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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = HONORS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 22 of 22
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 001, SEM
K-12 Education: Problems and Policy. Meets Jan 9-Mar 20. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kaplan,Aaron Howard

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

America's public education system is world-class and mediocre, overly stressful and plagued by low expectations, the teenage playground of Ferris Bueller and the depressing wasteland that denies many students a fair chance to succeed. Almost everyone agrees that the system faces problems, but the public is staunchly divided on most reform efforts. We will discuss current issues like charter schools, voucher programs, standardized testing, and school funding, and we will examine how education policy is intertwined with issues of race and class. Finally, we will look at how the schools are portrayed in the media and in pop culture. Students will be expected to attend all 10 sessions, participate in class discussions, and complete 2-4 short assignments responding to the readings. Tuesdays 3-4 Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13, 20

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 002, SEM
Guilty or Innocent?: Racial Disparities in Health Care and the Question of Clinician Bias. Meets Jan. 9-March 13. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hasiakos,Peter Spiros

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Much evidence indicates that racial disparities in the quality of treatment in health care exist. However, very few have been able to objectively address the question of whether or not these disparities are due to overt clinician bias. In this mini-course, students will be exposed to the existing research that addresses this question as well as search for new literature that may bring more insight to the classroom. Students will sharpen their understanding of this issue through selected readings, short written responses, class discussions, and possibly a project-oriented assignment at the end of the course.

Tuesdays 4-5pm Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 003, SEM
Clown Logic. Meets Jan. 30-Mar. 27. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 12).

Instructor: Shelly,Mary Lou

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

What is a clown? A clown is an entertainer who makes us laugh. A clown is a dreamer who doesn't follow the rules of the practical world. A clown is a misfit, an outsider, and a questioner of authority. In the face of an often absurd and confusing world, a clown is also a creative problem solver.

Donald McManus says that the clown has "a limitless ability to invent new rules." Clowns have a different way of approaching the world than the average person does; they have a logic all their own. It is this off-the-wall logic that makes clowns so funny to watch, and so fascinating to study.

In this course, we will explore the logic of the clown. Through short readings, film screenings, and hands-on experiments in clown problem solving, we will come to a better understanding of what the logic of a clown might be, and perhaps how it is (or can be) used in our own world. Be prepared to have fun! We'll read, we'll watch, we'll talk, we'll play. (We may even juggle!)

Films, readings, and performances we will refer to in this course: Federico Fellini (The Clowns, 8 ½, La Strada), Samuel Beckett (Waiting for Godot, Endgame), Jaques Lecoq (The Moving Body), Charlie Chaplin (The Circus), the Marx brothers (At the Circus), the clowns of the New Pickle Circus (esp. Bill Irwin, Larry Pisoni, Geoff Hoyle), and more.

Tuesdays 4-5 Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 27

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 004, SEM
From Numbers to Stories: Perspectives on Data Graphics. Meets Jan. 8- Mar. 19. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Engle,Keary M

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Visualize a single page recounting the French army's gruesome fate during Napoleon's 1812 Russian campaign. Charles Joseph Minard's seminal graphic depicting this history is a classic example of how creativity can transform raw, abstract data into a powerful narrative. This seminar will discuss Minard's work and delve into questions of how we can and should communicate through graphics.

From demystifying the London cholera epidemic in 1854 to expediting the liftoff of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986, the methods for visualizing quantitative data have enormous impact. We express complex data collections as pictures to allow for holistic perception of the underlying trends and patterns. These images tell stories, visual narratives that are informative and powerful. Transforming raw data into a meaningful story requires techniques from both art and mathematics. If this process is misunderstood, the meaning of the data can be distorted or confused. Thus, it is crucial to learn how to construct data graphics that are clear and efficient.

In this class, we will discuss the philosophy of data representation as it relates to human perception and learn how to best communicate quantitative information to others. We will draw on the work of contemporary thinkers like Edward Tufte, Howard Wainer, and Robert Harris and more foundational thinkers like Playfair, Galileo, and Newton. Participants will develop their skills in critiquing data graphics found in news media and discover ways to improve data presentation within their own work. Course requirements include weekly readings, class participation, and a final project. Though not required, an elementary knowledge of statistics will be helpful.

Mondays, 5:00-6:00 Jan. 8, 22, 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, March 5, 12, 19

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 005, SEM
Language Education Policy, Immigrant Children, and the American Dream. Meets Jan. 24-Mar. 14. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 5.

Instructor: Fang,Louann

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

One fifth of all children in the US are immigrant children who speak English as a second language, and first- and second-generation immigrant children are the most rapidly growing segment of the US child population. In spite of recurring problems, America's public schooling has long been perceived as the ticket to the American dream: a meaningful and self-chosen lifestyle, economic success, and full membership as an American. The increasing cultural and linguistic diversity and needs of these immigrant children are a challenge that more and more public school districts are facing.

As we consider this widespread and increasingly relevant situation, what are some obstacles in the public school systems today in immigrant children's education? How well are the problems faced by language minority children addressed by current education policies and classroom practices? Where do immigrant children fit in American classrooms and eventually in American society?

Some of the themes we will consider in light of this growing population include: language and identity; conflicting ideas of assimilation and pluralism among immigrant groups; federal, state and local educational policies and approaches toward educating second-language children; problematizing the categories of the underprivileged, i.e. racial minorities, linguistic minorities, socio-economically disadvantaged; the debates about desegregation, affirmative action and diversity; school reform, and educational social movements such as Teach for America.

This is a highly participatory discussion-based class around the readings, current events and personal reflections. We will be investigating current issues concerning the education of immigrant children, and participant interests and suggestions will be taken the first day of class to finalize the topics. Possible mandatory course readings include: The American Dream and the Public Schools, by Jennifer Hochschild, and Children of immigration, by Carola & Marcelo Suarez-Orozco.

Wednesdays 4-5:30, January: 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, March: 7, 14

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 006, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 007, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 008, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 250 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Evolution of Cognition and Social Science Ways of Knowing

Instructor: Birdsall,William C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

There is now overwhelming evidence for the evolution of life on this planet. This course will review that theory and the evidence for it, not to learn biology, but to understand the implications of believing that human cognition has evolved.

  • What can and do we know?
  • What is certainty and of what can we be certain?
  • How does science differ from ordinary experience?
  • How and why is social science so different from physical science?
  • In what sense are social sciences actually sciences of the artificial since their subject matter — language, family, kinship rules, money, markets, culture — are our creations?

The purpose of this course is to carefully review the philosophical foundations of modern social science disciplines and compare their methods. The disciplines I will emphasize are economics, anthropology, and psychology; political science and sociology will not be neglected if there is interest among the students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 250 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Alternative Realities: The Science and Study of Human Perception

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

This course will investigate a number of broad, highly subjective, inherently interesting questions about the nature of human perceptual experience. The broadest of these will be the question of cultural relativism: Do people from widely different cultures experience immediate reality in fundamentally different ways? The alternative realities to be explored will be those attributable to cultures, subcultures, cults, historical eras, substances (i.e., drugs), and mental illness. Most importantly, the scientific enterprise itself, as one mode among others, of establishing an order of reality will also be presented in this context. Grades will be determined entirely by writing papers: one two-page weekly "commentary" paper discussing ideas and issues that are currently under discussion in class, and one longer paper due at the end of the term, in which the student develops a concept about the nature of human perception and how it generically relates to some concept of "reality".

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 250 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Women's Lives in 20th-Century China

Instructor: Wang,Zheng

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

This seminar will introduce you to recent scholarship on women's experiences in twentieth-century China, with an emphasis on a history of the Chinese feminist movement. We will focus on the emergence and development of feminist discourse in modern China, discuss its relations with rising nationalism, dominant political parties, and China's pursuit of modernity. We will highlight diverse Chinese women's multiple roles in the 20th century, study and compare women in and outside the Chinese revolution, and examine women's relations with the socialist state. The course will end by discussing Chinese women's activism today. All readings are in English. Personal voices and life stories constitute the majority of the reading. The reading materials will be supplemented by a variety of visual materials shown in class, such as excerpts from the documentary TV series "A Chinese Women's History in the Twentieth Century." The course is organized as a seminar, with emphasis placed on reading, writing, and lively class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 251 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Women's Lives in 20th-Century China — has moved to Honors 250.004

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

This seminar will introduce you to recent scholarship on women's experiences in twentieth-century China, with an emphasis on a history of the Chinese feminist movement. We will focus on the emergence and development of feminist discourse in modern China, discuss its relations with rising nationalism, dominant political parties, and China's pursuit of modernity. We will highlight diverse Chinese women's multiple roles in the 20th century, study and compare women in and outside the Chinese revolution, and examine women's relations with the socialist state. The course will end by discussing Chinese women's activism today. All readings are in English. Personal voices and life stories constitute the majority of the reading. The reading materials will be supplemented by a variety of visual materials shown in class, such as excerpts from the documentary TV series "A Chinese Women's History in the Twentieth Century." The course is organized as a seminar, with emphasis placed on reading, writing, and lively class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 251 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 002, SEM
The Symphonic Century: Music and Revolution in the 19th Century

Instructor: André,Naomi A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

Punctuated by revolutions, the 19th century was an era marked by social, political, and economic unrest. From the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century through the multiple rebellions in 1848, the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, and the instability that led to the first World War, the spirit of revolution ran strong in the 19th century.

This course looks at the evolution of one of the premiere musical genres of the 19th century — the symphony — within the larger context of its time. How do the early beginnings that emphasize a strict adherence to musical form reflect the social upheaval brought on through the French Revolution? In a time of strong juxtapositions, how does the symphony articulate the aesthetics of the sublime and the beautiful, the monumental and the miniature, the public and the private, the individual and the nation?

In this class we will examine the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz, Tchaikovsky, Dvořák, Brahms, and Mahler. Attention to musical form and style, composer biography and placement in music history, and contemporary musicological methodologies will be presented in a way that engages those from all musical backgrounds (no prerequisites required).

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 252 — Sophomore Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Way the Earth Works

Instructor: Pares,Josep M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Honors

The theory of Plate Tectonics states that the Earth's outermost layer is fragmented into large and small plates that are moving relative to one another as they ride atop hotter, more mobile material. Such a theory profoundly changes our ideas about how the earth works. The paradigm developed from the hypothesis that continents on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean had drifted apart ('Continental rifting'). Fossil Earth's magnetic field in rocks, volcanoes and earthquakes provide the evidence. Development of the theory allows better understanding of mountain building, distribution of fossil remains, the origin of features on the ocean floor, and much more. This course involves three hours of weekly meeting time and selected reading material. No background in Earth Science is necessary. Evaluation is based on class participation, three exams, a series of student presentations on selected topics, and written essays on the same subject.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing.

HONORS 290 — Honors Introduction to Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR./SR.H.PRG

HONORS 291 — Honors Introduction to Scientific Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor.

HONORS 292 — Honors Introduction to Scientific Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. HONORS

HONORS 390 — Junior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. DIR.

HONORS 490 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. Permission of instructor.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Complexity and Emergence. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Holland,John H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Prerequisites: Either familiarity with programming (no particular language required), or a course in finite mathematics. All technical topics will be defined in class.

Course Organization: This is a highly interactive class with students from all over campus. You will be expected to contribute to the class discussion and will be graded accordingly. There will be a final paper which you will present to the class.

Topics: Much of our investigation will center on complex adaptive systems (cas). A cas consists of adaptive (learning) agents with conditional interactions. Typical examples are the central nervous system, a market, the immune system, and the internet. Because of evolution and adaptation, cas exhibit perpetual novelty in their structure and behavior.

"Complexity" and "emergence" are difficult topics with different meanings in different areas. Rather than trying to provide precise definitions of these terms, we will develop a range of ideas, examples, and intuitions that provide a deeper understanding.

The order of topics will depend partly upon particular interests of the class, but the following topics, at least, will be covered

  1. Performance systems [sets of condition/action rules].
  2. Signal-passing systems — their pervasiveness from cell biology to language.
  3. Parallelism — systems with many rules active simultaneously.
  4. Agent-based models (models with multiple interacting agents).
  5. Credit assignment — strengthening stage-setting and predictive rules.
  6. Rule discovery — genetic algorithms.
  7. Building blocks — their role in everything from perception to invention.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 002, SEM
An Honors Mini-Course on Contemporary Poetry. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Yaeger,Patricia Smith
Instructor: Mattawa,Khaled Ahmad

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

This course will focus on contemporary poets who define new conceptual, political, and aesthetic territories. They differ radically from one another in subject matter and personae: a Muslim immigrant woman, a gay male whose life was touched by AIDS, a male postcolonial Nobel Laureate, and a female poet exploring natural theology. Passionate about their subject matter as well as their craft, Mohja Kahf, Mark Doty, Derek Walcott, and Louise Gluck present diverse visions for contemporary poetry's abilities to embrace their different vision and a poet's necessary skill at addressing multiple audiences and constituencies.

The class will meet on the following days: Friday, January 19, 2-4pm; Friday, January 26, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 9, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 16, 2-4pm.

Students will be graded on the basis of their participation in class and final group presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Art and Science of Humor: Theory and Practice, Practice, Practice. Meets March 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, April 2. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Mankoff,Robert Toby

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

An introduction to the nature, history, and value of humor to explore theories of humor, examine the development of all types of humor, and discuss benefits of humor such as its link with creativity and its opposition to stress. Students create humor with a "comic toolbox" of cognitive skills that take the individual from conception to execution of a comic idea, whether it be cartoons, humorous essays, stand-up routines , sit-coms. Guest speakers from these fields will give first hand accounts of the humor manufacturing process, from soup to nuts. Grade determined by a presentation in the last week that uses what has been learned both theoretically and on a practical level. The presentation might consist of cartoons on a theme, a humorous essay, a stand up routine, a funny website or something interesting.

Robert Mankoff is Cartoon Editor for THE NEW YORKER.

PREREQUISITE: A gift for laughter and a sense that the world is mad.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

 
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