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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = MINI
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 493 — Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC
Middle East Minorities. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The aim of this course is to expose students to various UM faculty and outside experts on a particular theme. It is taught from a comparative perspective to introduce students to a range of historical periods, geographical areas, and methods for future study and research.

AAPTIS 593 — Mini Course — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Demons, Pantheons, Golden Ages: The Case of Turkish Nationalism. Meets 1/22-2/14. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 29).

Instructor: Berktay,Halil

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The complex transition from 19th-century varieties of Ottoman identity or Muslim patriotism to Turkish nationalism in the throes of the protracted crisis of 1908-22. The search for a viable past : contemporary traumas vs mytho-historical ways of compensation. Alternative golden ages, projected affinities, and corresponding value systems. Early textbooks; popular history; the invention of Central Asian origins; questions of race; Yusuf Akçura's and Fuat Köprü lü 's weaving of an evolutionary grand narrative; grafting a national discourse onto an Ottoman-centered imperial discourse; early Kemalism's redefinition of Turkish nationalism. Literary sources : Ömer Seyfeddin, Mehmed Akif, Naz?m Hikmet, Yahya Kemal. The objectives and constraints of the Turkish Thesis of History.

This course will be taught by Halil Berktay, Associate Professor of History, and also Program Coordinator for both History and Turkish Studies, at Sabanci University (Istanbul, Turkey). BA-MA Economics (Yale '68); PhD History (Birmingham, UK '91).

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 001, LEC
Mini-Course Meets Jan. 08, 2007-Feb. 21, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Aller,Monique Christine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 002, LEC
Mini Course Meets Jan. 08, 2007-Feb. 21, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Cameron,Scott Aron; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 003, LEC
Mini Course Meets March 5, 2007-April 17, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Brink,Thomas Gentry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 004, LEC
Mini Course Meets March 5, 2007-April 17, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Cameron,Scott Aron; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 005, LEC
Meets Jan 8-Feb. 21. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Aller,Monique Christine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 006, LEC
Meets March 5-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Brink,Thomas Gentry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

BIOLCHEM 576 — Signal Transduction
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 5. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Fisher,Stephen K
Instructor: Carter-Su,Christin
Instructor: Guan,Kunliang

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

A review of hormone and neurotransmitter receptors as well as the cellular effectors that are regulated by receptor activation. Oncogene products as signal transducers and the interaction of the known signaling pathways are also covered. The various techniques used to study signal transduction as well as important experimental strategies employing these techniques will also be presented. Lecture.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two terms of organic chemistry; BIOLCHEM 415 or 451/452. Physical Chemistry is strongly recommended.

BIOLOGY 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CAAS 490 — Special Topics in Black World Studies
Section 001, LEC
The Making of the Black Atlantic: The Neo-Slave Narrative in the African Diaspora. Meets 3/7-4/11. (Drop/Add deadline=March 13)

Instructor: Tillet,Salamishah Margaret

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Minicourse

This mini-course looks at contemporary novels about slavery — a genre that has been called neo-slave narrative. We will explore the preoccupation that post-Civil Rights and postcolonial writers have in recovering and reinventing the lives of enslaved Africans, as well as their concerns about national identity, memory, and history.

While we make reference to the canonical slave narratives of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will spend the majority of the class examining the following Black Atlantic neo-slave narratives:

  • Octavia Butler's Kindred (United States);
  • Caryl Phillip's Cambridge (England);
  • Dionne Brand's At the Full and Change of the Moon (Canada);
  • Charles Johnson's Middle Passage (United States); and
  • Michelle Cliff's Abeng (Jamaica).

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing or permission of instructor.

CAAS 490 — Special Topics in Black World Studies
Section 002, LEC
South African Cinema. Meets March 5th-April 10th, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Ekotto,Frieda

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Minicourse

As a South African filmmaker who makes films mainly about women and children I am interested in showing work around that theme. Work that I have collaborated on and work that I have either produced or directed.

However it would be very important to show work that has been created post 1994 with regards to a new South Africa and how the Black filmmakers now had the opportunity to tell their own stories. i.e., filmmakers like Dumisani Phakati very talented, creative, never went to film school yet gives most filmmakers a run for their talent. We need to understand why and how it was and has been important for new voices to challenge the status quo of how cinema and documentary has been important in defining who we are as people in South Africa. The issue of cinema in South Africa is something we are still trying to define, partly because we are a young democracy and film is expensive although new technologies, i.e., DVD is making it possible to make films. Films like Fools by Ramadan Suleman and Teddy Materra's film ‘ Max and Mona' come to mind. These two films are distinctly different films yet there is an independent refreshing creativity that is not necessarily characteristic of South African cinema, the point I am trying to make is that South Africa is diverse, unique and we all trying different forms of expression and defining who are as a people and how we want to be perceived by the world. I would also want to look at white filmmakers and how they have interpreted post 1994.

NOTE: Guest Lecturer Xoliswa Sithole from South Africa

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing or permission of instructor.

CJS 450 — Minicourse in Japanese Studies
Section 001, SEM
Parliament and Party Politics in Japan. Meets 1/9-4/3 (no classes 2/27 & 3/6). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kawato,Sadafumi

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, WorldLit

This seminar is intended for graduate students and motivated undergraduate students interested in Japanese politics and comparative politics. This course will examine legislative institutions and legislative politics in Japan by focusing on research conducted by political scientists including the instructor. Each week the class will scrutinize empirical research. Students are required to write a review paper or an empirical research paper at the end of the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CMBIOL 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 001, LEC
The Economics of Waste (MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 1 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Porter,Richard C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

During the last quarter century, America has woken up to the fact that we have waste problems. As a result, waste of all kinds has become heavily regulated. In this course, the entire waste-scape is viewed — mining waste, agricultural waste, packaging waste, household trash collection, landfills, incinerators, litter, mandatory deposits (on beverage containers or on hazardous wastes), interstate and international waste trade, recycling (lots on this), hazardous waste, Superfund, low-level radioactive waste, and spent nuclear-reactor fuel.

This one-month, one-credit course will examine how federal, state, and local governments have undertaken the regulation of waste and what the effects of regulation have been on economic efficiency, health, and the environment.

There are three prerequisites: 1) Economics 101; 2) interest in learning how to analyze economic policy issues, especially those concerned with waste and recycling; and 3) willingness to recall and use algebra, graphs, and other tools of analysis that you studied in the introductory microeconomics course. (Be warned: In the past, students who had trouble with the theory in Econ 101 have found the theory in this course to be hard.) Each class (except the first and the last) will begin with a short quiz to ensure your attendance and careful prior reading of that day's textbook assignment (some 40+ pages per class). There will be no make-up quizzes except by prior arrangement. Following the quiz, since the textbook is the lecture, each class will be entirely discussion (and on some days, some lecturing on difficult parts of the text). The course grade will be: 50 percent comprised of the average of the seven quiz grades; 25 percent for the grade on a short paper, dealing with a specific real-world waste problem and its attendant policies (and requiring more legwork than library); and 25 percent of the grade on a last-class final exam stressing use of the economic analysis of the textbook.

The textbook ("The Economics of Waste" published by Resources for the Future Press 2002) is in the UM libraries, so prospective enrollees can see what they are getting into. A new paperback copy costs $28, but cheaper used copies are available online.

Note the course times carefully: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:10-5:25 pm, 4 January — 1 February ONLY

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 002, LEC
Growth, Inflation, and Depression (MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Barsky,Robert B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This course in applied macroeconomics combines theory, history, and statistics, focusing on the economic analysis of some outstanding historical episodes in the United States and Europe. The goal is not to establish chronology so much as to show how macroeconomic theory and simple statistical techniques can shed light on the causes of inflation, depression, and asset price fluctuations. Probable topics are: the Great Depression, the German hyperinflation, the stagflation of the 1970s, stabilization of inflation, macroeconomic determinants of stock price fluctuations, consumer confidence, and macroeconomic implications of oil price changes.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 395 — Topics in Economics and Economic Policy
Section 004, LEC
Theory of Games (MEETS JAN 4 — MAR 15 ONLY). (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Poker, chess and checkers may have more to do with economics than you think: many economic interactions share with these games a significant strategic dimension. To determine optimal courses of action, a participant in the market will often need to form conjectures about the behavior of others, and must always be cognizant of the fact that these others' actions are based on conjectures about her behavior as well.

The theory of games allows us deal with these sorts of complex decision-making scenarios. In this course we will look to develop insights into market behavior by studying and playing various market games. Far from a rigorous course in game theory, we strive to provide intuitive insights into the nature of economic games by playing through simple games in class, and analyzing the results. The games we consider will address issues a broad range of markets: examples include the oligopolistic oil market, the market for used cars and labor markets.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102.

ECON 603 — Microeconomic Theory III
Section 001, LEC
Class meets Jan 4 — Feb 23 only. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course will cover the modern general equilibrium theory along with applications and extensions.

  1. Planning problems
  2. Prove the classical existence, welfare and core convergence theorems
  3. Examine non-convexities, properties of aggregate excess demand, smooth economies, the Arrow-Debreu model of contingent commodities
  4. Circumstances where competitive markets are inefficient: Externalities and Public goods; Coase theorem.

  5. General equilibrium under uncertainty, including incomplete markets. Equilibrium and Time.

  6. The theory will be accompanied by various applications.

Starr, Ross. General Equilibrium Theory: An Introduction, Cambridge, 1997. Mas-Colell, Andreu; Michael Whinston and Jerry Green, Microeconomic Theory, Oxford, 1995. Debreu, Gerard. Theory of Value, Yale, 1959.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Permission of instructor

ECON 604 — Microeconomic Theory IV
Section 001, LEC
Class meets Mar 5 — Apr 17 only. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Information and incentive economics, incentive adverse selection, signalling, and screening. Also addressed are the principal-agent model, introduction to contract theory, social choice theory, Arrow's theorem, social welfare functions, axiomatic bargaining, and mechanism design.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Permission of instructor

ECON 609 — Advanced Mathematical Models for Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kimball,Miles S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Covers advanced methods in optimal control, dynamic programming, monotone comparative statics and von Neumann-Morgenstern decision theory, preservations of properties under expectations and maximization, Boyd's symmetry theorem, and convex cone methods. The course emphasizes developing an intuitive understanding of the methods by proof-sketches, solved examples, and problem sets rather than fully formal proofs.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; ECON 600 or permission of instructor.

ECON 610 — Stochastic Dynamic Optimization in Economics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Stolyarov,Dmitriy L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course studies stochastic dynamic optimization in continuous time. The focus is on the optimal control of Brownian motion. The course first develops the mathematical apparatus necessary to calculate the expected present value of functions of general diffusion processes. It then investigates optimal stopping, smooth pasting, and optimal stochastic control. Applications include investment under uncertainty, optimal consumption of a durable good, and stochastic optimal growth.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600 — 604, 603 and 604 can be taken concurrently or permission of instructor

ECON 613 — Advanced Topics in Mathematics for Economics
Section 001, LEC
(Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Nakajima,Daisuke

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course is a formal introduction of probability theories, which is based on measure theories. Topics may include general frameworks of measure theories, the concepts of Independence, conditional expectations, martingale, convergence in distributions and Brownian motions. This course should also work as proof-writing practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 600, 601-604 or permission of instructor

ECON 619 — Advance Theory I
Section 001, LEC
MEETS JAN 4 — FEB 23 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Masatlioglu,Yusuf Can

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

Current focus is on information economics, including informational herding, optimal learning, and experimentation (including models of informational herding, financial timing, and informational demand). We also explore dynamic search-matching models.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600/permission of instructor

ECON 620 — Advanced Theory II
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Ozdenoren,Emre; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course will examine some issues in mechanism design with a focus on applications such as (i) auctions, (ii) the provision of public goods, and (iii) voting. The course will be based on some classic articles in this field as well as some more recent papers. The focus will be on the knowledge that the mechanism designer is assumed to have about the agents for whom she designs an incentive mechanism. We shall also examine how the solution concept that the mechanism designer uses to predict how agents will respond to given incentives reflects her beliefs about the agents. Examples of solution concepts that are relevant here are dominant strategies, Bayesian equilibrium, and ex-post equilibrium. Finally, we shall examine how the mechanism designer's prior knowledge, and the solution concept that she uses, affects which incentive scheme she will identify as optimal.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON 600/permission of instructor

ECON 751 — Computational Macroeconomics
Section 001, LEC
MEETS MAR 5 — APR 17 ONLY. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Zhang,Jing

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Minicourse

This course is an introduction to quantitative analysis of dynamic general equilibrium models in macroeconomics. It first introduces calibration techniques briefly and then focuses on solution methods. This course covers both linear methods (linear-quadratic and log-linearization) and nonlinear methods (value function iteration and finite elements). The relevant macro models in this class will be the production economy with a representative consumer, or with heterogeneous consumers under different market structures.

ENGLISH 483 — Great Works of Literature
Section 002, LEC
An Honors Mini-Course on Contemporary Poetry. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Yaeger,Patricia Smith
Instructor: Mattawa,Khaled Ahmad

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This course will focus on contemporary poets who define new conceptual, political, and aesthetic territories. They differ radically from one another in subject matter and personae: a Muslim immigrant woman, a gay male whose life was touched by AIDS, a male postcolonial Nobel Laureate, and a female poet exploring natural theology. Passionate about their subject matter as well as their craft, Mohja Kahf, Mark Doty, Derek Walcott, and Louise Gluck present diverse visions for contemporary poetry's abilities to embrace their different vision and a poet's necessary skill at addressing multiple audiences and constituencies.

The class will meet on the following days: Friday, January 19, 2-4pm; Friday, January 26, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 9, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 16, 2-4pm.

Students will be graded on the basis of their participation in class and final group presentations.


GEOSCI 104 — Ice Ages, Past and Future
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

This course examines the effects of past glaciations on the landscape and on life, and on man in particular. Speculation on the causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past million years and predictions of future ice ages, based on current geological research, are examined.

GEOSCI 105 — Continents Adrift
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205 or 146.

The seemingly stable land masses of the world are in motion. Continental collision and fragmentation are only a few of the attendant processes associated with these motions. This course deals with the modern concept of plate tectonics and continental drift, the processes, and the products of this dynamic system.

GEOSCI 105 — Continents Adrift
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Ruff,Larry John; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205 or 146.

The seemingly stable land masses of the world are in motion. Continental collision and fragmentation are only a few of the attendant processes associated with these motions. This course deals with the modern concept of plate tectonics and continental drift, the processes, and the products of this dynamic system.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Zhang,Youxue; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 107 — Volcanoes and Earthquakes
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Lange,Rebecca Ann; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 205, 146, or 147.

The earth in action; geography of earthquakes and volcanoes and catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism, volcanic rocks, and volcanic and geologic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; the relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; and volcanism and geothermal energy, man-made earthquakes, and earthquake prediction and control.

GEOSCI 111 — Climate and Mankind
Section 002, LEC
Meets March 6 thru April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Moore Jr,Theodore C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 201 or 151.

A short, half-term lecture course covering topics including weather, climate factors, climate. The course will explore how climate affects humans and how humans affect climate.


GEOSCI 114 — Global Warming
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Poulsen,Christopher James

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

Review of the geological evidence for global warming including geochemistry of natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gases, global radiation balance, sediment and ice core records, and ancient hot climates with discussion of possible remediation methods and their economic and political context.

Advisory Prerequisite: High School math, physics, and chemistry.

GEOSCI 114 — Global Warming
Section 011, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 22. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Poulsen,Christopher James

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GEOSCI 151.

Review of the geological evidence for global warming including geochemistry of natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gases, global radiation balance, sediment and ice core records, and ancient hot climates with discussion of possible remediation methods and their economic and political context.

Advisory Prerequisite: High School math, physics, and chemistry.

GERMAN 290 — The Internet in German (LAC)
Section 001, REC
(Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Case,Beau D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This new course is designed to offer German students an academic examination and application of the Internet. In this course, we will:

  • review German computing and related vocabulary;
  • become familiar with various useful German studies websites;
  • learn how to evaluate websites and other information resources;
  • critique websites related to German studies;
  • learn to use the website creation software, Dreamweaver;
  • study the principles of good website design and aesthetics;
  • and, for our final course project we will, in small groups, create our own meta-sites on various topics of our interest.

We will speak and write in English, but we will use German in reading of website material. Outside of class work, approximately 1 hour per week, includes: reading of handouts and brief articles; working on the final group course project; and surfing the web! Grades will be determined by: participation and attendance, a quiz or two, occasional assignments or class presentations, and the final course project.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 232.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 001, SEM
K-12 Education: Problems and Policy. Meets Jan 9-Mar 20. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Kaplan,Aaron Howard

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

America's public education system is world-class and mediocre, overly stressful and plagued by low expectations, the teenage playground of Ferris Bueller and the depressing wasteland that denies many students a fair chance to succeed. Almost everyone agrees that the system faces problems, but the public is staunchly divided on most reform efforts. We will discuss current issues like charter schools, voucher programs, standardized testing, and school funding, and we will examine how education policy is intertwined with issues of race and class. Finally, we will look at how the schools are portrayed in the media and in pop culture. Students will be expected to attend all 10 sessions, participate in class discussions, and complete 2-4 short assignments responding to the readings. Tuesdays 3-4 Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13, 20

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 002, SEM
Guilty or Innocent?: Racial Disparities in Health Care and the Question of Clinician Bias. Meets Jan. 9-March 13. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hasiakos,Peter Spiros

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Much evidence indicates that racial disparities in the quality of treatment in health care exist. However, very few have been able to objectively address the question of whether or not these disparities are due to overt clinician bias. In this mini-course, students will be exposed to the existing research that addresses this question as well as search for new literature that may bring more insight to the classroom. Students will sharpen their understanding of this issue through selected readings, short written responses, class discussions, and possibly a project-oriented assignment at the end of the course.

Tuesdays 4-5pm Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 003, SEM
Clown Logic. Meets Jan. 30-Mar. 27. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 12).

Instructor: Shelly,Mary Lou

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

What is a clown? A clown is an entertainer who makes us laugh. A clown is a dreamer who doesn't follow the rules of the practical world. A clown is a misfit, an outsider, and a questioner of authority. In the face of an often absurd and confusing world, a clown is also a creative problem solver.

Donald McManus says that the clown has "a limitless ability to invent new rules." Clowns have a different way of approaching the world than the average person does; they have a logic all their own. It is this off-the-wall logic that makes clowns so funny to watch, and so fascinating to study.

In this course, we will explore the logic of the clown. Through short readings, film screenings, and hands-on experiments in clown problem solving, we will come to a better understanding of what the logic of a clown might be, and perhaps how it is (or can be) used in our own world. Be prepared to have fun! We'll read, we'll watch, we'll talk, we'll play. (We may even juggle!)

Films, readings, and performances we will refer to in this course: Federico Fellini (The Clowns, 8 ½, La Strada), Samuel Beckett (Waiting for Godot, Endgame), Jaques Lecoq (The Moving Body), Charlie Chaplin (The Circus), the Marx brothers (At the Circus), the clowns of the New Pickle Circus (esp. Bill Irwin, Larry Pisoni, Geoff Hoyle), and more.

Tuesdays 4-5 Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, Mar. 6, 13, 20, 27

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 004, SEM
From Numbers to Stories: Perspectives on Data Graphics. Meets Jan. 8- Mar. 19. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Engle,Keary M

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Visualize a single page recounting the French army's gruesome fate during Napoleon's 1812 Russian campaign. Charles Joseph Minard's seminal graphic depicting this history is a classic example of how creativity can transform raw, abstract data into a powerful narrative. This seminar will discuss Minard's work and delve into questions of how we can and should communicate through graphics.

From demystifying the London cholera epidemic in 1854 to expediting the liftoff of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986, the methods for visualizing quantitative data have enormous impact. We express complex data collections as pictures to allow for holistic perception of the underlying trends and patterns. These images tell stories, visual narratives that are informative and powerful. Transforming raw data into a meaningful story requires techniques from both art and mathematics. If this process is misunderstood, the meaning of the data can be distorted or confused. Thus, it is crucial to learn how to construct data graphics that are clear and efficient.

In this class, we will discuss the philosophy of data representation as it relates to human perception and learn how to best communicate quantitative information to others. We will draw on the work of contemporary thinkers like Edward Tufte, Howard Wainer, and Robert Harris and more foundational thinkers like Playfair, Galileo, and Newton. Participants will develop their skills in critiquing data graphics found in news media and discover ways to improve data presentation within their own work. Course requirements include weekly readings, class participation, and a final project. Though not required, an elementary knowledge of statistics will be helpful.

Mondays, 5:00-6:00 Jan. 8, 22, 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, March 5, 12, 19

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 005, SEM
Language Education Policy, Immigrant Children, and the American Dream. Meets Jan. 24-Mar. 14. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 5.

Instructor: Fang,Louann

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

One fifth of all children in the US are immigrant children who speak English as a second language, and first- and second-generation immigrant children are the most rapidly growing segment of the US child population. In spite of recurring problems, America's public schooling has long been perceived as the ticket to the American dream: a meaningful and self-chosen lifestyle, economic success, and full membership as an American. The increasing cultural and linguistic diversity and needs of these immigrant children are a challenge that more and more public school districts are facing.

As we consider this widespread and increasingly relevant situation, what are some obstacles in the public school systems today in immigrant children's education? How well are the problems faced by language minority children addressed by current education policies and classroom practices? Where do immigrant children fit in American classrooms and eventually in American society?

Some of the themes we will consider in light of this growing population include: language and identity; conflicting ideas of assimilation and pluralism among immigrant groups; federal, state and local educational policies and approaches toward educating second-language children; problematizing the categories of the underprivileged, i.e. racial minorities, linguistic minorities, socio-economically disadvantaged; the debates about desegregation, affirmative action and diversity; school reform, and educational social movements such as Teach for America.

This is a highly participatory discussion-based class around the readings, current events and personal reflections. We will be investigating current issues concerning the education of immigrant children, and participant interests and suggestions will be taken the first day of class to finalize the topics. Possible mandatory course readings include: The American Dream and the Public Schools, by Jennifer Hochschild, and Children of immigration, by Carola & Marcelo Suarez-Orozco.

Wednesdays 4-5:30, January: 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, March: 7, 14

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 006, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 007, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 135 — Ideas in Honors
Section 008, SEM
Meets Jan. 4-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

A guided journey that opens first-year students' eyes to the importance of scholarship and research in an area of the seminar leader's expertise. Subject matter and discussions are confronted from the vantage point "Why does it matter?"

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year standing in the Honors Program.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Complexity and Emergence. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Holland,John H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Minicourse

Prerequisites: Either familiarity with programming (no particular language required), or a course in finite mathematics. All technical topics will be defined in class.

Course Organization: This is a highly interactive class with students from all over campus. You will be expected to contribute to the class discussion and will be graded accordingly. There will be a final paper which you will present to the class.

Topics: Much of our investigation will center on complex adaptive systems (cas). A cas consists of adaptive (learning) agents with conditional interactions. Typical examples are the central nervous system, a market, the immune system, and the internet. Because of evolution and adaptation, cas exhibit perpetual novelty in their structure and behavior.

"Complexity" and "emergence" are difficult topics with different meanings in different areas. Rather than trying to provide precise definitions of these terms, we will develop a range of ideas, examples, and intuitions that provide a deeper understanding.

The order of topics will depend partly upon particular interests of the class, but the following topics, at least, will be covered

  1. Performance systems [sets of condition/action rules].
  2. Signal-passing systems — their pervasiveness from cell biology to language.
  3. Parallelism — systems with many rules active simultaneously.
  4. Agent-based models (models with multiple interacting agents).
  5. Credit assignment — strengthening stage-setting and predictive rules.
  6. Rule discovery — genetic algorithms.
  7. Building blocks — their role in everything from perception to invention.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 002, SEM
An Honors Mini-Course on Contemporary Poetry. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Yaeger,Patricia Smith
Instructor: Mattawa,Khaled Ahmad

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

This course will focus on contemporary poets who define new conceptual, political, and aesthetic territories. They differ radically from one another in subject matter and personae: a Muslim immigrant woman, a gay male whose life was touched by AIDS, a male postcolonial Nobel Laureate, and a female poet exploring natural theology. Passionate about their subject matter as well as their craft, Mohja Kahf, Mark Doty, Derek Walcott, and Louise Gluck present diverse visions for contemporary poetry's abilities to embrace their different vision and a poet's necessary skill at addressing multiple audiences and constituencies.

The class will meet on the following days: Friday, January 19, 2-4pm; Friday, January 26, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 9, 10-12:30 and 1:30-4pm; Friday, February 16, 2-4pm.

Students will be graded on the basis of their participation in class and final group presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

HONORS 493 — College Honors Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Art and Science of Humor: Theory and Practice, Practice, Practice. Meets March 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, April 2. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Mankoff,Robert Toby

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Honors, Minicourse

An introduction to the nature, history, and value of humor to explore theories of humor, examine the development of all types of humor, and discuss benefits of humor such as its link with creativity and its opposition to stress. Students create humor with a "comic toolbox" of cognitive skills that take the individual from conception to execution of a comic idea, whether it be cartoons, humorous essays, stand-up routines , sit-coms. Guest speakers from these fields will give first hand accounts of the humor manufacturing process, from soup to nuts. Grade determined by a presentation in the last week that uses what has been learned both theoretically and on a practical level. The presentation might consist of cartoons on a theme, a humorous essay, a stand up routine, a funny website or something interesting.

Robert Mankoff is Cartoon Editor for THE NEW YORKER.

PREREQUISITE: A gift for laughter and a sense that the world is mad.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director.

HUMGEN 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

INSTHUM 411 — Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
Section 001, SEM
The Art and Science of Humor: Theory and Practice, Practice, Practice. Meets March 5, 7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, April 2. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Mankoff,Robert Toby

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

An introduction to the nature, history, and value of humor to explore theories of humor, examine the development of all types of humor, and discuss benefits of humor such as its link with creativity and its opposition to stress. Students create humor with a "comic toolbox" of cognitive skills that take the individual from conception to execution of a comic idea, whether it be cartoons, humorous essays, stand-up routines , sit-coms. Guest speakers from these fields will give first hand accounts of the humor manufacturing process, from soup to nuts. Grade determined by a presentation in the last week that uses what has been learned both theoretically and on a practical level. The presentation might consist of cartoons on a theme, a humorous essay, a stand up routine, a funny website or something interesting.

Robert Mankoff is Cartoon Editor for THE NEW YORKER.

PREREQUISITE: A gift for laughter and a sense that the world is mad.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate standing.

LACS 490 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mini-course
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

LACS 590 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MENAS 493 — Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC
Middle East Minorities. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The aim of this course is to expose students to various UM faculty and outside experts on a particular theme. It is taught from a comparative perspective to introduce students to a range of historical periods, geographical areas, and methods for future study and research.

MICRBIOL 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ORGSTUDY 395 — Current Issues in Organizational Studies
Section 001, SEM
Exploring Careers in Organizational Studies. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Nordberg,Ryan M

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

This mini-course will explore issues in career decision making, strategies for internship/job search success and challenges and key success factors for transitioning from the academic to the professional (post-college) world. Students will learn...

  • how to identify and research career options and employment trends;

  • career decision making theories

  • how to build personal "brand equity" through resumes, cover letters and interviews

  • the value of networking and other job search strategies

  • employer expectations for candidates and new employees

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory psychology and sociology, and ECON 101

PHRMACOL 576 — Signal Transduction
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 5. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Fisher,Stephen K
Instructor: Carter-Su,Christin
Instructor: Guan,Kunliang

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

A review of hormone and neurotransmitter receptors as well as the cellular effectors that are regulated by receptor activation. Oncogene products as signal transducers and the interaction of the known signaling pathways are also covered. The various techn

Advisory Prerequisite: Two terms of organic chemistry; BIOLCHEM 415 or 451/452. Physical Chemistry is strongly recommended.

PHRMACOL 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHYSIOL 576 — Signal Transduction
Section 001, LEC
Meets Jan 4 thru Feb 5. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Fisher,Stephen K
Instructor: Carter-Su,Christin
Instructor: Guan,Kunliang

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

An overview of hormone and neurotransmitter receptors as well as the cellular effectors that are regulated by receptor activation. Oncogene products as signal transducers and the interaction of the known signaling pathways will be covered. The various techniques used to study signal transduction as well as important experimental strategies employing these techniques will also be presented. This course is module I of Cellular Physiology (PHYSIOL 576, 577, 578).

Advisory Prerequisite: Two terms of organic chemistry; BIOLCHEM 415 or 451/452. Physical Chemistry is strongly recommended.

RCIDIV 350 — Special Topics
Section 002, SEM
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

RCIDIV 350 — Special Topics
Section 004, SEM
Pills, Politics and the Public Good: Ethical Crossroads in the Pharmaceutical Industry. Meets 1/30-3/27. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 12).

Instructor: Greenspan,Henry

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

This course draws on current debates about ethical practice within the pharmaceutical industry with an eye toward wider questions about corporations, politics, and social responsibility.

Major topics include: A perceived "ethics problem" within the pharm industry, critiques of industry's relationship with the FDA, post-Vioxx concerns about drug safety, statutes shielding drug companies from civil liability (lawsuits), direct-to consumer advertising, direct-to-physician advertising (e.g., "drug reps"), industry-funded research and medical journals, paradigms for medical care that are not drug-centered.

The course will include a number of video excerpts and guest speakers, including representatives from industry, industry critics, the FDA, and practicing physicians. We will also be involved in a major program at the U-M Medical School featuring speakers who have been central in shaping national policy.

Requirements include attending 7 of 8 sessions and completing a series of one-page assignments. Students who want to explore these issues in greater depth (and receive 3 credits in total) may consider also taking RCIDIV 351.001: "Research Seminar on Ethics, Politics, and the Pharmaceutical Industry." The research seminar supplements the mini-course for interested students, but it is perfectly fine to take only the mini-course

This class is partly sponsored by the President's Initiative on Ethics in Public Life and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year. Many thanks to them!

REES 405 — Topics in Russian and East European Studies
Section 001, LEC
Ethnicity & Violence in the Former Yugoslavia. Course meets March 8-29. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 14).

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The minicourse will examine the political, economic, social and psychological factors which led to the shocking ethnic violence in former Yugoslavia in the 1990s (conflict involving Serbs, Croats, Bosnian Moslems, Albanians and Macedonians) through discussion and analysis of narrative and documentary films and accompanying historical readings. Evaluation of students' work will be based on class participation and one short paper due at semester's end.

REES 405 — Topics in Russian and East European Studies
Section 002, LEC
Music Literature and Politics. The Unbearable Lightness of Czech Arts & Politics. 1 credit. Course meets Jan 11-Feb 15. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Stary,Martin

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The course focuses on the ways music was being manifested in literary arts and to what extent both music and literature influenced political events and shaped cultural environment under the communist regime in post war Czechoslovakia (with the main stress on 1970s & 80s). Relevant historical events will be discussed. This will be a multimedia course. Literary excerpts will be studied, related music listened to, and also some movie samples watched and debated. The topics include, among others:

  • Milan Kundera's Joke: Dialogue between the Novel and Kundera's ambivalent approach to folk music;
  • Václav Havel, 'Literature from the Boiler Rooms' & Rebellion of Underground Music (Plastic People of the Universe);
  • Josef Škvorecký, the role of 68 Publishers & Ubiquitous Jazz Element in development of Škvorecký's characters;
  • Song writers, folk singers and the importance of their 'Song Poetry' in forming young generation's minds and in keeping older generation straight (Karel Kryl, Jaroslav Hutka, Jaromír Nohavica, et al.);
  • Czech poets and specific uses of their poetry in Czech Art Rock and Rhythm & Blues scene (Josef Kainar, Václav Hrabe, Pavel Srut, Petr Skoumal, et al.);
  • Bohumil Hrabal, Czech Jazz Section and the unique role of Jazz Music in crushing communist ideology.

REES 410 — Polish Culture
Section 001, SEM
Rock Kills Communism: Dismantling of the Totalitarian State in Poland. 1 credit. March 7 — April 11. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 13).

Instructor: Westwalewicz,Piotr Antoni; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Rock music was the primary factor in the process of defeating totalitarianism in Poland — argued Franciszek Walicki, one of the prominent veterans of Polish pop music, during a conference on rock and politics in Gdańsk in 2000.

Did Polish popular culture destroy the very foundations of Communism? Or did the decline of Communism allow the increasingly critical voices of prominent cabaret artists, pop musicians and cartoonists to express the sentiments of the population?

A study of Polish popular culture in the 1970's and 1980's, the last two decades of the Communist rule in Poland and other Central and Eastern European countries. Humor, music, political and social commentary by such icons of Polish counterculture as Młynarski, Grzeskowiak, Chyła, Mleczko, Olewicz, Hołdys, Mogielnicki, Ciechowski, and others. A detailed analysis of texts, drawings, performances and films documenting the gradual collapse of the Communist control of all aspects of life.

Grading will be based on attendance, participation, and short reflection papers.

All required readings will be contained in a course pack.

No knowledge of Polish language and culture necessary.

ROMLANG 400 — Topics in Romance Languages and Literature
Section 001, REC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

SLAVIC 490 — Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
Section 002, LEC
Rock Kills Communism: Dismantling of the Totalitarian State in Poland. 1 credit. March 7 — April 11. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 13).

Instructor: Westwalewicz,Piotr Antoni; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Rock music was the primary factor in the process of defeating totalitarianism in Poland — argued Franciszek Walicki, one of the prominent veterans of Polish pop music, during a conference on rock and politics in Gdańsk in 2000.

Did Polish popular culture destroy the very foundations of Communism? Or did the decline of Communism allow the increasingly critical voices of prominent cabaret artists, pop musicians and cartoonists to express the sentiments of the population?

A study of Polish popular culture in the 1970's and 1980's, the last two decades of the Communist rule in Poland and other Central and Eastern European countries. Humor, music, political and social commentary by such icons of Polish counterculture as Młynarski, Grzeskowiak, Chyła, Mleczko, Olewicz, Hołdys, Mogielnicki, Ciechowski, and others. A detailed analysis of texts, drawings, performances and films documenting the gradual collapse of the Communist control of all aspects of life.

Grading will be based on attendance, participation, and short reflection papers.

All required readings will be contained in a course pack.

No knowledge of Polish language and culture necessary.

SLAVIC 490 — Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
Section 003, LEC
Ethnicity & Violence in the Former Yugoslavia. Course meets March 8-29. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 14).

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The minicourse will examine the political, economic, social and psychological factors which led to the shocking ethnic violence in former Yugoslavia in the 1990s (conflict involving Serbs, Croats, Bosnian Moslems, Albanians and Macedonians) through discussion and analysis of narrative and documentary films and accompanying historical readings. Evaluation of students' work will be based on class participation and one short paper due at semester's end.

SLAVIC 490 — Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
Section 004, LEC
Music Literature and Politics. The Unbearable Lightness of Czech Arts & Politics. 1 credit. Course meets Jan 11-Feb 15. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Stary,Martin

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The course focuses on the ways music was being manifested in literary arts and to what extent both music and literature influenced political events and shaped cultural environment under the communist regime in post war Czechoslovakia (with the main stress on 1970s & 80s). Relevant historical events will be discussed. This will be a multimedia course. Literary excerpts will be studied, related music listened to, and also some movie samples watched and debated. The topics include, among others:

  • Milan Kundera's Joke: Dialogue between the Novel and Kundera's ambivalent approach to folk music;
  • Václav Havel, 'Literature from the Boiler Rooms' & Rebellion of Underground Music (Plastic People of the Universe);
  • Josef Škvorecký, the role of 68 Publishers & Ubiquitous Jazz Element in development of Škvorecký's characters;
  • Song writers, folk singers and the importance of their 'Song Poetry' in forming young generation's minds and in keeping older generation straight (Karel Kryl, Jaroslav Hutka, Jaromír Nohavica, et al.);
  • Czech poets and specific uses of their poetry in Czech Art Rock and Rhythm & Blues scene (Josef Kainar, Václav Hrabe, Pavel Srut, Petr Skoumal, et al.);
  • Bohumil Hrabal, Czech Jazz Section and the unique role of Jazz Music in crushing communist ideology.

WOMENSTD 482 — Special Topics Minicourse
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

This course takes up a single topic of a very specific or contemporary nature.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

 
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