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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = HJCS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 21 of 21
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HJCS 102 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Weizman,Paula; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 101.

HJCS 102 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Weizman,Paula; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 101.

HJCS 102 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, II
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Eliav,Milka

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 101.

HJCS 102 — Elementary Modern Hebrew, II
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Eliav,Milka

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 101.

HJCS 202 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lamm,Doron; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

The focus of instruction is on the four language skills. Review of morphology and syntax, and readings in fiction and nonfiction prose. Continued emphasis on oral work and writing skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 201.

HJCS 202 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Birman-Rivlin,Bilha

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

The focus of instruction is on the four language skills. Review of morphology and syntax, and readings in fiction and nonfiction prose. Continued emphasis on oral work and writing skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 201.

HJCS 202 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Rosenberg,Ilan

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

The focus of instruction is on the four language skills. Review of morphology and syntax, and readings in fiction and nonfiction prose. Continued emphasis on oral work and writing skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 201.

HJCS 202 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Rosenberg,Ilan

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

The focus of instruction is on the four language skills. Review of morphology and syntax, and readings in fiction and nonfiction prose. Continued emphasis on oral work and writing skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 201.

HJCS 202 — Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Birman-Rivlin,Bilha

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

The focus of instruction is on the four language skills. Review of morphology and syntax, and readings in fiction and nonfiction prose. Continued emphasis on oral work and writing skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 201.

HJCS 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

HJCS 281 — Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
Section 001, LEC
Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

HJCS 302 — Advanced Hebrew, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rosenberg,Ilan

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course materials consist of texts from Modern Hebrew prose: fiction and non-fiction. Writing and speaking skills are enhanced through a series of related assignments. Review of basic language structures and enrichment of vocabulary are among the objectives of this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 301.

HJCS 395 — Directed Undergraduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HJCS 470 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270 or JUDAIC 270, or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 202.

HJCS 495 — Directed Undergraduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous class) and would like to study some aspect of the topic in further detail. An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading and the requirements must be specified when the approval is given.

Intended audience: This course is especially designed for upper level undergraduates concentrating in HJCS, but may be offered to students in other departments engaged in cross-disciplinary studies.

Course Requirements: Instructors decide Course Requirements on an individual basis for each student.

Class Format: The student and instructor meet 1-3 hours per week depending on the number of credits, the individual needs of the student, and the format necessary for the student's course of study.

HJCS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HJCS 570 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270/JUDAIC 270 or HJCS 470/ACABS 470.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202).

HJCS 577 — Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
Section 001, SEM
Hebrew Modernism 1900-1930: Tradition, Modernity, Language, Space

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The literary works of Hebrew Modernism were created during the early decades of the 20th century, mainly in the urban centers of Eastern and Central Europe, before Hebrew was solidified as a vernacular in Mandatory Palestine. The formation of Hebrew Modernism is one of the most puzzling chapters in the history of Hebrew and Jewish literature.

Many crucial questions concerning Hebrew Modernism remain open: How did modernist Hebrew fiction and poetry arise before the language became a vernacular? What poetic and historic shifts enabled its development? What are the modernist elements, and what (if anything) is specifically Hebrew or Jewish in this literary project? What are the relations between Hebrew and Yiddish Modernism, and the various movements of European Modernisms (Decadence, Impressionism, Expressionism, Naturalism, Stream of the Consciousness Narrative, etc.)? How to understand Hebrew Modernism in the contexts of the competing political and ideological movements of Jewish nationalism, Zionism and Socialism? What is the place of traditional/religious Jewish texts and language in the formation of Hebrew Modernism? The seminar will deal with some of these questions by exploring the main works of Hebrew literature in the last decade of the 19th century (the fin de siècle) and the first three decades of the 20th century. We will read fiction and poetry by S.Y. Abramovitz, Y.L. Peretz, M.Y. Berdichevsky, Ch. N. Bialik, Y.Ch. Brenner, U.N. Gnessin, Gershon Shofman, Dvora Baron, Yaacov Shteinberg, Avraham Ben-Yitzhak, David Fogel, Rachel Bluvstein and Esther Rabb, as well as theoretical and historical writing about Modernism in general (Adorno, Benjamin, Raymond Williams, Richard Sheppard) and Hebrew Modernism in particular (Kurzweil, Miron, Harshav, Kronfeld).

Special attention will be given to the ways in which Hebrew modernist writers were engaged with "the crisis of language," with "radical reinvention of Jewish traditions," as well as shifting perceptions of gender and erotic desire, space and place, geographical and metaphorical journeys, the Diaspora as a mental place, etc.

HJCS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HJCS 990 — Dissertation Research Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

HJCS 995 — Dissertation Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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