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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = GEOSCI
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 62 of 62
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
GEOSCI 104 — Ice Ages, Past and Future
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

This course examines the effects of past glaciations on the landscape and on life, and on man in particular. Speculation on the causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past million years and predictions of future ice ages, based on current geological research, are examined.

GEOSCI 105 — Continents Adrift
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205 or 146.

The seemingly stable land masses of the world are in motion. Continental collision and fragmentation are only a few of the attendant processes associated with these motions. This course deals with the modern concept of plate tectonics and continental drift, the processes, and the products of this dynamic system.

GEOSCI 105 — Continents Adrift
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205 or 146.

The seemingly stable land masses of the world are in motion. Continental collision and fragmentation are only a few of the attendant processes associated with these motions. This course deals with the modern concept of plate tectonics and continental drift, the processes, and the products of this dynamic system.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 111 — Climate and Mankind
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 201 or 151.

A short, half-term lecture course covering topics including weather, climate factors, climate. The course will explore how climate affects humans and how humans affect climate.


GEOSCI 114 — Global Warming
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Poulsen,Christopher James

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

Review of the geological evidence for global warming including geochemistry of natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gases, global radiation balance, sediment and ice core records, and ancient hot climates with discussion of possible remediation methods and their economic and political context.

Advisory Prerequisite: High School math, physics, and chemistry.

GEOSCI 114 — Global Warming
Section 011, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Poulsen,Christopher James

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

Review of the geological evidence for global warming including geochemistry of natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gases, global radiation balance, sediment and ice core records, and ancient hot climates with discussion of possible remediation methods and their economic and political context.

Advisory Prerequisite: High School math, physics, and chemistry.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

A one-term laboratory course covering the laboratory portion of Introduction to Geology. The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Students who register for GEOSCI 118 must also be enrolled in GEOSCI 119 or they must have taken 119 in an earlier academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 118 — Introductory Geology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit if completed an introductory course in geology (GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, or 218).

The laboratory provides hands-on experience with minerals, rocks, and maps. Participants will learn to identify common minerals and rocks, use topographic and geologic maps, and draw and interpret geologic cross sections. Examples will be drawn from areas of recent glaciation, volcanism, and earthquakes to show how these features are depicted in maps.

Required text: Laboratory Manual for Physical Geology, by Jones and Norris.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 119, or 205 and 206, or 135.

GEOSCI 119 — Introductory Geology Lectures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted if completed or enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 120. No credit granted if completed both GEOSCI 205 AND GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206. Only 3 credits with GEOSCI 205 or GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206.

GEOSCI 119 is a basic single-term course in introductory geology concentrating on the evolution of the Earth in physical and chemical terms. Reference to the interaction of the external biosphere — atmosphere — hydrosphere with the earth's interior is an essential component of the course.

Topics covered include:

  • plate tectonics: continental collision and fragmentation
  • tsunamis, earthquakes and volcanoes
  • evolution and extinction: dinosaurs and the fossil record
  • glaciers, global warming and climate change
  • geologic time

Lectures three hours per week. A separate discussion section for one hour each week is scheduled for review and discussion of topics covered in class.

To also enroll in the Intro Geology Lab, register for any section of GEOSCI 118. The GEOSCI 118 laboratory provides a practical study of minerals, rocks, fossils and geologic maps. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in both GEOSCI 119 and 118, since the lab sessions complement the lectures and discussions.

NOTE: GEOSCI 119 plus 118 replaces GEOSCI 117.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Earth: Portrait of a Planet, by Marshak, second edition, W.W. Norton & Company, New York. ISBN: 0-393-92502-1

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON or GEOSCI 118 for the lab

GEOSCI 122 — Extreme Weather
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Samson,Perry J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: NS

This course provides an introduction to the physics of extreme weather events. The course uses weather disasters and threats to illustrate the physical laws governing the atmosphere.

We examine solar eruptions, ice ages, climate change, monsoons, El Niño, hurricanes, floods, droughts, heat waves, thunderstorms, lightning, hail, tornados, and other extreme atmospheric events to illustrate the basic physical laws that produce these events. Participants are expected to apply these principles to a series of homework assignments including hands-on weather forecasting and analysis of storm events.

Required resources for this course include:

  1. An on-line subscription to XamPREP: Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens with
  2. (Optionally) A hard-copy version of Essentials of Meteorology by C. Donald Ahrens (it's redundant but some really prefer to also have the traditional paper copy), and
  3. A copy of Extreme Weather by Chris Burt.

GEOSCI 125 — Evolution and Extinction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Baumiller,Tomasz K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 106 may only elect GEOSCI 125 for 2 credits.

The course examines the concepts of evolution and extinction, stressing the role that the fossil record has played in their development. The broad patterns in history of life are presented starting with earliest evidence of life on earth. Basic geological principles necessary for reconstructing earth history are introduced. Readings are drawn from a variety of sources, including primary scientific literature. Requirements: attendance in lectures, discussion sections; readings; several short writing assignments; exams.

GEOSCI 140 — Science and the Media
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lithgow-Bertelloni,Carolina R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

There has never been a greater chasm between the importance of science to society and society's understanding of it. Reporting on scientific discoveries and technological advances are often biased, inaccurate, or wrong. We will examine the relationship between science and the media and try to answer the following questions: Is scientific reporting fair, accurate, and informed? Is it sensationalist? Can the public evaluate the scientific information presented to them? How do scientists communicate their work? We will use case histories, primarily from the earth and environmental sciences to address these questions. We will cover the basic concepts and facts behind each case, and discuss its presentation to the public. We will use a variety of resources ranging from newspaper and TV reports to the Internet. Members of the university and local media will participate.

No prerequisites. High school science highly recommended. Evaluation will be based on midterm and final projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school science highly recommended. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 142 — From Stars to Stones
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 114 may only elect GEOSCI 142 for 2 credits.

This seminar starts from stellar evolution and the formation of the elements in stars, and ends at the formation of terrestrial planets from these elements and their early evolution (especially the Earth). Students learn cosmochemical and geochemical concepts and methods and apply them to several theme topics. Though factual knowledge is an important part of the course, emphasis is on how scientists study and solve problems and how science progresses using historical examples.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school math and science. Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All other students need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 146 — Plate Tectonics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ritsema,Jeroen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed three of GEOSCI 105, 107, and 205. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 146 for two credits. Those with credit for GEOSCI 205, or both GEOSCI 105 and 107, may only elect GEOSCI 146 for one credit.

Two hundred million years ago the Earth's continents were joined together to form one gigantic super-continent, called Pangea. Plate tectonic forces broke Pangea apart and caused the continents to drift. We study the evidence for plate tectonics and the large-scale dynamics of the Earth's interior that is responsible for mountain building, earthquakes faulting, volcanic eruptions, changes in Earth's magnetic field and much more.

The course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics and written essays on the same subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 147 — Natural Hazards
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Those with credit for GEOSCI 107 or 205 may only elect GEOSCI 147 for 2 credits. Those who have credit for both GEOSCI 107 and 205 may only elect 147 for 1 credit.

This first-year seminar examines the geologic origin, as well as economic and societal impact of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, tsunamis, climate change, and meteorite impacts through lectures, discussion, student presentations, and research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 155 — Evolution of North America
Section 001, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 411.

A close examination of ancient rock records provides a geological framework for North America's history from its formation to its future, including formation and erosion of a mountain belt and a large meteorite impact site, deposition of glacial deposits and rocks formed during continental flooding due to global warming.

Through seminar discussion, preparation of term papers, and individual presentation, the students master a geological framework and an understanding of Earth history from its formation to its future. Lectures for the first third of the course will be supplemented by readings in the book, A Short History of Planet Earth — Mountains, Mammals, Fire and Ice, by J.D. Macdougall (Wiley and Sons, paperback). This will be followed by a midterm exam based on the lectures and the book. Two term papers on the seminar topics, to be thoroughly reviewed and revised, complete the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 157 — History of Earth Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stixrude,Lars P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

This course explores the development of ideas in the history of earth science and the evolution of our understanding of the earth and its environment, from the classical scholars to the plate tectonic revolution. Students learn central geological concepts and develop a sense for the nature of science and the scientific method within the historical context.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 172 — Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit for seniors.

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid, interconnected changes now occurring in the Earth system — its climate, human population, resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II — Human Impacts guides students in learning about our natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-supported introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, our impacts on land, air, and water resources, modern energy and climate policy and pressures on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is suitable for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I, its companion course on the physical processes. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning skills, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty. This course is one of three core courses required for the Global Change Minor.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly lab exercises, course participation, a web poster project, midterms, and a final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn, among other topics, about:

Human Population Growth Its History and Social Influences Detection of Global Environmental Change Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Human Impacts on Resources Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources Energy and Climate Issues Urban and Industrial Environments Deforestation and Desertification Biodiversity Achieving Sustainable Development Economics of Development International Treaties and Government Our Common Future Models of the Future

GEOSCI 201 — Introduction to Physical Geography: The Earth System
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Blum,Joel D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 144. Those with credit for GEOSCI 111 may only elect GEOG 201/GEOSCI 201 for 3 credits.

This introduction to physical geography emphasizes the nature and dynamics of the earth system including the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and solid earth, and their interactions. Topics include seasons, heat balance, global warming, ozone destruction and circulation, moisture, precipitation, clouds, groundwater, ocean circulation, waves and tides, plate tectonics, landform evolution and soil development, the biosphere, climate evolution, and global change.

GEOSCI 205 — How the Earth Works: The Dynamic Planet
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 116, 117, 119, 120, or 146. No credit granted to those who have completed both GEOSCI 105 and 107. Those with credit for one of GEOSCI 105 and 107 may only elect GEOSCI 205 for 1 credit.

An integrated look at the dynamic Earth, with an emphasis on processes involved in its formation 4.56 billion years ago, the early development of its atmosphere, oceans and crust, and the subsequent evolution of its continents and ocean basins.

GEOSCI 206 — How the Earth Works: The Water Cycle and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI/ENVIRON 116, 117, 119, or 120. Those with credit for GEOSCI 109 may only elect GEOSCI/ENVIRON 206 for 1 credit.

This course describes behavior of earth materials in the surficial environment. Water is the main transport agent in the geological cycle; its unique properties and exchange rates among oceans, lakes, rivers, and groundwater are one focus. Interaction between water reservoirs and physical and chemical weathering of soils, sediments, and rocks also are discussed. Impact of humans on the surficial environment is a unifying theme because we can affect hydrologic and geochemical cycles. No special background required. Two lectures per week. Evaluation based on exams and participation.

Required text: The Blue Planet, by Skinner, Porter & Botkin.

GEOSCI 208 — Hot Topics in the Earth Sciences
Section 001, SEM
Hot Topics in the Earth Sciences

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

The modern Earth Sciences are in the middle of some of the hottest debates in science on topics such as climate, global change, natural hazards, water and resources, evolution and origin of life, and the future of our planet. The Geological Sciences Department hosts an endowed Smith Lecture Series in which earth scientists from many research areas around the world share their latest work on these topics. Seminar participants will attend the lectures, read the posted topical articles, and post a weblog entry each week discussing new earth science insights gained from hearing the lecture and the effectiveness of the speaker in communicating these points.

Intended audience: Undergraduates interested in earth sciences and the environment.

Course Requirements: Attendance at both the weekly Smith Lecture and preceding seminar is mandatory. Grade is based on weekly attendance, participation in discussion sessions, and weblog entries.

Class Format: Meets for one hour before lecture, then for the Smith Lecture.

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

The oceans of earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 284 — Environmental Geology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 148. Those with credit for GEOSCI 147 may elect GEOSCI/ENVIRON 284 for only 3 credits.

Environmental Geology examines the interactions between today's human society and our dynamic planet. It begins with geologic materials and processes, and goes on to specific topics that include soils, ground water, natural hazards (volcanism, landslides, earthquakes, floods), land surface and sea level, pollution and global warming, energy resources and waste disposal.

Previous experience in geological or environmental sciences is not required. The course includes two, 1.5 hr lectures and one discussion period (in which homework exercises are discussed) per week. Evaluation is by means of class participation, exercises, and two exams.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS:
Geology and the Environment, 4th Edition
Bernard W. Pipkin (University of Southern California), Dee D. Trent (Citrus College), Richard Hazlett (Pomona College)
Publisher: Brooks Cole; 4th edition (March 30, 2004)
ISBN: 0534490514
Laboratory manual: TBA

GEOSCI 310 — Petrology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mukasa,Samuel B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Petrology is the study of the origins of rocks. Emphasis is placed on igneous and metamorphic rocks in this course. The evidence for the deep crustal and upper mantle sources of igneous rocks is traced using petrographic, geochemical, and phase diagrammatic observations. In metamorphic petrology the response of metamorphites to changes in pressure, temperature, and fluid composition will be evaluated, primarily using petrographic and phase equilibrium data. Plate tectonic processes will be tied in to the origin and evolution of many igneous and metamorphic rocks. Some comparisons with extra-terrestrial igneous petrology will be made. The lectures are coordinated with microscopic laboratories using optical techniques to identify and evaluate mineral assemblages. The grade is determined through a combination of midterms, laboratory exams, and a final.

Required text: Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology by Best.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 231 and permission of instructor

GEOSCI 321 — Earth Systems Dynamics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jablonowski,Christiane; homepage
Instructor: Lithgow-Bertelloni,Carolina R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Describes the major wind systems and ocean currents that are important to climate studies. The primary equations are developed and simple solutions derived that explain many of these motions. The relations among the dynamics and other parameters in the climate systems are illustrated by examples both paleo and present day systems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Preceded or accompanied by MATH 215 or 216.

GEOSCI 351 — Structural Geology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Niemi,Nathan A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 451.

Description and analysis of geological structures in the Earth's crust and introduction to global tectonics. Three lectures and one laboratory session weekly. The following topics are covered: the description of geological structures; the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting; stress, strain, deformation and rheology; introduction to dislocation theory; micro-structural analysis; principles of plate tectonics; selected orogenic systems of the world. This is a core course for concentrators, but is open to all who want to have a basic knowledge of geology.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory geological sciences laboratory course

GEOSCI 418 — Paleontology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fisher,Daniel C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Introduction to the principles, methods of analysis, and major controversies within paleontology; familiarization with the fossil record and its use in problems involving evolutionary biology, paleoecology, and general Earth history.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in geology (GEOSCI 116, 117, 120 or 205/206/118) or BIOLOGY 162

GEOSCI 419 — Paleontology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Fisher,Daniel C

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course involves observation, analysis, and interpretation of fossil material. Its goal is to give student experience dealing with paleontological problems and to develop a familiarity with the morphology, systematics, ecology, and evolutionary history of important groups of fossil organisms.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 418.

GEOSCI 421 — Principles of Physical Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Examines the fundamentals of physical oceanography; the physical properties of the ocean and water masses; circulation of the atmosphere, sea surface, and deep waters; the behavior of light and sound in the ocean; surface and internal waves; tides; and coastal oceanography including the circulation of estuaries and lagoons.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 222 and 223; MATH 115 and 116.

GEOSCI 422 — Principles of Geochemistry
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Instruction is directed toward how geochemical methods, such as stable isotope and trace element analysis, radioactive age dating, determination of phase relations of minerals and melts at low to high temperature and pressure, and computation of or experimentation on equilibria in the hydrosphere, hydrothermal solutions, and metamorphic and igneous systems, can unravel and provide insight into the origin and chemical evolution of the earth and its parts (core, mantle, crustal rocks).

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 231, 305, 310 and CHEM 125/126/130.

GEOSCI 429 — Computational Mineralogy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Becker,Udo

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

The course is designed to appeal to a broad cross-section of students from the natural sciences and engineering with an interest in mineral or material surfaces analysis and reactivity. This course will introduce the surface sensitive techniques to determine the atomic and electronic structure of materials and their surfaces at a fundamental level. Along with the introduction of different simulation techniques, examples will be studied on how to use these and what information can be gained to understand fundamental processes such as surface stability, relaxation, reconstruction, reactivity, redox processes, surface diffusion and others. This knowledge will lead to a better understanding of applications in environmental mineralogy, crystal growth (up to complex growth processes such as biomineralization), the role of mineral surface reactivity in catalytic processes in the atmosphere, in soils, in sediments, and in technical applications.

Almost all environmentally relevant reactions, any adsorption reactions, crystal growth and dissolution, photochemical processes, and stability of solid matter are controlled by surface and interface processes. Even though this course focuses on minerals, their surfaces and adsorbates onto these, the computational principles and techniques to simulate these are common to mineralogy, chemistry, physics, and materials science. Therefore, this course addresses students from these different disciplines. It not only complements courses in the Geological Sciences curriculum (especially environmental geochemistry, petrology, and mineralogy) but also the curricula in the Physics, Chemistry, and Engineering department. Computational mineralogy has been a growing field, especially over the last ten years and the continuously growing number of simulation techniques and computer power to determine properties of solid surfaces has made great progress to understand how the earth works and to optimize reactions to remediate environmental problems and catalytic processes on surfaces.

3 hpw lecture supplemented by readings from textbooks and scientific journals. Grades will be based on weekly homework assignments, a mid-term and a final exam, and a term project that involves a significant contribution from practical simulation work.

Prerequisites: One course in mineralogy, petrology, solid state chemistry, solid state physics, or materials science, or permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI,One course in mineralogy, petrology, solid state chemistry, solid state physics, or materials science, or permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 439 — Fossil Record and Evolution of Mammals
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gingerich,Philip D

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Contribution of fossil record to our understanding of the evolutionary process and the origin, radiation, and systematic relationships of mammals. Emphasis on functional anatomy, origin of modern mammalian orders in the Paleocene and Eocene, and the Miocene to recent faunal history of mammals.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 449 — Marine Geology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Alt,Jeffrey C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Topography, geomorphology, sediments, processes, and environments of the oceans; characteristics of oceanic segments of the earth's crust; seafloor spreading and plate tectonics; paleooceanography and paleoclimatology.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 222/223 or introductory physical geology (GEOSCI 116, 117, 120 or 205/206/118)

GEOSCI 451 — Introductory Earth Structure
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Niemi,Nathan A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 351.

Description and interpretation of geological structures in the Earth's crust and introduction to global plate tectonics. Topics covered are: mechanics, stress, strain and deformation; hand-specimen and field description of geological structures; the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting; flow of rocks (rheology); introduction to dislocation theory; microstructural analysis; principles of plate tectonics; tectonic evolution of selected regions. The course is aimed at those with an interest in geology beyond the introductory level, as well as students who want a basic understanding of the outer Earth's physical properties.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

GEOSCI 465 — Biogeochemical Cycles
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carroll,Mary Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Biogeochemical cycles describe how carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other elements cycle through not only the atmosphere, the oceans, and the landmasses of the earth. This course is useful to students in many fields including engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry, biology, geology, natural resources, and public health. The biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur; the atmosphere and oceans as reservoirs and reaction media; the fate of natural and human-made sources of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds; the interactions among major biogeochemical cycles and resultant global change: greenhouse gases, acid rain, and ozone depletion.

TEXT: Global Environment: Water, Air, and Geochemical Cycles, Berner and Berner, Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, CHEM 210, and PHYSICS 240 (or 260).

GEOSCI 483 — Geophysics: Seismology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ritsema,Jeroen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Elastic properties of rocks, elastic waves, seismological instruments and data, use of body wave travel times, surface wave dispersion, and periods of free vibrations to infer the structure and composition of the earth's interior; earthquake intensity and magnitude scales; spatial, temporal, and magnitude distribution of earthquakes, earthquake source mechanisms, seismological contributions to understanding of earth dynamics and global tectonics, moonquakes, underground nuclear explosions and "man-made" earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control. Lectures and laboratory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent election of MATH 215 and PHYSICS 240 (or 260).

GEOSCI 489 — Geological Sciences Honors
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 490.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 490 — Geological Sciences Honors
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Readings, discussions, and special work in geological sciences for undergraduate Honors students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 489.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 497 — William T. Smith Lecture Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Hot Topics in the Earth Sciences

Instructor: Walter,Lynn M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

The modern Earth Sciences are in the middle of some of the hottest debates in science on topics such as climate, global change, natural hazards, water and resources, evolution and origin of life, and the future of our planet. The Geological Sciences Department hosts an endowed Smith Lecture Series in which earth scientists from many research areas around the world share their latest work on these topics. Seminar participants will attend the lectures, read the posted topical articles, and post a weblog entry each week discussing new earth science insights gained from hearing the lecture and the effectiveness of the speaker in communicating these points.

Intended audience: Undergraduates interested in earth sciences and the environment.

Course Requirements: Attendance at both the weekly Smith Lecture and preceding seminar is mandatory. Grade is based on weekly attendance, participation in discussion sessions, and weblog entries.

Class Format: Meets for one hour before lecture, then for the Smith Lecture.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two required Geological Sciences concentration core courses.

GEOSCI 498 — Research or Special Work
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 499.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 499 — Research or Special Work
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Research or special work in geological sciences for undergraduate or graduate students. May be taken as a one-term or two-term sequence with GEOSCI 498.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 508 — Metamorphic Petrology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Essene,Eric J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course is designed to introduce the student to research topics in metamorphic petrology. Laboratory emphasizes petrographic observation, lectures focus on relation between rock systems and phase equilibria. Term paper of research topic of student's choosing is a central element of this course. Required field trip.

Advisory Prerequisite: GEOSCI 231 and 310 or GEOSCI 431; Graduate standing.

GEOSCI 534 — Seminar in Geophysics, Tectonics, or Structure
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stixrude,Lars P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Topical or current research presentations by graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 534 — Seminar in Geophysics, Tectonics, or Structure
Section 002, SEM
Tectonics, Structural Geology, and Geomorphology Research Seminar

Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Clark,Marin Kristen; homepage
Instructor: Van Der Voo,Rob; homepage
Instructor: Ehlers,Todd A
Instructor: Niemi,Nathan A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 2
Reqs: BS

Weekly research group meeting ("FroST"). Research in tectonics, structural geology and geomorphology; annual student and faculty research seminar of TSG group.

The Tectonics, Structural Geology and Geomorphology Group at the University of Michigan focuses on the dynamics, kinematics and mechanics of the Earth's crust and lithosphere. Research topics range from processes at the microscopic scale to global plate tectonics and their connection to surface processes, using observations from the field, from the laboratory and from modern computing.

tudents and researchers in PaSTeL combine geologic observations with modern laboratory techniques (such as geochemistry, paleomagnetism, thermochronology) and modeling in various combinations. The strong integration of modern quantitative and laboratory approaches offers a unique environment to study the principles that govern lithospheric processes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 534 — Seminar in Geophysics, Tectonics, or Structure
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 2
Reqs: BS

Topical or current research presentations by graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 535 — Seminar in Mineralogy, Petrology, or Geochemistry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mukasa,Samuel B; homepage
Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

A seminar on topics in mineralogy, petrology, or geochemistry. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 536 — Seminar in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wilson,Jeffrey A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Topics in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 536 — Seminar in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology
Section 015, SEM

Instructor: Lohmann,Kyger C
Instructor: Peters,Shanan; homepage
Instructor: Niemi,Nathan A

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Topics in Stratigraphy, Paleontology, or Sedimentology for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 709 — Thesis Research-A.M., M.S.
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

The Master of Science degree in Geology or the Master of Science degree in Mineralogy. A thesis, a report on a research project, or a publishable scientific paper must be presented to and judged acceptable by two faculty members who form the Candidate's M.Sc. Committee. The chair of the Committee will be the faculty member under whose direction the work is done. The subject of the research project, scientific paper, or thesis, whichever the Candidate elects, must be chosen no later than the first week of the second term in residence. Four copies of the hardbound thesis (or the report or manuscript in lieu of thesis) must be presented to the Department Chair no later than the last day of classes of the term in which the degree is expected. Copies will be put on permanent reserve at the Science Library and in the Department. If the Candidate elects to submit a scientific paper, it will be read and judged acceptable for submission as a publication by his/her faculty committee.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 929 — Investigations in Geology and Mineralogy
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Laboratory research, readings, and investigations in geology and mineralogy (other than thesis research).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

GEOSCI 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

 
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