landscape and their impact on contemporary environmental perception.

Course will introduce students to the field of landscape studies, exploring topics relating to landscape history, perception and design. Focus is on the interplay of cultural beliefs and values, social realities and artistic expression through the medium of landscape, and the subsequent impact on contemporary perception of the environment. Course has relevance to anyone interested in the relationship between humans and the natural world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior/Senior/permission of instructor

ENVIRON 303 — Topics in Environmental Natural Science
Section 001, LEC
GIS Explorations

Instructor: Breck,James Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course uses geographic information systems (GIS) to help understand and analyze environmental problems as well as spatial questions in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. A hands-on approach is used to demonstrate GIS principles using a wide variety of examples.

Course requirements:
Maps, graphs, or tables will be prepared during each class session, demonstrating GIS concepts, skills, and analyses with examples from a variety of disciplines.

A term project is required demonstrating the use of GIS to complete an analyses involving spatial data. Students will each present a 10-minute PowerPoint presentation, including maps, images and charts or tables that show the results of their analysis, and submit a hard copy of the project, including metadata descriptions of the derived products.

There will be one midterm exam and a final exam (short answer format). The final exam will be cumulative.

ENVIRON 303 — Topics in Environmental Natural Science
Section 002, LEC
Chemical Principles of Environmental Pollution

Instructor: Meliker,Jaymie R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Special topics course seeks to examine environmental problems and issues from a humanities perspective. Specific topics vary term to term.

ENVIRON 304 — Topics in Culture and Environment
Section 001, SEM
Environmental Anthropology

Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar reviews the history of environmental anthropology, and explores recent trends and directions in environmental anthropology. We will interrogate the boundaries of this field of knowledge, considering works that range from human ecology, to political economy (and political ecology), to structuralist and post structuralist analyses of human relationships to the natural world. We will read a balanced load of ethnography and theory, and will also see a range of films. In our film viewings and readings we will be emphasizing a few key contexts about which have been produced works from divergent traditions of environmental anthropology: The Congo basin in equatorial Africa, Indonesia, and the forests of the Amazon basin. Three short papers will be the most important basis for grading, along with course participation and presentations during seminar discussions. Permission for this course to be a meet together with the Program in the Environment is pending; the home department would be anthropology.

Required texts include: Anna Tsing, In the Realm of the Diamond Queen; Richard Roy Grinker, Houses in the Rainforest; and Laura Rival, Trekking Through History.

ENVIRON 306 — Global Water
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Princen,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course engages students in one of the critical environmental issues of the 21st century: freshwater scarcity. It is an issue that intersects with other environmental, economic and political issues such as food, biodiversity, trade, international security, global justice. Questions are raised concerning international cooperation, local-global interactions, collective action, sustainability, development, trade, North-South relations, equity, and diplomatic practice. The first part of the course deals with substance — water use and misuse — and the processes of reaching agreement — negotiation. Water includes the biophysical conditions and the social determinants of increasing scarcity. Negotiations include theory (from game theory to legal to interpersonal and diplomatic) and practice (one-on-one negotiating, mediating, multilateral, diplomacy). The second part of the course is a multiparty negotiation where students and staff are entirely in role. The course combines features of a seminar (readings and discussion), a lecture, and a lab (simulation).

Intended audience: Primarily juniors and seniors with a background in environmental policy and international relations.

Course Requirements: Active participation; several quizzes, mid-term, and take-home final; team research and poster presentation.

ENVIRON 310 — Toxicology: The Study of Environmental Chemicals and Disease
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Loch-Caruso,Rita; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course explores relationships between environmental chemicals and adverse human health outcomes, providing an introduction to the study of toxicology. More specifically, the course examines chemical and biological factors that determine and influence toxicity, and the role of chemical exposure in the development of specific diseases such as cancer, birth defects, and reproductive disorders.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory Biology and Chemistry.

ENVIRON 311 — Rivers, Lakes, and Wetlands: Introduction to Aquatic Ecosystems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wiley,Michael J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Introduces fundamental physical/chemical/biological concepts and basic techniques necessary for the study of aquatic ecosystems. Covers physical-chemical processes, overview of aquatic fauna and flora, and surveys major types of aquatic ecosystems including rivers and streams, lakes, wetlands, oceans. Interactions between the hydrological cycle and the landscape provide the basic theme around which ecosystem presentations are organized. Laboratory sections present basic taxonomic materials during the first half of the course; during later half lab sessions will focus on field trips to representative environments and on the collection of biological specimens for required individual collections.   

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in BIOLOGY or permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 350 — The Built Environment: Introduction to Landscape Change
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Michener,David C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The content of this course is broad, but critically important for helping informed citizens learn to look at the things we build and the spaces we inhabit. Built environments affect our entire lives, yet we rarely focus on their influence. This course bridges the natural science, social science, and humanities realms anticipated in the Program in the Environment. Course lectures and readings emphasize breadth over depth. Student case study work, however, will develop depth in particular landscape topics.

This course is an introduction to the role of humans in shaping the built environment. It explores physical design and cultural meaning at various scales and contexts in the landscape. We explore the power of physical design and planning to enrich the human spirit, provide functional needs, interpret cultural history, and sustain natural systems. The course is concerned with exploring how Americans shape space and how, in turn, space shapes people. We take a topical approach, dealing with different aspects of landscape change, design, and planning. The course illustrates how humans have adapted and shaped landscapes for functional and aesthetic goals. A unifying theme is emphasized throughout: the important link between natural and social processes of landscape change. Landscape design and planning professional skills will not be taught directly; the goal is not to prepare students for landscape architecture practice. This course, however, is designed to encourage students to think about land from many different perspectives. Prepare to think, talk and write about villages, mobile homes, theme parks, shopping malls, freeways and farms, among other built forms. You will be asked to consider many aspects of these diverse places — economic, social, historical, political, and ecological.

Three exams per term. Five assignments, including a semester-long journal exercise and four other exercises that have two to five pages of writing each.

Intended audience: Sophomores and Juniors in the Program in the Environment, or elsewhere in LSA. The course should appeal both to students interested in environmental literacy generally, and to those following specific environmental career tracks.

ENVIRON 361 — The Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: De Young,Raymond K

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the techniques available for changing individual environmental stewardship behavior with a focus on achieving durable change. It will be argued that individuals require information and motivation before they are willing to alter their behavior. Furthermore, only certain types and combinations of information and motivation result in long-lasting behavior change. A portion of the course will focus on mind-body techniques and their role in promoting mental restoration and integrated wellness. These states are discussed as possible pre-conditions to deep environmental awareness, concern and stewardship. Students participate in team-based research in which they investigate walking routes in Ann Arbor neighborhoods. The research goal is to design behavior change techniques that encourage regular walking along routes identified as having the potential to enhance mental restoration and environmental awareness.

ENVIRON 370 — Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Quinn,Kelly Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.   

ENVIRON 375 — Environmental and Resource Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Helfand,Gloria E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 471 or 472.

This course focuses on how basic economic concepts — supply, demand, and opportunity cost — can be used to understand and manage a wide range of environmental problems. Topics include the sources of market failure for environmental goods, externalities and policy approaches for their control, discounting and benefit-cost analysis, nonmarket valuation, and management of nonrenewable and renewable resources. The emphasis is on conceptual understanding rather than formulas or solution algorithms; students have to understand economic reasoning more than they will use math. The tests and much of the homework assignments are short-answer questions that require students to explain their reasoning. Lectures will cover key concepts; discussion sections and readings will provide reinforcement through examples and problem-solving. Students completing this course will have an improved understanding of the economics paradigm, the sources of environmental problems, and some ideas for their solution.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ENVIRON 376 — Environmental Ethics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bouma,Rolf T

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The fact that humanity's relationship to nature has gone awry is rarely disputed, but the proposed cures are manifold. How should humans value the non-human world? Do humans have ethical duties to entities other than fellow humans?

This course investigates a variety of proposed answers that claim to better situate humans with respect to nature. Such systems include variations on anthropocentrism, including a number of e-centric cousins (ecocentrism, biocentrism, zoocentrism, etc.) as well as movements such as deep ecology and ecofeminism. Current questions and controversies will be used to highlight the alternative visions that these various philosophies offer. Also considered will be the components of personal and communal ethics that lead to changes in praxis.

ENVIRON 377 — Literature and the Environment
Section 001, LEC
Imagining Wild America

Instructor: Knott Jr,John R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

The course will examine a series of interrelated questions about how we imagine and live with wild nature in America, including evolving cultural attitudes toward wildness and "wilderness"; the work of managing wildness (as in Yellowstone National Park); efforts to preserve or restore wild nature; understandings of place; and the porousness of boundaries between nature and culture. Texts will include selections from Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and contemporary nature writers; Gary Snyder's The Practice of the Wild and selected poems; poetry by Mary Oliver; James Welch's evocation of Plains Indian life in his historical novel Fool's Crow; Terry Tempest Williams' Refuge; and T.C. Boyle's futuristic A Friend of the Earth. Assignments will involve a combination of paper and journal writing and a final examination.


This course fulfills the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 004, IND

Instructor: Grese,Robert E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 035, IND

Instructor: Savage,Phillip E

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 087, IND

Instructor: Mendelson,Nina A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 103, IND

Instructor: Rabe,Barry George; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 398 — Environment Internship Program
Section 116, IND

Instructor: Currie,William S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ENVIRON 399 — Junior Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bierbaum,Rosina M; homepage
Instructor: Bavington,Dean Louis

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This course starts Program in the Environment Honors students on their research projects. During the term, students develop a topic of interest into a research proposal. This requires identifying the topic, accessing pertinent literature, finding a faculty sponsor, developing a research design, and writing a research proposal. Course readings and discussions will focus on research methodology and dissemination of research findings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 409 — Ecology of Fishes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diana,James Stephen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Ecology.

ENVIRON 409 — Ecology of Fishes
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Diana,James Stephen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Ecology.

ENVIRON 418 — Biology and Management of Insects
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Witter,John A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules: concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students], interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

FOR 2 CREDITS ELECT SEC 006; FOR 3 CREDITS ELECT SEC 005; FOR 4 CREDITS ELECT SEC 002 OR SEC 003 AND SEC 001.

ENVIRON 418 — Biology and Management of Insects
Section 005, LEC

Instructor: Witter,John A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules: concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students], interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

FOR 2 CREDITS ELECT SEC 006; FOR 3 CREDITS ELECT SEC 005; FOR 4 CREDITS ELECT SEC 002 OR SEC 003 AND SEC 001.

ENVIRON 418 — Biology and Management of Insects
Section 006, LEC

Instructor: Witter,John A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules: concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students], interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

FOR 2 CREDITS ELECT SEC 006; FOR 3 CREDITS ELECT SEC 005; FOR 4 CREDITS ELECT SEC 002 OR SEC 003 AND SEC 001.

ENVIRON 449 — Organizational Theory and Change
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Romani,John H

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The ability of any society to bring about improvements in its environment is heavily dependent on the effectiveness of the administrative arrangements used to implement programs developed to accomplish these ends. Within this context, the role and function of the various organizational entities created to administer environmental programs, along with the processes by which these units operate, are critical factors in determining whether the goals for environmental betterment will be achieved. The purpose of this course is to assist the student develop an understanding of how these entities are structured, relate to one another, and operate in the special milieu that constitutes the field of environmental policy.

ENVIRON 467 — Biogeochemical Cycles
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carroll,Mary Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Biogeochemical cycles describe how carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other elements cycle through not only the atmosphere, the oceans, and the landmasses of the earth. This course is useful to students in many fields including engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry, biology, geology, natural resources, and public health. The biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur; the atmosphere and oceans as reservoirs and reaction media; the fate of natural and human-made sources of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds; the interactions among major biogeochemical cycles and resultant global change: greenhouse gases, acid rain, and ozone depletion.

TEXT: Global Environment: Water, Air, and Geochemical Cycles, Berner and Berner, Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, CHEM 210, and PHYSICS 240 (or 260).

ENVIRON 475 — Environmental Law
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Churchill,Sally Jo

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Introduces students to environmental law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic torts, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities, public trust doctrine and regulatory takings. Additional areas include administrative law and constitutional law as they relate to environmental law. Students learn about environmental law by studying court decisions and statutes, watching A Civil Action, listening to guest lecturers, and taking field trips.

ENVIRON 490 — War and the Environment: A Lethal Reciprocity
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Singer,J David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Many of us study, and perhaps worry about, war. Many of us study, and perhaps worry about environmental degradation. But few of us study or worry about them at the same time. In this not-such-fun upper-class seminar, students will do exactly that. We begin with the recognition that: a) war and the preparation for war typically lead to depletion and degradation of the biosphere; and b) resource mal-distributions, depletion, and degradation can frequently lead to armed conflict within and between territorial states. The success of the weekly seminar meetings will be largely dependent on student preparation, in the care and thought that they put into the required and personally selected readings, as well as their ability to engage in lively and mature conversation. My ability to guide and inform the discussion will also help, but more than forty years of fairly competent experience should create a constructive but skeptical, and friendly but precise mode of conversation. Frequency and quality of student participation will account for about 10% of their grade.

Course Requirements: Participation in weekly discussions including, but not limited to, the ability to summarize and evaluate assigned readings orally. One five page paper. One 8-page paper. Optional abstract assignment.

Intended Audience: Junior and seniors in Program in the Environment, Political Science, or other departments with interests in environmental issues and international politics.

Class Format: One 3 hour seminar, once per week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Coursework in environment or political science

ENVIRON 499 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The primary goal of the course is to carry out the Honors thesis research, with guidence and support of a faculty sponsor. Class sessions in the Winter term provide the opportunity to discuss thesis progress and problems, issues related to writing the thesis, and preparation for the final presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENVIRON 399 and permission of instructor.

 
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