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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = HISTART
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HISTART 102 — Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trippe,Rosemary

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed HISTART 150

This course offers a survey of art and architecture from the Early Renaissance period to the present, in which European and American works will be examined within their historical, cultural and social contexts. The concept of the artist reappears in western culture during the Early Renaissance. However, from that point on the role of the artist, the viewer, the patron, and of art itself each undergo a series of redefinitions that shape the appearance and content of works. Through presentation of individual works in context in lectures, and participation in weekly discussion sections, students will develop skills in visual analysis of art and architecture and in reading and critical analysis of art-historical literature.

Requirements: one midterm, one paper, final exam, mandatory attendance and participation in discussion sections, readings for lectures and sections. Textbooks: (required): H.W. Janson, History of Art: The Western Tradition, 7th ed., vol. 2 (ISBN #013-193472-4 (after 1/1/07 ISBN # 98013934726) and a course pack. In addition, Henry M. Sayre, Writing About Art, 5th ed. ISBN # 013-194560-2 is recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: U.G.

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Visual Representation of Classical Mythology

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Myths are one way of structuring and explaining the world. This course explores the 'after life' of classical mythologies by focusing on the classical revival of the Renaissance, but we also study the intersection of these traditions with contemporary representations, chiefly in film. The course aims to familiarize students with a core set of myths, ones narrated in Ovid's Metamorphoses, and which provided a framework for picturing themes like transformation, desire and creativity. We will combine analysis of literary poetics with close attention to visual literacy. Through gender analysis, we focus on the construction of masculinity (e.g., Hercules) and femininity (e.g., Venus). The very fictionality of myth made it an apt vehicle for the figuring of creativity, here investigated through the stories of Narcissus, Prometheus and Pygmalion. Textbook: Ovid, Metamorphoses, Penguin.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 194 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Theaters of Power: The Palace in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Schrader,Jeffrey A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

After 1600, palaces became increasingly important as venues of both statecraft and the arts. Rulers poured resources into construction and decoration so as to create theaters worthy of their majesty. The result is that palaces inspired some of the key developments in the history of art and politics. By focusing on examples in western Europe, in particular the French palace of Versailles, we will explore how art and architecture were harnessed to project messages of power. This course covers media such as painting and sculpture, yet other realms — including landscape architecture and theatrical performances — will also occupy our attention. We will evaluate how palaces bolstered the public image of monarchs who sought to expand their authority and create what approximates our idea of the modern nation-state. Further material will illustrate the evolving fortunes of palaces from their greatest moments to when they no longer stood at the forefront of the arts.

IV. 3, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTART 212 — Understanding Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Harris,A Melissa; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture.

This course examines visual, cultural, historical, and philosophical aspects of the man-made environment using examples from the field of architecture and the allied arts. The intent of the course is to provide a general view and a rudimentary understanding of the profession and the discipline of architecture. Upon completion of the course, the student is expected to demonstrate an understanding of the ideation context and the formal attributes of the built environments of various eras. The format includes two weekly lectures, weekly discussion sections, and several basic design problems.

HISTART 214 — Introduction to African-American Art
Section 001, LEC
Twentieth Century African-American Art: An Introduction Survey

Instructor: Francis,Jacqueline R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course covers key issues regarding the last century's African-American painting, sculpture, photography, and mixed media art. Moving through the material chronologically, we will discuss a variety of styles, cultural and social history, patronage, and critical reception. We will also examine the benefits and problems of studying the production of artists of color as a separate field, considering alternatives to the broad category of "African-American art" and the outlook for new, critical methodologies. The course is an opportunity for students to expand their descriptive and analytical skills through oral participation in class and reasoned writing on exams and in short papers.

IV. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111 or permission of instructor

HISTART 222 — Introduction to Roman Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Steven James Ross

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

A millennium and a half after its collapse, the Roman Empire lives on in the popular imagination. No wonder: at its peak, Rome's empire was the largest the world had yet seen, spanning almost 3000 miles from West to East, with a population of 50 million inhabitants. Its capital was the world's first megacity, a sprawling home to a million people from all walks of life. From the movies we have visions of decadent emperors, fearless gladiators, and the teeming masses screaming for blood at the Colosseum. But what was life in ancient Rome really like? This course will move beyond the standard stereotypes and explore the history and culture of the city of Rome and its vast empire. Through the objects the Romans left behind, such as ruined temples, perfume bottles, imperial portraits, and soldiers' helmets, we can use art and archaeology to reconstruct the story of ancient Rome and the experiences of daily life in the Empire. Beginning with Rome's lowly origins as a small village we will trace its rise and eventual fall, traversing the empire from rainy Britain to the sands of the Sahara. Along the way we will explore such topics as politics and power, life in the army, religion, food and drink, entertainments, and the private life of its subjects. The readings and illustrated lectures will provide a broad overview, while weekly discussion sections will focus on specialized topics. There are no prerequisites for the course. Your grade will be based on two 1 hour-long exams, one final exam, and your section participation.

HISTART 230 — Art and Life in 19th-Century America
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zurier,Rebecca; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This class asks what the study of art history and American history can tell us about each other through an intensive focus on a complex period in the past. The nineteenth century saw the transformation of the United States from a rural to an industrial, urban nation; a Civil War that divided the country, Westward expansion that enlarged it, and waves of immigration and border movement that changed its population; the rise of a middle class, and the emergence of women into public and professional life. American artists and architects sought to rival their European contemporaries and eventually produced distinctive works that responded to national trends. Through hands-on research in archives and visits to see original works of art in museums and libraries, along with readings in primary-source documents and recent critical interpretations, we will examine both developments in the fine arts and the impact of historical change on the material and popular culture of everyday life in America. Among the topics to be investigated are:

  • the role of art in creating an image of America as "nature's nation";
  • machine-made art and machines as art;
  • the West as viewed from the painter's easel,
  • the photographer's lens, and the frontier homestead;
  • the interaction of Native American artists, Anglo settlers, and the tourist trade;
  • the creation of Civil War monuments;
  • parlors and the ideology of the Victorian home;
  • mass-produced images and the dissemination of art for middle-class taste;
  • the brooding psychology in the Gilded-Age paintings of Eakins, Homer, and Cassatt.

The class will include at least one field trip.

Textbook: Frances Pohl, Framing America: A Social History of American Art plus online course reserves. Students who need background reading may also choose to purchase any edition of John Mack Faragher et al., Out of Many vol. 1 (a U.S. History textbook) and/or Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing about Art.

IV. 4

HISTART 262 — Art and Language: East and West
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Powers,Martin J
Instructor: Duanmu,San

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Since the 18th century the binarism "East/West" has constituted the paradigmatic cultural comparison. In many people's minds, these constructs represent two opposite poles of human experience. Right up to the present day, some western writers maintain the uniqueness and superiority of European art, while others have advocated learning from Asian ideals. Likewise some scholars believe that Chinese is the most primitive language, while other scholars believe that Chinese is the most advanced language. Some scholars even believe that the difference between some eastern and western languages has given rise to two completely different styles of thought! With increasing globalization and the rise of China as a world power, the need to stretch our imaginations beyond the constraints of traditional constructs has become a serious concern for fields ranging from business and law to anthropology, art and literature. One of the goals of this course is to offer students the tools to critically examine popular accounts of "East" and "West." Exposure to logical, historical, linguistic, and visual modes of analysis will prepare students to recognize common misconceptions and formulate questions about culture and language in more rigorous and sophisticated ways. Through a careful examination of scholarly constructions of "East" and "West," students will acquire as well a fuller appreciation for the diversity of cultural expression and shared human experience. Requirements include a midterm and a final. In addition students will be assigned two short papers (5 — 7 pages), each designed to train students in basic approaches to linguistic and visual analysis.

III. 3

HISTART 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
Baxter (language);
Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
Heinrich (modern culture, film)
Lam (music);
Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
Ning (religious art);
Laing (art history);
Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
Robson (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

HISTART 272 — 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath
Section 001, LEC
Modernism, the Avant Garde, the Aftermath

Instructor: Potts,Alexander D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, we shall be exploring the many different kinds of work produced by European and American artists during the 20th century. We shall begin with the avant-gardes of the early part of the century, then focus on various forms of modernism and realism produced in the mid-century, and finish with the postmodernism and late modern art of the end of the century. Two issues dominate the survey. First, we shall be studying ways in which modern artists have redefined the nature of the image and art object, both with new forms of painting and sculpture, but also with photographic work and hybrid forms of art such as environments and assemblages. Secondly, we shall be discussing how these various forms of art responded to the political and social realities of the times in which they were made, whether by offering a picture of these realities, or by seeking to make some kind of political intervention in them. The relationship between artistic radicalism and political radicalism will be a key concern, as will artists' strategies for negotiating modernization and consumerism. The course is taught by way of lectures and discussions in sections. There is no course reader, but you will need to buy three textbooks from the Yale University Press series Art of the Twentieth Century (total cost $90). Any further set readings not in these textbooks will be made available on electronic reserve.
Art of the Avant-Gardes, edited by Steve Edwards and Paul Wood.
Varieties of Modernism, edited by Paul Wood.
Themes in Contemporary Art, edited by Gill Perry and Paul Wood.

IV. 4

HISTART 292 — Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carr,Kevin Gray; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTART 495.

This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the history of Japanese visual culture, introducing the art of the archipelago from ancient times through the present day. Although primarily a chronological examination of key artistic monuments, the class will also discuss thematic issues such as the materiality of art, cultural exchange, the meaning of nature, and the relationships between artistic production and religion, class, and society. The course makes no claim to be comprehensive, and the goal of the lectures is only to introduce you to the panoply of Japanese art and the ways that it interacted with the cultures that produced it. At the end of the course, you should have a better understanding of many aspects of Japanese history, thought, religion, and visual culture; but you should also develop a heightened awareness of and sophistication about your visual world in general.

III. 1, 2, 3, 4

HISTART 299 — Experiential Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Intended for students to wish to receive credit for an internship or other experiential work under the direction of a member of the faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in History of Art

HISTART 299 — Experiential Study
Section 010, IND

Instructor: Silverman,Raymond A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

Intended for students to wish to receive credit for an internship or other experiential work under the direction of a member of the faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in History of Art

HISTART 301 — Nature, Culture and Landscape
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diamond,Beth

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

to This course examines human landscape interventions throughout Western history within a series of spatial archetypes that embody various layers of the human/nature dialectic. Focus is on the interplay of cultural beliefs, values, social realities and artistic expressions within the medium of landscape and their impact on contemporary environmental perception.

Course will introduce students to the field of landscape studies, exploring topics relating to landscape history, perception and design. Focus is on the interplay of cultural beliefs and values, social realities and artistic expression through the medium of landscape, and the subsequent impact on contemporary perception of the environment. Course has relevance to anyone interested in the relationship between humans and the natural world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior/Senior/permission of instructor

HISTART 345 — Introduction to Medieval Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Timmermann,Achim; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course provides an introduction to the built environment of the Middle Ages from the fall of Rome to the dawn of the Renaissance. Students will integrate the study of architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring for example the impact of the cult of saints, princely courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism and rising urbanism.

IV. 2

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

HISTART 351 — The Art and Poetry of Michelangelo
Section 001, LEC
Art & Poetry of Michelangelo.

Instructor: Willette,Thomas Chauncy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature and cultural theory of Humanism. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention in order to grasp the rhetorical strategies and poetic "figures" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his eloquent marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the primary source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry — notably the sonnet, the madrigal and the epitaph — as well as the language employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. We will study a considerable portion of his production in sculpture, painting and architecture while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome.

Course Requirements: Short assignments given in class; 4-5 short papers (2-3 pgs); midterm blue-book exam; substantial term paper, with preliminary draft.

Intended Audience: Upper-class undergrads

Class Format: 3 contact hours per week in seminar format

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 102 or 251

HISTART 393 — Junior Proseminar
Section 001, SEM
Theories of Artistic Expression in China

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Throughout the 20th century and up to the present, prominent critics of European and American art have reacted keenly to theories of art in China. Roger Fry, Clement Greenberg, Norman Bryson, W.J.T. Mitchell, Arthur Danto, and James Elkins, among others, have either marvelled at or maligned Chinese ideals of spontaneity, calligraphic brushwork, and sudden "enlightenment" to name a few buzzwords. What were those theories and what do they have to do with the problematic of modern art? This course is designed to provide a critical view of the evolution of art theory in China, introducing basic terms, concepts, and artistic ideals in their original historical context. Because Chinese art theory spans some 1500 years and the primary and secondary literature is rich even in English, we will concentrate on the theory of Song times (960-1278), with some reference to theories of the 17th century. Since it was Song theory which inspired Roger Fry and other 20th-century European and American critics, we will discuss the writings of several such critics and try to understand why the art theory of China has retained its fascination for modern writers. Students will learn how to conduct original research using online sources as well as hardcopy, including an extensive list of primary sources in translation. There will be an oral progress report and a written term paper. Readings will be available online. No previous course work in Chinese art is required.

III. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in History of Art and upperclass standing.

HISTART 393 — Junior Proseminar
Section 002, SEM
Hieronymus Bosch

Instructor: Timmermann,Achim; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Blending realism, allegory and fantasy, the paintings of Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450-1516) have captivated, puzzled and shocked their audiences for more than five hundred years. Yet, despite their great appeal to the imagination, and their often bawdy and frivolous subject matter, Bosch's paintings are at heart didactic and moralizing works — works that seek to address profound theological and ethical questions, all of which Bosch and his contemporaries ultimately considered to derive from Eve's fatal mistake in the Garden of Eden. Centering on humanity's frailty, folly, proneness to sin (even, perhaps, the sin of attempting to tamper with Nature's works), and ultimate destiny, Bosch's paintings employ a number of visual strategies that range from biting satire to what may be called the pictorial construction of alternative, better, worlds. In exploring these aspects, we will primarily focus on Bosch's great triptychs, specifically the ‘Garden of Earthly Delights' and the ‘Haywain' (both in Madrid), the ‘Temptation of St. Anthony' (Lisbon), and the ‘Last Judgement' (Vienna). While the nature of this seminar is determined by a strong element of visual analysis, we will also be reading a series of contemporary texts that help us better understand and contextualize Bosch's often striking pictorial inventions; these include devotional and moralizing treatises such as the ‘Art of Dying Well', hagiographical sources, particularly the ‘Golden Legend', as well as humanistic literature, for instance Sebastian Brant's ‘Ship of Fools' or Erasmus of Rotterdam's ‘Praise of Folly'. It is expected that the student will leave this seminar not only with a better understanding of the art of Bosch, but also with a deeper appreciation of late medieval visual culture at large.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Concentration in History of Art and upperclass standing.

HISTART 394 — Special Topics
Section 001, LEC
Art and Architecture in Latin America, c.1520-c.1820

Instructor: Schrader,Jeffrey A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Spanish "discovery" of the Americas in 1492 initiated a profound engagement between the so-called Old and New Worlds into the nineteenth century. This relationship propelled European art and architecture into new terrain, yet the result was not a seamless extension of visual cultures across the Atlantic. Our coverage of the principal developments in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Peru will accordingly focus on the evolving fortunes of native and foreign traditions. Churches and cathedrals will be analyzed for their role in the propagation of the Catholic faith. The imperial enterprise, which favored European conventions, at times also introduced African and Asian dimensions to the pictorial arts. Other subjects will include the use of artistic media developed in pre-Columbian times, the emergence of local traditions such as casta painting, the formation of Creole identities, the status of the artist, and questions of patronage.

V. 3, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 394 — Special Topics
Section 002, SEM
Arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world, 6th-12th centuries.

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage
Instructor: Thomas,Thelma K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the 6th century Byzantium, the Christian empire of New Rome dominated the Mediterranean. In the east, Sassanian Persia seemed to be the main threat to Byzantine political and cultural hegemony until, suddenly it seemed, late in the 7th century, the Umayyad caliphate emerged as a new force on the southern and eastern Mediterranean coasts, taking over territories that had been at the spiritual heart of Byzantium. As they forged a new Islamicate culture, the Umayyad, and later, the Abbasid societies drew upon the multiple cultural traditions of the regions they incorporated. In turn, Byzantines emulated the new traditions of the increasingly powerful Islamic world. This course will explore aspects of appropriation, accommodation and transculturation in the art and architecture of Byzantium and the Islamicate world during the first centuries of contact. The focus of this course is on cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East. Interactions with artistic traditions of Western Europe, particularly during "the Crusades" will be considered as well. Special attention will be paid to the intertwining of traditions in architectural transformations of sacred space, architectural accommodations for religious worship, developments of the imagery of rulership, and the roles of ornament, aniconism, icons, and iconoclasm in the arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world. Medieval, Mediterranean and the Middle East.

I. 2

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 394 — Special Topics
Section 003, LEC
Architecture and Modernity

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course surveys the history of architecture in relation to the history of modernity, from the first quarter of the 19th century onwards. The course will trace the genesis and development of foundational themes of architectural modernism, making reference to parallel developments in other fields, ranging from new scientific discourses to new media. Important themes in the history of architecture, such as — structural rationalism, historicism, neo-Kantian formalism, narrative referentiality, theories of reception, and (utopian) socialism, — will be considered in relation to corollary or contradictory developments in other disciplines. The course will be organized chronologically, beginning with radical changes to architecture and artistic culture in the 19th c. It will be based on a series of comparative case studies focused on specific objects and texts placed within their geographical and historical context, making use of recent exhibitions and publications that bring architecture into relationship with other developments in the modern period. The class is a lecture course with opportunity for class discussion on a regular basis.

IV. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 394 — Special Topics
Section 004, LEC
Contemporary African Art

Instructor: Adams,Sarah Margaret

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a survey of contemporary African art from 1950 to the present. Over the course of the academic term, we will consider how the field of contemporary African art history was defined in the past and how it is understood by various scholars today. We will also discuss the meeting points and departures between contemporary African art, and modern and contemporary art as a whole.

Required text: Sidney Littlefield Kasfir's Contemporary African Art.

I. II. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 398 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, SEM
Senior Thesis for Honor Students

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This course will function identically to HISTART 397, except that issues having to do with the writing, organization, and rhetorical strategies of the senior thesis will receive more emphasis than problems related to research. Each senior thesis writer will meet weekly with faculty advisors and the Director of Undergraduate Studies (who oversees the seminar). Class time is divided between group meetings (of all parties) and individual tutorials (between students and their advisors). The seminar thus provides a weekly 3-hour forum in which students and faculty discuss a wide range of issues having to do with research techniques, methodological problems, and writing skills. It also encourages exchange and cooperation among thesis-writers concerning the challenges of an extended research project.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 397.

HISTART 399 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

HISTART 406 — Looking at African Things
Section 001, SEM
Exhibiting Africa: Museum Representation of the continent and Its People

Instructor: Silverman,Raymond A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What are the cultural forces that have driven the collecting and display of Africa — its animals, its peoples, and the things that people make — in the museums of Europe, North America and Africa? "Exhibiting Africa" examines the social, political, economic and aesthetic ideologies that have influenced the interpretation of the continent in a variety of exhibitionary contexts, including expositions, natural history museums, ethnology museums, art museums, and zoological parks. The course, which focuses primarily on sub-Saharan Africa, is organized in three sections. The first considers the history of museum representation in the West — practices associated with Europe's first encounters with West Africa in the 15th century, systematic collecting and display shaped by Darwinian evolutionary theory, and the "discovery" of African art at the turn of the 20th century. The second part of the course examines the history of museums in Africa — indigenous analogues for the museum, the Western institution introduced during the colonial period, and new paradigms for the museum that are grounded in the needs of local communities. The third section offers an opportunity to apply some of the current thinking about representing cultures in the conceptualization of an exhibition that will be installed in U-M's Exhibit Museum of Natural History. The course is presented as a seminar. Weekly meetings will include lecture and discussion built around reading assignments and museum/gallery visits. The class will travel to Washington, DC, during the second half of the course, to visit a number of museums that have been involved with interpreting the cultures of Africa. There are no text books for the course, reading assignments will be drawn from a set of articles, essays and book excerpts available through U-M Library's electronic reserves. In addition to preparing written summaries of weekly reading assignments, students will prepare a critical analysis of an exhibition dealing with Africa, and written and visual materials for the proposed exhibition. No prerequisites are required, however, some knowledge of Africa and/or cultural theory associated with colonial and post-colonial encounters is recommended.

II. 3, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 108/CAAS 108

HISTART 415 — Studies in Gender and the Arts
Section 001, LEC
Women Artists in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from the Netherlands, England, Spain and elsewhere. We examine spaces and modes of production (primarily courts, convents, and cities), and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. We also consider the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and one course in Women's Studies or History of Art.

HISTART 419 — Primitivism: A Modern Project
Section 001, SEM
A Modern Project

Instructor: Francis,Jacqueline R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

IV. V. 4

HISTART 422 — Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K
Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The ancient Etruscans have left many tantalizing traces of their unique culture in the form of temples, towns, and tombs and the wealth of artifacts and works of art they contained. Although often characterized as a mysterious people, we can, in fact, learn a great deal about the Etruscans from their artistic and archaeological remains. This course will examine the material evidence for Etruscan life from the 8th to the 1st century BC, taking into account artistic developments, socioeconomic and political conditions, religious and burial practices, gender issues, and historical events. It will also take note of the influence of Etruscan civilization on the Romans and on later cultural periods in Italy. Twice-weekly slide-illustrated lectures and class discussions will be supplemented when possible by visits to area museums. Readings include a textbook and articles in an electronic course pack. Grading is based on class participation (which includes discussion of reading assignments), two examinations (a midterm and a final based on slide and essay questions), and short writing assignments on Etruscan objects. Students enrolled for graduate credit must also write a substantial research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students may elect to focus their research on Etruscan artifacts that are being prepared for installation in the new Upjohn wing of the Kelsey Museum. Required textbook: Sibylle Haynes, Etruscan Civilization. Estimated cost $50 or more, but less than $100. IV. 1

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222.

HISTART 424 — Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Who were the people living in Palestine and Arabia during the first centuries BCE and CE? What were their traditions, and how did the imposition of Roman hegemony alter the cultural landscape? This class will consider these questions through analysis of the material and visual record. We will explore the character of Nabataean Arabia, Hasmonean and Herodian Judaea, and the interaction that took place between neighboring groups. Focal studies will include urbanization and nomadism, negotiations and expressions of status and wealth, religious art and architecture, and the management of the imperial military and administration.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222.

HISTART 433 — Greek Sculpture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Greek sculpture is known to us today through original figures and reliefs in terracotta, bronze, and marble, and through Roman copies of "masterpieces" already famous by the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. Of the surviving Greek "originals," a large percentage were architectural, carved to decorate sacred buildings, tombs, and other monuments. These include some of the best-known material survivals of antiquity, such as the sculptures of the Parthenon, or the Pergamon altar. Architectural sculptures are also particularly valuable to the history of Greek sculpture in general, because in comparison with single figures, much more is usually known about their original contexts: when they were made, who paid for them, and where they were set up. This course will provide a chronological survey of this rich body of material, while also addressing certain pervasive thematic questions. Special attention will be paid to the sculptural adornment of Greek temples. What can we learn from these complex and often violent images about Greek social and religious values, and about Greek ideas of the power of representation?

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101.

HISTART 435 — The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Art and Archaeology of Anatolia

This course provides a chronological survey of the art and archaeology of western Turkey, the place the Greeks called Anatolia, "the land of the rising sun," from the late Bronze Age (15th -12th centuries B.C.) to the Hellenistic period (2nd century B.C.). The course begins by examining the collapse of Aegean Bronze Age civilization from an Anatolian perspective, focusing especially on the archaeology of Troy and the Trojan war, and on the Hittite empire. We will then consider the re-emergence of town life in the Iron Age (11th to 6th centuries B.C.) and the formation of independent kingdoms in places such as Phrygia and Lydia, the lands of Midas and Croesus. Special attention will be paid to the role of Anatolia as an intermediary between the Greek cities of Ionia, on the western coast of Turkey, and the complex civilizations of the ancient Near East — in subjects as diverse as architectural ornament, the evolution of urban form, bronze casting, and the adoption of a written script. In the 6th century B.C., Anatolia was conquered by Persian invaders, who established a unified system of government that lasted until the coming of Alexander the Great in the mid-4th century B.C. In examining the Persian period in Anatolia, we will focus on the career of Mausolus, whose eponymous tomb, the Mausoleum, built and decorated by some of the most famous Greek architects and artists of his day, became one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. The last section of the course will consider the influence of the Anatolian heritage on the development of Hellenistic Greek civilization in sites such as Pergamon, which emerged as the capital of a powerful independent kingdom in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. The archaeological evidence considered in this course comes mainly from excavations carried out at town-sites and monumental cemeteries, and the course will also investigate contemporary developments in Anatolian archaeology, including new research strategies such as regional survey in addition to ongoing excavation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

HISTART 489 — Special Topics in Art and Culture
Section 001, SEM
Transactions between Architecture and Photography

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will look at architecture in and through mass media in the 20th century, in relation to theories of perception, to architectural abstraction, to the history of media (photography, film, journalism, and now digital media), and to contemporary theories of vision and visuality. It will focus in closer detail on the relationship between photography and architecture, for the purposes of greater specificity. For students of design, it has two main intentions: to re-configure consciousness of how photographic images function in relation to three-dimensional space; and to provide a discipline with which to confront the subject of spatial production in the age of digital reproduction. While a recent spate of monographs and studies on the subject has opened a legitimate area of historical consideration, so far very little has been done to analyze the role of photography in the larger project of modern and contemporary architecture. Important questions await further study. We will open up some of these questions through a series of historical case studies in which architecture and photography are closely related. These include:

Architecture and the invention of photography: Daguerre and Fox Talbot; 19th c French. topographic photography; Aleksandr Rodchenko, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and constructivist photography; Adolf Loos's critique of photography; Photographic and architectural exhibitions in Germany, 1925-33 Le Corbusier and Marius Gravot; MoMA 1932 and 1947; the reception of photographic images; Julius Shulman and Richard Neutra; James Stirling and the breakdown of photography; Manfredo Tafuri's operative photography; Yukio Futagawa and photographic colonization; "The New Topographics" exhibition and; 1970s topographic photography; Herzog + de Meuron (Eberswalde, Cottbus, Basel); Recent German photographers of architecture: the case of Brasilia; Global architecture and the photographic image.

The course will also consider the various contexts of photography and how context influences the transmission of information. These contexts include archives, architectural journals, general interest journals, books on photography, books on architecture, and a variety of exhibition contexts. Requirements: Reading, attendance, and participation in class discussion; one short presentation on an assigned topic; one longer presentation on a topic of the student's selection; final research paper or visual analysis project as agreed upon with instructor. Estimated cost: $50 or more, but less than $100. IV, 4

HISTART 489 — Special Topics in Art and Culture
Section 002, SEM
Building Tokyo

Instructor: Takenaka,Akiko
Instructor: Wilkins,Gretchen Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the relationship between social and political forces and architectural production in Tokyo from 1868 until the present. Since Tokyo became Japan's capital in 1868 its urban form has evolved through a perpetual cycle of construction and destruction. The Kanto earthquake of 1923, the air raids of 1945, the Olympic games of 1965, the "bubble" economy of the 1980s, and current proliferation of neo-Corbusian "cities with the city" have collectively produced the elusive spatial character of Tokyo. Significant historical events frame the discussion of key architectural projects and urban spaces in Tokyo. The course is divided by themes including spaces of transportation, commerce, death and memory, religion, sex, leisure, culture, dwelling, and office. Examining Tokyo through the last 150 years enables us to understand not only the development of modern and contemporary Japanese architecture, but also the influence of socio-economic and political forces on the built environment, as well as how the resulting spaces are utilized.

A one-week trip to Tokyo is a mandatory component of this course. During the trip, students will conduct research on a chosen site, from which they will develop a final project. Expenses for the trip will be covered by the History of Art Department, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, Office of International Programs, and the Center for Japanese Studies. Students are required to pay a $150 fee for the trip, and must cover most of the meals in Japan. A passport is required for the trip. Enrollment by instructors' consent only.

III. 4

HISTART 489 — Special Topics in Art and Culture
Section 003, SEM
Problems in African Art: Theory and Practice of Body Art

Instructor: Adams,Sarah Margaret

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the United States today we are witnessing a tremendous increase in both scholarly and popular attention to body art. In spite of this resurgence there is little agreement as to what, precisely, constitutes "body art." Some scholars limit the definition of body art to tattooing, scarification, and other permanent adornment of the skin. Others use this term in discussions of modern and contemporary performance art and theater. The term "body art" is also applied to work by photographers and painters who explore various aspects of the human body. Increased popular interest in various types of surgical modifications of the body has drawn critical attention from scholars in a number of fields. In this course we will explore a range of works that have been collected under the umbrella of "body art," and we will consider what is at stake in applying various labels to these works. For example, what is at stake in calling an African masquerade a performance piece? What is at stake in calling plastic surgery body art? This course is structured by a broad range of theoretical readings. Theoretical models we will consider include those rooted in anthropological studies, models that are concerned with external or more aesthetic appraisals of the work, and others that attempt a more embodied approach. We will also consider how cultural and ideological systems of power act of the body, especially in colonial and neocolonial moments. The readings will provide a variety of theoretical frameworks within which body arts can and are discussed. Students will be expected to apply some of these models (or perhaps others of their own finding) to their own final research projects.

Required Text: Body Thoughts by Andrew Strathern.

II. 4

HISTART 489 — Special Topics in Art and Culture
Section 004, SEM
Memory Works: Post-Disaster Re/Construction and Memorial Practices

Instructor: Takenaka,Akiko

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines how national and local, as well as collective and personal memories are preserved, transformed, or politicized in modern and contemporary societies through acts of construction, reconstruction, memorialization and commemoration following human and natural catastrophes including war, terrorism, earthquakes and fires. The course will begin with a close reading of key scholarly works that theorize cultural and collective memory to familiarize ourselves with the important themes and issues that have been raised in relation to the complex issues surrounding activities and institutions of memory keeping. We will then examine and analyze selected case studies according to such theoretically suggestive themes as trauma, mourning, celebration, and repression. Case studies will be drawn from around the globe, including European cities in the aftermaths of World War II air-raids, Hiroshima after the atomic bomb, recovery of Tokyo after multiple natural and human catastrophes, post-war architectural heritage in the former Yugoslavia, memorialization practices in post-communist Eastern Europe, and recent American tragedies such as September 11th and Hurricane Katrina. In each site, we will look at the process of reconstructing the existing landscape, creation of monuments and memorials, rituals of memorialization and commemoration, as well as other means of memory preservation including oral history narratives and museum exhibits, with a particular attention on how individual and collective memory is being treated and for what means. In the last weeks, students will present their research on a site of their choice.

III. IV. 4

HISTART 584 — Painting in Islamic Countries
Section 001, SEM
Painting in Islamic countries: Mughal India and the Coalescence of Visual Cultures

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From Rembrandt in the 17th century to Howard Hodgkin in the 20th, Mughal painting has inspired and enchanted artists, collectors, and scholars with its extraordinary pictorial richness and originality. This seminar seeks to understand the historical and social circumstances of the production and consumption of Mughal painting through close analysis of illustrated manuscripts, album pages, and primary source material. Students will explore the particularities of the visual idioms (Persian, Indic, European) that coalesced into this innovative representational language. Emphasis will be on artists and royal patrons, workshop and training practices, reception and aesthetic "grading," and rhetorical and ideological constructions that constituted the visual culture of Mughal India. Several recent exhibitions and seminal publications on Mughal painting enriched by retranslated or freshly translated royal memoirs, chronicles, and travel accounts make this an opportune moment to investigate the formation and trajectory of the Mughal style of painting. Active participation in class discussions, weekly readings and précis of assigned texts, two oral presentations, and a research paper constitute the grade. Visits to museums both near and far will be arranged.

III. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285.

HISTART 600 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER.G.ADV.

HISTART 603 — Independent Study in Asian Art
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of Graduate advisor.

HISTART 617 — Visual Valence: Case Explorations in the Critical Analysis of Material Culture
Section 001, SEM
Arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world, 6th-12th centuries.

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage
Instructor: Thomas,Thelma K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the 6th century Byzantium, the Christian empire of New Rome dominated the Mediterranean. In the east, Sassanian Persia seemed to be the main threat to Byzantine political and cultural hegemony until, suddenly it seemed, late in the 7th century, the Umayyad caliphate emerged as a new force on the southern and eastern Mediterranean coasts, taking over territories that had been at the spiritual heart of Byzantium. As they forged a new Islamicate culture, the Umayyad, and later, the Abbasid societies drew upon the multiple cultural traditions of the regions they incorporated. In turn, Byzantines emulated the new traditions of the increasingly powerful Islamic world. This course will explore aspects of appropriation, accommodation and transculturation in the art and architecture of Byzantium and the Islamicate world during the first centuries of contact. The focus of this course is on cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East. Interactions with artistic traditions of Western Europe, particularly during "the Crusades" will be considered as well. Special attention will be paid to the intertwining of traditions in architectural transformations of sacred space, architectural accommodations for religious worship, developments of the imagery of rulership, and the roles of ornament, aniconism, icons, and iconoclasm in the arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world. Medieval, Mediterranean and the Middle East.

I. 2

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTART 617 — Visual Valence: Case Explorations in the Critical Analysis of Material Culture
Section 002, SEM
Etruscan Art and Archaeology

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K
Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The ancient Etruscans have left many tantalizing traces of their unique culture in the form of temples, towns, and tombs and the wealth of artifacts and works of art they contained. Although often characterized as a mysterious people, we can, in fact, learn a great deal about the Etruscans from their artistic and archaeological remains. This course will examine the material evidence for Etruscan life from the 8th to the 1st century BC, taking into account artistic developments, socioeconomic and political conditions, religious and burial practices, gender issues, and historical events. It will also take note of the influence of Etruscan civilization on the Romans and on later cultural periods in Italy. Twice-weekly slide-illustrated lectures and class discussions will be supplemented when possible by visits to area museums. Readings include a textbook and articles in an electronic course pack. Grading is based on class participation (which includes discussion of reading assignments), two examinations (a midterm and a final based on slide and essay questions), and short writing assignments on Etruscan objects. Students enrolled for graduate credit must also write a substantial research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students may elect to focus their research on Etruscan artifacts that are being prepared for installation in the new Upjohn wing of the Kelsey Museum. Required textbook: Sibylle Haynes, Etruscan Civilization. Estimated cost $50 or more, but less than $100. IV. 1

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTART 642 — Problems in Byzantine Art
Section 001, SEM
Arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world, 6th-12th centuries.

Instructor: Babaie,Sussan; homepage
Instructor: Thomas,Thelma K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

In the 6th century Byzantium, the Christian empire of New Rome dominated the Mediterranean. In the east, Sassanian Persia seemed to be the main threat to Byzantine political and cultural hegemony until, suddenly it seemed, late in the 7th century, the Umayyad caliphate emerged as a new force on the southern and eastern Mediterranean coasts, taking over territories that had been at the spiritual heart of Byzantium. As they forged a new Islamicate culture, the Umayyad, and later, the Abbasid societies drew upon the multiple cultural traditions of the regions they incorporated. In turn, Byzantines emulated the new traditions of the increasingly powerful Islamic world. This course will explore aspects of appropriation, accommodation and transculturation in the art and architecture of Byzantium and the Islamicate world during the first centuries of contact. The focus of this course is on cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East. Interactions with artistic traditions of Western Europe, particularly during "the Crusades" will be considered as well. Special attention will be paid to the intertwining of traditions in architectural transformations of sacred space, architectural accommodations for religious worship, developments of the imagery of rulership, and the roles of ornament, aniconism, icons, and iconoclasm in the arts of Byzantium and the Islamicate world. Medieval, Mediterranean and the Middle East.

I. 2

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 655 — Studies in the History of the History of Art
Section 001, SEM
The Vienna School

Instructor: Sears,Elizabeth L; homepage
Instructor: Willette,Thomas Chauncy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Fin-de-siècle Vienna, the hub of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was a crucible not only for the development of modern art and architecture but also for the emergence of the art historical discipline as we know it. Seminally important art historians taught at the University of Vienna and held curatorships in Viennese museums: Wickhoff, Riegl, Dvořák, Strzygowski, Von Schlosser, and we will study the writings of each. Themes to be treated include Viennese pedagogy (structural analysis of form, the use of archival sources), the critique of Semper's functionalist approach to art, the engagement with modern aesthetics (Hegel, Hildebrandt, Herbart and Croce), the involvement in contemporary art controversies, the promotion of cross-cultural study, the analysis of pictorial narrative, the recuperation of maligned epochs of art-making, and the recovery of western Kunstliteratur. We will also consider reworkings of First Vienna School ideas by members of the Second Vienna School in the 1920s and 1930s (Pächt, Sedlmayr, etc.). An understanding of art historical study in Vienna provides students in art history and cognate fields and disciplines with conceptual tools for dealing with the visual, as well as a novel perspective on early twentieth-century cultural history. Graduate students in all fields are welcome. Reading knowledge of German is recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 666 — Problems in 17th Century Art and Visual Culture
Section 001, SEM
Perspectives on Perspective

Instructor: Brusati,Celeste A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

By the seventeenth century perspective had come to encompass a wide range of pictorial practices and divergent aims, yet modern concepts and metaphors of perspective that have shaped both the history and practice of art in our time draw on fairly reductive models of what perspective is. The seminar explores this disjunction between the practice and ideas of perspective, and what its implications are for our use of perspective as a category of analysis. We will be discussing key texts on perspective from the early modern and modern periods, including those by Panofsky, Damisch, Ivins, and Elkins, in order to understand how perspective has become identified with particular ways of seeing, concepts of space and historical distance, the "Western" scientific gaze, and modern subjectivity itself. Alongside our assessment of these texts we will be examining ways that perspective is deployed in painting, anamorphic art, maps, prints, Trompe-l'œil pieces, optical devices, and Japanese folding screens and hand-scrolls. Our aim will be to discover what aspects of pictorial practice have been illuminated, marginalized, and/or eclipsed in the discourse of perspective, and to rethink both the parameters of the category and its use in the analysis of pictures and visuality. Class discussions will focus on early modern European case studies, but participants may choose paper topics from their own areas of interest and research. Course expectations include informed participation, occasional in-class exercises, a short oral presentation, and a substantial critical research paper. The seminar will be interdisciplinary in approach and students from all disciplines are welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 700 — Independent Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate advisor. Graduate standing.

HISTART 772 — Problems in Modern Art
Section 001, SEM
Reading Photographs — History, Theory & Methods of Analysis

Instructor: Zurier,Rebecca; homepage
Instructor: Biro,Matthew Nicholas; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is designed to introduce graduate students from all disciplines to photography as a visual, social, historical, and theoretical phenomenon. Through a series of case studies drawn from the history of American and European photography, students will be introduced to central methods of analysis as well as key issues in the study of historical photographs. Among the ways of analyzing and interpreting photographs that we will interrogate are formal analysis, photographic technique, semiotics, social history, critical theory, phenomenology, institutional analysis, media studies, genre study, and psychoanalysis. Key issues that shall be examined include the photograph as a document, the photograph as art, the photograph as icon, index, and symbol, photography and the archive, and photography as a modernist and a postmodernist practice. Our overarching goals in this seminar are to give students a basic understanding of the key issues and concepts in the history of photography as well as to train them to describe, analyze, and interpret photographs in a way that will allow them to use photographs in their research. Whenever possible, the seminar will work with original photographs on campus and in area collections.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 815 — Hellenistic Cities of the Near East
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on Hellenistic Cities of the Near East. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTART 822 — Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire
Section 001, SEM
Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire: Reading Persepolis

Instructor: Root,Margaret C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar explores the nature and contested meanings of Persepolis, the heartland Iranian capital of the Achaemenid Persian empire (550-330 BCE). It serves students working in diverse areas of ancient studies, urban and architectural studies, and art history/history broadly; it is meant to provide a forum for focused dialogue on two intertwined issues of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural/cross-temporal relevance:(1) the complex historiography of being Persepolis as viewed through western historical sources and their legacies in juxtaposition with the archaeological record of images and architecture, and (2) viable strategies toward interpretation of original intention and subsequent reception in the meanings of an extraordinary program of visual art and built environment produced for the first "world empire."*Ancient texts will be read in translation.

Specialist knowledge in the Achaemenid empire is not a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 853 — Problems in Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K
Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

A course on problems in Etruscan art and archaeology. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTART 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

The Preliminary Examination, normally taken in April of the third year, forms a bridge between coursework and dissertation research. It is based upon the student's initial formulation of a dissertation topic. By the close of the second year, students are required to give the DGS a tentative list of three members of the Preliminary Examination Committee. The precise areas of questioning and the bibliography begin to be developed by the student in consultation with members of the Committee at a meeting convened well in advance of the examination, but no later than the beginning of the term prior to the term in which the student intends to take the Preliminary Examination.

The Preliminary Examination is designed to consolidate and test students' command over the art and scholarship of their major field of study: students must demonstrate up-to-date knowledge of principal artists, genres and monuments, and familiarity with scholarly literature and art historical problems. The examination is set by the student's primary advisor (normally the eventual chair of his/her Dissertation Committee) and at least one other faculty member from the History of Art. It is read by the student's Preliminary Examination Committee, which consists of the two faculty members who set the examination, and a third reader who also takes part in the oral follow-up exam. In fields where only one faculty member may be able to set the exam, it is still read by the two additional faculty on the committee.

The written Examination, taken on two consecutive days, consists of four areas of questioning: the general field (historically and geographically defined) from which the dissertation is drawn [Part I] and three more focused areas broadly relevant to the proposed dissertation topic [Part II]. Depending on the character of the dissertation and the needs of the student, the areas of questioning in Part II may focus on a particular medium or genre, a critical category or concept, a body of comparative material, or a related minor field. One area of questioning may be devoted to theoretical or methodological issues pertinent to the dissertation or to a topic in a cognate discipline of special importance to the student's dissertation research. In preparing for Part I of the Exam, a student discusses the general field with his/her primary advisor, who is responsible for seeing that the student covers an appropriate range of material. Examples of general fields include "Islamic Art and Architecture Between the Seventh and the Thirteenth Centuries," "Islamic and Christian Worlds in the Mediterranean Basin, Tenth to Thirteenth Centuries," "Modern European Painting and Sculpture, 1848-1945," "Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art," and "Arts of China in the Song Period, 960-1279." As a general rule of thumb, a student should expect that studying for the general field portion of the preliminary exam will prepare him/her to teach undergraduate survey courses in that area. After discussing the general field with the primary advisor, the student then submits to the Preliminary Examination Committee a paragraph defining and delimiting the general field, prepares a bibliography of key texts, and identifies a corpus of works of art for which s/he will be responsible. In preparing for Part II of the Examination, a student composes a bibliography and proposes three questions for each of the three focus areas; these questions serve as the basis for the exam in each of the three focus areas.

Timing of the Preliminary Exam

In order to remain in good standing in the program, the student must pass the Preliminary Examination by the end of the winter term of his/her third year. Students who enter the program with a prior M.A. must pass the Preliminary Examination before the end of the winter term of their second year. The Preliminary Examination is taken during the last week of classes. The oral defense takes place by the end of the following week.

Examination Format

The Preliminary Examination consists of three parts. The written portion is taken on two successive days.

Part I: This section consists of written responses to questions posed in relation to slides, photographs or objects drawn from the general field of the student's specialization. Students are given two hours to write the answers, either longhand or on a portable computer. Upon completion of the test, the student immediately submits the essays or disk to the Graduate Program Coordinator for distribution to the Committee.

Part II: The second part consists of three long essays on issues raised by the material in the designated areas. Typically these questions, developed from questions proposed by the student, are thematically oriented and directed toward matters of theory, criticism and interpretation, historiography and bibliography. Students are given two hours to write each of the three essays (selecting one questions from a choice of two in each case), either longhand or on a portable computer. Immediately upon completion of each test, the student submits the essay or disk to the Graduate Program Coordinator for distribution to the Committee.

Part III: The final component is an oral examination of one and one half hours taken within one week of the written portions of the Examination. The oral is administered by the entire committee of three examiners and serves as an opportunity to discuss issues not addressed, or insufficiently treated in the written Exam. This is also an occasion for beginning to discuss the student's preparation of the dissertation prospectus.

A student must pass all parts of the preliminary examination. S/he will be asked to retake unsatisfactory portions of the Examination. Barring exceptional circumstances, students will not be allowed to resit the Exam more than once.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

HISTART 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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