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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = FIRST_YEAR_SEM
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 001, SEM
Dismantling American Notions of Race

Instructor: Gunning,Sandra R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

What are we really talking about when we use the word "race?" Students will explore this question by paying close attention not only to a history of the American usage of the term, but also to other markers of identity (ethnicity, class, sexuality, etc.) that have shaped that usage. Course readings will be drawn from history, feminist and gender studies, media studies, literature, and cultural anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 002, SEM
Contemporary American Humor and Performance

Instructor: Clark,Daniel Emmett

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar will explore the performance of comedy in modern America, focusing on how America's increasingly diverse national character influences humor and comedic presentation. Drawing from all available forms of comedy, this class will encompass an overview of the study of American humor by balancing leading scholarship with firsthand analysis of both canonical American comedians and those performing today, including Lenny Bruce, Dave Chappelle, Stephen Colbert, and many others.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 003, SEM
Spoken Word Poetry

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, Theme

Learn the art of performance poetry and spoken word in this new freshman seminar! Each week, we will read contemporary poetry, or watch performances of local and nationally-known spoken word artists, and study the phenomena of Poetry Slam competitions in America. Students will also engage in creative exercises to empower the artist in all of us. No previous poetry experience necessary. For the term project, students will produce a spoken word event and/or poetry publication.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 004, SEM
Contemporary American Hunor & Performance

Instructor: Clark,Daniel Emmett

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of topics and issues in American Studies in a seminar format from a Humanities perspective. It enables students to have contact with regular faculty in a small-class experience and to elicit their active participation in the topics under discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ASIAN 251 — Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Daoism

Instructor: Elstein,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Is there such a thing as "Daoism," and if so, what is it? In this course we will examine some of the philosophical and religious traditions that are categorized as Daoism, focusing on the philosophy of the Warring States period (441-221 BCE), religious developments in the Six Dynasties (220-589 CE), and modern Western interest in Daoism to try to answer some key questions.

  • What kinds of religious goals are part of Daoism?
  • How are different ritual, meditative, alchemical, and sexual practices all related?
  • Is Daoism really a good source for feminist and environmental ethics?

All readings will be in English. There are no prerequisites. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Japanese Storytelling in Words and Pictures

Instructor: Carr,Kevin Gray; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What makes a good story and how do you tell it? This class will examine the close relationship of artistic and literary productions in Japan from the Heian Period to the present day, considering the ways that stories are imagined in different media, genres, and social contexts. We will consider the significant differences between visual and textual narrative through focused readings of primary and secondary texts and narrative theory. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical reading and looking skills through a series of hands-on exercises designed to illuminate the process and significance of creating, viewing, and transmitting the stories that have moved people in Japan up to contemporary times.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 001, SEM


Instructor: Cortes-Ortiz,Liliana

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

This seminar provides a broad introduction to primate behavior and examines the social and sexual behavior of Neotropical primates such as howler monkeys, capuchin monkeys, muriquies, marmosets, and tamarins. Major issues and topics in current behavioral studies of primates will be addressed through readings of research journals and books and group discussions. We will also make use of oral presentations on particular aspects of the behavior of different species of Neotropical primates, and one short writing assignment. Through all of these activities students will be immersed in the fascinating lives of wild primates that occur in some of the most amazingly diverse tropical locations of Central and South America.

There will not be a textbook. Readings will come from a number of research articles, and from Primate Behavioral Ecology, by K. Strier, 3d edition, 2006, and Animal Behavior, by J. Alcock, 8th edition, 2005.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Malcolm X, Black Power, and the Practice of History

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines the life and legacy of Malcolm X, considering him both as an historical figure whose ideas and actions were part of a specific historical moment, and as an iconic, almost mythical figure whose image continues to stand as a powerful symbol. Our focus will be on understanding Malcolm X's influence on the Black Power movement of the 1960s and 1970s, when various organizations and individuals claimed to be carrying on his legacy. In addition, we will critically assess the ways in which his legacy continues to be constructed and used to represent that period of Black struggle. Our investigation will be guided by three broad objectives. First, we will study Malcolm X's life leading up to his emergence as a national and international figure of Black resistance. Secondly, we will examine the contours and depth of his activism and its relationship to the broader African American freedom movement. This will include a close look at the various ways in which his ideas and his example as a political activist impacted the Civil Rights movement and the emergence of the Black Power movement following his assassination in 1965. Finally, we will analyze and interpret contemporary representations of Malcolm X in both scholarly and popular forms, allowing us to better understand his legacy and his place in narratives of African American history. Throughout the academic term, we will take care to highlight the ways that ideas and images are used to construct historical meaning — that is, to make sense of the past and its relationship to the present.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme, FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
The Dying God in Myth and Literature

Instructor: Reed,Joseph D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The figure of the dying god — variously named Adonis, Osiris, or Attis and embodying both beauty and tragedy — has exerted a fascination from ancient times to the present day. Worship was sometimes central to the community, sometimes marginal yet compelling in its "outsider" status. Myths invited meditations on love and death in various modes from comedy to epic. Through the great mythological texts of Greece and Rome as well as modern literature and art, this course explores this figure in all its variety, along with Christian adaptations and recent interpretations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 121 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Composition)
Section 001, SEM
War and Remembrance

Instructor: Berlin,Netta

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

This course centers on Homer's Iliad and its paradigmatic value for military conflict in antiquity and the modern era. The course begins with a close reading of the epic, in particular the dynamic relationship between the narrowly circumscribed subject ("the anger of Achilles") and the complex narrative that transforms this subject into an evocative and enduring account of war. The remainder of the course considers works in a variety of disciplines (e.g., tragedy, philosophy, psychology) for which the Iliad has provided access to understanding war and its call to remembrance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Culture of Criticism, Criticism of Culture

Instructor: Seo,Joanne Mira

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, FYSem

This course will examine the function of criticism in society and how criticism is disseminated through cultural production. We will focus on the poets and critics of democratic Athens (criticism of poetry in the thought of Plato and Aristotle and its relationship to their political philosophies, Aristophanes as a political poet) and compare them with the works of more recent cultural critics such as Robert Warshow, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, as well as contemporary cultural products such as films and novels. To what extent can cultural criticism define and analyze areas beyond the arts, and how do cultural products such as poetry, literature and film critique contemporary culture?

Students will be evaluated on attendance, class participation, the presentation of group work, and brief writing assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Jewish Encounter with America

Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Is America the Promised Land or a cultural waste land? In this first-year seminar, we will explore how a series of Jewish writers have grappled with this complicated question, from the period of the great migration from Europe up to the present. The writers we will study include Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, Philip Roth, and Cynthia Ozick. Among the specific questions we will address are the following: How does Jewish identity transform in the New World? How do ideas from the religious traditions of Judaism get translated into new forms? What kind of stories do Jewish writers tell about the past and what sort of future do they envision? We will also consider the Jewish response to such phenomena as the backlash against immigrants in the 1920s, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. Requirements include short response papers and a term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Language, Literature and Personal Identity

Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our language provides us with the means by which we define ourselves, our world and our place in our world. Just as powerfully our language also function to keep us in our place. We will begin our term-long examination of this dilemma with a close study the language we use in our everyday lives, paying close attention to how language functions to enable us to establish and maintain relationships. We will extend our analysis to close readings of three important novels which demonstrate the literary use of language in exploring human identity. Written work will include weekly two-page essays which will become the basis of two longer papers, one of which will be based on a text of your choice. The assigned texts include Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice; Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes were Watching God and E.M. Forster's Maurice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The American Short Story — 20th Century Origins and Evolutions

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course examines the development of the American short story over the course of the twentieth century, touching on the works of both major and under-read writers. In addition to examining these authors' fictional techniques, we will also be investigating the ways in which authors stole from and argued with one another as well as how the popular understanding of the short story changed over the course of the century. Reading will be substantial. Requirements include two essays (one short, one long) as well as reading responses and one small presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 001, SEM
Uncommon Ground: Introduction to Environmental Literature

Instructor: Anderson,Marjorie Caldwell

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

How do different writers represent landscape? How do writers and readers understand the role of the natural world in human culture? What are the relationships between urban and rural environments? These questions inform our work together, the core of which is class discussions, reading, and writing. Authors include Mark Twain, Norman Maclean, Willa Cather, Barry Lopez, and Annie Dillard.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 002, SEM
Emerging Diseases

Instructor: Foufopoulos,Johannes; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem, Theme

In this seminar we look beyond the fright created by the popular media and examine the societal, economic, and ecological factors that drive the appearance of new diseases. We learn not only about the fascinating biology of emerging pathogens but also how various processes interact to produce an outbreak.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 140 — Science and the Media
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lithgow-Bertelloni,Carolina R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

There has never been a greater chasm between the importance of science to society and society's understanding of it. Reporting on scientific discoveries and technological advances are often biased, inaccurate, or wrong. We will examine the relationship between science and the media and try to answer the following questions: Is scientific reporting fair, accurate, and informed? Is it sensationalist? Can the public evaluate the scientific information presented to them? How do scientists communicate their work? We will use case histories, primarily from the earth and environmental sciences to address these questions. We will cover the basic concepts and facts behind each case, and discuss its presentation to the public. We will use a variety of resources ranging from newspaper and TV reports to the Internet. Members of the university and local media will participate.

No prerequisites. High school science highly recommended. Evaluation will be based on midterm and final projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school science highly recommended. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 142 — From Stars to Stones
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 114 may only elect GEOSCI 142 for 2 credits.

This seminar starts from stellar evolution and the formation of the elements in stars, and ends at the formation of terrestrial planets from these elements and their early evolution (especially the Earth). Students learn cosmochemical and geochemical concepts and methods and apply them to several theme topics. Though factual knowledge is an important part of the course, emphasis is on how scientists study and solve problems and how science progresses using historical examples.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school math and science. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All other students need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 146 — Plate Tectonics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ritsema,Jeroen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed three of GEOSCI 105, 107, and 205. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 146 for two credits. Those with credit for GEOSCI 205, or both GEOSCI 105 and 107, may only elect GEOSCI 146 for one credit.

Two hundred million years ago the Earth's continents were joined together to form one gigantic super-continent, called Pangea. Plate tectonic forces broke Pangea apart and caused the continents to drift. We study the evidence for plate tectonics and the large-scale dynamics of the Earth's interior that is responsible for mountain building, earthquakes faulting, volcanic eruptions, changes in Earth's magnetic field and much more.

The course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics and written essays on the same subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 147 — Natural Hazards
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 107 or 205 may only elect GEOSCI 147 for 2 credits. Those who have credit for both GEOSCI 107 and 205 may only elect 147 for 1 credit.

This first-year seminar examines the geologic origin, as well as economic and societal impact of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, climate change, and meteorite impacts through lectures, discussion, student presentations, and research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 155 — Evolution of North America
Section 001, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 411.

A close examination of ancient rock records provides a geological framework for North America's history from its formation to its future, including formation and erosion of a mountain belt and a large meteorite impact site, deposition of glacial deposits and rocks formed during continental flooding due to global warming.

Through seminar discussion, preparation of term papers, and individual presentation, the students master a geological framework and an understanding of Earth history from its formation to its future. Lectures for the first third of the course will be supplemented by readings in the book, A Short History of Planet Earth — Mountains, Mammals, Fire and Ice, by J.D. Macdougall (Wiley and Sons, paperback). This will be followed by a midterm exam based on the lectures and the book. Two term papers on the seminar topics, to be thoroughly reviewed and revised, complete the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 157 — History of Earth Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stixrude,Lars P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

This course explores the development of ideas in the history of earth science and the evolution of our understanding of the earth and its environment, from the classical scholars to the plate tectonic revolution. Students learn central geological concepts and develop a sense for the nature of science and the scientific method within the historical context.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Visual Representation of Classical Mythology

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Myths are one way of structuring and explaining the world. This course explores the 'after life' of classical mythologies by focusing on the classical revival of the Renaissance, but we also study the intersection of these traditions with contemporary representations, chiefly in film. The course aims to familiarize students with a core set of myths, ones narrated in Ovid's Metamorphoses, and which provided a framework for picturing themes like transformation, desire and creativity. We will combine analysis of literary poetics with close attention to visual literacy. Through gender analysis, we focus on the construction of masculinity (e.g., Hercules) and femininity (e.g., Venus). The very fictionality of myth made it an apt vehicle for the figuring of creativity, here investigated through the stories of Narcissus, Prometheus and Pygmalion. Textbook: Ovid, Metamorphoses, Penguin.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Theaters of Power: The Palace in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Schrader,Jeffrey A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

After 1600, palaces became increasingly important as venues of both statecraft and the arts. Rulers poured resources into construction and decoration so as to create theaters worthy of their majesty. The result is that palaces inspired some of the key developments in the history of art and politics. By focusing on examples in western Europe, in particular the French palace of Versailles, we will explore how art and architecture were harnessed to project messages of power. This course covers media such as painting and sculpture, yet other realms — including landscape architecture and theatrical performances — will also occupy our attention. We will evaluate how palaces bolstered the public image of monarchs who sought to expand their authority and create what approximates our idea of the modern nation-state. Further material will illustrate the evolving fortunes of palaces from their greatest moments to when they no longer stood at the forefront of the arts.

IV. 3, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Epidemics: Deadly Disease in U.S. Culture

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions will explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (four to five hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Written assignments are two five-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $160 more. Course Pack available at Dollar Bill.

Assigned Books:

  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange (Greenwood)
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years (Chicago)
  • De Kruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Barry, The Great Influenza (Viking)
  • Oshinsky, Polio(Oxford)
  • Garrett, The Coming Plague (Penguin)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Leo Africanus

Instructor: Poteet,Ellen Spence

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

In 1510, at the age of seventeen, al-Hassan ibn Muhammad al-Wazzani set off from Fez in Morocco across the Sahara for Timbuktu. Before he was twenty-five, this young man had traveled the length and breadth of the Maghrib, Sahara, and Sudan, arriving in Egypt soon after Mamluk ascendancy. He was, as the occasion called for, scholar, lawyer, merchant, diplomat, and troubadour. In 1518 he was captured at sea and brought to Pope Leo X, son of Lorenzo the Magnificent, a Medici. The pope was so impressed by the young man's learning that he freed him, renamed him after himself (hence, Leo Africanus), and baptized him. Leo died, probably in Tunis and probably a Muslim, in 1552.

For the seminar we will read extensive sections of John Pory's translation of Leo Africanus' Description of Africa, presented to Sir Robert Cecil, of the court of Queen Elizabeth I of England, selections from other primary sources (Arabic and European, in translation), secondary studies relevant to sixteenth-century African and Mediterranean history, and Amin Maalouf's novel Leo Africanus. The seminar will take its shape in significant part from students' interests, whether in: Sudanic peoples and cultures; Saharan trade; Arab-African relations; the urban centers of Fez, Timbuktu, and Mamluk Cairo; Medici Italy as Leo encountered it; or Elizabeth I's stakes in "the land of the Moors." The emphasis will be on a deeper historical understanding of the life of Leo Africanus and the fluid age in which that life was passed.

Engaged participation, short papers, and a final class project will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
England in the Age of Hogarth

Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

William Hogarth was the greatest English artist and interpreter of the social scene in the eighteenth century. He satirized all aspects of life, high and low, and left us a vivid set of images of his times. Taking as a starting point Hogarth's complex, teeming images we shall examine the rich and teeming history of England in an age of great exuberance, achievement and change. Like Hogarth, we shall be interested in the stark contrasts between rich and poor, modern courtship and prostitution, drunkenness and (relative) sobriety, war and peace and notions of beauty and ugliness.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Russian Witchcraft in Comparative Perspective

Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Many of the assumptions that we make about witches and witchcraft do not hold true in the Russian case. Unlike the western European cases, where witches were overwhelming imagined as female, in Russia, the vast majority of the accused were male. In the west, Satan and a satanic pact defined the essential nature of witchcraft, but in Russia the devil made little appearance in witchcraft cases. How can we explain these differences? What do the differences and similarities tell us about Russia and about witchcraft? We will analyze fairy tales, folk practices, miracle tales, contemporary descriptions and trials, and we will read several recent studies that offer thought-provoking analytical frameworks.

A new component of the course will be a unit on the understandings, justifications, and results of judicial torture in witch trials in Russia and the west, a subject with startling relevance in the world of today.

The course is conceived as a collective effort to puzzle out some of the fundamental problems and methods of comparative history. Students will have a chance to do original research and analysis.

The course requires no background in Russian history and is open to all interested first-year students.

Course Requirements:

The course will be a small discussion class, meeting twice a week. Requirements will include very short weekly response papers (2 pages), plus a longer (10 page) source-based paper due at the end of the semester. Students will be required to submit their longer papers in draft form and then to rewrite them incorporating editorial suggestions. Students will be expected to attend every class, to participate regularly, and to present results of their individual research to the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 150 — First Year Seminar in Judaic Studies
Section 001, SEM
The Jewish Encounter with America

Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Is America the Promised Land or a cultural waste land? In this first-year seminar, we will explore how a series of Jewish writers have grappled with this complicated question, from the period of the great migration from Europe up to the present. The writers we will study include Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, Philip Roth, and Cynthia Ozick. Among the specific questions we will address are the following: How does Jewish identity transform in the New World? How do ideas from the religious traditions of Judaism get translated into new forms? What kind of stories do Jewish writers tell about the past and what sort of future do they envision? We will also consider the Jewish response to such phenomena as the backlash against immigrants in the 1920s, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. Requirements include short response papers and a term paper.

LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
Indigenous Languages of North America

Instructor: Pharris,Nicholas J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Before Columbus, the linguistic landscape of North America included about 300 highly diverse languages, as different from each other as they were (and are) from European languages. In this course, we investigate the major families of Native American languages to see how they work and how they differ, both among themselves and from European languages. We also examine efforts to revitalize endangered indigenous languages and explore the relationships among language, culture, and thought.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

MATH 127 — Geometry and the Imagination
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Joukhovitski,Valentina; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course (except for MATH 385 and 485).

Background and Goals: This course introduces students to the ideas and some of the basic results in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. Beginning with geometry in ancient Greece, the course includes the construction of new geometric objects from old ones by projecting and by taking slices. The course is intended for students who want an introduction to mathematical ideas and culture. Emphasis is on conceptual thinking — — students will do hands-on experimentation with geometric shapes, patterns and ideas.

Content: The section begins with the independence of Euclid's Fifth Postulate and with the construction of spherical and hyperbolic geometries in which the Fifth Postulate fails; how spherical and hyperbolic geometry differs from Euclidean geometry. The last topic is geometry of higher dimensions: coordinization — — the mathematician's tool for studying higher dimensions; construction of higher-dimension analogues of some familiar objects like spheres and cubes; discussion of the proper higher-dimensional analogues of some geometric notions (length, angle, orthogonality, etc.).

Alternatives: none Subsequent Courses: This course does not provide preparation for any further study of mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics including a geometry course. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Aesthetics: Artistic Value from a Dual Perspective of Philosophy and Art History

Instructor: Moscovici,Claudia

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar is for students who enjoy art, and are curious about why they enjoy it. It combines philosophical analysis of art with our actual appreciation of it — which includes a visit to the museum, oral presentations and artistic projects. Aesthetics — a name derived from the Greek word aesthesis meaning "sense experience" — concerns itself with the study of art. Aesthetic philosophy seeks to understand the principles that underlie our value judgments:

  • What is beauty? Is it objective in any way? How is aesthetic pleasure related to perception?

  • What is artistic talent or genius? What makes something be art?

Such philosophical questions also have a historical dimension, and cannot be answered only in the abstract. Thus, philosophy can benefit from art history. Art historians attempt to answer such questions as:

  • What constitutes artistic value for a given period, group or set of artists?

  • What perceptual/aesthetic problems were specific artists working on?

  • Who sponsored them, and why? How did critics respond to them?

This seminar introduces students to the question of artistic value from a dual perspective, informed by philosophy and art history. Perhaps in this way we can better understand our own responses to art.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Sax,Greg M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our problem: Humans are free. Nothing makes us do a free act. So, if circumstances determine an act, it isn't free. The universe is different. Causes determine every event in accord with natural laws. But humans are parts of the universe. So, every action is determined by its causes. Thus, humans aren't free.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Moral Dimensions of the University

Instructor: Krenz,Gary D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, Theme

This course examines moral dimensions of the University and its faculty, students, and staff in their roles as citizens of an academic community. Our goal is to help students think about how to approach participation in this community and develop their deliberative competencies by questioning academic life and the University from moral and social standpoints. We will organize our inquiries into three domains:  academic integrity; the University as an academic community; the University's moral obligations as an institution.

 

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 005, SEM
fundamental questions

Instructor: MacPherson,Brian C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

We will examine answers given by philosophers through the ages and in contemporary times to fundamental questions such as the existence of God, death and immortality, the nature of right and wrong, and what constitutes art and beauty. This is a discussion-based course where each student will be asked to give an oral presentation on assigned articles. Additional course requirements will include writing short discussion papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHYSICS 112 — Cosmology: The Science of the Universe
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Tarlé,Gregory; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

What else is there in the universe besides stars? Why do we think there was a big bang? How big is a galaxy and how might they have formed? This course provides answers to such questions, stressing conceptual understanding and simple calculational problem solving.

Advisory Prerequisite: Although no science prerequisites are required, exposure to physics at high school level would be helpful. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instruc

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem, Theme

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Twins and what they teach us

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar will focus on twinship. Throughout historical time, and across many cultures, twins have been the source of much fascination. In literature, they have served as a metaphor to explore identity, good vs. evil, multiple life options, symmetry, and soul mates, and in science, they have been used to disentangle genetic and environmental influences on health and behavior.

In order to gain an understanding of the experience, influences, and impact of twinship, we will examine literature and films that have used twins, we will interview twins, and parents, siblings, and spouses of twins, and we will consider theory and research on the biology and psychology of twins, and on the impact of recent increases in the incidence of twinning. A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with weekly reading and written assignments. In addition, there will be several group projects and a final exam. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 003, SEM
Global Perspectives on Social Justice: 100 Year Korean American Experience

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar is an interdisciplinary course that explores contemporary experiences of Korean Americans in the United States from a social justice perspective. In the context and course of the first century of Korean-American history, 1903-2003, it examines the unique contributions, struggles, and challenges for social justice in a multiethnic and multicultural America. This class will be conducted in a seminar consisting of lectures, presentations, creative projects, student interaction activities, interactive learning experiences, and discussions. Practical opportunities for socio-cultural teaching and learning experience will be included in the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 004, SEM
Creative work and social change

Instructor: Creekmore,Phillip M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Artists, craftspeople, and cultural knowledge-makers have been instrumental but not acknowledged as creators of social change through the practice of "everyday politics". This seminar will explore several types of creative activities, especially those that involve both visual and narrative materials (pictures and stories). We will study how those activities have produced social change, especially among disadvantaged or stigmatized groups (like youth, persons with brain disorders, prisoners, the elderly, people with HIV/AIDS) in the United States and South Africa. Students will themselves develop the skills to combine creative materials with narrative writing to produce social change.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM
The Human Mind & Brain

Instructor: Polk,Thad A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

How are mental processes like memory, language, and attention implemented in the brain? What is the neural basis of insanity? Of sleep? Of depression? What, if anything, can the brain tell us about consciousness? Within the last few decades, science has made significant progress on these and related questions by studying the effects of brain damage and by recording brain activity in intact individuals. In this seminar, we will survey this exciting field. We will first familiarize ourselves with the structure of the human brain and then learn what is being discovered about how the brain implements a variety of mental processes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
World Utopia and Dystopia in Fiction and Film

Instructor: Khagi,Sofya

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Both utopia (describing an imaginary ideal society) and dystopia (describing an imaginary evil society) have captured the imagination of numerous generations of readers. This course investigates the history of these exciting genres across national boundaries through critical writing and reading. It traces the evolution of the genres from the works of antiquity and the Renaissance, through the nineteenth century and the development of Socialist rationalist utopia, to the great age of dystopia, and up to postmodern parodic novels. It explores how English, Russian, American, Czech, Polish, and other utopias/dystopias respond to key socio-political developments in the world, and how they react to various cultural movements (e.g., Romanticism, the Avant-Garde, Postmodernism), as well as how they take on various aspects of fantasy and science fiction. Authors will include Thomas More, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Evgeny Zamyatin, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Karel Čapek, Stanisław Lem, Thomas Pynchon, and Vladimir Voinovich. Select Anglo-American, German, and Russian movies will be shown.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

STATS 125 — Games, Gambling and Coincidences
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keener,Robert W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem

Emphasizes problem solving and modeling related to games, gambling and coincidences, touching on many fundamental ideas in discrete probability, finite Markov chains, dynamic programming and game theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 150 — First-Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Music in Our Lives

Instructor: Nagel,Louis B

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, and harmony. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Why Grandpa Went to War: The Psychology of Obedience and Drives Toward World War

Instructor: Brown,Donald R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

What were the social, economic, geopolitical and personal psychological conditions in 1943 that would result in an 18-year old freshman leaving college and going off to spend the next three years fighting with the U.S. Army in Europe and liberating Dachau? What led up to 1943 and how did this series of historical events become a part of the life of American youth and continue to affect that generation's (your grandparents) behavior after World War II and through today? What do we know from 30 years of research on the nature of obedience that resulted in both self-sacrifice and the Holocaust? These questions will be explored using the resources of historical works, novels, films, and personal documents. Each student will interview a member of that generation, preferably a grandparent or surrogate, with armed services experience during the war and write a psycho-history of their subject's experiences and its consequences for their lives and times.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Human Sexuality and Gender Issues

Instructor: Mayes,Frances L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectives including historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual throughout their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality. Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including choice of sexual partners and behaviors, the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making, sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias. The course requires access to the Internet, and uses a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a semester project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships

Instructor: Menlo,Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to assist members toward an understanding of the personal and situational forces that help and hinder persons in their relationships with each other and in their efforts to work and live together. It will also assist members to transform this social psychological understanding into constructive actions for handling the problems and difficulties that inevitably arise when people are together. There will be opportunity to refine one's competencies at reflective listening, giving and seeking feedback, interpersonal observation, and mindfulness in thinking about issues. The class sessions are interactive and informal with brief information-giving, focused discussions, interpersonal learning exercises, and videotapes. Reading assignments are mainly through course handouts and other suggested sources. To stimulate personal reflection on interpersonal issues, class members maintain an observation log and a reading log and do a term paper on a relevant, self-selected topic. This work is also used as the source of evaluation and grading in the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 004, SEM
LUCY: The Lives of Urban Children and Youth Initiative

Instructor: Galura,Joseph A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme, FYSem

This service-learning course explores the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings through traditional coursework integrated with personal reflection and community involvement. We will study the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of children and youth. For example, how have community members helped to create and support positive roles for children and youth. Students will work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that shape social identity and expectations. This course is intended for students with an interest in teaching, or urban and community studies, or both.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Contemporary Issues in Medicine Use and Pharmacy

Instructor: Welage,Lynda S
Instructor: Mueller,Bruce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Although medications have long been the primary means to treat disease in Western society, only in recent years has their use evoked widespread interest beyond the health care professionals who work with them and the individual patients who consume them. This seminar will describe and evaluate key issues that have raised the visibility of medication use in recent years. Areas that will be addressed include drug development and regulation, the economics and financing of medication benefit programs, medication taking behaviors, and programs to achieve proper medication use. The role of the pharmacist in managing that use, including culturally competent care, will be addressed.

Examples of specific issues that may be used to illustrate the course topics include direct-to-consumer advertising of medications, the balance between patient confidentiality and health professionals' need to know, insurer payment for "life style drugs" such as Viagra® for impotence and Rogaine® for baldness, and clinical controversies such as the use of hormone replacement therapy in menopausal women. Course readings will be selected from the clinical, professional, and lay literature and serve as the basis for class discussion and written assignments. One of the desired outcomes of this course is to develop in students the ability to critically analyze differing perspectives that affect how medications are used.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 006, SEM
Libations of the Gods: Alcohol and Other Mind-Altering Substances

Instructor: Tolbert,Margaret M
Instructor: Rutowski,Patricia A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the broad social and economic impacts of alcohol, with an emphasis on the effects of alcohol on health. Information will be presented on the historical perspective of alcohol and its role in the United States since the twentieth century. Students will consider the many impacts of alcohol on individuals, families, organizations, and broader society. By exploring how we are socialized into drinking and what changes could be made to positively alter the way this socialization occurs, students will gain a greater understanding of the role played by family, culture, peers and the alcohol industry in the development of drinking patterns. At the same time they will learn how to foster a more mature approach to, and responsible use of, alcohol. Classes also provide opportunities to engage in stimulating discussions with faculty and other experts from within the University of Michigan.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 150 — Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Gender and Music

Instructor: André,Naomi A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course explores how gender relates to music.

  • Can music be masculine or feminine?
  • Is there a gendered voice in music?
  • What is at stake in thinking about music and gender?

The course materials will incorporate different genres and styles of music from "classical" (e.g., opera and symphony) to "popular" (e.g., jazz and blues, rock and hip-hop). We will also discuss how gender and music interact in literature (readings include Ntozake Shange's novel Sassafrass, Cypress and Indigo and the poetry of Langston Hughes and Shakespeare). While gender and music will be the focus of this seminar, we will also consider how this topic intersects with sexuality, race, class and ethnicity.

This course is designed for first-year students. No previous musical background is required except that you be passionate about some type (any style or genre) of music. Grades will be based on class participation (discussion and short presentations) and written work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 151 — Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Women's Lives in 20th-Century China

Instructor: Wang,Zheng

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar will introduce you to recent scholarship on women's experiences in twentieth-century China, with an emphasis on a history of the Chinese feminist movement. We will focus on the emergence and development of feminist discourse in modern China, discuss its relations with rising nationalism, dominant political parties, and China's pursuit of modernity. We will highlight diverse Chinese women's multiple roles in the 20th century, study and compare women in and outside the Chinese revolution, and examine women's relations with the socialist state. The course will end by discussing Chinese women's activism today. All readings are in English. Personal voices and life stories constitute the majority of the reading. The reading materials will be supplemented by a variety of visual materials shown in class, such as excerpts from the documentary TV series "A Chinese Women's History in the Twentieth Century." The course is organized as a seminar, with emphasis placed on reading, writing, and lively class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

 
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