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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = JUDAIC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 22 of 22
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
JUDAIC 102 — Elementary Yiddish II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is the second term of the two-year Yiddish language sequence. You will now continue to improve your speaking, understanding, reading and writing skills, and study more complicated grammatical structures and idiomatic expressions. You will expand your vocabulary and learn to talk about ideas and emotions. We will start reading simple folk tales and modern Yiddish literary texts: poems by Itsik Manger, Kadya Molodowsky, Avrom Reyzen and short stories by Sholem Aleichem, Moyshe Nadir and others. We will continue the class correspondence and you will be required to write weekly compositions, just like last academic term. A project report is due again at the end of the academic term, which can be an individual or a group project, and can vary from a research paper (in English about any Yiddish topic) to a performance of a scene in Yiddish or presenting some Yiddish food along with the recipe in Yiddish.

Grading System: Classroom work: 30% Quizzes & homework: 30% Exams: 30% Project: 10%

As you can see from the grading system, active classroom participation is very important, as are daily homework assignments — always due on the next class.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC/YIDDISH 101.

JUDAIC 150 — First Year Seminar in Judaic Studies
Section 001, SEM
The Jewish Encounter with America

Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Is America the Promised Land or a cultural waste land? In this first-year seminar, we will explore how a series of Jewish writers have grappled with this complicated question, from the period of the great migration from Europe up to the present. The writers we will study include Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, Grace Paley, Philip Roth, and Cynthia Ozick. Among the specific questions we will address are the following: How does Jewish identity transform in the New World? How do ideas from the religious traditions of Judaism get translated into new forms? What kind of stories do Jewish writers tell about the past and what sort of future do they envision? We will also consider the Jewish response to such phenomena as the backlash against immigrants in the 1920s, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. Requirements include short response papers and a term paper.

JUDAIC 202 — Intermediate Yiddish II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Lang Req

Welcome to your fourth term of Yiddish! If you are taking this course you have either completed JUDAIC 201 or have taken three academic terms of Yiddish elsewhere.

This year we will continue the course of study we began last year. Emphasis will shift slightly towards reading and speaking. We will read and discuss more complicated texts, continue class correspondence and you will immerse yourself in another project.

Grading: Classroom work: 30% Quizzes & homework: 30% Exams: 30% Project: 10%

As you can see from the grading system, active classroom participation is very important, as are daily homework assignments — always due on the next class.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC/YIDDISH 201.

JUDAIC 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

JUDAIC 281 — Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
Section 001, LEC
Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

JUDAIC 302 — Advanced Yiddish II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Szabo, Vera ; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts are considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Student learn how to approach handwritten documents.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC/YIDDISH 301.

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 001, LEC
American Jews & Media Industries

Instructor: Moore,Macdonald S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

"Jews Run Hollywood. So What?"

A decade ago this double-edged headline ran on the cover of Moment, a glossy, self-described "Jewish Magazine." Controversies like this have been sustained by a stew of envy and guilt, but their sources are to be found in old employment restrictions that forced Jews to innovate outside of mainstream American industries. Well into the mid-twentieth century, major American corporations seldom hired Jews. They worked primarily in family businesses; many were employed in printing and garment trades, suppliers to industries of ideas and fashions. Jews built on niche opportunities in emergent and developing media enterprises: movies, photography, recorded music, radio, comics, and television. As these 'canned' entertainments became simultaneously popular and seriously prestigious, controversies flared over the roles of Jews in 'the mass media'. We examine these issues by discussing a wide range of illustrative and analytical materials. Preparation for class often includes the study of movies, photos, and audio recordings.

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 002, LEC
Jewish and Other Others

Instructor: Freedman,Jonathan E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we'll look at the Jewish-American experience from roughly 1880 to the present day from a comparative perspective: that is, in terms of the ways in which that experience looks when placed in relation to that of African-Americans (and the fraught idiom of race), Asian-Americans (and the "model minority" myths applied to both groups) and other Euro-Americans. Our readings will be drawn from history (e.g., Matthew Frye Jacobsen's Whiteness of a Different Color), from anthropology (Sherry Ortner's New Jersey Dreaming: Capital, Culture, and the Class of '58) musicology (Jeffrey Melnick's The Right to Sing the Blues), and film criticism (Michael Rogin's Black Face, White Noise); but we'll spend most of our time reading novels, poems, and plays, and watching films that speak to the complexities both of the Jewish-American experience and of its place in the ethnoracial hurly-burly of twentieth-century America. Two short papers; One long one; quizzes every now and then to keep you on your toes!

JUDAIC 317 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 006, LEC
THE YIDDISH CLASSICS AND MODERNITY

Instructor: Norich,Anita

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What do we know about modern Yiddish culture? What are its origins and how did it develop? Who were its major writers and what were the themes, social structures, literary forms of primary concern to them? In this course we will answer these and other questions by reading the fiction of three writers: Sh.Y. Abramovitch (also known as Mendele Moykher Sforim, the "grandfather" of Yiddish literature), Sholem Aleichem, and Y.L. Peretz. Their short stories and novels are considered the classics of modern Yiddish literature and offer a provocative introduction into the Eastern European Jewish milieu in which they wrote and the historical, political, social and economic transformations of the late 19th-early 20th century. We will also consider some of the adaptations made of their work in Yiddish and English drama and film (including Fiddler on the Roof), and some of the changes made when their stories and novels were brought to an American audience.

All readings will be in English translation. No knowledge of Yiddish is required for this course.


This course fulfills the New Traditions Requirement for English concentrators.

JUDAIC 385 — History of Zionism and the State of Israel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Endelman,Todd M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course covers the rise of Jewish nationalism from its origins in the late nineteenth century through the creation of the State of Israel in 1948 and the history of the Jewish state in the following half-century. Emphasis will be placed on the political context out of which Zionism developed and on the larger cultural trends that shaped the variety of ideologies within the Zionist movement. Significant time will also be devoted to examining the role of Zionist activity within the histories of major Jewish communities in the Diaspora prior to World War II and the competing ideologies and movements (socialism, strict orthodoxy, and assimilationism) that challenged the Zionist solution to the "Jewish Question." The tragic confrontation between Jews and Arabs within the Land of Israel will be explored in some depth, with particular attention being paid to the genesis of the confrontation. The last cluster of lectures will focus on the cultural, social, and political problems that have beset the State of Israel from its establishment in 1948 to the present and on the links between these and broader themes in modern Jewish history as a whole.

There will be a midterm examination, a ten-page analytical paper, and a comprehensive final.

JUDAIC 387 — History of American Jews
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Deborah Dash

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).


JUDAIC 417 — Topics in Judaic Studies
Section 001, SEM
Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and Arts

Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course spans over two hundred years of Jewish cultural activity in Russia. At the theoretical level, the course will address such issues as multilingualism, minority culture in an imperial context, relationships between culture and ethnicity and culture and religion. At the practical level, we will discuss a wide variety of works of literature, criticism, essays, visual arts and cinema. Structurally the course consists of four section: a historical introduction, two case studies of the cities of St. Petersburg and Odessa as major centers of Jewish cultural production in the Russian Empire, and an overview of the Soviet period.

JUDAIC 467 — Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
Section 001, SEM
Hebrew Modernism 1900-1930: Tradition, Modernity, Language, Space

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The literary works of Hebrew Modernism were created during the early decades of the 20th century, mainly in the urban centers of Eastern and Central Europe, before Hebrew was solidified as a vernacular in Mandatory Palestine. The formation of Hebrew Modernism is one of the most puzzling chapters in the history of Hebrew and Jewish literature.

Many crucial questions concerning Hebrew Modernism remain open: How did modernist Hebrew fiction and poetry arise before the language became a vernacular? What poetic and historic shifts enabled its development? What are the modernist elements, and what (if anything) is specifically Hebrew or Jewish in this literary project? What are the relations between Hebrew and Yiddish Modernism, and the various movements of European Modernisms (Decadence, Impressionism, Expressionism, Naturalism, Stream of the Consciousness Narrative, etc.)? How to understand Hebrew Modernism in the contexts of the competing political and ideological movements of Jewish nationalism, Zionism and Socialism? What is the place of traditional/religious Jewish texts and language in the formation of Hebrew Modernism? The seminar will deal with some of these questions by exploring the main works of Hebrew literature in the last decade of the 19th century (the fin de siècle) and the first three decades of the 20th century. We will read fiction and poetry by S.Y. Abramovitz, Y.L. Peretz, M.Y. Berdichevsky, Ch. N. Bialik, Y.Ch. Brenner, U.N. Gnessin, Gershon Shofman, Dvora Baron, Yaacov Shteinberg, Avraham Ben-Yitzhak, David Fogel, Rachel Bluvstein and Esther Rabb, as well as theoretical and historical writing about Modernism in general (Adorno, Benjamin, Raymond Williams, Richard Sheppard) and Hebrew Modernism in particular (Kurzweil, Miron, Harshav, Kronfeld).

Special attention will be given to the ways in which Hebrew modernist writers were engaged with "the crisis of language," with "radical reinvention of Jewish traditions," as well as shifting perceptions of gender and erotic desire, space and place, geographical and metaphorical journeys, the Diaspora as a mental place, etc.

JUDAIC 470 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270 or JUDAIC 270, or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 202.

JUDAIC 495 — Independent Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 496 — Independent Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 497 — Senior Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Senior thesis research. Under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 498 — Senior Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Senior thesis research. Under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

JUDAIC 500 — Independent Study in Judaic Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor/department.

JUDAIC 570 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270/JUDAIC 270 or HJCS 470/ACABS 470.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202).

JUDAIC 628 — Studies in Jewish History
Section 001, REC
Narrating and Representing the Holocaust

Instructor: Endelman,Todd M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the sixty years since the end of World War II, historians and social scientists have produced an impressive body of scholarly literature on the character and causes of the Nazi destruction of the Jews. This colloquium aims to introduce graduate students in various disciplines to problems in the interpretation and representation of the Holocaust. The first half of the course will be devoted to the historiography of the Holocaust, including debates about the origins of the Final Solution, the participation of various groups within German society in the process of mass murder, Jewish responses to persecution, survival in the camps, and the behavior of the Allied governments and other so-called third parties. In the second half of the academic term, the focus of the class will shift to discussion — among historians, cultural critics, and social scientists — about the representation and memorialization of the Holocaust in the media, high and low literature, the arts, and other forums. One theme that will emerge repeatedly throughout the semester is the question of what values and interests are at stake in a particular interpretation or representation.

JUDAIC 652 — Jewish Political Thought and Experiences: Eastern Europe, America and Israel
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

While there seems to be no systematic Jewish political theory or practice, there are political ideas in ancient, medieval and modern Jewish sources such as the Bible, Talmud and Jewish philosophers. We examine how the ideas have played out under conditions of sovereignty and diasporas, ranging over ancient and modern Israel, Eastern Europe and the United States, with some reference to medieval Spain and modern Western Europe. Communal politics, Bundism, Zionism, and Jews' relationship to Liberalism, socialism and Communism are analyzed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

 
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