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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = LACS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 14 of 14
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
LACS 399 — Thesis-Writers' Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Frye,David L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Senior Thesis required for the interdepartmental concentration program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies is intended to deepen your understanding of a specific issue or problem in the field, while drawing together your work in separate disciplines. It represents a significant amount of work, and provides you with an opportunity to work closely with an individual faculty member while exploring in greater depth issues that may have arisen in your earlier course work and research. (If you are interested in Latin America and the Caribbean but cannot devote a considerable amount of energy in your senior year to such a project, you might consider the LACS Undergraduate Minor, which has no thesis requirement.) For more information about LACS 399, please contact the LACS Student Advisor at 763-0553.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 455 — Topics in Latin American Studies
Section 002, SEM
Brazilian History

Instructor: Caulfield,Sueann
Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Brazil is a place of paradoxes and contrasts. The fifth most populous nation, it boasts one of the world's largest economies and an advanced industrial sector, but suffers income disparity and regional economic imbalances that are among the world's most dire. Its constitution guarantees broad social and economic justice and protects the rights of historically disenfranchised groups, but the implementation and enforcement of the law is hobbled by special interests and police corruption. It is a nation that celebrates its rich multi-ethnic cultural heritage, but remains stratified by perceived racial and regional differences.

In this course, we will examine the historical roots of these paradoxes, focusing particularly on how racial, ethnic, and regional distinctions have been continually re-constructed since the sixteenth-century European invasion. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and post-emancipation social relations; the celebration of racial democracy and the reality of racism in the twentieth century; religious expression and competition; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production, particularly in the areas of dance and music. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression. For example, students will explore the history of the Brazilian martial art capoeira and participate in a workshop led by a Bahian capoeira master. A highlight of the course will be our study of Black cultural movements since the 1970s, with a special focus on the impact of the music of Gilberto Gil, currently Brazil's Minister of Culture. The class will attend a Gilberto Gil concert in March.

The course will conclude by looking at how Brazil's current governing party (the Workers' Party), led by a former laborer from the impoverished northeastern region of Brazil (President Luiz Inacio da Silva, "Lula"), has successfully campaigned with a platform emphasizing the goal to transform the history of exclusion that has characterized the nation's racial and social history, and the political culture of corruption that is obstructing this effort.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 455 — Topics in Latin American Studies
Section 003, SEM
Art and Architecture in Latin America, c.1520-c.1820

Instructor: Schrader,Jeffrey A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Spanish "discovery" of the Americas in 1492 initiated a profound engagement between the so-called Old and New Worlds into the nineteenth century. This relationship propelled European art and architecture into new terrain, yet the result was not a seamless extension of visual cultures across the Atlantic. Our coverage of the principal developments in the Caribbean, Mexico, and Peru will accordingly focus on the evolving fortunes of native and foreign traditions. Churches and cathedrals will be analyzed for their role in the propagation of the Catholic faith. The imperial enterprise, which favored European conventions, at times also introduced African and Asian dimensions to the pictorial arts. Other subjects will include the use of artistic media developed in pre-Columbian times, the emergence of local traditions such as casta painting, the formation of Creole identities, the status of the artist, and questions of patronage.

V. 3, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 471 — Elementary Quechua, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Chavez Mejia,Virginia

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Introduces students with little or no Quechua proficiency to conversational and cultural skills needed to use the language in real life situations. Covers both written and spoken Quechua; introduces basic structures of Quechua while focusing on the development of speaking and reading skills; emphasis is on developing conversational ability. Those who successfully finish this course will gain sustained control of basic conversation. Evaluations based on homework, weekly quizzes, reading aloud, interviews.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 472 — Elementary Quechua, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Chavez Mejia,Virginia

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Second-term continuation of Elementary Quechua I; course introduces basic structure of Quechua while focusing on the development of speaking and reading skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 474 — Intermediate Quechua, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Chavez Mejia,Virginia

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Continuation of intermediate Quechua emphasizing conversational skills and grammatical structure. Students learn complex structural patterns, build up vocabulary, get acquainted with Andean culture and society, and develop conversation skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 476 — Advanced Quechua, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Chavez Mejia,Virginia

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Continuation of advanced Quechua. Course is designed to improve conversation skills, build up vocabulary, and heighten reading ability. Strengthened aural/oral training is given. Students work with original, unedited texts as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials in Quechua literature.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LACS 490 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mini-course
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

LACS 499 — Reading and Research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

LACS 590 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LACS 601 — Supervised Graduate Study in Latin America
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Independent study abroad, by arrangement with instructor and with LACS.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

LACS 619 — Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, SEM
What is Left in Latin America?

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a proseminar, intended for graduate students from different disciplines interested in understanding the history and representation of Latin America and the Caribbean in the twentieth century. It will cover selected aspects of the cultural and social history of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LACS 655 — Special Topics in Latin American Studies
Section 001, SEM
Peripheral Modernisms: Latin American 20th Century through the Lenses of Architecture

Instructor: Lara,Fernando Luiz

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on the artistic and cultural practices of modernism as it emerged in Latin America. It uses modern architecture as a departure point for investigating the political, social and economic factors as well as the artistic expression of what has been called "peripheral modernization" in the twentieth century. The course will focus especially on Brazil, but will also consider the cases of Argentina, Mexico and Venezuela. Organized mostly around discussions and student presentations, the course requires students to analyze artistic and cultural manifestations of a variety of modernist movements. The first half of the course is devoted to the ideas behind the concepts of modernity, modernization and modernism, paying special attention to the ways these concepts and their periodization vary in different national contexts. The second half of the course uses Latin American Modern Architecture as a case study for exploring how these concepts were expressed through a specific artistic form.

LACS 655 — Special Topics in Latin American Studies
Section 002, SEM
Brazilian History

Instructor: Caulfield,Sueann
Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

Brazil is a place of paradoxes and contrasts. The fifth most populous nation, it boasts one of the world's largest economies and an advanced industrial sector, but suffers income disparity and regional economic imbalances that are among the world's most dire. Its constitution guarantees broad social and economic justice and protects the rights of historically disenfranchised groups, but the implementation and enforcement of the law is hobbled by special interests and police corruption. It is a nation that celebrates its rich multi-ethnic cultural heritage, but remains stratified by perceived racial and regional differences.

In this course, we will examine the historical roots of these paradoxes, focusing particularly on how racial, ethnic, and regional distinctions have been continually re-constructed since the sixteenth-century European invasion. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and post-emancipation social relations; the celebration of racial democracy and the reality of racism in the twentieth century; religious expression and competition; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production, particularly in the areas of dance and music. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression. For example, students will explore the history of the Brazilian martial art capoeira and participate in a workshop led by a Bahian capoeira master. A highlight of the course will be our study of Black cultural movements since the 1970s, with a special focus on the impact of the music of Gilberto Gil, currently Brazil's Minister of Culture. The class will attend a Gilberto Gil concert in March.

The course will conclude by looking at how Brazil's current governing party (the Workers' Party), led by a former laborer from the impoverished northeastern region of Brazil (President Luiz Inacio da Silva, "Lula"), has successfully campaigned with a platform emphasizing the goal to transform the history of exclusion that has characterized the nation's racial and social history, and the political culture of corruption that is obstructing this effort.


 
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