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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = MEMS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 11 of 11
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MEMS 211 — Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

MEMS 212 — Renaissance Europe
Section 001, LEC
Political, Social, and Cultural History of Europe from about 1350 to 1550

Instructor: Hughes,Diane Owen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will explore the political, social, and cultural history of Europe from about 1350 to 1550, two centuries of momentous change: scholarship recovered the lost texts and ideas of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds; critical reading of texts inspired a dramatic questioning of religious authority; art, medicine, and philosophy renewed an interest in the physical and psychological nature of man; scientific calculation put the sun rather than the earth at the center of the universe; exploration made Europeans aware of sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas; and the printing press made all of these changes available to a wider public. We will explore the substance and consequences of such changes, including some negative ones, such as the expulsion of Muslims and Jews, colonial exploitation, and the censorship of ideas. Lectures will provide students with a structural approach to the period; discussion sections will provide close engagement with historical sources.

MEMS 333 — Dante's Divine Comedy
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Cornish,Alison

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is dedicated to a guided reading of the Divine Comedy in its entirety. Lectures and discussion are in English. The text will be provided in facing-page translation for the benefit of those who know some Italian and those who do not. Students will learn about the historical, philosophical, literary context of the poem as well as how to understand its relevance in modern terms. Evaluation will be on the basis of one research paper written in two phases, a midterm and final founded on identification and commentary on passages taken from the text, and occasional quizzes on the reading as the need arises.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Italian is not required.

MEMS 345 — Introduction to Medieval Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Timmermann,Achim; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course provides an introduction to the built environment of the Middle Ages from the fall of Rome to the dawn of the Renaissance. Students will integrate the study of architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring for example the impact of the cult of saints, princely courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism and rising urbanism.

IV. 2

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

MEMS 367 — Shakespeare's Principal Plays
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Worthen,William B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will consider Shakespeare's plays from a range of perspectives: in the context of early modern literary and cultural history; as documents in the history of ideology, notably the ideologies of identity; and as designs animating dramatic performance in the early-modern theater, in subsequent theaters, and (glancingly) in a range of media today. We will develop a series of key terms for the analysis of drama, and consider how the plays conceive Shakespeare's theater as a site of theoretical inquiry. The course will be paced at roughly one play per week, in addition to a substantial critical/theoretical reading that will mark the point of departure for our discussion of the play. Plays to be chosen from the range of Shakespeare's career, and will include early and late comedies, a history cycle, several major tragedies and romances. Several papers, midterm, final examination. I will order the Norton Complete Works, but any recent edition of Shakespeare's plays will be fine.


This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

MEMS 368 — Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
Section 001, LEC
Revenge Plays from Kyd to Webster

Instructor: Mullaney,Steven G

WN 2007
Credits: 4

A study of major dramatic works from the revenge tradition that flourished on the Elizabethan and Jacobean stage and included many of the most popular plays of the period. We will read plays by a number of Shakespeare's contemporaries and a select few Shakespearean plays which will highlight the energetic dialogue between playwrights and acting companies of the period. Designed along the lines of ENGLISH 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to ENGLISH 367. Plays will be read intensively as theatrical and literary works, and also will be considered in relation to complex social and political issues of the period. Among the plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi. Approximate book cost: $100 (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

MEMS 444 — Reading of Old French Texts
Section 001, REC
Introduction to Medieval Literature, 12-13c

Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Crusades and courtly love, King Arthur and the grail — these are some of the subjects of twelfth- and thirteenth-century literature and of this class. We will read medieval epics, romances, poetry, and short narratives. Some of these are quite beautiful, some are quite weird. Readings and discussion in modern French, though some secondary reading assignments may be in English, and we'll study some Old French just for fun. We will also look at the ways in which some modern films understand and represent the French Middle Ages. Participation in class discussion is essential, and there will be a series of writing assignments.

Enforced Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above.

MEMS 465 — Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class is an introduction to the work of the most influential literary figure of the English Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer, and it focuses on his major work, the Canterbury Tales, a complex exploration of late medieval literary traditions and the communities and institutions with which they were affiliated. Embracing narratives about politics and social class, sex and marriage, religious practices and differences, women's status, and more, the Canterbury Tales helped to establish literature as an important forum for thinking about social life at the beginning of the English literary tradition. After learning to read and pronounce Chaucer's Middle English, we will proceed to a close analysis of the tales, attending to the literary and the historical contexts they engage.

Course requirements include active participation, quizzes, informal in-class writing, and two essays.

This course satisfies the pre-1600 requirement.

MEMS 490 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty member. Intended for students with projects not subsumed under regular MEMS offerings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MEMS 491 — Honors Senior Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Taylor,Karla T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

The centerpiece of the MEMS concentration is the senior Honors thesis, which is meant to be the single most meaningful piece of work you will do as an undergraduate at Michigan. This course is designed to guide you in this difficult and rewarding process, from first glimmerings, to conceiving the project, doing the research, and writing your honors thesis. We will spend some time each week working together on learning techniques and methods generally applicable to academic research in the humanities. We will also discuss what makes an honors thesis different from a long end-of-term paper. The honors thesis is a major essay, composed over the course of at least two semesters. The thesis should not be merely an extended survey of the relevant critical or scholarly literature; nor should it be a record of your private musings on a given topic. The thesis should display extended evidence of the author's searching, creative, well-articulated thoughts about his/her subject. It should also be built on a substantial amount of original research, and display a strong conceptual grasp of the issues it raises.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions. The course will meet in a seminar format for 3 hours per week. Students will elect a total of 6 hours for the course but may divide this into two terms. Students will write a 60-100 page Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors student and senior standing.

MEMS 898 — Interdisciplinary Dissertation Colloquium in Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stein,Louise K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

The Interdisciplinary Dissertation Colloquium is an integral part of the Graduate Certificate Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies. It seeks to meet three needs:

  1. to provide useful criticism of dissertation work from a wider range of expertise and methodological points of view than normally encompassed in a dissertation committee
  2. to provide advanced students with experience in public presentation of scholarly papers
  3. to create an intellectual forum that will bring together graduate students in disparate fields, so as to encourage interdisciplinary dialogue and consequent broadening of horizons

It is intended for doctoral candidates at the prospectus- or dissertation-writing stage of their programs. Students to not need to be admitted to the Certificate Program in order to take this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

 
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