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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = FRENCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 53 of 53
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
FRENCH 102 — Elementary French, Continued
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Bendacha,Rachid

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 101

FRENCH 102 — Elementary French, Continued
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Solheim,Jennifer

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 101

FRENCH 102 — Elementary French, Continued
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Neu,Helene

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 101

FRENCH 102 — Elementary French, Continued
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Sullivan,Lorrel L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 101

FRENCH 102 — Elementary French, Continued
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Sullivan,Lorrel L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 101

FRENCH 103 — Review of Elementary French
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Bendacha,Rachid

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 102, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190.

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course Coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by recommendation of the placement exam or with the permission of the coordinator. (Information on the placement exam is available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.) Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be hourly exams, quizzes, a final exam, writing assignments, and speaking tests.

By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French(both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

Enforced Prerequisites: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement; RCLANG 150.

FRENCH 103 — Review of Elementary French
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Bendacha,Rachid

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 102, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190.

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course Coordinator: Lorrel Sullivan, lorrelsu@umich.edu

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by recommendation of the placement exam or with the permission of the coordinator. (Information on the placement exam is available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.) Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be hourly exams, quizzes, a final exam, writing assignments, and speaking tests.

By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French(both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

Enforced Prerequisites: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement; RCLANG 150.

FRENCH 112 — Second Special Reading Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Criso,Rachael A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 101, 102, 103 or RCLANG 190

Although available for undergraduates, this course is mainly geared toward graduate students from any discipline compelled by their individual departments to pass a foreign language requirement.

Offered each winter term, FRENCH 112 exists as the follow-up class for FRENCH 111 (taught each fall term). However, FRENCH 111 is not a prerequisite. A sufficient knowledge of French is necessary if the student has not attended FRENCH 111, and suitability to enter the class will be at the discretion of the instructor.

Each academic term begins with regular, mandatory class meetings, as we spend time finishing the text used in FRENCH 111, as well as incorporating the group translation of relevant articles treating a wide range of topics. After several weeks, students will select a substantial French article (approx. 10,000 words) that pertains directly to their specific area of study, and individual translation of this is then undertaken by the students, aided by weekly individual meetings with the instructor.

Depending on the requirements of each department, students may opt to take a language requirement exam (offered by their department) at any time, and may leave the class if they succeed. Or, students may attend for the entire term and earn a grade sufficient for completion of their program's language requirement.

Text: Reading French in the Arts and Sciences by Edward Stack

Attendance to first section is mandatory. Class is conducted in English (texts in French). Auditors are accepted if they participate fully in class discussions and complete all homework assignments. Graduate students who have another required course or teaching obligation that conflicts with the current schedule for this class are encouraged to contact the instructor.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 111

Advisory Prerequisite: FRENCH 111

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Moutinou,Juliette K

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Moutinou,Juliette K

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Dalla Torre,Elena

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Meyer,Kathleen E

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Moutinou,Juliette K

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.
Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Mc Mann,Lori Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 013, REC

Instructor: Mc Mann,Lori Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 015, REC

Instructor: Butler-Borruat,Roger Eugene

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 231 — Second-Year French
Section 017, REC

Instructor: Butler-Borruat,Roger Eugene

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Lori McMann, lmcmann@umich.edu

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop your awareness of French-speaking cultures around the world, via the exploration of a variety of Francophone cultural documents (including Internet resources, literary texts, and demographic information).

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of reading and writing assignments, written exercises, and computer-based laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as a final examination.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Metroz,Aurelien

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Meyer,Kathleen E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Gabaron,Sabine G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Zeil,Camille Armand

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Zeil,Camille Armand

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Gabaron,Sabine G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 013, REC

Instructor: Monteiro,Odile Sarah

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 015, REC
Business French

Instructor: Gabaron,Sabine G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 017, REC

Instructor: Gordon,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 019, REC

Instructor: Maret,Sylvie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 021, REC

Instructor: Gordon,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 232 — Second-Year French, Continued
Section 023, REC

Instructor: Maret,Sylvie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Kathleen Meyer, kemeyer@umich.edu

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 231 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 250; assignment by placement test.

FRENCH 235 — Advanced Practice in French
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Butler-Borruat,Roger Eugene

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Yannick Viers, yannick@umich.edu

This course deals with recent political, social, economic and cultural issues facing today's French/European societies. Themes are explored through readings and audiovisual material.

Its content includes:

    1. The French Republic
    2. The European Union
    3. Transatlantic Relations:
      - Franco/Euro-American Relations
      - Globalization and its Opponents
    4. Some Critical Issues:
      - Delinquency
      - AIDS
      - Homophobia
      - Rights of Handicapped People
    5. Families:
      - Marriages
      - P.A.C.S. (Civil Solidarity Pacts)
      - Gay Marriages and Adoption
    6. Women:
      - Rights and Inequalities
      - Abortion
      - Violence against Women (Domestic Violence and Genital Mutilation)
      - Bioethics
    7. France's Multicultural Society:
      - Slavery and Colonization
      - Immigration
      - Islam of France and in Europe
      - Islamic veil controversy
      - "Fighting Hatreds" (Anti-Semitism and Racism)
      - Stand-Up Comedy/Raï Music/French Rap
  • The final grade is based on three oral presentations (30 %), three essays (30 %), several written exercises (20 %), and class participation (20 %).
  • Required Texts: French 235 Coursepack (Yannick Viers), French Grammar (M. Crocker Coffman, McGraw-Hill)
  • Recommended Texts: Insiders' French (Eleanor Levieux, University of Chicago Press), Robert Micro Poche (Le Robert)

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 290 or 310, or assignment by placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Transfer students who receive transfer credit from their previous college or university for FRENCH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the French placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for FRENC

FRENCH 235 — Advanced Practice in French
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Viers,Yannick A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Yannick Viers, yannick@umich.edu

This course deals with recent political, social, economic and cultural issues facing today's French/European societies. Themes are explored through readings and audiovisual material.

Its content includes:

    1. The French Republic
    2. The European Union
    3. Transatlantic Relations:
      - Franco/Euro-American Relations
      - Globalization and its Opponents
    4. Some Critical Issues:
      - Delinquency
      - AIDS
      - Homophobia
      - Rights of Handicapped People
    5. Families:
      - Marriages
      - P.A.C.S. (Civil Solidarity Pacts)
      - Gay Marriages and Adoption
    6. Women:
      - Rights and Inequalities
      - Abortion
      - Violence against Women (Domestic Violence and Genital Mutilation)
      - Bioethics
    7. France's Multicultural Society:
      - Slavery and Colonization
      - Immigration
      - Islam of France and in Europe
      - Islamic veil controversy
      - "Fighting Hatreds" (Anti-Semitism and Racism)
      - Stand-Up Comedy/Raï Music/French Rap
  • The final grade is based on three oral presentations (30 %), three essays (30 %), several written exercises (20 %), and class participation (20 %).
  • Required Texts: French 235 Coursepack (Yannick Viers), French Grammar (M. Crocker Coffman, McGraw-Hill)
  • Recommended Texts: Insiders' French (Eleanor Levieux, University of Chicago Press), Robert Micro Poche (Le Robert)

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 290 or 310, or assignment by placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Transfer students who receive transfer credit from their previous college or university for FRENCH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the French placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for FRENC

FRENCH 235 — Advanced Practice in French
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Viers,Yannick A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Yannick Viers, yannick@umich.edu

This course deals with recent political, social, economic and cultural issues facing today's French/European societies. Themes are explored through readings and audiovisual material.

Its content includes:

    1. The French Republic
    2. The European Union
    3. Transatlantic Relations:
      - Franco/Euro-American Relations
      - Globalization and its Opponents
    4. Some Critical Issues:
      - Delinquency
      - AIDS
      - Homophobia
      - Rights of Handicapped People
    5. Families:
      - Marriages
      - P.A.C.S. (Civil Solidarity Pacts)
      - Gay Marriages and Adoption
    6. Women:
      - Rights and Inequalities
      - Abortion
      - Violence against Women (Domestic Violence and Genital Mutilation)
      - Bioethics
    7. France's Multicultural Society:
      - Slavery and Colonization
      - Immigration
      - Islam of France and in Europe
      - Islamic veil controversy
      - "Fighting Hatreds" (Anti-Semitism and Racism)
      - Stand-Up Comedy/Raï Music/French Rap
  • The final grade is based on three oral presentations (30 %), three essays (30 %), several written exercises (20 %), and class participation (20 %).
  • Required Texts: French 235 Coursepack (Yannick Viers), French Grammar (M. Crocker Coffman, McGraw-Hill)
  • Recommended Texts: Insiders' French (Eleanor Levieux, University of Chicago Press), Robert Micro Poche (Le Robert)

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 290 or 310, or assignment by placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Transfer students who receive transfer credit from their previous college or university for FRENCH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the French placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for FRENC

FRENCH 235 — Advanced Practice in French
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Viers,Yannick A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Override Request Information: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/overrides.html
Course coordinator: Yannick Viers, yannick@umich.edu

This course deals with recent political, social, economic and cultural issues facing today's French/European societies. Themes are explored through readings and audiovisual material.

Its content includes:

    1. The French Republic
    2. The European Union
    3. Transatlantic Relations:
      - Franco/Euro-American Relations
      - Globalization and its Opponents
    4. Some Critical Issues:
      - Delinquency
      - AIDS
      - Homophobia
      - Rights of Handicapped People
    5. Families:
      - Marriages
      - P.A.C.S. (Civil Solidarity Pacts)
      - Gay Marriages and Adoption
    6. Women:
      - Rights and Inequalities
      - Abortion
      - Violence against Women (Domestic Violence and Genital Mutilation)
      - Bioethics
    7. France's Multicultural Society:
      - Slavery and Colonization
      - Immigration
      - Islam of France and in Europe
      - Islamic veil controversy
      - "Fighting Hatreds" (Anti-Semitism and Racism)
      - Stand-Up Comedy/Raï Music/French Rap
  • The final grade is based on three oral presentations (30 %), three essays (30 %), several written exercises (20 %), and class participation (20 %).
  • Required Texts: French 235 Coursepack (Yannick Viers), French Grammar (M. Crocker Coffman, McGraw-Hill)
  • Recommended Texts: Insiders' French (Eleanor Levieux, University of Chicago Press), Robert Micro Poche (Le Robert)

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 290 or 310, or assignment by placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Transfer students who receive transfer credit from their previous college or university for FRENCH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the French placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for FRENC

FRENCH 270 — French and Francophone Literature and Culture
Section 001, REC
Couples

Instructor: Ibbett,Katherine M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What does it mean to be a couple? Which kinds of twosomes count as couples, and which do not? This course will trace the status and structure of the couple through a series of French texts from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. We'll talk about marriage, friendship, and the relationship of the couple to wider communities like the family, the nation, or the state. Readings will be drawn from a variety of genres and media: novels, prose poems, sonnets, essays, plays and films. Do the questions posed by these texts help us to deal with the nuances of thinking about couples today?

Readings include Charrière, Lettres de Mistriss Henley; Rousseau, Du contrat social (extracts), Le Lévite d'Ephraim; Montaigne, "De l'amitié,"; Racine, Bérénice; Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal; Truffaut, Jules et Jim; Eric Fassin and Michel Feher, "Parité et PaCS: anatomie politique d'un rapport."

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 235 with a grade of C- or higher

FRENCH 270 — French and Francophone Literature and Culture
Section 002, REC
Enfance

Instructor: Bayraktar,Elissa Justine Bell

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Keeping in mind that enfance literally means "the inability to speak," in this course, we will consider how certain works in French from the 18th to the 20th centuries speak for and through children. From theories of education to nostalgic memoirs and attempts to "capture" children on film, what concept of childhood do these works reveal? How does the concept change across historical, national, and gender divides? If children are elusive subjects, childhood is often represented as an unattainable place in the past. What strategies do authors use to return there, and why? We will seek answers to these queries through the study of works by such authors as Rousseau, Madame de Genlis, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Proust, Radiguet, Laye, Truffaut, Satrapi, and others.

Written work will include discussion board postings, regular quizzes, and three formal analyses of varying length. Students will have the opportunity to make both individual and group presentations to the class.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 235 with a grade of C- or higher

FRENCH 270 — French and Francophone Literature and Culture
Section 003, REC
Ideals of Friendship

Instructor: Miller,Michelle Linnette

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

As networking, Facebook, and sex buddies all begin changing what it can mean to be a "friend," people are beginning to examine friendship's past, to ask how friendship has been defined in former cultures, and how our own attempts at it stack up. This course will examine ideals of friendship in literature from early modern France, whose views of friendship's possibilities differ greatly from our own.

As obsessed with narratives of the ‘one true friend' as some people are with the number of hits on their blogs, early modern texts imagine friendship as something quite involved. Friends are big hitters in these texts: they steer your ethics and your learning, and if you're king, they help you rule. Like voles, these fictional friends pair for life and their bonds become public relationships. Many works even cast friends as integrated parts of families, deploying concrete familial language to spin out fantasies of inclusion.

Probing scenarios such as these, we will consider the ways in which early modern French literature both supports and belies the interest of contemporary social revisionists — theorists who have begun turning to early modern friendship in search of ideas about more inclusive forms of democracy and the nuclear family's revision. While this course will attempt to contextualize early ideals of friendship within the specific values of humanism, the Reformation, and noble culture, the course will also encourage students to reflect trans-historically upon what specific texts suggest.

Readings are subject to revision but may include: Montaigne's "De l'amitié" and excerpts from "Sur des vers de Virgile" ; excerpts from Rabelais' Pantagruel and Tiers Livre; Corneille's Rodogune and Molière's Le Tartuffe.

Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of at least two exams and two papers, as well as active in-class participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 235 with a grade of C- or higher

FRENCH 274 — French and Francophone Societies and Culture
Section 001, REC
RURAL MATTERS

Instructor: Robert,Julie L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course will consider the history and representation of rural societies and culture in both France and French-Canada. We will look at medieval romances, fables, philosophical essays, films and 19th and 20th century novels. Through attentive readings of texts and consideration of historical facts and trends, we will seek to answer the following questions: How do literary texts participate in the creation or rebuttal of the stereotypes of rurality that are pervasive even in our own society? How has the image of the rural been used for political purposes? How does the rural differ from one kind of space (farms, forests, tundra, remote villages…) to another? Why do urban cultures tend to ignore their rural origins? Why, at the same time, do urban societies see the rural as somehow more authentic? Do we have to see the rural in relation to the urban? What is the relation between rural culture and other discourses, such as religion, gender, and economics?

Readings: Thérèse Desqueyroux by François Mauriac, Menaud, Maître Draveur by Félix-Antoine Savard, and a course-pack with excerpts from Chrétien de Troyes, Jean de La Fontaine, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile Zola, Yves Thériault, Gabrielle Roy, Lionel Groulx and André Gide. The subject of the course will be also explored in the film La grande séduction.

To better develop speaking, reading and writing skills in French, evaluation will be based on 3 short essays, a final paper, and active participation in class discussion, including daily responses to reading questions.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 235 with a grade of C- or higher

FRENCH 274 — French and Francophone Societies and Culture
Section 003, REC
Media and French Revolutions

Instructor: Chang,Dominica Sung Hee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we will explore how mediated representations shape our understanding of the world we live in and of past events. To what extent does the information we consume via print, audio, and visual news sources, as well as fictionalized filmic and novelistic accounts, influence public opinion and historical memory? What roles do political ideology and propaganda play in this process? How might these effects be complicated during moments of intensified social or political tumult?

This course will address these questions by investigating the dynamic relationship between diverse forms of media and the French Revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848, as well as the Paris Commune of 1871. We will broaden our current conception of "mass (multi) media" by critically examining the representation of these revolutions in 19th-century journalistic articles, political caricatures, paintings, popular songs, novels, and photographs. (Note: this is not a course on contemporary media studies.)

Texts will include: short journalistic articles from various 19th -century newspapers, popular political songs, excerpts from Victor Hugo's Les Misérables (1862), political caricatures, paintings (e.g., Eugène Delacroix's La Liberté guidant le peuple (1830)), as well as propagandistic photographs from the period of the Paris Commune.

Evaluation will be based on active class participation, weekly written responses to readings on the Ctools discussion forum, as well as two or three substantive compositions and an oral class presentation.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 235 with a grade of C- or higher

FRENCH 333 — French Phonetics
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Neu,Helene

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in articulatory and descriptive phonetics and an introduction to French phonology. Students will also learn techniques for improving their own pronunciation or for their use in teaching French to others. We will examine the physiological characteristics of individual sounds (consonants, vowels, and semi-consonants), the relationship between the meaningful sounds of French and their orthographic representations, the rules governing pronunciation of 'universal' French, and the most salient features in the pronunciation of selected regional varieties of French from within France and from other parts of the francophone world. Much of the focus of the course will be on rules governing syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion or retention of the 'mute e'. Students will have opportunities to apply theory to practice in class, but most oral production practice will be assigned as independent and regular work to be done with audiotapes outside of class.

Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, analyzing phonological problem sets and oral practice using recordings on the class CTools site. Written homework, tests, and a final written final exam will evaluate students' ability to recognize and describe phonological and orthographic patterns, their understanding of theory, and use the phonetic alphabet. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, recitation of 1-2 poems, and the final oral exam will be used to evaluate proficiency in pronunciation.

Students should note that this is not a conversation course nor is it a course that will focus on the development of oral proficiency in French. Rather, it is an introduction to one aspect on linguistics — phonetics — applied to the description and production of French sounds, their representation in spelling and in the International Phonetic Alphabet, and the contexts in which they occur or alternate with other sounds. The course requires attention to details, especially in the transcription system, in recognition of patterns, and in pronunciation.

FRENCH 333 is taught entirely in French.

Textbook for the course: Dansereau, Diane. Savoir dire. Cours de phonétique et de prononciation. 2nd edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2006.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320); or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320).

FRENCH 369 — Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity
Section 001, REC
Myths of Paris: Representations of the City and "la Cité"

Instructor: Chang,Dominica Sung Hee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Myths of Paris: Representations of the City and "la Cité"

In this course, we will examine some of the major literary, cultural, and intellectual movements that have shaped the character of French representations of Paris from the French Revolutionary era to the present. Special focus will be placed on literary and filmic representations of Paris (and its myths), especially as they — and Paris itself — have dramatically evolved throughout the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. A variety of genres will be explored and students will gain further experience with critical approaches to reading and writing. This course will be conducted in French. Writers examined will include Honoré de Balzac, Charles Baudelaire, Guillaume Apollinaire, Louis Aragon, Tahar Ben Jelloun, and Calixthe Beyala. Visual texts will include paintings, photographs, and filmic representations of the French capital.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

FRENCH 374 — Problems in Society and Social Theory
Section 001, REC
The Public, the Private, and the Universal

Instructor: Caron,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Modern French culture is a universalist one in which society is structured by the state at one end and free and equal individuals at the other. Such a universalist culture relies on a strict dichotomization of public and private spheres, the latter encompassing all markers of group identity and community, such as religion, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, etc. In this course, we will study how the two spheres are defined, enforced, and opposed. Why much attention will be paid to the question of Jewishness, which has served as a template for the articulation of French universalism, we will also study books and movies that foreground issues of class, gender, race, and sexuality.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

FRENCH 375 — Cinema and Society in the Francophone World
Section 001, REC
FILM, MEDIA AND CULTURE CINEMA AND SOCIAL DISCOURSE: A POETIC OF FRIENDSHIP IN FRANCOPHONE FILM.

Instructor: Ekotto,Frieda

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will concentrate on representations of minorities in films produced from the early 80's to the present time in France, and in their former West African colonies. These films not only examine France's colonial past, which until recently has remained obscure, but also they problematize questions of national identity through contemporary issues to race, racism, ethnicity, sexuality as well as class and gender. The connecting thread that links all the films enumerated here is the friendship portrayed between individuals of different races or ethnic origins. The interethnic friendship that develops can be analyzed as an attempt to negotiate new definitions for identities that are inherently subversive to national identity. At one level, we will concentrate on cinema as a language, an ideological discourse that aims to provide a critical exploration. At another level, we will analyze how the selected film inscribe and reinscribe the same kind of representations of minorities on the screen.

We will also investigate the epistemology of friendships in films produced within the French countries specified above. The films include:

  • Mehdi Charef's Le thé au Harem d'Archi Ahmed (1984);
  • Claire Denis's Chocolat (1988) and J'ai pas sommeil (1994);
  • Thomas Gilou's Black Mic Mac (1988);
  • Coline Serreau's Romuald et Juliet (1988);
  • Brigitte Rouan's Outremer (1990);
  • Mathieu Kassovitz's Café au lait (1993) and La Haine (1995);
  • Dridi Karem's Bye-Bye (1995);
  • Luc and Jean Pierre Dardenne's La Promesse (1996);
  • Jean-Marie Teno's Clando (1966); and
  • Mohamed Camara's Dakan (1997).
  • Dardenne's Mahamat-Saleh Haroun's Bye Bye Africa (1999);
  • Ousmane Sembene's Faat Kine (2000);
  • Mostefa Djadjam's Frontieres (2000);
  • Joseph Gai's Karmen Gei (2001)
  • and films viewed in FESPACO.

As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to attend the FESPACO Film Festival in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in Africa (Feb.24-March 3, 2007.) The biennial festival showcases newly released as well as unreleased films by filmmakers from all over the continent. Students will have the opportunity not only to attend film showings, but also to meet and interview film directors, actors, actresses and critics. Students will earn 1 additional credit for this component of the course, which is UC 399.007.
OUAGA, BURKINA FASO February 24-March 3, 2007.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

FRENCH 378 — Studies in Genre
Section 001, REC
Theater and Theatricality in Early Modern France

Instructor: Ibbett,Katherine M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this class we will read a range of plays from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that raise questions about gender, family and sexual relations, and social class. Alongside the plays, we'll read some texts by writers who think playacting is wrong, and we'll see how playwrights defend themselves against those accusations. We'll also think about ways to be "theatrical" that don't happen on stage, thinking about what it means to accuse someone of "theatrical" behavior.

Two papers, two exams, and the occasional performance.

Readings include Corneille, Le Cid; Molière, Dom Juan, L'école des femmes; Racine, Andromaque, Phèdre; Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro; Rousseau, Lettre à D'Alembert

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

FRENCH 379 — Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Section 001, REC
Families: Stories of Sex and Violence

Instructor: Caron,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3

If you were to choose between your family and your friends, who would you choose, and why? When is the family an oppressive structure? When is it a recourse against social and political oppression? What are the links between heterosexuality and capitalism? Is homosexuality inherently subversive? How are the private and the public spheres articulated, and for what purpose?

The focus of the course is the twentieth century and the modern family. In addition to short theoretical texts dealing with the construction of the modern bourgeois family, we will read a variety of literary texts that challenge existing models and/or propose alternative ones.

Readings: Jean Cocteau, Annie Ernaux, Émile Ajar, Emile Copfermann, Hervé Guibert, Denis Lachaud.

Films: Ma vie en rose, by Alain Berliner, and additional film clips.

This course is taught entirely in French.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above

FRENCH 399 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Visit www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/concminors/indepstudy.html for detailed instructions and application.

Enforced Prerequisites: Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299, and one RCLANG 320

FRENCH 414 — Advanced Business French
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Criso,Rachael A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BA 415.

During this class, we will deepen our linguistic and cultural awareness of the French-speaking business world. We will study and practice both written and spoken commercial French within their true cultural context. Themes covered during the semester will include banking, advertising, product marketing, claims and disputes, company organization and hierarchy. The mechanics of job application in French will be covered in detail, as will possible scenarios encountered once accepted into a company. Required writing assignments will concentrate on commercial correspondence, stressing the traditional nature of written business French. Oral work will include the practice of communication and integration in both formal and social business settings.

A series of business culture videos will be viewed and used as a springboard for discussion regarding the differences (both perceived and real) between business interactions in the francophone world and the U.S.

A portion of the class will be spent working directly with French peer business students at The Euromediterrané Business School in Marseille, France. Weekly contact will take place virtually via iChat videoconference. Students will collaborate on assigned projects.

This class is conducted entirely in French. Attendance is mandatory. Students must be officially registered.

Enforced Prerequisites: FRENCH 380

FRENCH 461 — Reading of Old French Texts
Section 001, REC
Introduction to Medieval Literature, 12-13c

Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Crusades and courtly love, King Arthur and the grail — these are some of the subjects of twelfth- and thirteenth-century literature and of this class. We will read medieval epics, romances, poetry, and short narratives. Some of these are quite beautiful, some are quite weird. Readings and discussion in modern French, though some secondary reading assignments may be in English, and we'll study some Old French just for fun. We will also look at the ways in which some modern films understand and represent the French Middle Ages. Participation in class discussion is essential, and there will be a series of writing assignments.

Enforced Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above

FRENCH 492 — Senior Honors Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Supervised independent study leading to the completion of an honors thesis; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

See the Honors Concentration in French section of the Romance Languages & Literatures department website for detailed information and application form.

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing

FRENCH 651 — Studies in Medieval Literature
Section 001, SEM
Introduction to Medieval Literature, 12-13c.

Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class offers an introduction to major texts of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, including chansons de geste, romances, poetry, and short narratives. Reading assignments and discussion in modern French, though some secondary reading assignments may be in English, and we will study some Old French (proficiency in Old French is not expected).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FRENCH 656 — Studies in 20th Century French Literature
Section 001, SEM
Proustian Perversions: Reading and the Politics of Happiness in A la recherche du temps perdu

Instructor: Hayes,Jarrod L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Cruising Proust
Lesbian Proust
Proust the sodomite
Proust voyeur
Proust in love
Proust in the tearoom
Proust in the closet
Proust in drag
Proust in the brothel
Proust in leather
Proust in chains
The Proustian spank
The Proustian wank

If, as Roland Barthes suggested, perversion is — quite simply — what makes us happy, Proust offers his readers many opportunities for happiness. For the young narrator, reading is a solitary, autoerotic pleasure; yet A la recherche suggests that there are many ways of getting in touch with a text. This seminar will explore ways in which Proust theorizes the act of reading as a form of desire, of cruising for signs, of disseminating pleasure. For Barthes, perversion is also political; perverse is whatever does not contribute to economic production or (hetero)sexual reproduction. So in addition to considering perversion as a theoretical practice, we will also examine its politics.

Proust and class struggle
Postcolonial Proust
Jewish Proust
Proust in the Orient
Proust Dreyfusard

A consideration of Proustian perversions runs counter to Proust's position in the French canon and canonical discussions of "great" Proustian themes such as the essential and eternal qualities of art, the workings of involuntary memory, and the ephemeral nature of worldly society. By taking a look at the turn towards the queer and the postmodern in Proustian scholarship (or by examining more closely what has been there all along), this seminar will not only encourage a critical approach to both the question of canon formation and the high/low distinction Proust has often been used to reinforce, but it will also use Proustian studies as an exemplary model for thinking through the ways literary fields, especially those based on single authors, define and transform themselves.

Seminar discussions will be conducted in English. Students without reading skills in French may also read Proust in translation. Because students may wish to purchase different editions, copies of A la recherche will not be ordered through local bookstores; students should therefore procure their own copies before the beginning of the semester. It is recommended that students interested in pursuing Proustian studies beyond the scope of this seminar invest in the 1987 four-volume Pléiade edition (if they have the means to do so and access to French bookstores). While it is hoped that students will read as much of A la recherche as possible, so that they can also read a handful of secondary texts, the seminar will focus on the following volumes with selected excerpts from the others:

Du côté de chez Swann
A l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs
Sodome et Gomorrhe
Le temps retrouvé

Requirements will include a final paper and several presentations on secondary texts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

FRENCH 899 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

FRENCH 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

FRENCH 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

 
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