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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = HISTORY
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 129 of 129
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HISTORY 111 — Modern Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Joshua H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course serves as an introduction to the major questions in European history from 1750 to the present. Beginning with the Enlightenment and the story of the French and Haitian revolutions, we will examine the history of industrialization, nation-building and European imperial expansion in the nineteenth century. The latter half of the course covers the crisis of European society in the twentieth century: two world wars, the Russian Revolution, fascism, decolonization, the Cold War, and the emergence of a new Europe after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1989.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTORY 110

HISTORY 142 — Introduction to Japanese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Designed primarily for freshmen and sophomores, the course focuses on a few recurrent concerns in the Japanese tradition from the earliest times to the present. Topics to be considered include man and nature, language and culture, the individual and the state, men and women, and death and transcendence. Readings in mythology and representative works of the literature and religious texts, lectures, discussions, and short papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

HISTORY 160 — United States to 1865
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hancock,David J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces the student to American history from the founding of British settlements in North America to the coming of the Civil War. Lectures and discussions emphasize the migration of people from Europe and Africa, the variety of settlements, racial interaction, the formation and development of new political, economic, social and religious institutions, and their role in the transformation of everyday life. Certain events, like the American Revolution, are examined in detail. This course also introduces the student to the reading of historical documents and the range of available types of historical analysis-diaries, letters, accounts, autobiographies, biographies, essays, monographs, and fictional narratives.

Course Requirements include: lectures, readings, midterm and final examination.

Grades will be computed on the following basis: Midterm Exam, 33%; Final Exam, 67%

Many of the readings are in the course pack (CP), which is for sale at Michigan Book and Supply. All readings than can be placed on reserve are at the Undergrad Library. All books that can be purchased are for sale at Shaman Drum Bookshop. All readings are also available via Course Tools. As a supplementary textbook, James Henretta's America's History is recommended but not required.

HISTORY 161 — United States, 1865 to the Present
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: McClellan,Michelle Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of American history since 1865. Focusing on both the domestic scene and America's changing place in world affairs, the class will return to a number of themes: America's growing economic and military power in the world — and the limits of this power; the development of a mass culture; the growth of a powerful economy and the efforts to distribute its munificence, to blunt its inequalities, and to maintain its prosperity; the struggle to win the rights of citizenship for all Americans, regardless of race, class, creed, or sex; and the efforts of America's political leaders and the national government to manage and control the changing political, economic, cultural, and international situation.

Readings will include a text, a primary documents reader, and some short monographs. These written sources will be supplemented by audio recordings, videos, and web sites. There will be two exams — one "in-class" and one "take-home — and a final exam. Participation in the weekly discussion sections will also determine part of your grade.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Epidemics: Deadly Disease in U.S. Culture

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions will explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (four to five hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Written assignments are two five-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $160 more. Course Pack available at Dollar Bill.

Assigned Books:

  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange (Greenwood)
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years (Chicago)
  • De Kruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Barry, The Great Influenza (Viking)
  • Oshinsky, Polio(Oxford)
  • Garrett, The Coming Plague (Penguin)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 196 — First-Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Leo Africanus

Instructor: Poteet,Ellen Spence

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

In 1510, at the age of seventeen, al-Hassan ibn Muhammad al-Wazzani set off from Fez in Morocco across the Sahara for Timbuktu. Before he was twenty-five, this young man had traveled the length and breadth of the Maghrib, Sahara, and Sudan, arriving in Egypt soon after Mamluk ascendancy. He was, as the occasion called for, scholar, lawyer, merchant, diplomat, and troubadour. In 1518 he was captured at sea and brought to Pope Leo X, son of Lorenzo the Magnificent, a Medici. The pope was so impressed by the young man's learning that he freed him, renamed him after himself (hence, Leo Africanus), and baptized him. Leo died, probably in Tunis and probably a Muslim, in 1552.

For the seminar we will read extensive sections of John Pory's translation of Leo Africanus' Description of Africa, presented to Sir Robert Cecil, of the court of Queen Elizabeth I of England, selections from other primary sources (Arabic and European, in translation), secondary studies relevant to sixteenth-century African and Mediterranean history, and Amin Maalouf's novel Leo Africanus. The seminar will take its shape in significant part from students' interests, whether in: Sudanic peoples and cultures; Saharan trade; Arab-African relations; the urban centers of Fez, Timbuktu, and Mamluk Cairo; Medici Italy as Leo encountered it; or Elizabeth I's stakes in "the land of the Moors." The emphasis will be on a deeper historical understanding of the life of Leo Africanus and the fluid age in which that life was passed.

Engaged participation, short papers, and a final class project will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
England in the Age of Hogarth

Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

William Hogarth was the greatest English artist and interpreter of the social scene in the eighteenth century. He satirized all aspects of life, high and low, and left us a vivid set of images of his times. Taking as a starting point Hogarth's complex, teeming images we shall examine the rich and teeming history of England in an age of great exuberance, achievement and change. Like Hogarth, we shall be interested in the stark contrasts between rich and poor, modern courtship and prostitution, drunkenness and (relative) sobriety, war and peace and notions of beauty and ugliness.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 197 — First-Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Russian Witchcraft in Comparative Perspective

Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Many of the assumptions that we make about witches and witchcraft do not hold true in the Russian case. Unlike the western European cases, where witches were overwhelming imagined as female, in Russia, the vast majority of the accused were male. In the west, Satan and a satanic pact defined the essential nature of witchcraft, but in Russia the devil made little appearance in witchcraft cases. How can we explain these differences? What do the differences and similarities tell us about Russia and about witchcraft? We will analyze fairy tales, folk practices, miracle tales, contemporary descriptions and trials, and we will read several recent studies that offer thought-provoking analytical frameworks.

A new component of the course will be a unit on the understandings, justifications, and results of judicial torture in witch trials in Russia and the west, a subject with startling relevance in the world of today.

The course is conceived as a collective effort to puzzle out some of the fundamental problems and methods of comparative history. Students will have a chance to do original research and analysis.

The course requires no background in Russian history and is open to all interested first-year students.

Course Requirements:

The course will be a small discussion class, meeting twice a week. Requirements will include very short weekly response papers (2 pages), plus a longer (10 page) source-based paper due at the end of the semester. Students will be required to submit their longer papers in draft form and then to rewrite them incorporating editorial suggestions. Students will be expected to attend every class, to participate regularly, and to present results of their individual research to the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 201 — Rome
Section 001, LEC
The Roman Empire and Its Legacy

Instructor: Van Dam,Raymond H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor.

Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. Everyone welcome.

HISTORY 205 — Modern East Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer
Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the PRC; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan; liberation and division into the two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3)the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and the rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on EA, the course explores the inter-relations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of HISTORY 204; however that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. There will be a midterm and final exam.

HISTORY 208 — Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
Religions in Latin America

Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From the peyote hunts of the Huichol Indians of northern Mexico to the Afro-Latin spirit possession ceremonies of Cuban Santería and Brazilian Candomblé; from the indigenous-imperial sacrifices of the Aztecs to the contemporary battle for believers between Catholic liberation theology and the new wave of Protestant Pentecostalism...

This introductory-level survey course will explore the great variety of religions, and the very different systems of meaning and ritual practice, that have arisen in and been imposed upon Latin American landscapes. We'll look at how these different traditions have intersected with and mutually influenced each other through processes of "transculturation".

No previous course work is required. Bring only a curious mind and a readiness to read!

HISTORY 208 — Topics in History
Section 005, LEC
Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

HISTORY 211 — Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

HISTORY 212 — Renaissance Europe
Section 001, LEC
Political, Social, and Cultural History of Europe from about 1350 to 1550

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will explore the political, social, and cultural history of Europe from about 1350 to 1550, two centuries of momentous change: scholarship recovered the lost texts and ideas of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds; critical reading of texts inspired a dramatic questioning of religious authority; art, medicine, and philosophy renewed an interest in the physical and psychological nature of man; scientific calculation put the sun rather than the earth at the center of the universe; exploration made Europeans aware of sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas; and the printing press made all of these changes available to a wider public. We will explore the substance and consequences of such changes, including some negative ones, such as the expulsion of Muslims and Jews, colonial exploitation, and the censorship of ideas. Lectures will provide students with a structural approach to the period; discussion sections will provide close engagement with historical sources.

HISTORY 218 — The Vietnam War, 1945-1975
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course will explore the origins of colonialism and the rise of the Cold War to understand the political, economic, and military conflicts that contributed to the outbreak of war in Vietnam after 1945. This course will not focus exclusively on American involvement in the war, but rather will attempt to portray a broader international perspective of this conflict. With several decades of massive economic, political, and military turmoil, it must be recognized that the Vietnam War brought an overwhelming amount of human tragedy and displacement. Accordingly, this course will attempt to both understand the policy decisions that led to war in Vietnam and, importantly, put a human face on the war — both for those from Vietnam (and surrounding nations) and those from the United States.

Along with informed participation in discussion section, all graded work required in this course will consist of written compositions, including two exams and a short paper.

Required readings for the course may be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State:

  • Stanley Karnow, Vietnam: A History
  • George C. Herring, ed. The Pentagon Papers
  • Bao Ninh, The Sorrow of War: A Novel of North Vietnam
  • Graham Greene, The Quiet American
  • Eric M. Bergerud, Red Thunder, Tropic Lightning: The World of a Combat Division in Vietnam
  • Le Ly Hayslip, When Heaven and Earth Changed Places

Course pack (available at Dollar Bill, 611 Church St.)

 

HISTORY 220 — Survey of British History to 1688
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this course, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

HISTORY 229 — Introduction to Historical Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Stein,Eric A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

One of the principal concerns of cultural anthropology has been to discover, document and interpret differences and similarities across cultures. Historical anthropology similarly looks at differences and similarities in the ways in which people understand the past, use the past and assign different meanings to the past in different societies around the world. While we generally believe that "history" is both an academic discipline and a chronological narrative about important events, those of us who study historical anthropology find that this is not a shared understanding of history throughout the world. People secure memories of the past in different ways: in some societies written sources are most important, for other societies it is the storyteller who guards memories of the past, for other societies tools of remembering are found in the environment, in buildings, and in other material forms. Some societies highly value special guardians of history, others don't.

  • Does this mean that the past is more important to some societies rather than others?
  • Do people actually remember differently or only use different tools to remember?
  • And what is memory anyway?
  • An account that conforms to one's present identity or an accurate assessment of the past?

      This course will address the power of the past, looking at why and how contemporary social demands and political battles are fought on the terrain of history and what we choose to remember and systematically forget about it.

HISTORY 230 — Humanities Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
United States as Empire

Instructor: Kramer,Paul Alexander

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

"The United States as Empire" revisits United States history through the lens of imperialism, covering among other themes continental empire-building in North America, overseas colonialism and "informal" commercial expansion in the 20th century, Cold War interventions and the post-Cold War "unipolar moment." Lecture and discussion will center on the rise of the United States as a world power, the question of whether the United States is or has been an empire, and the consequences of world power for domestic U.S. society.

HISTORY 230 — Humanities Topics in History
Section 010, LEC
The Chinese Renaissance

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course offers an introduction to the profound cultural transformations that occurred in China during the eleventh century, a period when China had the largest cities in the world, with bustling night markets, antique shops, restaurants, and theaters. The simultaneous, interrelated developments in economy, technology, philosophy, religion, literature, and painting during this period bear a close resemblance to those of the Italian Renaissance, yet the achievements of the Song dynasty (960-1279) are much less well known than those of Florence, Venice, and Rome. The course provides an overview both of the history of this period and of the study of this period by European and American historians, thereby affording an introduction to the history of the Song dynasty as well as a modest introduction to the study of history as a discipline.

The final grade will be based on class participation, a short analysis paper, a book review, and a final examination. Prior familiarity with Chinese history is not required.

All readings will be gathered in a course pack.

HISTORY 231 — Social Science Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
The Left in Latin America in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

Over the last decade and a half, emerging social forces have been significantly changing the political landscape in Latin America. Innovative social movements, from the Zapatistas in Mexico to the Piqueteros in Argentina, have redefined the scope and mood of national politics in the region. Ever since the election of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela in 1998, a number of politicians commonly associated with the "left" have been elected presidents in their nations: Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, in Brazil, Ernesto Kirchner, in Argentina, Tabaré Vázquez in Uruguay, Evo Morales in Bolivia, and Michelle Bachelet in Chile.

Several candidates also linked to the "left" have gained significant support in recent presidential elections in other countries: Ollanta Humala in Peru and Andrés Manuel López Obrador in Mexico. More than half of Latin America's 500 million people are now ruled by presidents who claim to be on the left of the political spectrum.

The proposed Honors seminar is designed to explore the significance of leftist politics in Latin America by tracing a connections between leftist transformations in the past and in the current period. The seminar will examine paradigmatic cases in Latin American politics, such as the 1954 coup in Guatemala against Jacobo Arbenz, the Cuban revolution, the Chilean "road to socialism," and the Chávez "revolution" in Venezuela. These case studies articulate questions about imperialism, nationalism, agrarian reform, gender, labor activism, state structures, political ideologies, natural resources, economic reform, populism, and socialist revolution. To the extent possible, I seek to relate this seminar to the LACS's series, "What's Left in Latin America"? that I have organized as director of LACS.

HISTORY 240 — The World Since 1492
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Interested in knowing how the current world system emerged? Want to know more about other possibilities that existed in the past — and that may appear in the future? How about understanding the roots of fundamental human identities, political systems, and economic patterns? Unlike most history courses, which focus narrowly on a particular period and area, this class offers students a rare chance to think big — to seek broad patterns and connections that extend across space and through time. We will explore the last 500 years of world history, highlighting major trends and transnational developments. "The World Since 1492" stresses wider patterns characterizing human societies in different parts of the world and considers encounters and exchanges within, between, and among different societies and cultures around the globe.

There are no prerequisites, intended for all undergraduates. Meets pre-1800 and transregional requirements in History.

HISTORY 241 — America and Middle Eastern Wars
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Juan R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course treats the impact and experience of warfare on the Twentieth Century Middle East. It examines the impact of the World Wars, the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli Wars, Afghanistan, the Gulf Wars, and the War on Terror on the shaping of the 20th-century Middle East. Grading is based upon a midterm and a final.

Texts: (Available at Shaman Drum Books and at the Undergrad. Library Reserve Reading Rm. Course pack is at Dollar Bill.

  • Larry Goodson. Afghanistan's Endless War. (U of Washington Press, 2001).
  • Michael Gordon and Bernard Trainor. The Generals' War. (Little, Brown, 1998.)
  • Steven Heydemann, ed., War, Institutions and Social Change in the Middle East (University of California Press, 2000).
  • John Miller and Michael Stone. The Cell. (New York: Hyperion, 2002).
  • Beverly Milton-Edwards and Peter Hinchcliffe. Conflicts in the Middle East since 1945. (London: Routledge, 2001).
  • Bob Woodward. Bush at War. (New York: Simon and Shuster, 2002).

HISTORY 247 — Modern Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diouf,Mamadou; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial and the postcolonial periods and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship.

The course has three following objectives:

  • to provide students with basic information about the period
  • to train students to think critically and historically
  • to develop general education skills

Course Requirements: Students are expected to (1) participate in class discussion (15%), (2) write one critical book review of a recommended monograph [approximately 4-5 pages] (25%). There will be a midterm (25%) and a final examination(35%).

Article and book chapter required readings are on reserve at University Reserves. Required texts are available for purchase at Shaman Drum bookstore.

HISTORY 252 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Elstein,David

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

HISTORY 255 — Gandhi's India
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramaswamy,Sumathi

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This survey course on 20th-century India explores the rich and complicated history of the subcontinent in the past hundred years through the eyes of two of its most well known spokesmen, "Mahatma" Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. The bulk of the course focuses on Gandhi whose many writings we will read to understand his political philosophy (with a special focus on civil disobedience and non-violence), his critique of scientific modernity, his attitudes towards his own body, and his views on women. In addition, we will consider the end of British rule in India, the successes and failures of Indian nationalism, the establishment of independent nation-states in the region, and post-colonial developments, especially the rise of religious fundamentalism.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTORY 206

HISTORY 278 — Introduction to Turkish Civilizations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This lecture-and-discussion course will teach the basic features of Turkish civilizations from the earliest time in the 6th century to the 20th century, from the viewpoint of cultural history. We will discuss the issue of bonds between the Turkish peoples on both the linguistic and on the cultural level. Besides an overview of the history of Turkish Empires with a special focus on the Ottoman Empire, emphasis will be placed on common cultural elements. These include tribal origins and tribal life, myths of origins as preserved in the epic literature, religious developments from "shamanism" to monotheistic religions, as well as aspects of material culture and arts.

Regular attendance and participation in the discussions, a midterm paper and a final paper will determine success in this course.

Textbook: Carter Findley: The Turks in world history. New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.

More (mandatory) readings will be made available through a course website (tba).


HISTORY 285 — Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carson,John S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

From automobiles and computers to immunizations and genetically modified foods, science, technology, and medicine are almost omnipresent elements of modern lives and lifestyles, and have been for many decades. This course will introduce students to some of the central ideas, techniques, and controversies in the social study of science, technology, and medicine.

Open to students with backgrounds in either the humanities/social sciences or the sciences, its purpose is to help participants think in a more informed, critical, and sophisticated manner about science, technology, and medicine (STM) and their implications for modern life. We will examine not only developments in the knowledge and practices that make up STM, but also how they affect society and how society shapes them.

There will be two lectures and one discussion session per week, and requirements will include weekly reading, a midterm, and at least one paper.

RCSSCI 275/HISTORY 285 meets the core course requirement for those wanting to pursue an STS minor through the Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

This class is open to both RC and non-RC students. Sign up soon before the course fills up!

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

HISTORY 301 — Discovery of the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lindner,Rudi P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID

How did we get here? What's going on? Where are we going with this? These questions define the physical sciences, and this course examines the history of the ways and means, human, observational, experimental, and theoretical, that astronomers and physicists have used to answer them. The course begins with what has been called the 'Scientific Revolution,' with Galileo and the Inquisition, but quite rapidly we come to the nineteenth century, and the heart of the course is on the development of our study of the universe, its origin, structure, and future, during the last few generations. Among topics we shall consider are the financing of science, the politics and security implications of modern research, history of computers, the roles of women, the geographical and cultural spread of research, popularization and demonization of science, pseudo-science, and the various contexts of science, in addition to the development of research and thought. So this is a history, and not a science, course, although many of the readings will come from scientists themselves, and our discussions will be centered on the human history rather than on the science itself.

HISTORY 302 — Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
Stalin & Stalinism

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Arguably, Stalin was the most powerful man in the world at the time of his death. He controlled not only the Soviet Union and much of Eastern Europe but also had enormous influence over the near billion people of China. He had turned the revolution of 1917 into an authoritarian dictatorship based on terror and police infiltration, yet was admired by intellectuals and activists around the world and adored by millions of his own citizens. This course will explore the roots of Stalinism, first through the biography of the dictator himself, then through a study of the ideology and practices of the Soviet system in the Stalinist years (1928-1953). Special emphasis will be placed on the Cold War and Stalin's foreign policy, but other topics will include the collectivization of the peasantry, the Great Terror of 1936-1938, and the Soviet struggle against Nazism in World War II.

Besides historical and political science works, students will read some fiction dealing with the period, as well as watch a film from the Soviet Union. The course will be run largely through discussions, though half-period lectures will be interspersed to cover various subjects. The course is appropriate for Honors students both as an introduction into the historical literature on a crucial period of twentieth century history and as a means to understand a society that stands at the opposite pole from democratic capitalist countries. Questions raised by studying the rise and maintenance of a powerful dictatorship, the major opponent of the United States in the Cold War, can help dedicated students to understand the variety of political solutions to problems of social transformation.

Requirements:

  1. All students will complete the readings and participate in the discussions.
  2. All students will prepare a mid-term paper (6-8 pages, typed, double spaced), which will analyze the readings to date.
  3. All students will report on their research and write a final research paper (12-15 pages, typed, double spaced) based on a topic that has been discussed with the instructor.

HISTORY 302 — Topics in History
Section 005, LEC
The Atlantic Slave Trade: Histories and Legacies

Instructor: Scott III,Julius S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Atlantic slave trade, by which millions of Africans were forcibly removed from their homelands and transported to Europe and the Americas, constituted one of the major forces in modern world history. From its origins early in the "Age of Explorations" through its abolition some four centuries later, this trade affected profoundly and in many ways shaped the entire Atlantic world-Africa, Europe, North and South America, the Caribbean. This course attempts to grapple with the complex history of the slave trade- its origins, development, and consequences-but it will also examine some of the painful legacies of the trade and efforts to address these legacies in various quarters of the Black Atlantic in literature and film, calls form reparations, and recent attempts to "reconnect" the African diaspora with Africa through DNA mapping. This is primarily a lecture and readings course, but each week we will make ample time for discussion and interaction.

HISTORY 305 — Histories of the Modern Caribbean
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Situated at the historical crossroads of Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The course will focus on the Greater Antilles — Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba — we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian revolution to the present.

HISTORY 319 — Europe Since 1945
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chin,Rita C-K

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course examines the social, political, and cultural history of the European continent from the end of WWII to the present. The lectures will be organized both chronologically and thematically. A course like this cannot aim at exhaustiveness, and some important topics in national histories will not be covered. We will focus instead on transnational events and movements that affected the lives of Europeans across the boundaries of the single nation states. As a rule, particular national cases will be discussed mostly as examples of general patterns and processes. We will deal with a wide range of sources (from monographs and scholarly articles to movies, memoirs, and works of fiction) in our attempt to move beyond the level of state policies and capture the meanings of events for the historical actors who lived through them. Topics will include the politics of the Cold War, the Stalinization of Eastern Europe, the process of European integration, the advent of mass consumption, protest movements in capitalist and socialist countries, the fall of communism after 1989 and its consequences, and the impact of postwar migration.

HISTORY 322 — The Origins of Nazism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

HISTORY 327 — The History of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Puff,Helmut
Instructor: Spector,Scott D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Does sex have a history? This course proposes to respond to this provocative question by demonstrating how modern notions of sexuality have emerged historically. In that sense, sex is not part of nature, it is part of culture, or rather cultures and their histories.

This lecture course will introduce students to an exciting new field of historical research. We will cast our net widely. Our history will contain histories and cultures whose sexual orders differ greatly from what we know about the West. But also within Western societies, we will discover a wealth of sexual cultures and practices that will help us transform our understanding of modern societies.

Our approach will be both topical and chronological. We will cover fields such as homosexuality, matrimony, prostitution, pornography, and transvestism. We will also investigate the interaction of sexuality with race, class, and gender. We will explore these topics by canvassing a history from ancient times to the present.

Intended audience: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Course Requirements: Attendance and active participation plus midterm and final exams. Two short essays (1-2 pages); a response paper to one of the required readings; student's comments on a source text of their choice.

Class Format: 3 hours of lecture per week with smaller group discussions from time to time during the term.

HISTORY 333 — Survey of East Central Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kennedy,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world. Lectures and discussions.

HISTORY 345 — History and Theory of Punishment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bright,Charles C

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In this course, we will explore the history and theory of punishment in the 19th and 20th Centuries. The main focus will be on the history of punishment in the United States, but we will draw on broader theoretical traditions and use comparative cases from other places. Central to the study will be patterns of change in punishment practices and how these reflected and/or foster new perspectives on who criminals are and what makes them misbehave. We will seek to understand how punishment systems create and defend coherent, if changing narratives about deviance, crime, and correction, and how these narratives work to organize the internal practices and the public discourse about punishment. Topics will include the invention of the penitentiary in the early/mid-19th Century, the development of industrial penology and the "big house" in the early 20th Century, contract labor systems and chain gangs that comprised penal practice in the American South after the Civil War, and the emergence of rehabilitative models of corrections and their crisis after the second World War. These historical explorations will frame a critical examination of contemporary penology and discourses on punishment. Class sessions will mix lectures with discussions and small group work. There will be several assigned books and a course pack; two essays and a final paper will supplant midterm and final exams. This is one of two required core courses for the Crime and Justice undergraduate academic minor.

HISTORY 348 — Latin America: The National Period
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Alberto,Paulina Laura

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

Latin America's history is tremendously, and increasingly, significant to global politics, culture, and economic trends. Sharing a hemisphere with the United States, Latin Americans have had especially close and complex relationships with their northern neighbor. Yet many in the United States possess only a superficial understanding of the region's diverse multicultural societies. This course will introduce students to how modern Latin American nations were formed after the region's independence, focusing especially on how people of diverse ethnic, political, and economic affiliations have struggled to shape their societies' politics and cultures.

Lectures include selections from Latin American music, film, art, journalism, photography, legal texts, and other primary sources. Readings include a concise interpretive textbook, an array of primary documents, a novel, short stories, and memoirs.

*Students proficient in Spanish may earn one additional credit by enrolling in the Spanish discussion section 004. This section, conducted entirely in Spanish, will include discussion of the regular course readings as well as short Spanish texts.

There are no prerequisites for this course.

HISTORY 352 — Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chang,Chun-Shu

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Major trends and problem areas in the social and intellectual history of premodern China, with particular emphasis on the evolution of main intellectual currents that influenced the development of social institutions. Special attention is given to subjects generally neglected in Western-language sources.

HISTORY 358 — Topics in Latin American History
Section 001, LEC
Brazilian History

Instructor: Caulfield,Sueann
Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

Brazil is a place of paradoxes and contrasts. The fifth most populous nation, it boasts one of the world's largest economies and an advanced industrial sector, but suffers income disparity and regional economic imbalances that are among the world's most dire. Its constitution guarantees broad social and economic justice and protects the rights of historically disenfranchised groups, but the implementation and enforcement of the law is hobbled by special interests and police corruption. It is a nation that celebrates its rich multi-ethnic cultural heritage, but remains stratified by perceived racial and regional differences.

In this course, we will examine the historical roots of these paradoxes, focusing particularly on how racial, ethnic, and regional distinctions have been continually re-constructed since the sixteenth-century European invasion. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and post-emancipation social relations; the celebration of racial democracy and the reality of racism in the twentieth century; religious expression and competition; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production, particularly in the areas of dance and music. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression. For example, students will explore the history of the Brazilian martial art capoeira and participate in a workshop led by a Bahian capoeira master. A highlight of the course will be our study of Black cultural movements since the 1970s, with a special focus on the impact of the music of Gilberto Gil, currently Brazil's Minister of Culture. The class will attend a Gilberto Gil concert in March.

The course will conclude by looking at how Brazil's current governing party (the Workers' Party), led by a former laborer from the impoverished northeastern region of Brazil (President Luiz Inacio da Silva, "Lula"), has successfully campaigned with a platform emphasizing the goal to transform the history of exclusion that has characterized the nation's racial and social history, and the political culture of corruption that is obstructing this effort.


HISTORY 359 — Visions of the Past
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Marwil,Jonathan L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course rests on the proposition that most of what most people have ever known about the past has come from deliberated aesthetic forms such as monuments, paintings, novels, and films. Many more Americans have read or seen Gone With the Wind than have ever read a history of the Civil War; films like Schindler's List have been the primary means by which Americans and Europeans have conceptualized the destruction of European Jewry. This course, therefore, will examine how and why history is represented in the various aesthetic forms, and how those representations have created our sense of what is important in history. We shall read a half dozen novels and plays, see several films, look at a variety of art and architecture, and listen to several musical forms. Classes will be lecture and discussion, and there will be one or two papers besides a midterm and final.

HISTORY 363 — U.S. Foreign Policy and International Politics Since World War II
Section 001, LEC
U.S. Foreign Policy and International Politics Since World War II.

Instructor: Kramer,Paul Alexander

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Examines the conflict and cooperation of the U.S. with other states in the Cold War, deconolonization, and regional crises. It also analyzes how non-state actors, new technologies, and global markets are transforming the international system. Readings include original documents and differing interpretations from America and abroad.

HISTORY 370 — Women in American History to 1870
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Karlsen,Carol F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the history of American women — as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes and regional, racial, and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early sixteenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's social relations; and to women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

HISTORY 371 — Women in American History Since 1870
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

HISTORY 385 — History of Zionism and the State of Israel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Endelman,Todd M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course covers the rise of Jewish nationalism from its origins in the late nineteenth century through the creation of the State of Israel in 1948 and the history of the Jewish state in the following half-century. Emphasis will be placed on the political context out of which Zionism developed and on the larger cultural trends that shaped the variety of ideologies within the Zionist movement. Significant time will also be devoted to examining the role of Zionist activity within the histories of major Jewish communities in the Diaspora prior to World War II and the competing ideologies and movements (socialism, strict orthodoxy, and assimilationism) that challenged the Zionist solution to the "Jewish Question." The tragic confrontation between Jews and Arabs within the Land of Israel will be explored in some depth, with particular attention being paid to the genesis of the confrontation. The last cluster of lectures will focus on the cultural, social, and political problems that have beset the State of Israel from its establishment in 1948 to the present and on the links between these and broader themes in modern Jewish history as a whole.

There will be a midterm examination, a ten-page analytical paper, and a comprehensive final.

HISTORY 387 — History of American Jews
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Deborah Dash

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).


HISTORY 391 — Topics in European History
Section 001, LEC
Hist of European Integration

Instructor: Gaggio,Dario

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The construction of the European Union is arguably the most exciting and controversial political experiment today. This aims to introduce students from a variety of humanistic and social scientific backgrounds to the study of European integration and trans-national identity formation, viewed as contested and contingent historical processes. Rather than viewing the history of European integration as an inevitable, linear, and self-contained institutional movement envisioned by a handful of founding fathers and implemented by their followers, we will focus on the often contentious debates which have surrounded the practices and meanings of political and economic governance, citizenship, and cultural identity. Thus topics include not only a historical overview of the institutional innovations which have led from post-WWII reconstruction to the adoption of a single currency (the Euro) in 2002, but also a discussion of how Europeans have encouraged and resisted integrative processes at the levels of technological change, popular culture, and social movements. Particular attention will also be devoted to the evolving relationships between western Europe and the rest of the world, especially eastern Europe, the U.S., and the post-colonial countries.

HISTORY 393 — Topics in U.S. History
Section 001, LEC
World War Two in the Pacific

Instructor: Salesa,Damon I

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Pacific theater of World War Two was a complicated war, one that has many histories. This course takes this conflict, the ‘Pacific War', as its central subject, and studies its origins and the military course of the war — the traditional focus of war histories — but greatly broadens these horizons to include other rarely appreciated, but equally vital, aspects of the war.

As well as looking at the war's origins and developments, the course will also study a number of other facets of the war: from the effects of the war on local communities, the war as a meeting of empires, to the arrival of the atomic age and the trials of war criminals. It culminates in a study of the ways that the war has been put into history, from the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian to Hollywood films to the History Channel.

HISTORY 395 — Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to History concentrators with permission of instructor.

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 001, SEM
Social History of American Civil War

Instructor: Vinovskis,Maris A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This is an undergraduate research seminar on the social history of the U.S. Civil War. In order to provide a brief overview of the Civil War, students will read several histories of that conflict with particular attention to the experiences of soldiers and civilians.

The focus of the course is writing a 25-35 page research paper using primary and secondary sources. This is a challenging, but important opportunity to learn how to write an original, fully-documented research paper as well as contribute to our understanding of the Civil War.

In preparation for writing their own papers, participants will read and critique previous student papers on the social history of the Civil War. Students, in consultation with the instructor, will select a topic for their research papers. They will then write a 5-10 page preliminary draft which includes an introduction to the overall papers, a brief review of the existing secondary literature on that topic, details about the primary sources to be used, and a description of the research design employed. After receiving detailed comments on that draft, students will revise and resubmit that portion of their paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 002, SEM
Ideologies & Empires in Chinese History

Instructor: Chang,Chun-Shu

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course will examine the major ideologies behind the rise, constitution, and fall of the powerful empires in Chinese history. It will focus on one empire: the Qin (Ch'in), 221-207 B.C., popularly known as the empire of the Great Wall and Terracotta Warriors. The first empire in Chinese history, the Qin Empire marked the end of China's Classical Age and the beginning of Imperial China. Founded by one great mystic hero, the First Emperor (Ying, Zheng, r. 221-210 B.C.), its short life of fourteen years actually charted the course of Chinese history for the next two thousand years. This course will look into the complex ideological forces behind the enigmatic personality of the First Emperor and the founding and developing of the Qin Empire. Finally, through this study, some "big questions" in the current historical scholarship will be raised:

  • Do ideologies matter in the rise and fall of powerful empires?
  • Do powerful empires lead to the "end of history"?
  • Do history-making heroes "live" forever?

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 003, SEM
History of Human Experimentation

Instructor: Howell,Joel D

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Experimenting on human beings has always raised a set of complex social, ethical, and political questions. Some of those issues have persisted over the centuries; some have been specific to a given time and place. Much of contemporary medical practice is based on knowledge created by experiments done on human beings. In this class we will examine several histories of human experimentation. We will ask how people at different times and in different places answered questions about whether it was acceptable to use human beings as research subjects. We will examine which human beings were the subjects of the experiments, and what limits were placed on the conduct of the experiments. Reading assignments will include both primary source material and some of the latest scholarship on the subject. No prior background in medicine is necessary.

The class is discussion format, with occasional short lectures. Students will be guided in choosing a topic for a research paper, finding sources, crafting a historical argument, and writing (and re-writing) drafts. The goal is to complete a full-length paper on a topic relevant to the class and (one hopes) of specific interest to the student. There will be other, smaller writing assignments.

Overrides for non-history concentrators will be allocated on the first day. Anyone absent from the first class without advance permission may not take the course. Evaluation will be based on discussions, oral presentations, and the student's writings.

Readings will include:

  • Coursepack of readings (cost estimated to be about $70)
  • David Feldshuh, Miss Evers' Boys
  • Susan E. Lederer, Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War
  • Susan Reverby, Tuskegee's Truths: Rethinking the Tuskegee Syphilis Study
  • Ignaz Semmelweis, trans K. Codell Carter, Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever

 

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 004, SEM
Emergence of U.S. Mass Culture

Instructor: Cook Jr,James W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course is designed as an intensive historical examination of U.S. popular and mass culture over two centuries. We will begin the academic term with the very first "cultural industries" of the 1830s and 40s (e.g., P.T. Barnum's museum exhibitions, dime novels, and blackface minstrel shows), and then follow the expansion and evolution of U.S. commercial entertainment through the dawn of electronic media and globalization. Probable weekly topics include: the commodification and distribution of localized vernacular forms; the rise of corporate structures, national markets, and syndication; the consolidation of new publics and modes of spectatorship; the mechanics of marketing and promotion; the politics of mass cultural representation and consumption; and the manifold impacts of U.S. mass culture, both at home and abroad.

Our scope will be deliberately broad and comparative, cutting across many different eras and cultural media: from museum exhibitions, theater, dance, and literature to radio, film, television, and perhaps even the internet. We will also make extensive use of 19th and 20th-century primary source materials (e.g., playbills, newspaper reviews, trade periodicals, pop songs, and video clips), in order to gauge the shifting meanings of mass culture according to historical context. Because this is an advanced writing course, students should expect approximately 25-30 pp. of assigned essays, with multiple opportunities for critical feedback and rewriting.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 005, SEM
Time and History

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Ideas about the age of the earth and the human race, the nature of time, and the beginning and destiny of human history, have varied greatly at different periods and across different cultures. This cultural and historical variability of time-concepts seems to defy the sense we have that time is the same for everyone, everywhere. With this problem in mind, this course will explore ideas of time and history comparatively, examining such issues as the anthropology and philosophy of time; the cultures of time to be found in the Biblical religions and in Hinduism and Buddhism; science and the Time Revolution of the 1860's; and the idea of progress and its critics.

This is a colloquium, with readings, class discussions, and papers. There is no examination. There will be one short essay and one long research paper. You will be asked to develop a prospectus of the research paper, a draft for discussion with the instructor, and to present the substance of it to the class before submitting the final version for grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 006, SEM
Partition of British India, 1947: History, Literature, Film

Instructor: Mir,Farina

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

In 1947, Britain's colonial rule over India came to an end after almost 200 years. At the same time, India was partitioned along religious lines into two countries, India and Pakistan. This course examines the history that led to the partition, the violence that accompanied it, and its continuing legacy in the Indian subcontinent. We will engage the partition through three different genres: history, literature, and film.

This course has no prerequisites.

Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in seminar discussions and 3 writing assignments.

Texts include:
Urvashi Butalia, The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India. Ritu Menon and Kamla Bhasin, Border and Boundaries: How Women Experienced the Partition of India. Bhisham Sahni, Tamas. Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
Section 001, SEM
The Great War & Literature

Instructor: Marwil,Jonathan L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

World War I, which to Europeans remains the Great War, has inspired an extraordinary body of literature. While much of it was composed within fifteen years of the war's end, poets, novelists, and dramatists still are inspired by it. Why this should be so will be one question this course will examine. Others will include the extent to which the literature of the war has shaped our view of it, and even of our view of war generally. The reading in the course will be drawn from a variety of literary genres, including history. And the reading will be considerable.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
Section 002, SEM
U.S. Intervention SEAsia Philippines

Instructor: Gaynor,Jennifer L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

U.S. intervention in the Philippines began in the late nineteenth century as a result of the Spanish-American War and at a time when Filipinos were already engaged in a revolution for independence from Spain. Our examination will begin with this time and stretch to the present, concentrating on the Philippine-American War and the early colonial period. The Philippine-American War, far longer and more brutal than the Spanish-American War, was (and sometimes still is) referred to as an "insurgency." Americans are afflicted with a curious amnesia regarding this war, despite the fact that it was undertaken in a largely pro-imperialist national climate. The war and the American colonial project in the Philippines set precedents for the projection of American power overseas. Study of them also reveals how deeply most Americans at home misunderstood what, in practice, the US was doing "over there." We will look at both American and Filipino/a perspectives on the U.S. invasion, the developing colonial project, and the post-World War Two Huk rebellion, as well as at the somewhat later (and ongoing) politics of military bases.

This course offers students an introduction to archival research, a time-consuming but highly rewarding approach to learning about history by doing what historians do. The primary sources we will use for archival assignments will be drawn from the University of Michigan's rich research collections.

Some class meetings will take place at the Bentley Historical Library on North Campus, the University's Special Collections Library, the Ford Presidential Library and the Museum of Anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
Section 003, SEM
Indonesia: The Long 1950's

Instructor: Gaynor,Jennifer L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This seminar considers social, political and economic changes during Indonesia's "long nineteen-fifties," a period stretching roughly from the 1940's through the mid-1960's. This period has been called a watershed for understanding subsequent developments in Indonesian history. Our examination will take us from the late colonial period and Japanese occupation in World War Two through the demise of Sukarno's troubled presidency and the beginnings of Suhartos' 32-year dictatorship. Along the way, we will delve into the anti-colonial nationalist revolution, scrutinize a number of regional rebellions, and analyze the decline of constitutional democracy and the transition to "guided democracy." Previous study of Indonesia is helpful but not necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
Section 004, SEM
Global History: Cities & Discontent

Instructor: Murphy,Edward L

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course approaches the question of global history through the accelerating processes of urbanization from the nineteenth century to the present. Paying particular attention to the ways in which expanding cities have been the location of tensions in governance and social class, the course will explore how the geographies of cities have both reflected and impacted central processes of state formation and capitalist accumulation in the modern world. During the course of the semester, we will examine efforts to transform urban life through processes of reform and resistance, focusing on social movements and the development of professional reformers in such areas as architecture, criminology, public health, and urban planning. The course will draw from monographs and studies based in a number of different world regions, making equal use of the work of historians, social geographers, and anthropologists.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

HISTORY 397 — History Colloquium
Section 005, SEM
Greek Religion: The Religious Life of Greeks & the Greek City-State

Instructor: Schmalz,Geoffrey C R

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course explores the ancient experience of Greek religion, from the perspective of both the community and the individual, the male and female. The structure of the course evolves around the twin aspects of Greek religion, as a symbolic expression of Greek culture and society as a whole — as a ‘Panhellenic Religion' — and of the individual Greek city-state — as ‘Polis Religion.' Hence the course is divided into two parts. The first half of the course consists of a survey of the main elements of Greek religion as universally celebrated in terms of a pantheon of gods, in ‘orthopractic' fashion with prescribed rites and festivals, and within sacred space and other religious boundaries; and also in respect to its ritualization of age-cycles and gender roles. The second half of the course is devoted to the religious life of ancient Athens, whose religious calendar and sacred landscape are especially well documented; and thus allow us to survey and explore the annual cycle of rites and festivals that closely defined that city and its population.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397.

HISTORY 398 — Honors Colloquium, Junior
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sheehan,Jonathan L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior thesis project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 398 — Honors Colloquium, Junior
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior thesis project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 399 — Honors Colloquium, Senior
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Senior honors seminar for thesis writers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students, HISTORY 398, senior standing, and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 401 — Problems in Greek History II
Section 001, LEC
The Peloponnesian War

Instructor: Schmalz,Geoffrey C R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Peloponnesian War, the cataclysmic showdown between Athens and Sparta between 431-404 B.C., was the longest, greatest, and most destructive conflict ever experienced in ancient Greece. As such it produced tremendous cultural and social change in ancient Athens. This course is in part a traditional narrative of the War, as followed in a close and comprehensive reading of Thucydides' Peloponnesian War; combined with a cultural exploration of Athens during the Fifth Century B.C., beginning with its ascendance as both an imperial power and history's first democracy, as well as the center of Greek arts and literature, and the city's cultural life was challenged and transformed by the Peloponnesian War. Thus, in addition to Thucydides, there will also be ‘cultural-historical' readings from the plays of Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, as well as the works of the early Sophists and their effect on Greek education and intellectual life; and an exploration of the art and architecture of the period.

HISTORY 405 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
Section 001, LEC
Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

HISTORY 417 — Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Weineck,Silke-Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

After reviewing the most central developments in late 18th and 19th century German intellectual history, we will concentrate on its seminal theoretical moments and movements during the long 20th century, an era that includes Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger and the philosophers of the Frankfurt school such as Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, and Jü rgen Habermas, as well as their reception in the English and French speaking world by authors like Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida. Readings and discussion in English; German concentrators are encouraged to register for GERMAN 404, the 1 credit LAC section accompanying this course. Requirements: three papers, 8-12 pages long, thorough preparation, lively participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: German students must have concurrent registration in German 404. See Course Guide

HISTORY 431 — History of the Balkans Since 1878
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fine Jr,John V

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course treats the region now comprising Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece and Albania from roughly 1800 to the present. It stresses the various peoples' struggle for independence from Ottomans and Hapsburgs, the development of nationalism, the crisis of 1875-78, Macedonia, the Balkan wars, World War I, creation of Yugoslavia, inter-war problems, World War II and resistance movements, Tito's Yugoslavia.

HISTORY 432 — Medieval and Early Modern Russia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kivelson,Valerie Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Since medieval times, Europeans have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, the reign of Ivan the Terrible, and the transformation of Muscovy in the seventeenth century.

Early Russian history poses particular intellectual challenges. The history of this period is not only completely unfamiliar to most people today, but is also complicated by the unreliability of the source record. Imagine trying to make sense of American history if the authenticity of the Constitution were uncertain and scholars were divided about whether or not the Civil War actually took place. This is the degree of uncertainty that plagues the history of early Russia and makes its study exceptionally exciting and interesting. Each student has the opportunity to contribute original insights and to participate in clarifying the opaque record by filling in some of the blanks. This course allows students to experience the joys of original interpretation and research in a field where the answers are still unknown.

Requirements:

  1. 7 very short weekly papers (1-2 pages) responding to questions from the readings.
  2. Midterm: take-home exam
  3. 7-10 page paper on a primary source
  4. Attendance and participation are REQUIRED

There are no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE READINGS:
(Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street. Additional readings will be available through Electronic Reserves and the course web site.)

  • De Madariaga, Isabel, Ivan the Terrible (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006).
  • Dmytryshyn, Basil, Medieval Russia: A Source Book, 850-1700 (Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International, 2000).
  • Halperin, Charles J., Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1985).
  • Orthodox Russia: Belief and Practice Under the Tsars, ed. Valerie Kivelson and Robert H. Greene, (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University, 2003).
  • Platonov, S. F., Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis & Social Struggles in Sixteenth & Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, John T. Alexander, trans. (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas,1971).
  • Riasanovsky, Nicholas V., and Mark D. Steinberg, The History of Russia, 7th edition (Oxford University Press, 2005).

HISTORY 434 — Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform
Section 001, LEC
Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

WN 2007
Credits: 4

After centuries of expansion, the tsarist empire collapsed in political crisis and military defeat. Within months the Bolsheviks had come to power in Russia and established what they claimed to be the first socialist government in history. This course will explore the fate of that government and the people it ruled, the seventy-four years of "socialist" experimentation, industrial transformation of a backward peasant economy, the establishment of a new type of party-state dictatorship, and the attempts after 1985 to transform the Soviet system that led to the collapse of the state.

Various critiques and explanations of Soviet society, ranging from Western sovietological Marxist, will be introduced and examined through the semester. The goal of the course is to establish the basis for a broader and deeper understanding of Soviet history and to provide material for analysis of the USSR, Russia, and the successor states from a variety of viewpoints.

HISTORY 434 — Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform
Section 010, LEC
Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

After centuries of expansion, the tsarist empire collapsed in political crisis and military defeat. Within months the Bolsheviks had come to power in Russia and established what they claimed to be the first socialist government in history. This course will explore the fate of that government and the people it ruled, the seventy-four years of "socialist" experimentation, industrial transformation of a backward peasant economy, the establishment of a new type of party-state dictatorship, and the attempts after 1985 to transform the Soviet system that led to the collapse of the state.

Various critiques and explanations of Soviet society, ranging from Western sovietological Marxist, will be introduced and examined through the semester. The goal of the course is to establish the basis for a broader and deeper understanding of Soviet history and to provide material for analysis of the USSR, Russia, and the successor states from a variety of viewpoints.

HISTORY 450 — Japan to 1700
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tonomura,Hitomi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the evolution of Japanese society from its prehistoric days to the last phase of the age of the samurai by focusing on such key topics as emperors and outcastes, sacrality and pollution, aristocrats and warriors, bureaucracy and feudalism, sexuality and religion, peasant and lord, and diplomacy and violence. Both chronologically and topically organized, the course will emphasize the interconnected patterns of social transformation over the millennium of history. Students will read translation of primary sources (literature and documents) in addition to textbooks and scholarly articles. Films and slide presentations will supplement lectures and class discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, in-class quizzes and three short take-home essays. The course welcomes participation by graduate students who will write an extra paper for earning graduate credits. No prerequisite for taking the course.

HISTORY 453 — Modern Southeast Asian History
Section 001, LEC
Mod Hist of SE Asia, 1942-2000

Instructor: Mrázek,Rudolf

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The evolution of Southeast Asian independence, tracing the growth of western concepts as they influenced native leaders who sought to integrate such ideas as nationalism, democracy, and communism within their respective societies. Special attention is paid to the catalytic effect of the Japanese occupation.

This is Part 1 of this course and that Part II, 1945-2000 is taught in the Winter term.

HISTORY 455 — Classical India and the Coming of Islam 320-1526 A.D.
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the character of Indian civilization at the moment of its full flowing — its classical age — whose fine arts, courtly life, religion and states were models for ages to come. It was a moment of India's greatest influence, thanks to the spread of its religions, arts, and sciences throughout Asia. Beginning with the Gupta Empire in 320 AD, we will examine the political and social institutions, religions, arts and material life of ancient India. We will go on to analyze the Turkish conquest of north India and the establishment of the Sultanate of Delhi. We will study the domestication of Islam in India, and patterns of Indian interactions with Islam. Prior study of India is not required, and both undergraduates and graduate students are welcome.

HISTORY 456 — Mughal India
Section 001, LEC
Mughal India

Instructor: Mir,Farina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the political, social, cultural, and religious history of India during the period of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858).

This course has no prerequisites. It satisfies the History department's pre-1800 requirement.

Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of two exams and a 4-5 page essay.

Texts include:
John Richards, The Mughal Empire (Cambridge, 1993)
Jamal Elias, Trans., Death Before Dying: The Sufi Poems of Sultan Bahu (U California, 1998)

HISTORY 467 — The United States Since 1945
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lassiter,Matthew D

WN 2007
Credits: 4

HISTORY 467 provides a topical and thematic approach to post-1945 United States history, including Cold War politics and culture, the fate of liberalism and the rise of conservatism, the power shift to the suburbs and the Sunbelt, social movements of the Left and the Right, the relationship between youth subcultures, countercultures and the mass consumer culture, and the era of globalization and its discontents.

The main emphasis of the course is the intersection of politics, culture, and society in recent U.S. history. We will engage questions such as:

  • How has the "frontier mythology" shaped postwar America?
  • How did the Cold War influence politics and popular culture in the United States?
  • What happened to the power base of organized labor? How have civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Christian Right, and other grassroots movements changed American society?

  • Why did the United States lose in Vietnam?
  • Why is the "war" metaphor so popular in American domestic policy?
  • Were the Seventies more important than the Sixties? Are the "culture wars" finally over?
  • How are Latinos and other new immigrant groups changing contemporary politics?
  • Did the ideology of American Exceptionalism advanced by Ronald Reagan and on display in two wars in the Middle East overcome the "Vietnam Syndrome"?
  • Is it accurate to speak of a new "American Empire" in the global arrangements that have replaced the Cold War framework?
  • Did the 1990s really mark the triumph of the "new economy"?
  • Where did your shoes actually come from?

The workload for HISTORY 467 resembles the requirements in 300-level history courses, and no prerequisites are necessary to enroll in this course. HISTORY 467 is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include scholarly books, films, documentaries, fiction, and short discussion projects. The graded assignments include a take-home midterm assignment, a 10 page research paper, and final exam.

The list below contains the books that are likely to be required for purchase, although these are subject to change.

  • Tom Engelhardt, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation
  • Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
  • Glenn Altschuler, All Shook Up: How Rock 'n' Roll Changed America
  • William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
  • William Finnegan, Cold New World: Growing Up in a Harder Country
  • Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
  • Bruce Schulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics
  • Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
  • Mike Davis, Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City
  • Thomas Frank, One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy

 

HISTORY 468 — Topics in U.S. History
Section 001, LEC
History of Latinos in Michigan

Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This is a an advanced research seminar on the history of Latino immigrants and Latino-Americans in the state of Michigan. As there is a scarcity of published material on the topic we will be working on primary research in U of M archives and the Institute for Social Research. The goal will be to produce individual research projects while laying the foundations for an ongoing Michigan Latino History Project. Research trips to Wayne State Library, MSU, and Grand Rapids are also planned. Advanced undergraduates, thesis writers, and interested graduate students are all welcome. Some background in Latino Studies or Latino history is recommended.

HISTORY 471 — Gender & Sexuality in India
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Ramaswamy,Sumathi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar considers the transformations of gender and sexual relations through time and across regions and social communities in different parts of India. The aim of the course is to examine the significance of gender and sexuality as historical constructs through which we might analyze Indian society and culture. We will begin the course by considering the historiographical and theoretical problems that confront scholars interested in women's history. We will next move to a broad survey of the history of women in the subcontinent from ancient times to the present. With this background, we will go on to consider in some detail the following topics: gender and religion; the impact of colonialism, nationalism and religious fundamentalism on the economic and cultural realities of women's lives; women, law and the state; women and politics; and the cultural politics of sexuality. Through an analysis of such issues, we will attempt to understand if there is something distinctly "Indian" about the gendered landscape of India.

HISTORY 472 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC
Qing Studies, 1600-1927

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Qing Empire (1644-1911) was one of the largest territorial empires in the world, yet it was run with a lean bureaucracy and comparatively small armed forces. In recent years, new research methods and improved access to new archives in China have enhanced our understanding how this vast empire actually operated. Through carefully selected readings in both recent and classical works on Qing history, this course will revisit different themes in Qing history such as the imperial house, ideology, the exam system, taxation, law, gender relations, military affairs and international relations. Prior knowledge of Chinese history is desirable, but the course is also aimed at advanced history students who have a general interest in East Asian history. Grades will be based on class participation and two papers.

HISTORY 476 — American Business History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lewis,David L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

Course pack. No text.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior, senior, or graduate standing

HISTORY 481 — Topics in European History
Section 001, LEC
Environment & History of Medieval Europe

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An overview of the themes and methods of environmental history as applied to preindustrial Europe, this course is also an attempt to understand medieval European history as an outcome of human actions in dialogue with natural processes. Thus the Great Events of the European Middle Ages, like the barbarian migrations into the Roman empire, or the feudal mutation of the eleventh century, or the "waning" medieval civilization of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, are examined in ecological contexts to show how human agency interacted with environmental conditions in each. The dynamic of human and natural is the course's theme, but its outcome will also be some familiarity with medieval history.

HISTORY 481 — Topics in European History
Section 002, LEC
Russia and its 'Easts'

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This topical seminar explores an important theme in tsarist Russian and Soviet history. The focus is on issues of race, ethnicity, and nationality — on the macro level of state politics, discourse, and economic, social, and cultural policy as well as on the micro level of lived social experience and personal identity. Students will work extensively with a wide variety of primary documents (in translation) and will use the lens of Soviet history to consider general technical and conceptual problems of historical analysis. Topics to be addressed include: the nature of "nationhood"; continuities and the lack thereof in tsarist and Soviet policies towards non-Russian groups; historiographical debates over the character of such policies; distinctions among non-Russian groups; the problem of studying groups without "voices" of their own; the role of ethnicity and nationality in the disintegration of the USSR; and the role of Russian nationalism.

HISTORY 481 — Topics in European History
Section 003, LEC
Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and Arts

Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course spans over two hundred years of Jewish cultural activity in Russia. At the theoretical level, the course will address such issues as multilingualism, minority culture in an imperial context, relationships between culture and ethnicity and culture and religion. At the practical level, we will discuss a wide variety of works of literature, criticism, essays, visual arts and cinema. Structurally the course consists of four section: a historical introduction, two case studies of the cities of St. Petersburg and Odessa as major centers of Jewish cultural production in the Russian Empire, and an overview of the Soviet period.

HISTORY 487 — Women in Victorian England
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zemgulys,Andrea Patricia

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focusing on the later Victorian and Edwardian periods in England (from about 1870-1920), this course will examine how women's lives were shaped by 'separate spheres' ideology — a set of powerful and rationalizing ideas that grew middle-class England in the Victorian period by preserving house and home as the 'proper' sphere of women, and preserving business and political life as the 'natural' sphere of men. We will explore topics ranging from marriage and household economy, to slum-reform, shopping, and the campaign for voting rights. Readings will include secondary sources in the history of the period, primary sources by political and social reformers (Octavia Hill and J.S. Mill), a cookbook, and several novels (by George Eliot, George Gissing, and Virginia Woolf). Students will be expected to write two papers, eight paragraphs, and two exams.


Approximate textbook cost: $80.


This course fulfills New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

HISTORY 498 — Topics in History
Section 001, LEC
Turkish-Armenian Relations in the 20th Century

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J
Instructor: Göçek,Fatma Müge; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to examine the evolution of relations between the Ottoman State/Turkey and Armenians/Armenia. The Genocide of Armenians during the First World War tends to dominate the characterization of these relations and has produced two very opposing narratives. The course will focus on the role of state and non-state actors (European, Turkish and Armenian) in the development of these relations and will consider the role of each discourse in nation and state building.

HISTORY 498 — Topics in History
Section 002, LEC
Cannibals, Idolators & Noble Savages: Ethnography from the Renaissance to Enlightenment

Instructor: Stolzenberg,Daniel A
Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This colloquium will trace the growth of ethnography and anthropology in the early modern world. We will explore how European theories about human nature and human difference — theories that construct and constrain the contemporary world — developed out of specific episodes of encounter and struggle. Topics will include the debate at Valladolid in 1550 over whether indigenous Americans fit Aristotle's definition of "natural slaves," Jesuit conversion strategies in China and India, narratives of travelers and slave-raiders in Africa, the emergence of cultural relativism, Enlightenment debates over race and human origins, and varying interpretations of how and why Hawaiians killed Captain Cook. Alongside critical analyses drawn from several disciplines, the main readings will be the primary sources themselves: vivid, enigmatic accounts, portraits of a world alien to the writer, yet also mirrors on the writer's own culture.

This is primarily a graduate class; advanced undergraduates interested in taking it should contact one of the instructors.

HISTORY 498 — Topics in History
Section 003, LEC
Political Violence & Historical Memory

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar we will explore the historical context, cultural construction, and social consequences of political violence. Among the themes that we will examine are: the racialization and gendering of violence; colonial, national, and globalizing forms of violence; spatial and temporal dimensions; terror and meaning; historical memory and commemoration. We will examine a range of cases, including India, Northern Ireland, Sri Lanka,, Argentina and Guatemala, and will use a variety of materials including film. Students will make class presentations and write brief commentaries and a final paper. The seminar is open to graduate students.

HISTORY 536 — The Rise of Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course provides an intensive introduction to the history of the rise of Islam. The period covered is roughly 500-950 CE.

It covers:

  • the Near Eastern and Mediterranean world in late antiquity;
  • Arabia before Islam;
  • the life of Muhammad and the earliest Muslim community;
  • the early Islamic conquests in the Near East, Central Asia, North Africa, and Spain;
  • the Caliphate as a political structure;
  • the emerging systems of Islamic theology and law; and
  • the astonishingly rapid growth and flourishing of a new, Islamic civilization throughout much of the Old World.

Major themes include:

  • contact and conflict between urban and nomadic populations;
  • political and sectarian divisions;
  • relations among the various religions and peoples;
  • travel and commerce;
  • new forms in literature, architecture and other areas.

Much of the reading consists of original sources translated from the Arabic. The great world history of al-Tabari (839-923) provides a constant point of reference, as look back at these events from al-Tabari's perspective.

Prerequisites. It is best if you already have the basic background course, AAPTIS 461 / History 442 or equivalent. However, this is not strictly required, if you can convince the instructor.

Requirements. These include a midterm examination, a final examination, and occasional short quizzes. Four short papers will also be assigned, 3-5 pages each. Topics for the first three papers will be assigned in class; the fourth paper will be on a topic of your choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Taught in English.

HISTORY 541 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

HISTORY 549 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage
Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HISTORY 592 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC
The Body in Pre-Modern Japanese Visual and Textual History

Instructor: Tonomura,Hitomi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The dramatic transformation in gender relations is a key feature of Japan's premodern history. In this course, we will examine how men and women in premodern Japanese society have constructed norms of male and female behavior in different historical periods, how gender differences were institutionalized in social structures and practices, how these norms and institutions changed over time, and how people's actual lives departed from the recognized norms. We will sharpen our analyses of men as gendered subjects while seeking to bring the "missing" women into view. Throughout the course, the feminist and other theoretical works will help us to interpret the textual and visual sources. Our goal is to understand the relationship between the changing structure of dominant institutions and the gendered experiences of women and men from different classes from approximately the seventh through the eighteenth centuries. This is not a lecture course, and our learning process depends on students' active participation in reading, interpreting and discussing the material. Some background in the fields of premodern Japanese history, literature, or art history would be helpful, though not required

HISTORY 600 — Introduction to Archival Administration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Conway,Paul L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 611 — The Literature of American History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lassiter,Matthew D
Instructor: Juster,Susan M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

HISTORY 611 provides an introduction to the literature of American history, with an emphasis on chronological breadth, thematic diversity, important foundational texts, and key methodological and theoretical innovations of more recent scholarship. The syllabus is not exhaustive but instead is organized around a series of critical historical episodes and historiographical debates. HISTORY 611 is a core requirement for all first-year graduate students in United States history. The seminar also is open to students in Anthro/History and American Culture, and other related fields only with the permission of the instructors.

HISTORY 617 — Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, SEM
What is Left in Latin America?

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a proseminar, intended for graduate students from different disciplines interested in understanding the history and representation of Latin America and the Caribbean in the twentieth century. It will cover selected aspects of the cultural and social history of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 619 — Knowledge/Power/Practice in Science, Technology, and Medicine
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Carson,John S; homepage
Instructor: Jackson,Steven J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This graduate readings seminar is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to some of the major themes and issues that occupy the field of Science and Technology Studies. Drawing on scholarship in history, sociology, philosophy, anthropology, and information studies, we will mix theoretical material with more empirically oriented studies. The course will focus particularly on the relation between social, political, and cultural contexts and the development of ideas, practices, tools, and objects within science, technology, and medicine. No particular expertise in a scientific field is expected or required of participants.

Work for the seminar will include reading approximately 200-300 pages per week, brief weekly response papers, two discussion papers based on a week's reading, and a final project of about 15 pages.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 620 — Studies in Modern Medicine and Health
Section 001, REC
Studies in Modern Medicine and Health

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, disease and the healing professions deeply influenced almost every aspect of social and cultural history. Social and intellectual changes, in turn, helped shape the changing history of disease and medicine. Like race and sex, disease can be seen as a category of difference whose boundaries have been framed and made visible by the intersection of changes in biology, society, and culture. This course combines an intensive introduction to the theoretical and monographic literature in the field, with a smaller-scale introduction to research methods usually reserved for seminar courses.

Students will write two review papers based on the secondary literature, as well as several short assignments based on primary source research. Students who wish to emphasize the research component may elect to take the course for seminar credit.

The examples we will study as a group will be drawn from American history, from initial native-colonial contacts to the crisis of AIDS. But comparisons will be drawn with non-American history and non-American topics will be available for individual papers. The course is not solely for those who wish to prepare an exam field or write a dissertation in medical history, but for anyone who wants to integrate the material and the cultural dimensions of human health in any historical area.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor.

HISTORY 621 — Studies in Women's History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to explore the issues, controversies, theory, and paradigms developed in U.S. women's and gender history in the last twenty-five years. Emphasis will be placed on an introduction to the historiography, methodology, and theory of this rich field, and how it can further our knowledge and understanding of the past and the present.

There are four categories of obligation in this course:
1. The weekly "core" reading assignments along with a weekly email to the class of roughly one page summarizing and commenting on the themes. (due Mondays at noon)
2. One written book report which must also be summarized in a five minute presentation in class
3. A "think piece" paper on a topic you and I have chosen together
4. Leading a discussion for one session.

A one-page precise of your paper is due in class week seven; the final paper is due one week after the last class session. Students are expected to attend ALL class sessions and be prepared to participate in discussion. Category 1 & 2 each will make up 25% of the grade; discussion facilitation 10%, and the paper 40%.

Advisory Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors with permission of instructor.

HISTORY 622 — Topics in World Economic History I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will cover the evolution of economic institutions and the role of these institutions in the economic growth of Europe, Latin America, Asia and the United States. Topics include: The divergence of Asian and European growth rates between 1500 and 1800. The creation of modern fiscal and monetary institutions. The role of stock markets, banking systems and exchange rate regimes in historical economic development. Particular attention will be paid to the Great Depression and historical banking panics, stock market crashes and exchange rate devaluations. The course will explore the historical costs and benefits of the different monetary and fiscal institutions adopted by Europe, Argentina, Brazil, China, Japan, The United States, and Canada.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Intermediate economic theory/statistics

HISTORY 628 — Studies in Jewish History
Section 001, REC
Narrating and Representing the Holocaust

Instructor: Endelman,Todd M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the sixty years since the end of World War II, historians and social scientists have produced an impressive body of scholarly literature on the character and causes of the Nazi destruction of the Jews. This colloquium aims to introduce graduate students in various disciplines to problems in the interpretation and representation of the Holocaust. The first half of the course will be devoted to the historiography of the Holocaust, including debates about the origins of the Final Solution, the participation of various groups within German society in the process of mass murder, Jewish responses to persecution, survival in the camps, and the behavior of the Allied governments and other so-called third parties. In the second half of the academic term, the focus of the class will shift to discussion — among historians, cultural critics, and social scientists — about the representation and memorialization of the Holocaust in the media, high and low literature, the arts, and other forums. One theme that will emerge repeatedly throughout the semester is the question of what values and interests are at stake in a particular interpretation or representation.

HISTORY 638 — Studies in Medieval History
Section 001, REC
Between Worlds

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This studies course will consider the position of Europe (1300-1600) as a continent and a culture "between worlds", namely, its economic, political, and cultural knowledge of and relations with other continents as well as its sense of the age as one poised between the authority of an ancient past and the lure of new discovery (the Renaissance dilemma). We will look in some detail at ethnographic accounts, the development of a new cartography, changes in historiography, and methods of the dissemination of knowledge.

HISTORY 651 — Studies in Modern French History
Section 001, REC
France in the 19th Century

Instructor: Cole,Joshua H

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The social, political and cultural history of France from the revolution of 1789 to the Dreyfus Affair of the 1890s.

Advisory Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French.

HISTORY 676 — Studies in Modern Japanese History
Section 001, REC
The Concept and Practice of Citizenship

Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

HISTORY 676 is an introductory graduate course for students planning to write a dissertation in modern Japanese studies or take a field in the same area. The course is designed to familiarize students with thematic topics as well as historiographic and theoretical issues in the field of modern Japanese history. While readings are primarily in English language secondary sources, students are encouraged to read specific sources in Japanese. This term, in conjunction with the current LSA Theme Year on citizenship, the course will address the concept and practice of citizenship — in local, national, and global contexts over the course of Japan's modern history. Specific themes and readings will be further elaborated in consultation with graduate students interested in taking the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR/SR P.I.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 001, REC
Caribbean History

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

For five centuries, the Caribbean has stood at a crucial crossroads in the unfolding history of the Americas, Europe, and the African diaspora, possessing an importance for world history disproportionate to its size. That importance is derived in part from the region's geopolitical and economic significance and hence centuries of colonial and imperialist domination, from extensive migration into, out of, and within the region connecting it to most major areas of the globe, and from its resultant extraordinary racial and ethnic complexity. The region's importance is also derived from its dramatic historical transformations, including the sudden, nearly complete destruction of its large indigenous population, the rapid expansion of plantation agriculture and importation of millions of enslaved Africans, the subsequent waning and overthrow of these systems, the profound global implications of the Haitian and Cuban revolutions, and the rise and fall of long, infamous dictatorships. These radical disjunctures make the Caribbean an ideal place from which to explore many of the central themes and contradictions of modern history: slavery and freedom, colonialism and independence, despotism and revolution, racial hierarchy and political equality, nationalism and transnationalism, and migration and creolization. In this course, we will examine historical literature treating these themes in the Caribbean with a focus on the Greater Antilles (Haiti, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica).

Students may take this class either as a History reading seminar (698), a History research seminar (796), or as a CAAS course (558).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 003, REC
Religion & Empire: Early Modern Atlantic.

Instructor: Gregerson,Linda K
Instructor: Juster,Susan M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Religious passions and conflicts drove much of the expansionist energy of post-Reformation Europe and provided both a rationale and a practical mode of organizing the dispersal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people from Europe to the Americas. During the formative period of European exploration, settlement and conquest of the Americas, from roughly 1500 to 1700, Europe's Christians, confronting the new and unfamiliar, were forced to explain and defend the old, often in novel and startling ways. This course will look at the dynamic expansion, fragmentation, and dispersal of religious communities and ideas in the 16th and 17th centuries through four interrelated categories: translation (the process of rendering familiar beliefs and texts in a new idiom); dissent (the challenge of defining and maintaining boundaries between the authorized and the unauthorized); diaspora (the experience of exile and estrangement); and transplantation (the rooting of the sacred in alien environments). All of these themes highlight the tremendous instability that the wars of the Reformation and imperial expansion introduced into organized religious life in the 16th and 17th centuries, on both sides of the Atlantic, and the creative adaptations of belief, practice, and community life that followed in the wake of these seismic events. Our texts will include major literary and historical documents of the period as well as important scholarly interventions. We are eager to convene this course as an intensive interdisciplinary conversation and we welcome students from American Culture, Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Sociology, Romance Languages, Art History, and other related disciplines, as well as those from our home departments of History and English. This course is sponsored by the Atlantic Studies Initiative and also satisfies the MEMS (Medieval and Early Modern Studies) proseminar requirement

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 004, REC
Cannibals, Idolators & Noble Savages: Ethnography from the Renaissance to Enlightenment

Instructor: Stolzenberg,Daniel A
Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This colloquium will trace the growth of ethnography and anthropology in the early modern world. We will explore how European theories about human nature and human difference — theories that construct and constrain the contemporary world — developed out of specific episodes of encounter and struggle. Topics will include the debate at Valladolid in 1550 over whether indigenous Americans fit Aristotle's definition of "natural slaves," Jesuit conversion strategies in China and India, narratives of travelers and slave-raiders in Africa, the emergence of cultural relativism, Enlightenment debates over race and human origins, and varying interpretations of how and why Hawaiians killed Captain Cook. Alongside critical analyses drawn from several disciplines, the main readings will be the primary sources themselves: vivid, enigmatic accounts, portraits of a world alien to the writer, yet also mirrors on the writer's own culture.

This is primarily a graduate class; advanced undergraduates interested in taking it should contact one of the instructors.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 005, REC
The Writing of Post-Soviet History: The Case of the Caucasus and Armenia.

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar will explore the historical and, more broadly, social science literature that has been produced in the last decade to narrate the story of ex-Soviet states, including the processes of state and nation formation, with special focus on the three republics of the south Caucasus. Particular attention will be paid to the issues raised and approaches adopted by Western scholars. The seminar will counterpoise, in particular, the conflict between a geo-strategic perspective and the logic of local and regional dynamics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 006, REC
Comparative Colonialisms

Instructor: Salesa,Damon I

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a graduate course that studies a variety of colonialisms, predominantly after 1800, in comparative modes. In the course we will study colonialism comparatively, excavate and analyse the ways in which colonialism was itself comparative; and explore the politics and practices of comparative historical studies of colonialism. Though the course is not explicitly bounded, a good deal of emphasis will rest on the colonized spaces of Australasia and the Pacific, and on the British and American empires more generally. Topics to be explored are highly varied and include comparative studies of race, law, economics, transnationalism, imperial and colonial circuitries, indigeneity, and governmentality; there will remain considerable space for students to move autonomously within the themes of the course.

The first part of the course will be built around some key ‘theoretical' or ‘methodological' works in the study of different colonialisms; the second part will turn to other works that are more specific in time and location, and which offer different strategies in the study of colonialism. The final part will be led by the engagements of students with these problematics, and will involve individual excursions into, or critiques of, these kinds of comparative routes and practices.

For further details or if you have any questions, please contact me. salesa@umich.edu

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 007, REC
Religion and the Secular

Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The last decades of the 20th century witnessed a remarkable resurgence of "religion" in the most public manner. The phenomenon has challenged the long-standing secularization thesis, i.e., the idea that modernity and modernization on a global scale will eventually bring about the complete disappearance of religion. But it has also challenged the very notion of secularity/laicity and, with it, the notion of the public sphere, understood as a domain that is in itself free from any sectarian determination, religious or otherwise, and as a domain that allows coexistence of divergent groups and interests, including religious ones, under the regime of "pluralism" and by virtue of parliamentary representation.

While the topic of religion has thus resurfaced conspicuously in the public domain, much of the current discussion about religion in the academy remains disparate, episodic, and lacking in critical historical perspectives. Particularly exigent is the need to recognize the radical historicity of the modern discourse on religion, that is, the historicity of our taken-for-granted understanding of what a religion is, and how this discourse about religion is deployed in our ordinary speech and everyday politics.

This seminar will be held in part in conjunction with a conference "Religion, Law, and the Public Sphere," to be held in February 16-18, 2007, second in the series of the initiative on Religion and the Secular.

Reading will include:

  • Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (1841)
  • Karl Marx, Marx on Religion
  • Max Weber, From Max Weber
  • Ernst Troeltsch, The Absoluteness of Christianity (1902/1912)
  • Émile Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912)
  • Sigmund Freud, Totem and Taboo (1913/14); Moses and Monotheism (1938)
  • Alain Badiou, Saint Paul: the Foundation of Universalism (1997)
  • Timothy Mitchell, Rule of Experts: Egypt, Techno-Politics, Modernity (2002)
  • Winnifred Fallers Sullivan, The Impossibility of Religious Freedom (2005)
  • David Scott & Charles Hirschkind, eds., Powers of the Secular Modern: Talal Asad and His Interlocutors (2006)
  • Hent de Vries & Lawrence Sullivan eds., Political Theologies: Public -Religions in a Post-Secular World (2006)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 700 — Independent Research Seminar
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 707 — Seminar on Medieval Social and Cultural History
Section 001, SEM
Between Worlds

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This studies course will consider the position of Europe (1300-1600) as a continent and a culture "between worlds", namely, its economic, political, and cultural knowledge of and relations with other continents as well as its sense of the age as one poised between the authority of an ancient past and the lure of new discovery (the Renaissance dilemma). We will look in some detail at ethnographic accounts, the development of a new cartography, changes in historiography, and methods of the dissemination of knowledge.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 711 — Seminar on Ottoman History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lindner,Rudi P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

HISTORY 711 is a seminar on Ottoman history. The focus is on the Ottoman cultural sphere, but in the past students have worked on aspects of Mediterranean or Inner Asian history as well. The seminar introduces students to the tools and techniques of studying the Ottoman era in Europe and Asia, and we review some of the leading contributions to the development of historiography. Each student will produce a research project, tailored to the student's linguistic skills and fields of interest.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 715 — Seminar in Early Modern European History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sheehan,Jonathan L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a research seminar in Early Modern European history. It has no overarching theme. Rather, it will provide a structure for students working in pre-modern Europe (understood broadly) to pursue their own research and to produce, by the end, an article-length piece of original writing. Optimally, it will also serve as a platform for developing the dissertation, both topically and in terms of writing. The class will pursue readings for approximately five weeks — topics will depend on the participants — and then the rest of the semester will be dedicated to the research project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French or German. Graduate standing.

HISTORY 719 — Seminar in Modern European History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Eley,Geoffrey H

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a historical research seminar in which participants complete a research paper on a topic of their choice and in their own area of study. Seminar meetings will focus on the tasks associated with the framing and writing of historical research papers. We will explore the relationship between concepts and evidence, between broader historiographies and specific case studies, between the narrative and material aspects of the production of historical work. We also consider, where relevant, the relationship between disciplinary codes and customs and interdisciplinary impulses in participant's projects. The course will serve as a forum in which students present their works-in-progress, read and offer written responses to each other's work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 744 — Seminar in Russian History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This research seminar is designed for graduate students in REES related departments and a select number of qualified seniors from the REES concentration program. It gives students an opportunity to pursue research in their own areas of specialization, and prepare seminar papers that will meet Honors thesis or MA thesis requirements or otherwise meet the standards for publication in scholarly journals. Common readings, classroom discussion, and student presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 771 — Research Seminar in U.S. History
Section 001, SEM
Colonialism & Empire in N Amer

Instructor: Karlsen,Carol F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed as a research seminar for graduate students in History. It is also interdisciplinary and will therefore be useful to students in related fields — American Culture, English, Art History, Women's Studies, etc. — who plan to incorporate historical research into their Ph.D. theses and subsequent scholarship. Its central thematic orientation is the emergence of the United States simultaneously as a nation and an empire and the subsequent processes by which so many Americans affirmed the former and denied the latter. We will also deal with forms of resistance to dominant policies and practices. Readings for this course include theoretical work on colonialism (and post-colonialism) in and beyond the Americas, as well as studies that speak to laws, education, political movements, travel narratives, fiction, film, painting, and photography. The main project for this course is either a dissertation prospectus or a first draft of a publishable article.

HISTORY 772 — Seminar in American Social History
Section 001, SEM
History and Policy Making

Instructor: Vinovskis,Maris A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on how historians have viewed and participated in the policymaking process. Following several more general discussions of history and policymaking, the seminar analyzes how history has been used recently in developing federal policies in education and adolescent pregnancy. Student papers focus on some aspect of federal, state, or local policymaking from an historical perspective, reflecting the student's own policy interests.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 795 — Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A research seminar on topics in Russian and East European Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
Section 001, SEM
American Cultural History

Instructor: Kelley,Mary C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Topics in American Cultural History is a research seminar in which "America" will be defined both in terms of the nation's territorial boundaries and the "Nuestra America" identified by Jose Marti. Students may select topics on either of these Americas from the seventeenth to the mid twentieth century. They may also interrogate the relations between the peoples of these two Americas. Cultural history will be defined with a similar breadth. Some may want to explore the premises of a particular "discourse community," as David Hollinger has labeled individuals coming together to debate shared values, acknowledge difference, and consolidate agreements. Others may look to aspects of culture embodied in material objects, performance, social consumption, or rituals.

The seminar, which begins with a series of common readings, has as its objective the completion of a publication-quality essay.

HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
Section 002, SEM
Studies in Modern Medicine and Health

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, disease and the healing professions deeply influenced almost every aspect of social and cultural history. Social and intellectual changes, in turn, helped shape the changing history of disease and medicine. Like race and sex, disease can be seen as a category of difference whose boundaries have been framed and made visible by the intersection of changes in biology, society, and culture. This course combines an intensive introduction to the theoretical and monographic literature in the field, with a smaller-scale introduction to research methods usually reserved for seminar courses.

Students will write two review papers based on the secondary literature, as well as several short assignments based on primary source research. Students who wish to emphasize the research component may elect to take the course for seminar credit.

The examples we will study as a group will be drawn from American history, from initial native-colonial contacts to the crisis of AIDS. But comparisons will be drawn with non-American history and non-American topics will be available for individual papers. The course is not solely for those who wish to prepare an exam field or write a dissertation in medical history, but for anyone who wants to integrate the material and the cultural dimensions of human health in any historical area.

HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
Section 003, SEM
African Paris: Histories and Literature of Race and Rethinking Negritude in Imperial France

Instructor: Diouf,Mamadou; homepage
Instructor: Ekotto,Frieda

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The goals of this course are to provide students with an overall view of race from a literary and historical perspective, and to offer students a context from which to study race relations outside the United States. While there are many courses which are taught on the topics of race in History and in CAAS, the curriculum still lacks courses that talk about race from the melding of a literary and a historical perspective. This course is designed to address this lack by examining the phenomenon of Negritude in the early part of the twentieth century to consider how literature and history can be imperative to the shaping of our consciousness of race. We believe that a course centered on Negritude is essential to extending the Race and Ethnicity required courses to include perspectives on race outside of the United States, as well as to understanding the important role culture played as a tool to articulate race as well as to combat racism. This course also seeks to intervene into a discussion on debates on globalization, multiculturalism and postcolonial studies, and to provide a concrete foothold for upper-level undergraduates to segue into these larger issues.

The phenomenon of Negritude will be extremely important in helping to bring discussions of race relations to an international level. Negritude was an Afro-European literary and cultural phenomenon of the early twentieth century. Negritude was one of the many ways in which black people from the French Empire first began to articulate notions of "Blackness", a way of conceiving of a kind of subjectivity that would transcend the deep divisions between Arabs, West Indian Africans, continental Africans and other members of the Black Diaspora and allow them to come together and find a new form of self-respect. They carved in Paris, the imperial metropolis, an imperial public sphere to sustain a conversation between imperial subjects — in particular but not only among Blacks — about citizenship, nationalism, universalism, modernity and race. Their goal: locate and/or reconcile African modes of thought, traditional African Humanism and a complex recreation of universalism.

This course will be taught by two faculty members, Frieda Ekotto, who holds appointments with Romance Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, affiliated with CAAS and Mamadou Diouf, who holds a joint appointment with CAAS and History.

This class will be taught seminar style, and students will be required to lead class discussion at least once a semester, and this will constitute a considerable amount to their grade. This means that the student will have to master the text for the day s/he has signed up for, and to pose important questions that the text introduces for the discussion, to field questions as well as to encourage class participation.

HISTORY 796 — Topics in History
Section 006, SEM
Caribbean History

Instructor: Turits,Richard L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

For five centuries, the Caribbean has stood at a crucial crossroads in the unfolding history of the Americas, Europe, and the African diaspora, possessing an importance for world history disproportionate to its size. That importance is derived in part from the region's geopolitical and economic significance and hence centuries of colonial and imperialist domination, from extensive migration into, out of, and within the region connecting it to most major areas of the globe, and from its resultant extraordinary racial and ethnic complexity. The region's importance is also derived from its dramatic historical transformations, including the sudden, nearly complete destruction of its large indigenous population, the rapid expansion of plantation agriculture and importation of millions of enslaved Africans, the subsequent waning and overthrow of these systems, the profound global implications of the Haitian and Cuban revolutions, and the rise and fall of long, infamous dictatorships. These radical disjunctures make the Caribbean an ideal place from which to explore many of the central themes and contradictions of modern history: slavery and freedom, colonialism and independence, despotism and revolution, racial hierarchy and political equality, nationalism and transnationalism, and migration and creolization. In this course, we will examine historical literature treating these themes in the Caribbean with a focus on the Greater Antilles (Haiti, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica).

Students may take this class either as a History reading seminar (698), a History research seminar (796), or as a CAAS course (558).

HISTORY 802 — Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

These courses, carrying one to three credits, are graded on a letter scale and are designed for preparation of a special topic or area not adequately covered by regular courses. Students may take them only with prior permission of a faculty member. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student sets formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. Registration for these courses requires an override from the graduate office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 804 — Reading for the General Examination
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

The preliminary examinations ensure that students have acquired the necessary background for teaching and scholarship in history. Field requirements for the prelim encourage a combination of breadth and depth. Normally, students will prepare at least one geographical/temporal field, usually the major field, and at least one distribution field different in area and/or time from the major field. Students will customize another field to the specific needs, in consultation with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. This field can be geographical, temporal, topical, or methodological. Students are also required to offer a cognate field in another discipline or interdisciplinary program on a subject that will enrich their preparation for teaching and research in history. Other programs may be pursued with the approval of the Graduate Committee.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 806 — Greek Law and Rhetoric
Section 001, LEC
Aeschines and Demosthenes

Instructor: Forsdyke,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will focus on two speeches by Athenian orators: Aeschines Against Timarchus and Demonsthenes On the Crown. We will read these speeches closely in the original Greek and discuss issues arising from the texts such as: the role of public oratory in democratic culture, the relation between politics and the courts, and conceptions of gender and sexuality.

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, two one-hour translation exams, an oral presentation and a ten page final paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HISTORY 807 — History and Instructional Experience
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Juster,Susan M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This class explores the practical application of recent historical theories to the instructional experience. It is designed for those who are serving as Graduate Instructors for the first time, usually in the second year of the doctoral program. The work-load and reading list is customized to the individual needs and interests of each student.

HISTORY 830 — Anthropology and History Workshop/Reading Group
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Cohen,David W
Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit course is to support a workshop/reading group of students in the Anthro/History program. It will be a seminar in format with the purpose of discussing works-in-progress and especially significant pieces of scholarship in the field. Presentations will be circulated and read in advance. The two hour session is dedicated fully to discussion of the work among all those present.

HISTORY 898 — Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy
Section 001, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

Advisory Prerequisite: Ph.D. candidacy status. Graduate standing.

HISTORY 900 — Preparation for Preliminary Examinations
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

HISTORY 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Juster,Susan M

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing.

HISTORY 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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