< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = LING
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 40 of 40
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
LING 102 — First Year Seminar (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
Indigenous Languages of North America

Instructor: Pharris,Nicholas J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Before Columbus, the linguistic landscape of North America included about 300 highly diverse languages, as different from each other as they were (and are) from European languages. In this course, we investigate the major families of Native American languages to see how they work and how they differ, both among themselves and from European languages. We also examine efforts to revitalize endangered indigenous languages and explore the relationships among language, culture, and thought.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

LING 111 — Introduction to Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Campbell-Kibler,Kathryn Barbara
Instructor: Pharris,Nicholas J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Haven't you always wondered why language is the way it is? Why do adjectives come before nouns in English but after them in French? Who decided that "whom" was classier than "who"? Can other animals learn language? Why do we say "geese" and "mice", rather than "gooses" and "mouses"? And, most basically, what exactly do you know when you "know" a language? This course will not only answer these questions, it will teach you how to think like a linguist, so after you finish. We will deal with how languages are structured in terms of their sounds (or signs!), words, sentences and conversations. We'll learn about kids acquiring language, brains using language, computers processing language and people building societies with language. And we will answer one of the most common questions asked of linguists: How many words for snow do Eskimos have, anyway? And why do so many people care?

LING 115 — Language in a Multicultural World
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Sarah G

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

  • Which is more common around the world, monolingualism or bilingualism? Who in the world is most likely to be multilingual? Who is least likely?
  • Do children who learn two languages from birth turn out to be developmentally and linguistically disadvantaged?
  • Does civil war tend to break out when a nation is linguistically divided? Why do some language contacts lead to bloody conflicts (in which language is ostensibly the major bone of contention) while other languages in contact have enjoyed a peaceful coexistence for hundreds or even thousands of years?
  • Would establishing English as the official language of the United States help to preserve English?
  • Why do the most pessimistic estimates predict the death of 90% of the world's 6,000 languages by the end of this century? (The most optimistic estimates predict that only about 50% of the world's languages will vanish by 2100. Both estimates are grim, from the viewpoint of language-lovers.)

This course will address these and other questions about global multilingualism, which is a (or the) major issue in language policies, language planning, and language contact in general. The focus will be a comparative study of language politics in countries all over the world, including such topics as language rights, language use in national educational systems, and other social implications of multilingualism.

LING 151 — Elementary American Sign Language II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Berwanger,Paula D

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of LING 150. Students will continue to learn to use and recognize selected grammatical structures of American Sign Language (ASL) for use in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics. Additional vocabulary is introduced to expand students' communicative skills in ASL conversations. Students also will learn additional ways of forming questions in ASL to enhance skills in using and recognizing a variety of ASL structures. Upon completion of LING 151, students will be able to observe basic courtesies while making introductions, giving directions, and conversing about past, present, and future events in ASL. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes role playing in selected situational activities. Class will meet two days, two hours a day.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 150.

LING 200 — Language and Human Mind
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Epstein,Samuel D
Instructor: Coetzee,Andries W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ID

Students will be introduced to inquiry into the nature of the human mind (cognitive psychology) with particular focus on the Chomskian Revolution in Linguistic Theory. Under this approach, "language" study constitutes a revealing inquiry into the nature of human cognitive capacities. The kinds of questions to be examined include:

1. What is (a) language? What is English? Where is it? Is it inside your head?

2. What is the human mind? Is it the same thing as your brain? Are the words that you are reading now getting in (or coming out) of your brain? What is cognition?

3. Close your eyes; Think of and/or visualize the exact route you would take from your current location back to your dorm. Is there a little movie **in your head**? Is there a map **in your head**? and you "read" it?

4. Suppose I say John hit the clown with the twinkie on his head yesterday. What does that mean? Does it have just one meaning — or more? How can a single stimulus, have multiple meanings? Is there something in your head? How did you "learn" what you know about it, even though you've never heard it before? Did someone give you a lesson about this exact sentence?

LING 210 — Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

A large part of your brain is devoted to language (a lot more than is devoted to morality). Because this allows you to use language effortlessly, you pay little conscious attention to it in daily life. It is only when you struggle to learn a foreign language, or deal with persons with linguistic disabilities, or get involved in a contractual dispute, that you are forced to think consciously about your own native language.

Linguistics dissects languages into their elements, and then tries to figure out how the pieces fit together. Each language can be thought of as consisting of a vocabulary (lexicon) that organizes concepts relevant to a particular cultural and natural environment, and a grammar (i.e. a processing system) that enables speakers to combine elements into phrases and sentences. It turns out that there are many viable designs for such a system, the result being a remarkable diversity of linguistic structures around the world. This seems to be because a grammar takes messages that are organized in a relational hierarchy (we can represent them as tree diagrams with many branches), and has to express them in a flat, linear sequence (the acoustic signal). This is an engineering challenge for which many solutions are available.

The course is heavy on data sets, some of them from languages you have never heard of. You will learn how to chop up sentences into phrases, phrases into words, words into morphemes, and morphemes into phonemes. You will examine spectrograms of your own utterances, and will learn how the gestures of your chest, vocal folds, jaw, tongue, lips, and velum create the acoustic disturbances that allow listeners to recognize vowels and consonants. You will learn to use phonetic symbols to transcribe these sounds, instead of ordinary spelling. You will learn about important differences among languages, and their worldwide geographic distributions (using a linguistic atlas); for example, how to order subject object and verb, how to express ‘X has Y', and how many ways there are to say ‘we'. We may even be able to shed some light on the dreaded subjunctive.

LING 251 — Intermediate American Sign Language II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Berwanger,Paula D

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Students will continue to learn communicative structures of American Sign Language (ASL) and develop further skills in the use of physical space to recognize and express various meanings. Vocabulary and idiomatic expressions will be expanded to cover increasingly varied settings. Students completing LING 251 will be able to communicate in ASL in a range of conversational interactions. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes situational role-playing and class presentations. LING 250 is a pre-requisite for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 250.

LING 260 — Art and Language: East and West
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Powers,Martin J
Instructor: Duanmu,San

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Since the 18th century the binarism "East/West" has constituted the paradigmatic cultural comparison. In many people's minds, these constructs represent two opposite poles of human experience. Right up to the present day, some western writers maintain the uniqueness and superiority of European art, while others have advocated learning from Asian ideals. Likewise some scholars believe that Chinese is the most primitive language, while other scholars believe that Chinese is the most advanced language. Some scholars even believe that the difference between some eastern and western languages has given rise to two completely different styles of thought! With increasing globalization and the rise of China as a world power, the need to stretch our imaginations beyond the constraints of traditional constructs has become a serious concern for fields ranging from business and law to anthropology, art and literature. One of the goals of this course is to offer students the tools to critically examine popular accounts of "East" and "West." Exposure to logical, historical, linguistic, and visual modes of analysis will prepare students to recognize common misconceptions and formulate questions about culture and language in more rigorous and sophisticated ways. Through a careful examination of scholarly constructions of "East" and "West," students will acquire as well a fuller appreciation for the diversity of cultural expression and shared human experience. Requirements include a midterm and a final. In addition students will be assigned two short papers (5 — 7 pages), each designed to train students in basic approaches to linguistic and visual analysis.

III. 3

LING 272 — Language in Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in comparative social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include:

  • What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How and to what extent does speaking a particular language construct a culturally specific model of the social and natural world, a sense of 'reality'?
  • How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class and gender?
  • How do linguistic practices and perceptions of language reinforce social divisions and relationships of unequal power?

In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how linguistic practices contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. We will consider how judgments about "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" speech are ultimately grounded in social rather than linguistic factors.

Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are:

  • Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change;
  • the relationship between language and social life, particularly relations of race, class and gender;
  • issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development of official and unofficial standard languages, and the social consequences of language change and language death.

Throughout the course, we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this class. Requirements for the class include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include textbook(s) and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

LING 305 — Advertising Rhetoric
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course considers how verbal and visual advertising messages are interpreted by consumers in a cultural context. The first part of the course is an informal ethnography of familiar products and services such as cars, diamonds, and banks. Advertising must deal with consumers' ambivalence toward advertisers, and with contradictory ideals for the products themselves (e.g., a car should be roomy yet compact, and exciting yet safe). Good consumer advertising must therefore include multiple messages, not always logically consistent. To see how this works in detail, it is necessary to delve into the full range of formal elements available in each medium. The course focuses on magazine ads, and includes analysis of photographic techniques, typeface selection, layout, and how the copy (=text) relates to the visuals. There is also some coverage of radio spots. In addition to individual homework (papers and exams), there will also be small-group creative competitions involving print and radio. No prior background in graphics or audio is expected, and the course is not open to students from the Art school. Basic instruction in Photoshop and in an audio program such as Audacity is included in the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

LING 313 — Sound Patterns
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pharris,Nicholas J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course explores two fundamental aspects of the sounds of human languages: speech sounds as physical entities (phonetics) and speech sounds as linguistic units (phonology). In viewing sounds as physical elements, the focus is articulatory descriptions: How are speech sounds made? What types of articulatory movements and configurations are used to differentiate sounds in the world's languages? In this part of the course, the goal is to learn to produce, transcribe, and describe in articulatory and acoustic terms many of the sounds known to occur in human languages. In the second part of the course, the focus is on sounds as members of a particular linguistic system. Phonological data from a wide range of languages are analyzed that is, regularities or patterns in sound distribution are extracted from the data set and then stated within a formal phonological framework. We will also construct arguments to support the proposed analyses, and will find that phonetic factors play a crucial role in validating phonological analyses. Throughout the course, a major emphasis is that speech sounds are simultaneously physical and linguistic elements, and that these two aspects of sound structure are interdependent. Class sessions will consist of lectures, phonetic practice, and discussion of phonological data sets. Each student will also write a research paper on the phonetics and phonology of a language. Course grades will be based on weekly assignments, midterm, and the research paper. LING 210, 211, 411 or permission of instructor is required to take the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 315 — Introduction to Syntax
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course investigates the syntax (sentence structure properties) of human language. It addresses the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. The focus here is on human language as a specific cognitive capacity restricted to humans, rather than on the individual languages (e.g., English, Arabic, Hindi) that are made possible by the existence of this capacity. For this reason, the course explores in detail many structural properties that are common across different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words — ‘who', ‘what' and so on — as most languages do). In order to explain this and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Korean or Turkish as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to. It is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in this short description (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say ‘Who do you like?' in English, instead of ‘You like who?', a possible word order similar to the one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language — which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task — can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience.

Prerequisites: Although there are no official prerequisites, students usually take one introductory course in linguistics (LING 111, 200, 210, 212) before taking this course. P>

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 316 — Aspects of Meaning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on the core aspects of the representation of meaning in human language. It adopts a compositional approach to meaning: how humans combine basic linguistic units (e.g., words or lexical items) into larger linguistic expressions that allow them to represent the complex aspects of reality and thought in natural language. More specifically, the course focuses on the connection between the structure of linguistic expressions (i.e., their syntax) and the construction of meaning (semantics). It adopts a simple but precise and powerful approach to meaning, focusing on the conditions under which complex linguistic expressions are true or not true. The students will become familiar with various tools that are relevant for a theory of meaning in human language, including set theory, propositional and predicate logic, (generalized) quantifier theory, scope and polarity.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 317 — Language and History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Baxter, William H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

All languages change over time and evolve in a historical context. The structures, vocabulary and geographic distribution of individual languages can often provide evidence about the history and the structure of the societies in which earlier speakers of these languages lived. This course will introduce students to the basic methods and concepts of historical linguistics and will discuss, by means of specific case studies, how language can aid in historical reconstruction of the (often distant) past.

Enrollment in this course requires prior completion of LING 210 or 211 or an equivalent introduction to linguistics. Students who have not met this requirement must have the permission of the instructor to take the course. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a series of quizzes and written assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 351 — Second Language Acquisition
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Nicholas C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This is an introductory course in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). How adults learn, or fail to learn, a second language is a fascinating question. It involves much of what we know about human cognition, psychology, and language. How best to help learners acquire a second language is an equally important educational issue. In addition to all of the factors which play a role in child language acquisition, SLA also involves effects of variation in second language educational, social and usage environments, ages of acquisition, levels of learner cognitive and brain development, motivation, and language transfer.

This introductory course describes the development of Second Language Acquisition as a research discipline and then reviews current cognitive, linguistic, psychological, educational, and interactional perspectives. The relevance of all of these disciplines motivates the cross-listing of the course across the Departments of Linguistics, Psychology, and the English Language Institute, and one goal of the course is to learn from each others' perspectives. Topics include the description of patterns of second language development and the degree to which there is consistency or variation across learners and languages, the question of modularity and the possibility of contributions of innate linguistic, cognitive, and functional universals, the degree to which language is learned and regularity emerges, connectionist and usage-based approaches to language acquisition, learning and instruction, critical periods and language acquisition, and sociocultural and sociolinguistic determinants.

There are two texts, the first which presents an overview of different theoretical perspectives on SLA, the second which applies SLA research and its implications in classroom contexts. The course is a lecture format with 2 exams and an empirical project, undertaken in groups, which investigates one aspect of SLA. There will be much opportunity for class discussion and participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211

LING 386 — Community Service and Language, Education, and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Axelson,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage
Instructor: Bogart,Pamela Susan Hickam

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This course will employ an academic service learning framework in preparing for and reflecting on this experimental practice. Students will receive training and supervision in teaching English as a Second Language and discuss issues as they emerge from the practica and the readings. Likely themes include lesson planning, task design, individual learner differences, and socio-cultural factors in teaching ESL. In addition, students will meet with the instructor in small groups based on site placement twice per month. No experience in teaching ESL or knowledge of the field is required although students with a background in applied linguistics, language education or second language immersion experiences are preferred. Students assist in a local ESL classroom or tutoring program for at least four hours per week or 48 hours during the academic term.

LING 394 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 001, LEC
Language and Religion

Instructor: Dworkin,Steven N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

If we define religion as a system of belief in and worship of some force or power higher than humankind, whether it be the one God of the Judeo-Christian and Moslem traditions, or the multiple deities of many ancient (and some contemporary) belief systems it seems safe to say that all cultures and societies practice some form of religion. Religious practices involve some form of oral communication with the superior power(s), which requires the use of language, the only tool available to humans to communicate (directly or indirectly) with the divine and to share the chosen beliefs with others. This course will examine how religions make use of language to meet their spiritual and non-spiritual goals, and how various facets of language are influenced by their use as the linguistic medium of religion. Topics to be examined and discussed include legends on the divine origin of human languages (and writing systems), references to language and speech acts in sacred texts, the nature and use of sacred and liturgical languages, the development of the religious vocabulary of a language, the problems involved in the translation and transmission of sacred texts, and the linguistic nature of prayer. Although this course will seek to examine these issues with reference to a large number of religions, emphasis will be placed on the Judeo-Christian and Islamic traditions.

Students will write two exams and a research paper on a topic (chosen in consultation with the instructor) relevant to the course topic. In addition, each student will make a brief oral presentation based on his/her paper topic. Readings will be provided in a coursepack.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211

LING 395 — Individual Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Adequately prepared students can pursue individual research with a member of the faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

LING 408 — Varieties of English
Section 001, REC

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors — Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in ENGLISH 407 (reading Old English), ENGLISH 407 is not a prerequisite.]

LING 429 — Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adel,Annelie

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What are the connections between language, linguistics, and language teaching materials? In particular, how can the recent advances in discourse analysis and corpus linguistics be built into tasks and exercises? This practical course is designed to give participants training in the processes of collecting authentic language data, analyzing that data, and converting it into appropriate pedagogical formats.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING,LING 313, 316, or 315.

LING 433 — Arabic Syntax and Semantics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will look closely at the structure and semantics of Modern Standard Arabic There will be focus on form and meaning. Students will be trained to analyze extended chunks of text, as opposed to individual sentences. The course will be conducted in English, but it is advisable that students should have at least two years of Arabic. Course grade is based on assignments, quizzes and exams. Course materials will both modern and medieval views of syntax.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 202 and 432.

LING 441 — Mathematics and Computation of Human Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Abney,Steven P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Human language has a rich mathematical structure, which is interesting in its own right, as well as for the computational methods and technologies that depend on it. This course describes the mathematics of language and provides an introduction to computational linguistics. Topics covered include formal language theory, semantics and logic, probabilistic models, information theory, and learning theory. The course involves no programming and has no specific prerequisites, but good mathematical aptitude and some background in linguistics are strongly recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Linguistics concentrators should take LING 315 and 316 first.

LING 492 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 001, SEM
Experimental sociolinguistics

Instructor: Campbell-Kibler,Kathryn Barbara

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a seminar course devoted to exploring the use of experimental techniques to investigate sociolinguistic questions. Participants will together scour the literatures of sociolinguistics, syntax, psycholinguistics, phonetics and language and social psychology, among other fields, to scavenge useful insights and methodologies. Much of the discussion will focus on how to capitalize on the rigor of experimental techniques while incorporating an adequate treatment of the messy complexity of social structures. Participants with backgrounds in either sociolinguistics or in experimental methods are welcome.

LING 494 — Undergraduate Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

An independent study course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the concentration advisor.

LING 495 — Senior Honors Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of concentration advisor.

LING 496 — Senior Honors Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 495

LING 513 — Phonology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Duanmu,San

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The organization of speech into the functionally distinct phonological units of particular languages. Applications of phonological analysis to English and other languages.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING. 313 or Permission of Instructor.

LING 514 — Semantics and Pragmatics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ludlow,Peter; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces four tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The four tools are:

  1. (intensional) predicate and propositional logic,
  2. discourse representation theory,
  3. situation theory, and
  4. generalized quantifier theory.

These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational — linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case. With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics relating to the syntax-semantics interface, quantification, scope and anaphora, information packaging and the various ways in which meaning and context interact.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING,Permission of instructor

LING 551 — Second Language Acquisition
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Nicholas C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This introductory course will focus on theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to second language development and teaching. The course will cover some of the major topics within second language acquisition research and will provide students with experience in data analysis and interpretation. While much of the literature focuses on the acquisition of English, examples and analysis of other language data will be discussed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LING 615 — Advanced Syntax
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Epstein,Samuel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A second term graduate level course in Syntactic theory. The intent is to move beyond the introductory-text level, begin reading primary literature critically, undertake research, and extend knowledge of the Government-Binding theory sufficient to initiate an informed investigation of the motivations for and overall design features of the Minimalist Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING. 515 or equivalent. Graduate standing.

LING 619 — Narrative Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focuses on the study of narrative. Our examination engages scholarly work in anthropology, linguistics, literature, psychology, sociology. Our major goal is to map out the landscape of this work, identifying and evaluating the key issues and concepts as well as the methods for examining these.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in grammar. Graduate standing.

LING 621 — Advanced Morphology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Heath,Jeffrey G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the narrow sense, morphology is word-structure. It examines how grammatical categories are expressed by audible modifications of lexical stems, including affixation, ablaut, and prosodic (accentual, tonal) modifications. Much of the phonology of languages is sensitive to categorial structure and is therefore better described as morphophonology. In addition, many languages have an intricate word-level morphosyntax; for example, rich agreement systems expressed within single words may involve the creation, deletion, fusion, and/or linear movement of morphemes, arguably reflecting the interaction of various cognitive and sociolinguistic factors as well as language-specific idiosyncrasies. Considered more broadly as the place where grammatical processes refer simultaneously to audible linear form and to categorial structure, morphology may be extended beyond word-level, to cliticization, compounding, tightly-knit phrases, inter-word affixal dependencies, and perhaps grammar in general.

Students will read some theoretical papers, but much of the work will involve data sets, which cover topics such as Arabic and Tamashek ablaut, diminutives, Algonquian and Australian rich agreement, West African grammatical tones, Athapaskan and Australian bicentric verbs, and numeral phrases in various languages.

Prerequisite: prior or concurrent coursework in phonology and any variety of grammatical theory, or permission of instructor.

LING 750 — Research Writing in Linguistics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Beddor,Patrice Speeter

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed for second-year graduate students who are working on their Qualifying Research Papers. The course is intended to provide structure to the process of writing the QRP, plus opportunities to present and receive feedback on work-in-progress. Because the QRP is often students' first major research paper, the course will also deal with broader aspects of writing, presenting, and publishing research papers in linguistics. If time permits, we will also discuss developing a strong CV (What should your CV look like if you are entering the academic job market?) and grant writing (What funding opportunities are available? When should you start thinking about them?).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Linguistics

LING 792 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 001, SEM
Experimental sociolinguistics

Instructor: Campbell-Kibler,Kathryn Barbara

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a seminar course devoted to exploring the use of experimental techniques to investigate sociolinguistic questions. Participants will together scour the literatures of sociolinguistics, syntax, psycholinguistics, phonetics and language and social psychology, among other fields, to scavenge useful insights and methodologies. Much of the discussion will focus on how to capitalize on the rigor of experimental techniques while incorporating an adequate treatment of the messy complexity of social structures. Participants with backgrounds in either sociolinguistics or in experimental methods are welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

LING 792 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 002, SEM
Linguistics as a Natural Science: The New Empiricism

Instructor: Abney,Steven P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Over the last fifteen years or so, computer scientists working on natural language processing (NLP) have made dramatic progress in the development of mathematically and computationally sophisticated methods of representing and analyzing language. Despite their focus on technology, it would be misguided to dismiss their work as "mere engineering." One expects successful work on language processing to build on linguistic theory — to quote Chomsky, "investigation of performance will proceed only so far as understanding of underlying competence permits." NLP researchers indeed originally took the "standard" linguistic theory as their point of departure. But NLP and linguistics have followed divergent trajectories for several decades, until at this point NLP researchers have abandoned current standard theories, and have developed their own, profoundly different, linguistic framework.

This alternative linguistics — "computational linguistics" in the sense of the linguistic framework used by computer scientists — is characterized by empiricism, sophisticated mathematics, and integration, that is, detailed study of how language fits into a larger picture of rationality. It is very important to understand that "empiricism" does not imply simplistic, brute-force assumptions about internal structure. Rather, computational linguistics combines complex structures with systematic data collection, probabilistic models, statistical inference, and experimentation. Rather than eschewing rationalism, it synthesizes rationalism and empiricism. The "new empiricism" in NLP is in keeping with larger trends in computer science and the natural sciences, and it has led to unprecedented participation of computational linguists in the larger scientific community. To give a few examples: there is heavy collaboration among computational linguists, machine learning specialists, and theoretical statisticians; there are close connections between certain work in computational linguistics and the work of applied physicists studying networks (including the internet); and biologists studying DNA sequences have borrowed probabilistic models of strings and trees from computational linguistics.

The goal of this seminar is to give linguistics students an accessible introduction to this alternative framework. Papers within this framework have begun to appear in the linguistics literature, and we will look at examples, as well as examples of models and methods that are relevant but have not yet made their way into the linguistics literature. The format will be reading and discussion of papers. Some leading questions are how the alternative framework differs from the standard approach, and how it differs from linguists' preconceptions about what computational linguists do. The seminar does not assume any computational background.

Students who are not enrolled, as well as faculty, are welcome to attend and participate. Enrolled students will be expected to write a term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

LING 792 — Topics in Linguistics
Section 003, SEM
Data Sources in Phonology

Instructor: Coetzee,Andries W

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar, we will explore the use of alternative data sources in phonological theorizing. Most of theoretical phonology relies primarily (often exclusively) on descriptive grammars as a data source. Although much can be learned about phonological grammar from descriptive grammars, there are also many questions that cannot be answered relying solely on this kind of data. In this seminar, we will look at the kinds of alternative data sources that are available, and at the kinds of questions that can be asked and answered using these alternative data sources. We will also consider the drawbacks and problems that we have to deal with when working with these data sources. The alternative data sources that we will look at include things like psycholinguistic experiments (word-likeness judgments, lexical decision tasks, perception tests, wug-tests, etc.), investigation of textual corpora, artificial language learning, acoustic and articulatory experiments, modeling, second language acquisition, loan word adaptation, etc. All participants will be required to design and execute at least a pilot study that uses one of these alternative data sources to investigate a topic that is relevant to current phonological theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

LING 801 — Seminar on Graduate Study
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Thomason,Sarah G

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LING 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

LING 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

LING 997 — Special Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 40 of 40