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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = GERMAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 69 of 69
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Heinz,Solveig Margaret
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Marquardt,Catherine Alice
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Block,Nicholas Alexander
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 101 — Elementary Course
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Buzzelli,Susan Nell
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit! The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. By the end of the semester, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin,
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, up-dated edition, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available online and at the LRC)
  • Flippo: When in Germany, Do as the Germans Do.

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Howes,William Seth
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Jackson,Sara Elizabeth
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Walsh,Simon Trevor
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Drittenbass,Catherine Elisabeth
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 102 — Elementary Course
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Johnson,Jonah M
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see the description for German 101 for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth semesters. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary 'survival skills' for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung , Textbook, updated edition
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook, updated edition
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Janosch: Oh, wie schön ist Panama [Paperback edition; ISBN: 3407780028]

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for 'Free Reading' [see description of 'Language Learning Journal' online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bü rger: Mü nchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps fü r Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary
  • PONS Basisworterbuch, Deutsch als Fremdsprache

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 101.

GERMAN 112 — Second Special Reading Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Dabak,Shubhangi
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Continuation of GERMAN 111. An intensive study of syntactical patterns of German expository prose to promote rapid understanding, followed by directed reading in various fields of specialization for research purposes. Graduate credit is not granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: GER 111/TEST

GERMAN 206 — Conversation Practice
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Drittenbass,Catherine Elisabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103.

GERMAN 206 — Conversation Practice
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Dabak,Shubhangi

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206.

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103.

GERMAN 212 — Sports and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century. There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one — soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Esen,Adile
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Hawkins,Joshua Ryan
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 231 — Second-Year Course
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Dischler,Vicki L
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

By this point in your career as a German student, you're ready to do some really interesting, fun and challenging things. In this course, you will watch 6 feature films (including Good Bye Lenin!) and one set of video interviews online, and see numerous other DVD/video clips in class. You will read some short texts and two short novels edited for language learners. The first is based on a popular movie about growing up and falling in love in former East Germany shortly before the fall of the Berlin Wall. The second is Kafka's Die Verwandlung (The Metamorphosis), in which Gregor Samsa awakes one morning from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed in his bed into an enormous bug, and wonders how he's going to get to work on time. The course pack will provide you with extensive explanatory notes and vocabulary glosses in order to help you to enjoy these two books, and to read them at a reasonable speed. Several class sessions will take place in the computer lab, where you will have an opportunity to listen to some German popular music, look at some art by German-speaking artists, learn about the geography of the German-speaking countries, take (part of) a test that has been proposed as a requirement for immigrants seeking German citizenship, and to inform yourself about the Holocaust.

You will review and extend the grammatical knowledge with which you entered the course by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; we've done our best to make learning grammar fun and interesting for you by our choice of exercises and examples.

You will have six opportunities in the first month of the course to pass a "Gateway Vocabulary Test" on a list of slightly less than 600 of the most common German words and phrases, most of which you will already have encountered. This will provide you with a solid vocabulary base which will make everything else you do with German easier for you. You need a score of 70% to pass this multiple choice test; once you pass it, you need not take it again. If you do not manage to pass this test by the last scheduled time, your final course grade will be reduced by one grade notch, i.e., an A would become an A-, an A- would become a B+ etc. Six additional, much shorter vocabulary lists later in the course will help you to further extend your vocabulary. We are working on projects that would allow you to listen to this vocabulary against a fun musical background, and to practice the vocabulary online using simulated flashcards; we hope you will enjoy these when they are ready! To help you study for the test, an identical version of the test will be available for you to take online as often as you wish. The test consists of a large item bank, of which you will see 40 items each time the test loads.

The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, you should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, and have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy yourself. You should be comfortable surfing the web in German, able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and you should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, so that you will be able to pursue your own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, practicing grammar, watching movies, etc.), regular attendance and participation, tests (including two informal oral tests), quizzes, and the Gateway Vocabulary Test. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $200 prize is awarded each semester for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Texts:

  • Thomas Brussig: Am kü rzeren Ende der Sonnenallee — Easy Reader Series, ISBN: 3126756891 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Franz Kafka [edited by Achim Seiffarth]: Die Verwandlung, [Book & CD], ISBN: 88-7754-808-8 Note: You will need this specific edited version
  • Coursepack (CP) (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text

All the grammar you are required to know is in the coursepack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference:

  • Rankin/Wells. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 4th Edition (G)

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals"

Please wait for information in class on the "Language Learning Journal" before you decide if you want to buy one of these.

  • Hans Peter Richter: Damals war es Friedrich ISBN: 3423078006
  • Adalbert von Chamisso: Peter Schlemihls wundersame Geschichte [Lesen leicht gemacht Series] ISBN: 3125592208
  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • C.R. Goedsche: Cultural Graded Reader: Heine ISBN: 0442220383 Unfortunately, this text has been out of print for some time ==> we cannot order copies for the bookstores. If you are interested in it, you should be able to find a used copy online, e.g. via amazon.com!

Other Recommended Texts

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition ($14, orange; conventional dictionary with >100,000 entries)
  • Harper Collins Beginner's German Dictionary, 2nd ed. 10,000 (??) entries, lots of helpful usage examples, especially easy to read and use.
  • PONS Basiswörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache (Green German-German dictionary. 8,000 entries + 1,500 idioms and much more usage information than a regular dictionary)
  • Zorach & Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th ed.
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 001, REC
Introduction to German Film Studies

Instructor: Dabak,Shubhangi
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 002, REC
Classics of German Literature

Instructor: Gezen,Ela Eylem
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This section offers an introduction to German literature through the reading of some of the most important texts in German (as well as world) literature. Our readings will proceed backwards, from Heiner Mü ller (20th century) to Lessing (18th century), including other eminent authors like Kafka, Heine, Goethe, and Schiller. Through these texts, we will not only deal with literary history, but also touch upon political and social developments, and central issues of German culture. In pursuit of this goal, we will read the texts at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity for understanding their meaning and learn how to discuss them under a large variety of aspects and perspectives. This means that class participation is mandatory, and, in order to improve both speaking and writing skills in German, a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 003, REC
Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm: Their Lives, Scholarship and Collection of Fairy Tales

Instructor: Dischler,Vicki L
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This course will explore the lives of the nineteenth-century scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm and their ever-popular collection of fairy tales. The primary goal of the course will be to situate the most famous work of the Brothers Grimm into their wide-ranging scholarly interests. The course will include an introduction to their lives and scholarship. Both the intellectual motivations behind the fairy tale project and the manner in which the tales were collected will be explored in depth. The course will devote significant time to the tales themselves, including many that are not well-known in the U.S. A wide range of materials and assignments will be employed in the course. Required texts include an edition of the tales and a course pack containing excerpts from biographies of the Brothers Grimm, passages from the Grimms' scholarly publications and personal correspondence, and exercises to improve students' reading and writing skills

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 004, REC
Mathematical and Scientific German

Instructor: Peterson,Dan Odell
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German — practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum , and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

Required text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
Recommended Texts:
  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 006, REC
Contermporary German Society and the European Union

Instructor: Buettner,Susan Sandra
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

While building a topic-oriented vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading and discussing a variety of authentic texts dealing with Germany's geography, economic situation, the situation of foreigners, the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society. Furthermore, students will get an insight into the evolution, the decision-making process, and current issues of the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 007, REC
Introduction to German Film Studies

Instructor: Marquardt,Catherine Alice
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 232 — Second-Year Course
Section 008, REC
German Crime Stories

Instructor: Steinbock,Kathryn A
Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230.

In this course, we will examine the representation of crime in various texts and genres with a view to establishing some characteristic features of these genres. In particular, we will try to establish what sets "serious" crime "literature" apart from "popular" crime fiction and crime journalism, so that this course will constitute a serious and entertaining introduction to the question "What is literature?" Friedrich Dü rrenmatt's novel Der Richter und sein Henker will constitute the main part of this course. We will read stories by other "serious" writers (Max von der Grü n, Gü nter Kunert, Wolfdletrich Schnurre) and by "popular" writers from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We will read newspaper articles and compare their approaches to crimes that caught people's attention. Towards the end, we will discuss Doris Dörrie's movie Happy Birthday, Tü rkel!! Be prepared to read, write, and talk a lot. One brief presentation, three short essays, one midterm, one final, some grammar, some fun.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test

GERMAN 243 — Faust
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Amrine,Frederick R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts; tr. Arndt); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend (tr. Lowe-Porter); and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. No knowledge of German is required.

GERMAN 290 — The Internet in German (LAC)
Section 001, REC
(Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Case,Beau D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This new course is designed to offer German students an academic examination and application of the Internet. In this course, we will:

  • review German computing and related vocabulary;
  • become familiar with various useful German studies websites;
  • learn how to evaluate websites and other information resources;
  • critique websites related to German studies;
  • learn to use the website creation software, Dreamweaver;
  • study the principles of good website design and aesthetics;
  • and, for our final course project we will, in small groups, create our own meta-sites on various topics of our interest.

We will speak and write in English, but we will use German in reading of website material. Outside of class work, approximately 1 hour per week, includes: reading of handouts and brief articles; working on the final group course project; and surfing the web! Grades will be determined by: participation and attendance, a quiz or two, occasional assignments or class presentations, and the final course project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 232.

GERMAN 300 — German Grammar and Composition
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Swennes,Erin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Textbook:
Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Lincolnwood: NTC, 1997.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232

GERMAN 300 — German Grammar and Composition
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Swennes,Erin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Textbook:
Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Lincolnwood: NTC, 1997.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232

GERMAN 303 — German Culture, Literature, and the Arts
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hell,Julia C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course examines topics in German Culture, combining historical surveys with in-depth analyses of selected works of literature, film, music, drama. With varying emphases, the course asks,

  • What are the milestones of German culture?
  • What are the most important stylistic developments in the history of German literature, film, and the other arts?
  • How has German culture intersected with the course of German history in different periods, from the Middle Ages to the present?
  • How have individual authors, works, or styles contributed to, or challenged, notions of German national identity?

In order to pursue such questions, the course will cover basic skills required for the analysis of literary, cinematic, musical, or artistic form. The course is taught in English. The following provides a survey of topics that might be covered in the course in chronological order, broken down by weeks:

  • Week 1: Early Modern Germany
  • Week 2: The Age of Enlightenment 1: Philosophy
  • Week 2: The Age of Enlightenment 2: Literature and Music
  • Week 3: Romanticism 1: The "Fragment" as Literary Form
  • Week 4: Romanticism 2: Epistolary Exchanges — the Letter as Literary Form
  • Week 5: Heimat, Nation, Fatherland — the Culture of Wilhelmine Germany
  • Week 6: The Culture of War / The Culture of Defeat
  • Week 7: Expressionism in Film, Theatre, and the Arts
  • Week 8: Weimar Culture 1 — the "New Objectivity"
  • Week 9: Weimar Culture 2 — the "New Woman"
  • Week 10: The Ministry of Illusion: Nazi Culture
  • Week 11: The Myth of the "Zero Hour" — Writing and Film in the Rubble
  • Week 12: The Culture of Revolt: 1968 and its Aftermath
  • Week 13: The Unification Effect: Literature and the Cinema after 1989
  • Week 14: Globalizing Germany: Migration and Culture

Intended audience: Open to undergraduates interested in German Studies, Cultural Studies, Literature, Cinema, and the Arts

Course Requirements: Students will be required to give a brief oral presentation on a topic from the syllabus; write short analyses of selected, representative works; and prepare a final essay on a topic to be arranged with the instructor. One exam on basic concepts covered in the course.

GERMAN 306 — Conversation Practice
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Dischler,Vicki L

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouragaed but not necessary.

GERMAN 306 — Conversation Practice
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouragaed but not necessary.

GERMAN 306 — Conversation Practice
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Wipplinger,Jonathan Otto

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouragaed but not necessary.

GERMAN 306 — Conversation Practice
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Drittenbass,Catherine Elisabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouragaed but not necessary.

GERMAN 308 — Preparation for Study Abroad
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

WN 2007
Credits: 2

'Study Abroad' is especially designed for, but not limited to, students who intend to participate in the University of Michigan's Academic Year in Freiburg (AYF) program. The course will meet one hour per week. Class hours will be devoted to presentations by faculty members and former AYF students on all aspects of German university life, travel in Germany, German politics, geography, history, food, holidays, social customs, medical care, the new monetary system, linguistic and cultural diversity, and LSA requirements relating to study abroad. These presentations will be given in English.

Required are: regular attendance, active participation, and an oral presentation in German on some aspects of Freiburg. Grades will be based on preparation and participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 231 or permission of instructor

GERMAN 312 — Study Tour Abroad
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Schuhwerk-Hampel,Margarete

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Residents in the Max Kade Program meet regularly during the Winter Semester in preparation for a study tour organized by the Department to a major city in a German-speaking country over Spring break. During the tour students keep a journal. Upon return students complete a paper of approximately 10 pages based on their observations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Max Kade Resident or GERMAN 221/231 or 310

GERMAN 322 — The Origins of Nazism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 001, REC
America in German Eyes: Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Images of the United States in German Culture.

Instructor: Wipplinger,Jonathan Otto

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From writers like Franz Kafka, Karl May, and Bertolt Brecht to current discussions about the influence of Hollywood blockbusters and the growing German rap scene, German culture was and is overflowing with images from and about the United States. This course examines how the German vision of America shifted over the course of the 20th century and what it is like today. We will engage with these Amerikabilder (images of America) as a springboard for looking at changes both inside and outside of German society, politics, and culture. We will discuss what America and/or American meant (and means) for German-speaking peoples and what these ideas tell us about Germany and also ourselves. Course requirements will include: short essays, an oral presentation, a midterm and final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 002, REC
German Drama

Instructor: Drittenbass,Catherine Elisabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will read a selection of short excerpts from some well-known German dramas, ranging from Lessing: Nathan der Weise , Goethe: Faust 1, Schiller: Wilhelm Tell , to Handke: Publikumsbeschimpfung (and others), and two dramas in their entirety: Brecht, Der gute Mensch von Sezuan and Duerrenmatt, Der Besuch der alten Dame. The course emphasizes reading, writing and discussion. Class time will be devoted to discussion of the texts and informal role plays based on the texts. If a German drama is performed during this time, we will try to see it as a class.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 003, REC
German for Engineering II

Instructor: Rastalsky,Hartmut Maria; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to German engineering discourse. It is designed to prepare students for internships and jobs requiring some knowledge of technical German, and for study abroad in a technical field in a German-speaking country. Readings will be taken primarily from Wie funktioniert das? Technik heute (5th ed.). This book provides a wide range of technical information in a standardized format consisting of one page of text with a facing page of illustrations for each topic. We will watch a number of videos related to the course material, and will make some use of the internet. The course will also include one or two field trips and/or guest lectures by faculty from technical fields. In addition, we will spend one day taking some things apart and putting them back together again. Vocabulary building will be emphasized strongly; grammar will be reviewed as needed. There will be a lot of partner and small group work during class time, in order to maximize students' opportunities to practice speaking and to help each other master the material.

Student tasks and the instructor's expectations will be based on the assumption that the majority of students will previously have had the equivalent of four semesters (or more) of college German. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students have some background in Engineering. Students enrolling in the course without such a background should be open to and interested in the study of scientific and technical concepts. In particular, it is not necessary to have previously taken German for Engineering I in order to enroll in this course: German for Engineering I and German for Engineering II cover different topics and can be taken in any order.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 004, REC
Ger Cult&Society for Business

Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore various aspects of "being" German, and how these contribute to the ways in which Germans are "German" and how they interact with other peoples all over the globe. Some of the aspects which will be dealt with are geography, history, politics, language, psychology, culture, and everyday living. Language of instruction is German. There will be readings and several movies or videos. The language of instruction is German.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 005, REC
Germany & the European Union

Instructor: Wunderwald-Jensen,Peggy M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, students will learn about the history and evolution of European Integration after World War II until its most recent enlargement in 2004. Students will get an insight into EU institutions, the decision-making process, and EU law. We will discuss specifics of the Internal Market, economic data and challenges after the introduction of the Euro as well as cultural, language, and minority issues. We will also select and discuss EU-related news and current developments. In addition to tests and essays, students will work independently on presentations about the 25 member states as a major assignment. Time will be spent on building a topic-oriented vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level. Guest speakers will be invited and/or we will attend guest lectures offered by the European Union Center. Students in this class will have the opportunity to take part in a 2-week Study Tour on "The European Union Today" through Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium at their own expense (May 28-June 11, 2006).

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 006, REC
Freud's Interpretation of Dreams

Instructor: Amrine,Frederick R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we will read carefully and discuss, in German, the main sections of one of the great classics of modern thought, Freud's Interpretation of Dreams [Die Traumdeutung], first published in 1900. Students will be asked to give in-class presentations on the sections of Freud's study we are not reading together, other works by Freud, his biography, and the historical context within which Freud wrote. They will also be asked to write several short essays, in German, on Die Traumdeutung. Special attention will be paid to Freud as a German prose stylist (he is an acknowledged master), and to the effects of persistent mistranslations of his work on the reception of Freud in the English-speaking world. The basis for this latter discussion will be Bruno Bettelheim's brief but immensely insightful study Freud and Man's Soul. This course seeks to provide practice in reading sophisticated German and writing in German on challenging academic topics, plus a solid conceptual foundation for further work in psychology or the humanities more generally.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 007, REC
German Youth Cultures

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Love Parade, Fettes Brot , and Lodown: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear fast. They stress difference, creativity, and-above all-individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetic are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class. This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities, and political orientations of youths within the 80s and 90s. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, publications), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this 'deutsche Besonderheit — der Mythos Jugend' (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, weekly essays, short grammar tests, motivated physical and oral presence.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 008, REC
The World According to Alma

Instructor: Kyes,Robert L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

At the dawn of the 20th century, Alma Schindler was regarded as the most beautiful, talented and intelligent woman in all Vienna. As we read her autobiography, we survey the lives and works of the artists, writers, composers, musicians and political figures whom she influenced, including her several spouses (Gustav Mahler, Walther Gropius, Franz Werfel) and intimate friends and lovers (e.g., Gustav Klimt, Maurice Ravel, Oskar Kokoschka, Arthur Schnitzler, Arnold Schönberg). We try to understand how art, music and literature could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos, as Vienna — the city of dreams — came to embrace German fascism. Readings from Alma's autobiography are supplemented by videos, paintings, musical compositions, and passages from works by contemporary authors.

Class time is devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to and discussing music (songs, symphonies and operas), discussing poems and novels, and surveying the political events of the time.

Required are at least three oral presentations in class, a one- to two-page essay every second week, a major project due at the end of the academic term, and active participation in class discussions. Matters of German grammar, style, pronunciation etc. will be treated according to the needs of the students. The entire course — including discussions, presentations and papers — will be conducted in German.

Required text:

  • Alma Mahler-Werfel, Mein Leben (available at Shaman Drum)

    Optional but recommended:

  • Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage,
  • a good German-English/English German dictionary.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

  • GERMAN 329 — Independent Study
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PER. CHRM.

    GERMAN 349 — Working in Germany
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Wunderwald-Jensen,Peggy M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    This course is designed for students planning to go on a summer internship in Germany. Students will become familiar with cultural differences between Germany and the U.S., both in everyday life and in a work environment. We will hear from other students about their experiences. We also will talk about practical issues, such as finding housing, buying a train ticket, and opening a bank account.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 231.

    GERMAN 350 — Business German
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as:

    • The geography of business in German
    • Branches of industry
    • Company structure
    • Office procedures
    • Business Forms
    • Product descriptions
    • Trade Shows
    • Import/Export

    In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be at least three major exams; a number of short reports, papers, and a final project. The language of instruction is German.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor.

    GERMAN 351 — Practice in Business German
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Expr

    This course will give credit to a student for the completion of an internship in a German-speaking country.

    Requirements for receiving credit are as follows:

    1. The student will complete an eight-week (minimum) internship in a German-speaking country before registering for these three credits.
    2. The student will then complete a report/paper of at least 20 typed pages in German on this experience.
      1. Part 1 of the paper will describe the location of the internship. It will include information on the geography, history, population, major industries, social structure, politics, and culture of the area.
      2. Part 2 of the paper will be a 2 –3 page description of the company or organization where the internship was completed. This part will include the elements of a "company presentation": location, history, major changes and developments, industrial branch, products, present legal form, number of employees, yearly turn-over, recent developments.
      3. Part 3 of the paper will be the student's personal account of the internship experience. This part should start with a description of a typical day for the intern: work hours, the facilities, the department, typical duties and activities, superiors, support staff, and co-workers, technologies, special events. If applicable, the student will compare and contrast the working situation and work-relationships in the United States and the location of the internship, noting similarities and differences between the two. The student may also include a description of the housing, as well as pictures and descriptions of travels or other non-work related activities and other mementos of the internship.
      4. Finally, the student will include a copy of any written summary or recommendation provided by the company upon the completion of the internship, as well as copies of thank-you letters written by the student to the company/department and to the landlord.
    3. During the registered term, the student will also make a ten-minute presentation in German about the internship experience to Business German students and potential interns.

    No regular class meetings are scheduled.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Internship in a German-speaking country.

    GERMAN 383 — Learning to Read German Lyric Poetry
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU

    Lyrical Poetry is the most condensed form of literary language, simultaneously the most precise and the most ambiguous one. It is at times subject to the strictest formal requirements, at times the venue of the most radical linguistic freedom. Poems can function as playful diversions or as the most serious formulations of philosophical thought . This course will introduce students to both the technical and the expressive aspects of the German lyrical tradition. Students will learn the language of poetic analysis — tropes such as metaphor and metonymy, structural elements such as stanza or enjambement — , will consider prominent lyrica themes — such war, love, the self, or nature — but they will also write their own poems in German. Requirements: a commitment to rigorous preparation, lively participation, several short and one long paper. Readings exclusively in German, discussion in German and English.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230 or 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

    GERMAN 402 — Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    After reviewing the most central developments in late 18th and 19th century German intellectual history, we will concentrate on its seminal theoretical moments and movements during the long 20th century, an era that includes Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger and the philosophers of the Frankfurt school such as Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, and Jü rgen Habermas, as well as their reception in the English and French speaking world by authors like Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida. Readings and discussion in English; German concentrators are encouraged to register for GERMAN 404, the 1 credit LAC section accompanying this course. Requirements: three papers, 8-12 pages long, thorough preparation, lively participation.

    Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 404. See Course Guide

    GERMAN 404 — Twentieth-Century German and European Thought (LAC)
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    This course is designed to highlight the German component of the European intellectual history surveys and to guide students through canonical texts of German intellectual history in the original language. Students read and discuss texts by Freud, Heidegger, and Walter Benjamin in German.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 231, and concurrent enrollment in GERMAN 402.

    GERMAN 406 — Conversation Practice
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Drittenbass,Catherine Elisabeth

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    No Katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

    The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the GERMAN 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 305 or 306.

    GERMAN 406 — Conversation Practice
    Section 002, REC

    Instructor: Wipplinger,Jonathan Otto

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    No Katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

    The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the GERMAN 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 305 or 306.

    GERMAN 426 — Advanced German
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

    All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

    GERMAN 426 — Advanced German
    Section 002, REC

    Instructor: Wipplinger,Jonathan Otto

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

    All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

    GERMAN 430 — Doing Business in German
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: VanValkenburg,Janet K

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Goals: to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) of business German, as well as to familiarize the participants with the business practices of the target culture.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 350 or one 300-level course beyond GERMAN 323, and permission of instructor

    GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
    Section 001, REC
    Austrian Politics

    Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: WorldLit

    Like many small countries, Austria too has been massively neglected by political and social sciences. Being in the shadow of Germany, Austria — if studied at all — becomes an appendage, an afterthought of its much larger and dominant neighbor. This course will attempt to rectify the situation by placing Austria onto center-stage.

    Deeply informed by history, the course will highlight Austria's political, social, economic and cultural development from the 19th century until today. In the process, such key concepts of political science as "consociationalism", class conflict, ethnic divisions, catch-all parties, neutrality, right-wing populism and the European Union as a new federation will be studied in detail.

    GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
    Section 002, REC
    Hans Christian Andersen

    Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: WorldLit

    If you are interested in fairy tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark, or Scandinavian literature, then this is the course for you!

    Hans Christian Andersen is one of the immortals of world literature. The fairy tales he wrote, such as "The Little Mermaid," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Emperor's New Clothes," are remarkable for their sense of imagination, descriptive power, and acute sensitivity. In contrast to the Brothers Grimm, who largely collected and retold folktales, Andersen distilled the earliest literary form of the fairy tale and the folktale into a genre that was uniquely his own.

    In this course, we shall read and analyze some of Hans Christian Andersen's best-known fairy tales, as well as a renowned Andersen biography and various critical texts. Our readings will primarily focus on his mastery of the genre and his complex narrative method, but the biographical aspects of his stories, his contributions to the visual arts, and the cultural setting of the tales will also be discussed. Furthermore, Andersen's fantastic fairy tales have often been adapted for the stage and screen, and we shall accordingly watch and analyze excerpts from some of these adaptations as well. This course will familiarize you with Andersen's works, especially his fairy tales, and will also help you increase your ability to think and work analytically, by developing the ability to analyze texts, voice criticism through coherent arguments, formulate good questions, and express your ideas in formal academic essays.

    Course requirements include attendance/participation, several brief essays, quizzes, and a final essay/project.

    For further details, contact the course instructor, Marc Pierce, at mpierc@umich.edu.

    All readings and discussions will be in English.

    GERMAN 457 — Twentieth Century German Fiction
    Section 001, REC
    Kafka in Context

    Instructor: Spector,Scott D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Interpretation of one of the hallmark authors of modern Western literature, Franz Kafka, is notoriously difficult. While enduringly compelling, Kafka's writing — from literary fiction to letters and diaries — seems elusively allegorical and challenging to decipher. Intriguing, too, is the unique historical situation in which Kafka lived as a German-speaking Jew in Prague in the last years of the multi-national Habsburg Empire and the early years of the Republic of Czechoslovakia. Kafka's personal writing (the diaries and letters, for example) is saturated with references to the questions of identity and ideology that haunted this epoch, but the creative fiction makes no explicit reference to it at all.

    For this class we will be reading some of Kafka's short fiction, fragments, letters, and one novel, along with some studies of Kafka's life and work and the historical contexts of these. The question we will be trying to answer throughout is: what is the relationship — if any — of the extraordinary writing of this author to the complex historical context in which it arose?

    Readings and discussion will be in German.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One year beyond GERMAN 232.

    GERMAN 492 — German Honors Proseminar
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors standing.

    GERMAN 499 — Seminar in German Studies
    Section 001, REC
    The Aesthetics of the Visual

    Instructor: Guillemin,Anna Claire

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course studies the visual arts and thoeries of visuality as articulated by German critics and writers over the course of several centuries. We begin by reading three seminal eighteenth-century texts about three different artistic media, sculpture, painting, and architecture. We ask how the writers conceived of their various subjects — Winckelmann on classical sculpture, Goethe on Gothic architecture and Heinse on the baroque paintings of Peter Paul Rubens — and how their strong readings reinterpreted each genre. Next we examine the practical experience of viewing art in the nineteenth century's new institutions of public museums and public monuments. We read both first-hand accounts of art exhibitions and museum construction as well as art historical essays on monumentality and art collecting. We then examine the aesthetics of viewership, and the nineteenth-century theories of empathy and affect, a central idea of aesthetic philosophy from German Romanticism into the twentieth century. Finally, we end the course by returning to our three visual media — sculpture, architecture and painting — by looking at Modernist discussions of these terms. We read Rilke's thoughts on Rodin's artistry, Loos's minimalist program for architecture and the essay of art historian Franz Wickhoff defending Klimt's scandalous painting "Philosophy," commissioned by the University of Vienna. We ask how the constructs of the artistic media have changed, and how the institutions and theories of viewership have developed to accommodate these new definitions.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One year beyond GERMAN 232.

    GERMAN 501 — Old English
    Section 001, SEM
    Old English.

    Instructor: Toon,Thomas E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English.

    GERMAN 502 — Old English Literature
    Section 001, SEM

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    After a brief review of the fundamentals, we will begin to translate a number of ancient and fascinating Old English poems.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 501. Graduate standing.

    GERMAN 753 — Topics in German Visual Culture
    Section 001, SEM
    Kracauer & Film Theory

    Instructor: Von Moltke,Johannes Eugen

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Shortly before his friend's and mentor's death in 1966, Theodor Adorno wrote of the Siegfried Kracauer, the "curious realist": "He thinks with an eye that is astonished almost to helplessness but then suddenly flashes into illumination." This course is devoted to an in-depth look at Kracauer's writings in an effort to reconstruct the parameters of such "visual thinking." Always keeping in mind the primacy of the visual in Kracauer's many pursuits as a cultural theorist, we will probe the different facets of his work from the early writings on film and popular culture during the Weimar Republic through the posthumously published History: The Last Things Before the Last. For although he is perhaps best remembered today for his influential 1947 history of Weimar Cinema, entitled From Caligari to Hitler, Kracauer was in fact a wide-ranging cultural theorist who took material, visual culture as a starting point for philosophical and sociological reflection. In this regard, his work directly intersects with the formative period of Frankfurt School Critical Theory, even as it appears to pave the way (at least retrospectively) for more recent trends in Cultural Studies. We will thus study Kracauer's work in relation to the thinking of Georg Simmel, Theodor Adorno, and Walter Benjamin; and we will trace how Kracauer's lifelong work on cinema intersected with an equally sustained interest in other areas of visual and popular culture. An architect by training and an autodidactic philosopher, a journalist for the FrankfurterZeitung and a cultural critic at large in the Weimar Republic, an occasional novelist and a major film theorist, and a posthumous historian, Kracauer remains a unique and incisive cultural theorist whose work warrants re-reading.

    GERMAN 821 — Seminar in German Studies
    Section 001, SEM
    Modern Theories of the Premodern

    Instructor: Puff,Helmut

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Core texts of twentieth-century criticism have consistently theorized modernity through figurations of that which came before. This comparative, if not genealogical, approach has set into motion powerful thought scenarios of inspiration and rejection, nostalgia and censure. In a series of readings, we will work toward applying critical pressure on both the modern and the pre-modern by bringing their relationality to the fore. The syllabus features key texts from a variety of disciplines, including literary criticism, history, sociology, and art history. We will discuss critics such as Auerbach, Benjamin, Bakhtin, Elias, and Foucault, among others

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    GERMAN 825 — German Studies Colloquium
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Hell,Julia C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course provides an interdisciplinary forum for scholarship in German Studies. It brings together graduate students and speakers from various disciplines within the University, as well as invited speakers and artists from across the US and Germany. Session formats very between seminars, formal presentations by invited speakers, and discussions of precirculated papers, including chapter drafts by advanced Ph.D. candidates. Topics vary from week to week. Requirements include regular response papers and other short, written assignments.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

    GERMAN 902 — Directed Reading
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 8

    Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of chair. Graduate standing.

    GERMAN 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 8

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

    GERMAN 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 8

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

     
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