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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = LHSP
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 10 of 10
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 001, REC
The Individual Voice in Community and Culture

Instructor: Chamberlin,Jeremiah Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

I have named this class "The Individual Voice in Community and Culture" because writing is not only a process of learning and expression, but also an important way to develop a conscious voice as an individual. We are each members — citizens, if you will — of diverse and myriad communities. Be it our regional or national background, educational or economic circumstances, ethnic or racial history, sexual or political preference, or religious or family upbringing, we understand the world and define ourselves in relation to the institutions and groups to which we belong (whether by choice or not). Yet ultimately, and perhaps most importantly, we are our own persons. Over the course of this semester we will explore the ways in which individuals — including ourselves — negotiate the different and sometimes difficult responsibilities of culture. By seeking to understand what "belonging" means, we will not only learn to see the world in a more complex way, but also begin the life-long process of developing our own voices as artists, writers, thinkers, and citizens.

LHSP 125 — College Writing
Section 002, REC
We're a Happy Family

Instructor: Cicciarelli,Louis A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

This section of LHSP 125 will pivot on two main, simultaneous concerns: the development of your writing voice and the essential practice of revision. While our texts will explore the sometimes dark, sometimes destructive, and always mysterious pull of family, this course is ultimately designed to guide your development as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in an academic community. We will use a workshop format to discuss our work-in-progress, with both peer critiques and full class workshops. Workshops will help us develop the critical skills necessary to read, discuss and analyze a piece of writing, and to learn how to apply these critical skills to our own work, especially in the process of revision. This class will stress drafting and revision as a necessary component of the writing process. Active class participation will also be a vital component of our class; discussions will develop critical processes that I believe help us clarify our thoughts and write good essays. In the end this course will improve upon your own writing processes and working methods as strategies you can return to as you continue to develop your writing.

Students will be expected to complete four revised essays, two short essays and two longer papers, and several one-page response papers. Our readings will include several essays that discuss notions of family in history and within the United States, as well as several short stories, a play, two novels, and two films steeped in family secrets, lore, struggle, dysfunction, and joy.

Texts may include Goodbye, Columbus, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Ice Storm, Into the Great Wide Open, Housekeeping, The Virgin Suicides, Magnolia, The Squid and the Whale, and East is East.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 001, REC
Personal/Vision

Instructor: Barron,Paul Douglas

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

We often value artists and writers because their visions are personal — they show us new worlds, or at least the same old world through new lenses. But it doesn't always work so smoothly. Think of art that's so off beat — the vision of which is so individual — that very few people get it. And can't some writing be personal to the point of self-indulgence? When writers or artists do get us to see, or make us feel or identify, how have they bridged that gap? And how much of the work can the audience be expected to do?

These are the sorts of questions you'll be encouraged to mine in this course, in essays about art and writing, but also as artists yourselves, as writers of creative nonfiction. Making your ideas and experience relevant to a wide audience goes to the heart of good writing, but it's not always easy. We'll emphasize pre-writing, drafting, research, and discovery. Among other activities, after some research, you'll introduce to your classmates the work of a little known artist, writer, or filmmaker you think deserves our attention.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 002, REC
The Shock of Recognition

Instructor: Ralph,Alexander Luria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

In "Prize Stock," Nobel Laureate Kenzaburō Ōe adapts the story of Huck Finn to a remote Japanese island, recasting Jim as a downed U.S. airman. "It seems unlikely," writes John Nathan, Ōe's translator, "that a Japanese schoolboy [Ōe] knowing only the tiny, manageable wilderness of the Japanese countryside could be much moved by Huckleberry's pilgrimage down the vast Mississippi: Ōe was ardently moved. It was Huck's moral courage, literally Hell-bent, that ignited his imagination.

"What Ōe experienced by reading Mark Twain was an example of what Herman Melville, another of the authors we'll read, has referred to as the "shock of recognition": "For genius, all over the world, stands hand in hand, and one shock of recognition runs the whole circle round." This idea of an authorial genius, however, is a relatively recent concept in the history of art, and, in this course devoted to imitation and adaptation, we will examine our notions of originality and inspiration. We shall do this both by rigorous study of literature, but also within our own literary efforts and experimentations.

Students will write four essays as well as smaller responses.

Additionally, as a class, we will organize a LHSP-wide public reading showcasing our work for the term. Our wide-ranging readings will include samplings from the Bible, pop lyrics, Renaissance essayists, fairy tales, a Chilean novelist, a memoir of Greenwich Village after World War II, and a unit devoted to the American short story.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 003, REC
"The Music of What Happens": Why We Need Poetry (Writing and the Arts)

Instructor: Tell,Carol

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Poetry addicts and skeptics alike are welcome in this writing course that explores the many challenges and pleasures in reading, writing, and thinking about poetry. We will examine the relationship of poetry to other art forms, such as music, film, and the visual arts, and consider the role of the poet in our culture. This is not a typical poetry class, or even a poetry class at all; we will be reading not just poems but essays, stories, reviews, song lyrics, and a novel (Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar), we will watch films (including Scorsese's documentary on Bob Dylan), and visit an art museum. Our emphasis will be on your writing as you experiment with different voices, forms, and genres: imitations, adaptations, interviews, short responses, anthologies, and two formal essays.

LHSP 130 — Writing and the Arts I
Section 004, REC
Picture Books: Photography, Portraiture and Narrative

Instructor: Kelley,Kendrick Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

The Harlem photographer Roy DeCarava tells us the photograph is "an illusion complete within itself". Such a statement addresses the tension between photography and other kinds of art and expression as well as calls attention to the possibilities for photography that extend beyond the notion of the picture as a document for truth-telling or evidence. This course will allow you to experience the work of a number of different American photographers from Mathew Brady and Alfred Stieglitz through more contemporary artists like Cindy Sherman and the recently re-discovered Mike Disfarmer. We will read a number of fictional texts that accompany the various photographers and discuss lines of influence and alternative modes of storytelling. Along with the readings, discussions, and paper writing, students will take a series of their own photographs and will construct their own aesthetic statement. This is not a "How-to" photography course, but rather a literature course with the added element of creative expression.


LHSP 140 — Arts and Humanities
Section 001, REC
Art in Public Spaces: Street Theater Art (START) Initiative

Instructor: Tucker,Mark E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

This course premieres an ambitious immersion into the creation of public street art. The course is divided into two parts: The first 5 weekends of the course students will work with local community theater members from the Burns Park Players to create stage sets for their 2007 musical theater production of Oliver! Simultaneously, students will be designing and producing their own large-scale animated sculpture presentations which will be featured in the first-annual downtown Ann Arbor, Fools Parade, presented by START on April 1st, 2007. As the originators of this artistic spectacle, students in this class will design, organize, and develop START in conjunction with community partners.

This will be a full ‘hands-on' experience which will challenge students' aesthetic assumptions while exploring techniques and tools for the making of large-scale theatrical scenery and sculptural elements. Although this course does not require any previous art experience, due to the public nature of the projects, it will be expected that the student already possess an excellent work ethic as well as the ability to grasp and apply aesthetic principles quickly, in a physically demanding, team oriented, public environment.

This course satisfies LHSP course requirements for Winter 2007; however, this course is not limited to LHSP students.

There is a $150 lab fee for materials required for this course. The lab fee will be billed to your student account.

*Due to the nature and size of the Theater and START projects, additional flexible weekend work hours will be scheduled on an individual/group basis.

LHSP 140 — Arts and Humanities
Section 002, REC
Red, Yellow, Blue and Beyond

Instructor: Tucker,Mark E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

In this course we will demystify the art of seeing. Learning to paint is a means towards learning to see. Learning to see, not what you "think" you see, but what you actually see, is the key that can unlock the door to your inner vision. Once you can access visual phenomenon through painting you will find out how much there is to see and how beautiful things really are.

This course will explore our perceptual world in terms of color by introducing the student to basic color theory, paint handling, color mixing, design, and reproduction techniques via challenging visual exercises and stimulating personal projects. The first part of the course will introduce students to drawing, a precursor to painting, using live models as our subject matter, and the second half of the course will concentrate on painting. Towards the end of the course students will be expected to develop painting ideas of their own combining their own aesthetic with processes and visual information learned in this course.

(Students who have taken a previous LHSP 140 course and wish to continue with advanced painting projects, may take this course again, with instructor permission).

NOTE: This course will require the purchase of various art materials related to acrylic painting and drawing.. A specific list of materials will be sent via email prior to the first class. There is also a lab fee of $75, which will cover the hiring of the model(s). This is a rigorous course with extensive painting assignments outside of class. There will also be required field trips to museums which will be scheduled separately. No prior experience required

LHSP 201 — Professional and Career Development
Section 001, REC
Career Exploration and Internship Preparation.

Instructor: Whitney,Charlotte E

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Uncertain about your career direction? Interested in summer internships? This course will guide you through the maze of resources inside and outside of the university. We will explore career assessment tools and look at your own particular interests and aptitudes in focusing on career paths. You will learn how to create a professional resume, build a portfolio, and develop skills in employment interviewing.

This course does not satisfy LHSP requirements for Winter 2007.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program.

LHSP 228 — What is Writing?
Section 001, LEC
Creative Responses to Genre

Instructor: Hutton,Elizabeth Bachrach

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What is meant by truth, in the context of a work of fiction? Why do we privilege objectivity in some arguments, and subjectivity in others? To what extent should a personal history affect the articulation of universal principles? Where does a writer's responsibility end, and a reader's responsibility begin? And how do we differentiate between "high" and "low" forms of art?

Through a close look at a variety of different forms of writing — the personal essay, the argumentative treatise, the novel, and the long poem — this writing course will explore the above questions, and put into practice some of our conclusions. We will delve into experimental texts and respond to them both critically and creatively. Our focus will be on expanding both our writing and our reading skills — and by the end of the course, we will have produced some of our own wonderful and strange works of creative non-fiction.

Readings will include Virginia Woolf's treatise on women and writing, A Room of One's Own, Plato's philosophical dialogue on love, The Symposium, Gayl Jones' provocative novel Corregidora, Anne Carson's long poem Autobiography of Red, as well as a so-called "popular" work of fiction to be determined by vote, and a few smaller texts to be decided and reported on individually.

Requirements will include a group presentation, bi weekly response papers, and two longer essays. The writing we do in this class will be sometimes analytical, sometimes more creative and imitative. Willingness to both experiment and stretch one's preconceptions will be a must.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

 
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