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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = WLIT
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 262 — Introduction to Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the Reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas.

AAPTIS 269 — Introduction to Turkish Civilizations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This lecture-and-discussion course will teach the basic features of Turkish civilizations from the earliest time in the 6th century to the 20th century, from the viewpoint of cultural history. We will discuss the issue of bonds between the Turkish peoples on both the linguistic and on the cultural level. Besides an overview of the history of Turkish Empires with a special focus on the Ottoman Empire, emphasis will be placed on common cultural elements. These include tribal origins and tribal life, myths of origins as preserved in the epic literature, religious developments from "shamanism" to monotheistic religions, as well as aspects of material culture and arts.

Regular attendance and participation in the discussions, a midterm paper and a final paper will determine success in this course.

Textbook: Carter Findley: The Turks in world history. New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.

More (mandatory) readings will be made available through a course website (tba).


AAPTIS 331 — Introduction to Arab Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed to give students an extensive survey of the cultural characteristics of the Arab world by situating the practices and traditions of the Arab world into their own unique setting. The material chosen, both for the lecture and for reading, focuses on issues of ethnic diversity that define the Arab world in particular and place into a greater multi-cultural realm. Special attention will be given to family, gender relations, national and religious minorities, East-West cultures and relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arabic art and music. The course material will be explored through lectures and videos supported by listening and viewing guides in addition to discussion based upon the assigned readings. In both their writings and in the class discussions, students discuss the meaning of culture and ethnicity and how misunderstanding these principles can lead to forms of stereotyping, intolerance, and racism. There will be emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Moreover, the course is accompanied by an interactive website utilizing the UM Course Tools Software. Grades will be based upon class participation, short essays, and a final project. Material: Course pack and website.

AAPTIS 462 — The Rise of Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course provides an intensive introduction to the history of the rise of Islam. The period covered is roughly 500-950 CE.

It covers:

  • the Near Eastern and Mediterranean world in late antiquity;
  • Arabia before Islam;
  • the life of Muhammad and the earliest Muslim community;
  • the early Islamic conquests in the Near East, Central Asia, North Africa, and Spain;
  • the Caliphate as a political structure;
  • the emerging systems of Islamic theology and law; and
  • the astonishingly rapid growth and flourishing of a new, Islamic civilization throughout much of the Old World.

Major themes include:

  • contact and conflict between urban and nomadic populations;
  • political and sectarian divisions;
  • relations among the various religions and peoples;
  • travel and commerce;
  • new forms in literature, architecture and other areas.

Much of the reading consists of original sources translated from the Arabic. The great world history of al-Tabari (839-923) provides a constant point of reference, as look back at these events from al-Tabari's perspective.

Prerequisites. It is best if you already have the basic background course, AAPTIS 461 / History 442 or equivalent. However, this is not strictly required, if you can convince the instructor.

Requirements. These include a midterm examination, a final examination, and occasional short quizzes. Four short papers will also be assigned, 3-5 pages each. Topics for the first three papers will be assigned in class; the fourth paper will be on a topic of your choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Taught in English.

AAPTIS 467 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

AAPTIS 474 — An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

In the period under discussion (16th-20th Centuries), Armenian literature flourished mostly in the Armenian dispersion. Alongside traditional literature in Classical Armenian, there had long emerged a new, secular literary trend, expressed in Middle Armenian. Responding to a growing national awareness, Armenian writers in the 19th century revised some of the principal elements of Armenian identity and placed a greater emphasis on its political aspects. Such trends and many innovative ones continued into the 20th century, but the Genocide of 1915 brought Western Armenian literature to an abrupt end. This tradition survived in the post-Genocide dispersion, at the same time as a new literature began to emerge in Soviet Armenia. This course will focus on a wide range of issues that reshaped Armenian letters in the modern period: from recovered and fresh ideas, renewed awareness and genres throughout the 16th-18th centuries, to the clash, in subsequent centuries, of old and new values; identity, legitimacy and continuity; nationalism, nationhood, and literary reactions to violence; and cultural, aesthetic and social concerns, all against a historical background.

AAPTIS 488 — History of Arabic Literature in English
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa as the moralistic and didactic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet Muhammad will be examined in detail.

Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists, will illustrate the intellectual vitality and values of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arabic culture over extended periods of time and diversity of location. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentations of essays to the class. Six essays will be required. These will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

ACABS 122 — Introduction to the New Testament
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Although it has influenced the Western world more than any other book, the New Testament — having originated almost 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean world — is not easy to understand. This course will, first of all, introduce the student to the historical, religious, and social setting of the New Testament. Then, we shall look at the various New Testament writings. They must be allowed to speak for themselves and not be clouded by any denominational or sectarian program. The student will be introduced to the insights and methods of modern scholarship when dealing with questions such as: What did the various New Testament writings really intend to say? How did they say it? Why did they say it? Finally, the problem of the development of early Christian doctrine will be addressed, albeit briefly. Why were some of the early Christian writings excluded from the New Testament canon? There will be two midterms and a final exam.

ACABS 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

AMCULT 327 — Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carroll,Amy Sara

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course considers the relationship between Latino/a literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production. A variety of topics is addressed in the study of such Latino/a literatures of the US as Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American.

ARMENIAN 416 — An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

In the period under discussion (16th-20th Centuries), Armenian literature flourished mostly in the Armenian dispersion. Alongside traditional literature in Classical Armenian, there had long emerged a new, secular literary trend, expressed in Middle Armenian. Responding to a growing national awareness, Armenian writers in the 19th century revised some of the principal elements of Armenian identity and placed a greater emphasis on its political aspects. Such trends and many innovative ones continued into the 20th century, but the Genocide of 1915 brought Western Armenian literature to an abrupt end. This tradition survived in the post-Genocide dispersion, at the same time as a new literature began to emerge in Soviet Armenia. This course will focus on a wide range of issues that reshaped Armenian letters in the modern period: from recovered and fresh ideas, renewed awareness and genres throughout the 16th-18th centuries, to the clash, in subsequent centuries, of old and new values; identity, legitimacy and continuity; nationalism, nationhood, and literary reactions to violence; and cultural, aesthetic and social concerns, all against a historical background.

ASIAN 152 — Introduction to Japanese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Designed primarily for freshmen and sophomores, the course focuses on a few recurrent concerns in the Japanese tradition from the earliest times to the present. Topics to be considered include man and nature, language and culture, the individual and the state, men and women, and death and transcendence. Readings in mythology and representative works of the literature and religious texts, lectures, discussions, and short papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

ASIAN 205 — Modern East Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer
Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the PRC; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan; liberation and division into the two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3)the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and the rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on EA, the course explores the inter-relations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of HISTORY 204; however that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. There will be a midterm and final exam.

ASIAN 220 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pranke,Patrick Arthur

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of Asian religions. It aims to cover the historical development (from ancient times down to the present) of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Shinto, etc., in cross-cultural settings that will include India, China, Korea, and Japan. Readings will include both primary texts (concerning doctrine, philosophy and religious practices) in English translation and secondary scholarship.

ASIAN 222 — Great Books of Japan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Introduction in translation to books which have influenced the Japanese people through the ages.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

ASIAN 251 — Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Daoism

Instructor: Elstein,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Is there such a thing as "Daoism," and if so, what is it? In this course we will examine some of the philosophical and religious traditions that are categorized as Daoism, focusing on the philosophy of the Warring States period (441-221 BCE), religious developments in the Six Dynasties (220-589 CE), and modern Western interest in Daoism to try to answer some key questions.

  • What kinds of religious goals are part of Daoism?
  • How are different ritual, meditative, alchemical, and sexual practices all related?
  • Is Daoism really a good source for feminist and environmental ethics?

All readings will be in English. There are no prerequisites. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Japanese Storytelling in Words and Pictures

Instructor: Carr,Kevin Gray; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What makes a good story and how do you tell it? This class will examine the close relationship of artistic and literary productions in Japan from the Heian Period to the present day, considering the ways that stories are imagined in different media, genres, and social contexts. We will consider the significant differences between visual and textual narrative through focused readings of primary and secondary texts and narrative theory. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical reading and looking skills through a series of hands-on exercises designed to illuminate the process and significance of creating, viewing, and transmitting the stories that have moved people in Japan up to contemporary times.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
Baxter (language);
Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
Heinrich (modern culture, film)
Lam (music);
Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
Ning (religious art);
Laing (art history);
Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
Robson (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

ASIAN 280 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, LEC
Studying and Playing Southeast Asian Music.

Instructor: Walton,Susan Pratt

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions — all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian and animist traditions. This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact have Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand? How do Indonesian youths transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as do the Javanese, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cyclicity is evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

This course satisfies the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

Book: Balinese Music, Michael Tenzer

ASIAN 302 — Rewriting Identities in Modern Japan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zwicker,Jonathan E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This introductory course to modern Japanese fiction examines how novels and short stories written after 1868 engage the issue of national, cultural, and social identities. The inquiry in the course simultaneously moves in two directions. We examine how fiction written in an age of national print-capitalism participates in the work of building a common understanding of a nation and its people, but we shall also see how the same fiction can spotlight divisions of gender, sexual orientation, class, generation and region.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

ASIAN 380 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, LEC
Politics of Emotion/Modern Chn

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The intricate relationship between the personal and the political in modern Chinese intellectual life has long permeated fiction, memoir, performance arts, visual arts, and cinema and new media produced throughout the twentieth century and continue to be produced today. This course reads emotion as a political battle and engages students in a discovering tour throughout twentieth and twenty-first centuries China, where interiority and ideology, sentimentality and sacrifice, and personal and political present themselves not only as inseparable, but also as mutually reinforcing. Combining the approaches of political psychology, literary criticism, intellectual history, women's studies, as well as visual and media studies, this course aims both at introducing modern Chinese literary and cultural studies as a field to interested students, but also at challenging conventional disciplinary boundaries in order to cultivate critical thinking skills that will be indispensable for students interested in the humanities and social sciences in general.

CJS 450 — Minicourse in Japanese Studies
Section 001, SEM
Parliament and Party Politics in Japan. Meets 1/9-4/3 (no classes 2/27 & 3/6). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kawato,Sadafumi

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, WorldLit

This seminar is intended for graduate students and motivated undergraduate students interested in Japanese politics and comparative politics. This course will examine legislative institutions and legislative politics in Japan by focusing on research conducted by political scientists including the instructor. Each week the class will scrutinize empirical research. Students are required to write a review paper or an empirical research paper at the end of the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CLARCH 222 — Introduction to Roman Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Steven James Ross

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

A millennium and a half after its collapse, the Roman Empire lives on in the popular imagination. No wonder: at its peak, Rome's empire was the largest the world had yet seen, spanning almost 3000 miles from West to East, with a population of 50 million inhabitants. Its capital was the world's first megacity, a sprawling home to a million people from all walks of life. From the movies we have visions of decadent emperors, fearless gladiators, and the teeming masses screaming for blood at the Colosseum. But what was life in ancient Rome really like? This course will move beyond the standard stereotypes and explore the history and culture of the city of Rome and its vast empire. Through the objects the Romans left behind, such as ruined temples, perfume bottles, imperial portraits, and soldiers' helmets, we can use art and archaeology to reconstruct the story of ancient Rome and the experiences of daily life in the Empire. Beginning with Rome's lowly origins as a small village we will trace its rise and eventual fall, traversing the empire from rainy Britain to the sands of the Sahara. Along the way we will explore such topics as politics and power, life in the army, religion, food and drink, entertainments, and the private life of its subjects. The readings and illustrated lectures will provide a broad overview, while weekly discussion sections will focus on specialized topics. There are no prerequisites for the course. Your grade will be based on two 1 hour-long exams, one final exam, and your section participation.

CLCIV 102 — Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English)
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Seo,Joanne Mira

WN 2007
Credits:
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

What did it mean to be Roman in the Ancient World? Was it all about togas, orgies, and world conquest? Or anxiety, violence, and a propensity for self-destruction? This course will approach the issue of Roman identity from a variety of social, political, and philosophical angles. Using selected Roman historians (e.g., Livy and Tacitus), poets (e.g., Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan) as our guides, we will explore who the Romans thought they were, what position they felt their society occupied in the Mediterranean world and in the universe, and how their self-definition changed over time. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which the Romans constructed their past in order to understand who they were in the present. Grade will be based on exams, papers, and participation in discussion sections.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR./SO./PER.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
The Dying God in Myth and Literature

Instructor: Reed,Joseph D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The figure of the dying god — variously named Adonis, Osiris, or Attis and embodying both beauty and tragedy — has exerted a fascination from ancient times to the present day. Worship was sometimes central to the community, sometimes marginal yet compelling in its "outsider" status. Myths invited meditations on love and death in various modes from comedy to epic. Through the great mythological texts of Greece and Rome as well as modern literature and art, this course explores this figure in all its variety, along with Christian adaptations and recent interpretations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 121 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Composition)
Section 001, SEM
War and Remembrance

Instructor: Berlin,Netta

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

This course centers on Homer's Iliad and its paradigmatic value for military conflict in antiquity and the modern era. The course begins with a close reading of the epic, in particular the dynamic relationship between the narrowly circumscribed subject ("the anger of Achilles") and the complex narrative that transforms this subject into an evocative and enduring account of war. The remainder of the course considers works in a variety of disciplines (e.g., tragedy, philosophy, psychology) for which the Iliad has provided access to understanding war and its call to remembrance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 350 — Topics in Classical Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Ancient Slavery

Instructor: Forsdyke,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

Slavery was widespread in ancient Greece and Rome and was crucial to the social, economic and cultural flourishing of these societies. Nevertheless, the ugly reality of ancient slavery is seldom confronted directly in studies of the ancient world. This course aims to redress this imbalance by offering a detailed examination of the role of slavery in Greek and Roman society. We will begin with the question of how slaves were acquired and what needs (social, economic, and ideological) they satisfied in these cultures. Of particular concern will be the question of how these societies justified the exploitation of slaves and developed (pseudo-) scientific theories and ideologies in support of slavery. Aristotle's theory of natural slavery stands as a particularly infamous example of these justifications. Forms of racist thought, however, can be traced back at least to the fifth century BCE and are based on ethnic prejudices and stereotyping that were prominent throughout antiquity. A major part of the course will be to examine how ancient racist attitudes were constructed (though social practice, discourse and visual representations). In this context we will examine competing modern definitions of racism, and, in particular, the differences between ancient and modern racism.

Along with the ideological aspects of slavery and racism, we will explore the pragmatics of social control and rebellion. For example, we will explore the techniques that masters used to control their slaves, and investigate instances when this control failed, i.e., slave revolts. We will also examine modes of slave resistance (e.g., deliberate negligence, dilatoriness and theft) and the ways that slaves formed a distinctive identity and culture separate from that imposed on them by their masters. Readings about other slave societies (e.g., the American South, Brazil and the Caribbean) will provide crucial comparative evidence and models for exploring aspects of ancient slavery.

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, weekly in-class response papers and quizzes, and take-home midterm and final exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: CLCIV 101 and 102

CLCIV 381 — Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Collins,Derek B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon. We examine witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives, trace the development of witchcraft and the witch stereotype in history, literature, and art from classical antiquity, through the middle ages, to the early modern period in Europe and America.

CLCIV 385 — Greek Mythology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Greek Mythology comprises a group of traditional stories that discuss a number of universal themes such as creation, death, gods, heroes, the Other, family feuds, local history, and — not to forget — sex and cannibalism. In this course we will study the development of these tales in Greek literature and art. We will look at the myths themselves but also consider the context in which they have come down to us. We should realize that while we see Greek myths largely as a form of entertainment (Disney's Hercules for example), in antiquity myths also offered the Greeks valid explanations of the universe, mankind and society. Our focus will be on the interplay between myths and ancient society in both its contemporary and modern interpretations.

CLCIV 472 — Roman Law
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frier,Bruce W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course introduces the Roman legal system, and more generally the process and history of legal thinking as it was first developed by the Romans. The course concentrates on the Roman law that concerns wrongs done by one person to another, as a result of which the victim can sue the wrongdoer for damages; in Roman law these are called "delicts" (similar to our torts). Teaching is mainly by the case law method used in law schools. The course is graded on the basis of a midterm examination, a term paper, and a final exam.

Enforced Prerequisites: Sophomore or above.

CLCIV 476 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
Section 001, LEC
Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

CLCIV 480 — Studying Antiquity
Section 001, LEC
The Worlds of Alexander the Great

Instructor: Schmalz,Geoffrey C R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

This course is devoted to exploring the conquests and worlds of Alexander the Great — the worlds of the East that he encountered and conquered, and the new Greco-Persian world that he attempted to create before his early death. It is also about the ‘Internal World' of Alexander himself: the conflicting bibliographic portraits (ancient and modern) of the Great Conqueror in hagiographic terms as a humane and gentle man, and a man of divine destiny and power (a ‘New Achilles'); or as a brilliant but deeply flawed individual, an increasingly delusional victim of his own success, and even a disassociative drunk. The course takes a source-based approach, with a close and comprehensive reading of the two principal ancient biographies of Alexander, Arrian's Anabasis (representing the ‘Official' Alexander tradition) and Curtius Rufus' History of Alexander the Great (representing the ‘Unofficial' or ‘Vulgate' tradition); supplemented by selective fragments of the earliest Alexander sources. Along the way we will also explore the physical and cultural world of Alexander and his legacy for the Hellenistic East, with readings from Michael Wood's In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great.

Enforced Prerequisites: Open only to concentrators in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology, Classical Language and Literature, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Modern Greek.

CLCIV 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study, WorldLit

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Civilization, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLCIV 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT, WorldLit

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

DUTCH 492 — Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
Section 001, SEM
ANNE FRANK IN PAST AND PRESENT.

Instructor: Broos,Antonius J M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE
Other: WorldLit

The first part of this course will deal with the history of Anne Frank in the Netherlands, her hiding and arrest, her famous diary, its popularity, and the attacks on its authenticity. Special attention will be given to the reception of Anne Frank in the USA and the image of Anne Frank in film and on stage and TV.

In the second part of the course, we will look at the Holocaust, as portrayed in other accounts, diaries, stories, and films, with special emphasis on survivors and their problems, children of survivors, etc. Although some of the literary examples will be taken from the Dutch, all literature will be read in English and the course will be conducted in English. Requirements are summaries of given articles, a midterm paper, a short oral presentation, a final exam, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussions.

Required reading:

  • Anne Frank, The Diary.
  • H.A. Enzen, Anne Frank. Reflections on her Life and Legacy Chicago, 2000.
  • Eric Heuvel A Family Secret Zaandam, 2005

  • ENGLISH 245 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

    The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

    ENGLISH 387 — Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Carroll,Amy Sara

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course considers the relationship between Latino/a literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production. A variety of topics is addressed in the study of such Latino/a literatures of the US as Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American.

    ENGLISH 401 — The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Other: WorldLit

    The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

    Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

    ENGLISH 444 — History of Theatre II
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

    ENGLISH 444 — History of Theatre II
    Section 002, REC

    Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

    GERMAN 212 — Sports and Society
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: SS
    Other: WorldLit

    Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century. There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one — soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

    GERMAN 243 — Faust
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Amrine,Frederick R

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts; tr. Arndt); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend (tr. Lowe-Porter); and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. No knowledge of German is required.

    GERMAN 322 — The Origins of Nazism
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

    Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

    Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

    GERMAN 402 — Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    After reviewing the most central developments in late 18th and 19th century German intellectual history, we will concentrate on its seminal theoretical moments and movements during the long 20th century, an era that includes Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger and the philosophers of the Frankfurt school such as Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, and Jü rgen Habermas, as well as their reception in the English and French speaking world by authors like Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida. Readings and discussion in English; German concentrators are encouraged to register for GERMAN 404, the 1 credit LAC section accompanying this course. Requirements: three papers, 8-12 pages long, thorough preparation, lively participation.

    Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 404. See Course Guide

    GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
    Section 001, REC
    Austrian Politics

    Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    Like many small countries, Austria too has been massively neglected by political and social sciences. Being in the shadow of Germany, Austria — if studied at all — becomes an appendage, an afterthought of its much larger and dominant neighbor. This course will attempt to rectify the situation by placing Austria onto center-stage.

    Deeply informed by history, the course will highlight Austria's political, social, economic and cultural development from the 19th century until today. In the process, such key concepts of political science as "consociationalism", class conflict, ethnic divisions, catch-all parties, neutrality, right-wing populism and the European Union as a new federation will be studied in detail.

    GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
    Section 002, REC
    Hans Christian Andersen

    Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: WorldLit

    If you are interested in fairy tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark, or Scandinavian literature, then this is the course for you!

    Hans Christian Andersen is one of the immortals of world literature. The fairy tales he wrote, such as "The Little Mermaid," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Emperor's New Clothes," are remarkable for their sense of imagination, descriptive power, and acute sensitivity. In contrast to the Brothers Grimm, who largely collected and retold folktales, Andersen distilled the earliest literary form of the fairy tale and the folktale into a genre that was uniquely his own.

    In this course, we shall read and analyze some of Hans Christian Andersen's best-known fairy tales, as well as a renowned Andersen biography and various critical texts. Our readings will primarily focus on his mastery of the genre and his complex narrative method, but the biographical aspects of his stories, his contributions to the visual arts, and the cultural setting of the tales will also be discussed. Furthermore, Andersen's fantastic fairy tales have often been adapted for the stage and screen, and we shall accordingly watch and analyze excerpts from some of these adaptations as well. This course will familiarize you with Andersen's works, especially his fairy tales, and will also help you increase your ability to think and work analytically, by developing the ability to analyze texts, voice criticism through coherent arguments, formulate good questions, and express your ideas in formal academic essays.

    Course requirements include attendance/participation, several brief essays, quizzes, and a final essay/project.

    For further details, contact the course instructor, Marc Pierce, at mpierc@umich.edu.

    All readings and discussions will be in English.

    GTBOOKS 192 — Great Books
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cameron,H Don
    Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: Honors, WorldLit

    Continuation of GTBOOKS 191, from Plato to the Renaissance. We will read Plato, Symposium and Republic; Vergil, The Aeneid; selections from the Old Testament and New Testament; St. Augustine, Confessions; Dante, The Divine Comedy, Inferno, and selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso); and selections from Boccaccio. GTBOOKS 192 is open only to first-year students in the Honors Program; other students wishing to take a similar course are encouraged to elect GTBOOKS 202.

    Advisory Prerequisite: FR.H.PRG.

    GTBOOKS 222 — Great Books of Japan
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Introduction in translation to books which have influenced the Japanese people through the ages.

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

    HISTART 222 — Introduction to Roman Archaeology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ellis,Steven James Ross

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    A millennium and a half after its collapse, the Roman Empire lives on in the popular imagination. No wonder: at its peak, Rome's empire was the largest the world had yet seen, spanning almost 3000 miles from West to East, with a population of 50 million inhabitants. Its capital was the world's first megacity, a sprawling home to a million people from all walks of life. From the movies we have visions of decadent emperors, fearless gladiators, and the teeming masses screaming for blood at the Colosseum. But what was life in ancient Rome really like? This course will move beyond the standard stereotypes and explore the history and culture of the city of Rome and its vast empire. Through the objects the Romans left behind, such as ruined temples, perfume bottles, imperial portraits, and soldiers' helmets, we can use art and archaeology to reconstruct the story of ancient Rome and the experiences of daily life in the Empire. Beginning with Rome's lowly origins as a small village we will trace its rise and eventual fall, traversing the empire from rainy Britain to the sands of the Sahara. Along the way we will explore such topics as politics and power, life in the army, religion, food and drink, entertainments, and the private life of its subjects. The readings and illustrated lectures will provide a broad overview, while weekly discussion sections will focus on specialized topics. There are no prerequisites for the course. Your grade will be based on two 1 hour-long exams, one final exam, and your section participation.

    HISTART 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

    The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
    Baxter (language);
    Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
    Heinrich (modern culture, film)
    Lam (music);
    Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
    Ning (religious art);
    Laing (art history);
    Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
    Robson (religion).

    Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

    HISTORY 142 — Introduction to Japanese Civilization
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Designed primarily for freshmen and sophomores, the course focuses on a few recurrent concerns in the Japanese tradition from the earliest times to the present. Topics to be considered include man and nature, language and culture, the individual and the state, men and women, and death and transcendence. Readings in mythology and representative works of the literature and religious texts, lectures, discussions, and short papers.

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

    HISTORY 205 — Modern East Asia
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer
    Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: SS
    Other: WorldLit

    This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the PRC; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan; liberation and division into the two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3)the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and the rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on EA, the course explores the inter-relations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of HISTORY 204; however that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. There will be a midterm and final exam.

    HISTORY 278 — Introduction to Turkish Civilizations
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This lecture-and-discussion course will teach the basic features of Turkish civilizations from the earliest time in the 6th century to the 20th century, from the viewpoint of cultural history. We will discuss the issue of bonds between the Turkish peoples on both the linguistic and on the cultural level. Besides an overview of the history of Turkish Empires with a special focus on the Ottoman Empire, emphasis will be placed on common cultural elements. These include tribal origins and tribal life, myths of origins as preserved in the epic literature, religious developments from "shamanism" to monotheistic religions, as well as aspects of material culture and arts.

    Regular attendance and participation in the discussions, a midterm paper and a final paper will determine success in this course.

    Textbook: Carter Findley: The Turks in world history. New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.

    More (mandatory) readings will be made available through a course website (tba).


    HISTORY 322 — The Origins of Nazism
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

    Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

    Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

    HISTORY 405 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
    Section 001, LEC
    Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

    Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

    Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

    Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

    We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

    Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

    HISTORY 417 — Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    After reviewing the most central developments in late 18th and 19th century German intellectual history, we will concentrate on its seminal theoretical moments and movements during the long 20th century, an era that includes Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger and the philosophers of the Frankfurt school such as Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, and Jü rgen Habermas, as well as their reception in the English and French speaking world by authors like Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida. Readings and discussion in English; German concentrators are encouraged to register for GERMAN 404, the 1 credit LAC section accompanying this course. Requirements: three papers, 8-12 pages long, thorough preparation, lively participation.

    Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 404. See Course Guide

    HISTORY 536 — The Rise of Islam
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides an intensive introduction to the history of the rise of Islam. The period covered is roughly 500-950 CE.

    It covers:

    • the Near Eastern and Mediterranean world in late antiquity;
    • Arabia before Islam;
    • the life of Muhammad and the earliest Muslim community;
    • the early Islamic conquests in the Near East, Central Asia, North Africa, and Spain;
    • the Caliphate as a political structure;
    • the emerging systems of Islamic theology and law; and
    • the astonishingly rapid growth and flourishing of a new, Islamic civilization throughout much of the Old World.

    Major themes include:

    • contact and conflict between urban and nomadic populations;
    • political and sectarian divisions;
    • relations among the various religions and peoples;
    • travel and commerce;
    • new forms in literature, architecture and other areas.

    Much of the reading consists of original sources translated from the Arabic. The great world history of al-Tabari (839-923) provides a constant point of reference, as look back at these events from al-Tabari's perspective.

    Prerequisites. It is best if you already have the basic background course, AAPTIS 461 / History 442 or equivalent. However, this is not strictly required, if you can convince the instructor.

    Requirements. These include a midterm examination, a final examination, and occasional short quizzes. Four short papers will also be assigned, 3-5 pages each. Topics for the first three papers will be assigned in class; the fourth paper will be on a topic of your choice.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Taught in English.

    HISTORY 541 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

    We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

    HJCS 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

    In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

    ITALIAN 333 — Dante's Divine Comedy
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Cornish,Alison

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course is dedicated to a guided reading of the Divine Comedy in its entirety. Lectures and discussion are in English. The text will be provided in facing-page translation for the benefit of those who know some Italian and those who do not. Students will learn about the historical, philosophical, literary context of the poem as well as how to understand its relevance in modern terms. Evaluation will be on the basis of one research paper written in two phases, a midterm and final founded on identification and commentary on passages taken from the text, and occasional quizzes on the reading as the need arises.

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Italian is not required.

    JUDAIC 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

    In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

    MEMS 333 — Dante's Divine Comedy
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Cornish,Alison

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course is dedicated to a guided reading of the Divine Comedy in its entirety. Lectures and discussion are in English. The text will be provided in facing-page translation for the benefit of those who know some Italian and those who do not. Students will learn about the historical, philosophical, literary context of the poem as well as how to understand its relevance in modern terms. Evaluation will be on the basis of one research paper written in two phases, a midterm and final founded on identification and commentary on passages taken from the text, and occasional quizzes on the reading as the need arises.

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Italian is not required.

    MODGREEK 325 — Athens, Present and Past
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S
    Instructor: Bhattacharyya,Sayan

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit


    Old cities are not just monuments to past glory. They are incubators for new ideas and sites of dynamic change. Athens has always been a city in transition, from ancient times, when it was a center of art, politics, philosophy, and commerce to the modern era, when it reemerged as a modern capital city. In this class, we will explore Athens neighborhood by neighborhood through photographs, films, travel descriptions, maps, poetry, plays, political writing, and fictional and non-fictional narrative. We will work through important moments in Athens' long history, as we also make stops at some of the city's contemporary hot spots — from the Acropolis to the Plaka and Kolonaki Square to beachfront scenes of Athens' modern night life — in order explore the different ways that Athens has reinvented itself.

    Optional Study Abroad trip to Athens, Greece: April 30-May 13, 2007
    This is an ISAC (Integrating Study Abroad into the Curriculum) course with an optional study abroad trip to Athens, Greece, April 30-May 13.

    Cost of travel to Greece will be about $800 plus the cost of air travel and some meals. Eligibility for trip: The instructor requires students interested in the study abroad trip to contact her (aleontis@umich.edu) for an interview as soon as possible. The Study Abroad trip to Athens is supported through an ISAC grant and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year.

    PHIL 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

    The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
    Baxter (language);
    Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
    Heinrich (modern culture, film)
    Lam (music);
    Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
    Ning (religious art);
    Laing (art history);
    Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
    Robson (religion).

    Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

    POLISH 326 — Polish Literature in English: 1890 to Present
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Carpenter,Bogdana; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    A study of the major trends in modern Polish literature from 1900 to present, with examination of representative works by nineteenth and twentieth century Polish writers. Polish literature is presented in the context of European literature as well as in relation to Poland's peculiar historical and political situation. All readings in English.

    RCHUMS 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

    The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
    Baxter (language);
    Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
    Heinrich (modern culture, film)
    Lam (music);
    Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
    Ning (religious art);
    Laing (art history);
    Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
    Robson (religion).

    Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

    RCHUMS 280 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

    The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

    RCHUMS 281 — Introduction to Comedy and Tragedy
    Section 001, LEC
    Inside the Dramatic Experience: Script Analysis & the Elements of Theater Production

    Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 280.

    An intensive introduction on how to read a play and interpret it for live stage production. Students will engage the viewpoints of director, actor, and dramaturge (literary/historical specialist) in practical exercises and prepared scenes. Work will begin with Edward Albee's The American Dream and the Midterm will focus on Richard Nelson's collection of scenes Roots in Water. The second half of the semester will concentrate on Caryl Churchill's Cloud Nine. Theoretical readings and written exercises will complement these Midterm and End-of-Term studio productions which will be acted and directed by the members of the course under the direct supervision of the instructor.

    RCHUMS 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RCHUMS 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
    Section 001, LEC
    Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

    Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RCHUMS 410 — Upperclass Literature Seminar
    Section 001, SEM
    The Writing Life

    Instructor: Stainton,Leslie Anne

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Other: WorldLit

    By now you've spent the better part of your adult life writing. You've turned out essays and reports, book reviews, job applications, letters, blogs, e-mails, exams, thank-you notes and grocery lists. You've tried your hand at poems and stories, maybe a speech or two. Perhaps you've published something in a newspaper or magazine, or you've embarked on a memoir or even written a book. One way or another you've experienced a "writing life." But what does the term really mean? And where do you go from here? Once you're out of college, how can you continue to make writing a meaningful part of your life?

    In this RC senior seminar we'll examine the writing life from a variety of perspectives. Not everyone who writes is a best-selling author — or even a published writer. Think of preachers and rabbis, politicians, historians, scientists, musicians, dancers, visual artists, architects, college presidents, schoolteachers and CEOs, many of whom write every day as part of who they are and what they do. We'll hear from some of these people in class, along with published authors, booksellers, editors, journalists, and publishers. We'll read memoirs by writers such as Eudora Welty, Anne Lamott, and Stephen King. You'll also go out into the community and talk to people for whom writing is a vital part of living, and you'll report back to the class on what you find. You'll also read and submit a written review of one book of your own choice that in some way addresses "the writing life."

    Throughout the semester, you'll develop a significant piece of writing in which you explore and articulate your own sense of what it means to write. This may be a single work or a series of works and may be take the form of a memoir, a play, a work of fiction, an extended piece of literary journalism, a biography or history, a prolonged essay or series of essays, or a combination of genres. The aim of this project is for you to arrive at a significant understanding of how writing can enrich your post-undergraduate life. This seminar is open to RC juniors and seniors; while it should be of particular interest to creative-writing majors, all majors are welcome and indeed encouraged. If we are to learn how diverse a field writing is, and how broadly relevant it can be, it's critical that we engage as many different voices as possible.

    *This course satisfies the RC Arts Practicum Requirement*

    RCHUMS 484 — Seminar in Drama Topics
    Section 001, SEM
    Performing the Verse of Whitman, Ginsburg and the Beats

    Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Other: WorldLit

    This is an early evening workshop in verse-speaking for writers, actors, musicians, and students of literature, based on the works of Walt Whitman and his 20th-century descendants, the "Beat" poets: Alan Ginsburg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Gregory Corso, etc. Students will be turned loose on Leaves of Grass and the poetry of the Beat Generation. Passages will be selected weekly, "rehearsed," and brought into class for presentation, critiques and coaching, whereupon pieces will be selected for further development (including dips into the critical literature) and repeat presentation. Stage-oriented vocal exercises will be a regular feature of the course as students learn how to increase their vocal range and interest, how to "score" a text, and how to "deliver" a live performance. A repertory of verse performance-pieces will thus be evolved in the course of the academic term which will in turn lead to a group performance of Ginsburg's Howl for its 50th anniversary.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, RCHUMS 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses.

    RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
    Section 001, SEM
    Richard III / Ta'ziyeh Project

    Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Other: WorldLit

    This minicourse will serve as the academic anchor for an experimental theater project in which the distinguished Iranian director Mohammad Ghaffari will adapt Shakespeare's Richard III in the idiom of the traditional Shi'ite Passion Play or Ta'ziyeh. Students will be introduced to this unique Islamic theatre form as well as studying Shakespeare's famous history play. All students will be expected to participate in some capacity in the project itself.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

    RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
    Section 002, SEM
    Acting Workshop

    Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Other: WorldLit

    In this two-credit course students will have a chance to work on a number of creative exercises and challenging scene assignments as an "in-house" acting company for directors from RCHUMS 482, "Director and Text". Actors will have the opportunity to learn about the audition process from the director's perspective and to explore how to work on a diverse set of characters from a wide range of dramatic material. All acting students will participate in improvisations and staging exercises as well as experience intensive scene study and the sustained rehearsal process for a production at the end of the term.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

    RELIGION 122 — Introduction to the New Testament
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Although it has influenced the Western world more than any other book, the New Testament — having originated almost 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean world — is not easy to understand. This course will, first of all, introduce the student to the historical, religious, and social setting of the New Testament. Then, we shall look at the various New Testament writings. They must be allowed to speak for themselves and not be clouded by any denominational or sectarian program. The student will be introduced to the insights and methods of modern scholarship when dealing with questions such as: What did the various New Testament writings really intend to say? How did they say it? Why did they say it? Finally, the problem of the development of early Christian doctrine will be addressed, albeit briefly. Why were some of the early Christian writings excluded from the New Testament canon? There will be two midterms and a final exam.

    RELIGION 202 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pranke,Patrick Arthur

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course is designed as an introduction to the study of Asian religions. It aims to cover the historical development (from ancient times down to the present) of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Shinto, etc., in cross-cultural settings that will include India, China, Korea, and Japan. Readings will include both primary texts (concerning doctrine, philosophy and religious practices) in English translation and secondary scholarship.

    RELIGION 204 — Introduction to Islam
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the Reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas.

    RELIGION 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

    In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

    RELIGION 381 — Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Collins,Derek B

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course explores witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon. We examine witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives, trace the development of witchcraft and the witch stereotype in history, literature, and art from classical antiquity, through the middle ages, to the early modern period in Europe and America.

    RELIGION 467 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

    We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

    RELIGION 476 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
    Section 001, LEC
    Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

    Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

    Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

    Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

    We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

    Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

    RELIGION 481 — The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Other: WorldLit

    The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

    Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

    RUSSIAN 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
    Section 001, LEC
    Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

    Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RUSSIAN 462 — Dostoevsky
    Section 001, LEC
    Life and Work of Fedor Dostoevsky

    Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    This course studies the life and work of Fedor Dostoevsky, locating him and his oeuvre in the cultural and intellectual history of Russia, while also examining an extensive and representative sample of his prose fiction in detail. It is intended both for those with a general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Dostoevsky.

    Poor Folk, The Double, Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov are read and analyzed. His contribution to literary and literary-political discussions of the time is assessed.

    RUSSIAN 482 — Ten Masterpieces of Russian Literature
    Section 001, LEC
    Ten Masterpieces of Russian Prose-Shorter Fiction

    Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Other: WorldLit

    Pushkin, The Stationmaster,The Shot, The Queen of Spades
    Lermontov, Taman, The Fatalist
    Gogol, Viy, The Overcoat
    Turgenev, The First Love
    Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man
    Tolstoy, Hadji Murat
    Chekhov, The Anonymous Story [Rasskaz neizvestnogo cheloveka]
    Nabokov, The Circle

    No knowledge of Russian is required.

    Midterm take-home exam. Final essay.

    An optional 1 credit hour Independent Study is available (for a total of 3 credits for the course).

    SCAND 421 — Modern Scandinavian Literature in English
    Section 001, REC
    Hans Christian Andersen

    Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: WorldLit

    If you are interested in fairy tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark, or Scandinavian literature, then this is the course for you!

    Hans Christian Andersen is one of the immortals of world literature. The fairy tales he wrote, such as "The Little Mermaid," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Emperor's New Clothes," are remarkable for their sense of imagination, descriptive power, and acute sensitivity. In contrast to the Brothers Grimm, who largely collected and retold folktales, Andersen distilled the earliest literary form of the fairy tale and the folktale into a genre that was uniquely his own.

    In this course, we shall read and analyze some of Hans Christian Andersen's best-known fairy tales, as well as a renowned Andersen biography and various critical texts. Our readings will primarily focus on his mastery of the genre and his complex narrative method, but the biographical aspects of his stories, his contributions to the visual arts, and the cultural setting of the tales will also be discussed. Furthermore, Andersen's fantastic fairy tales have often been adapted for the stage and screen, and we shall accordingly watch and analyze excerpts from some of these adaptations as well. This course will familiarize you with Andersen's works, especially his fairy tales, and will also help you increase your ability to think and work analytically, by developing the ability to analyze texts, voice criticism through coherent arguments, formulate good questions, and express your ideas in formal academic essays.

    Course requirements include attendance/participation, several brief essays, quizzes, and a final essay/project.

    For further details, contact the course instructor, Marc Pierce, at mpierc@umich.edu.

    All readings and discussions will be in English.

    Advisory Prerequisite: JR/SR/G/P.I.

    SCAND 442 — The Icelandic Saga (in English Translation)
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The Icelandic Sagas are unique literary documents from medieval Iceland. They inform us about the cultural, political, and religious currents of a land in tumult and transition. Unlike many contemporary texts, these are not inherently moralistic or celebratory- instead they are dark, matter-of-fact inquiries into the way individuals respond to often unresolvable situations.

    In this course, we will encounter vindictive women, treacherous kings, heroes and anti-heroes, lawyers, and poets. Texts include Njál's Saga, Egil's Saga, The Saga of Gísli the Outlaw, Grettir's Saga, selections from Snorri Sturluson's Heimskringla, and several shorter sagas such as Hrafnkel's Saga and Thorstein Staff-Struck.

    Key themes engaged in the class include vengeance and feuds, magic and religion, self and group identity, family ties, and gender roles.

    The class is structured as a seminar, and participation will include discussion of the readings, short papers, presentations, and a term paper. All texts are in English, and there are no prerequisites.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing or permission of instructor.

    SLAVIC 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    SOC 212 — Sports and Society
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: SS
    Other: WorldLit

    Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century. There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one — soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

    SPANISH 327 — Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Carroll,Amy Sara

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course considers the relationship between Latino/a literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production. A variety of topics is addressed in the study of such Latino/a literatures of the US as Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American.

    THTREMUS 211 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU
    Other: WorldLit

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

    The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

    THTREMUS 322 — History of Theatre II
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

    THTREMUS 322 — History of Theatre II
    Section 002, REC

    Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    The history of theatre, internationally regarded, from about 1660 to the present.

     
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