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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = MODGREEK
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 13 of 13
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MODGREEK 102 — Elementary Modern Greek, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: Graduate students should elect MODGREEK 502.

The course follows the same pedagogical scheme as MODGREEK 101, with classroom dialogues, non-competitive group games, and improvised scenarios. Instruction in more advanced grammar and syntax is effected through both formal methods and drills. By the end of the term, students are exposed to approximately four-fifths of modern Greek grammar and syntax and are expected to be linguistically competent in a variety of everyday contexts. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, a one hour midterm exam, and a final.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 101.

MODGREEK 105 — Elementary Modern Greek Conversation
Section 001, REC
ELEMENTARY GREEK CONVERSATION

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course gives students the opportunity to articulate everyday needs in Greek. The course is designed for beginning students who know how to read but can barely speak. In-class exercises have students introduce themselves, give directions, shop; order food and drink, open a bank account, describe their physical discomfort, rent an apartment, explain how to play a favorite sport or cook a great meal, etc.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 101.

MODGREEK 202 — Second Year Modern Greek, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: Graduate students should elect MODGREEK 504.

This is the final term of the Modern Greek language sequence, and, upon successful completion, students will be able to meet the LS&A language requirement. The course focuses on expanding vocabulary through reading more complex journalistic prose and literary texts (20th-century poetry and prose) and discussion of those texts. Special attention is paid to the historical depth of the language through instruction in etymology. The proficiency gained by the end of the course should enable students to express themselves in Modern Greek on topics of interest; students ought to be able to read, with dictionary help, all writing in Standard Modern Greek. Along with class participation, class tests, one midterm, and a final examination will determine the final grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 201.

MODGREEK 205 — Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation, I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Take your knowledge of Greek to a new level! This course aims to give students confidence in their ability to handle many speaking situations and topics: love, housekeeping, politics, movies, and all the great things in life. It designed for students who have had at least three (3) terms of Greek or whose oral skills place them in 2nd year Greek and who are interested in enhancing their spoken language skills.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 201.

MODGREEK 302 — Intermediate Modern Greek II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Graduate students should elect MODGREEK 506.

Selections from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural content.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 202.

MODGREEK 305 — Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Emphasizes self-expression in conversational Greek. The course touches on challenging aspects of the Greek language, such as colloquial Greek, idioms and set phrases, as well as the language of the media and fast and furious Greek conversations on current events. The language of youth slang, media, everyday speech, and "Gringlish" are studied and imitated. Students work on expanding vocabulary, finding synonyms, and understanding varying spoken styles, which are necessary to appreciate life in Greece's many speaking communities — to acquire proficiency in the spoken language.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 301/302.

MODGREEK 318 — Greek-American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lambropoulos,Vassilios; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

While Greek culture, thought, and values have always been studied and revered in the U.S., the actual Greeks who immigrated to this country were received differently. They faced many forms of discrimination and exclusion that often led them to protests, marches, strikes, demands for equal rights, and alliances with minority groups. This course studies that particular migrant group, a unique case in American race history: the arrival and settlement of Greeks, a people admired in theory and reviled in practice.

The story is one of dissociation between image and reality, identity and ethnicity, discourse and experience, as the American public distinguished the cultural legacy of Hellenism from the immigrating Hellenes. While Greece stood as an abstract ideal, the actual Greeks appeared dark, barbaric, Eastern (as opposed to Western), lazy, intemperate, dishonest, and above all racially and mentally degenerate in sharp contrast to those they claimed as ancestors. Sometimes even Greeks themselves began treating each other in similar terms.

By examining Greek American history, culture, practices, and institutions, this course studies a test case of complex discrimination that includes racial, ethnic, religious, linguistic, gender, class, cultural, and several other elements. It analyzes the successes and the pitfalls of collective identity as it has been understood in this country over the last two centuries by following the Greeks' gradual ascendancy to whiteness, Hellenization, Europeanization, middle class status, heterosexual normality, public recognition, and assimilation. Students will be required to complete assigned readings and write two 8-page papers based on drafts.

This dissociation between modern Greeks and "real," that is ancient, Greeks is still evident today in course offerings everywhere as College listings distinguish between "Modern Greek" and "Greek" classes whereby the latter, apparently considered "more authentically Greek," do not require to be qualified as "Ancient."

MODGREEK 325 — Athens, Present and Past
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S
Instructor: Bhattacharyya,Sayan

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit


Old cities are not just monuments to past glory. They are incubators for new ideas and sites of dynamic change. Athens has always been a city in transition, from ancient times, when it was a center of art, politics, philosophy, and commerce to the modern era, when it reemerged as a modern capital city. In this class, we will explore Athens neighborhood by neighborhood through photographs, films, travel descriptions, maps, poetry, plays, political writing, and fictional and non-fictional narrative. We will work through important moments in Athens' long history, as we also make stops at some of the city's contemporary hot spots — from the Acropolis to the Plaka and Kolonaki Square to beachfront scenes of Athens' modern night life — in order explore the different ways that Athens has reinvented itself.

Optional Study Abroad trip to Athens, Greece: April 30-May 13, 2007
This is an ISAC (Integrating Study Abroad into the Curriculum) course with an optional study abroad trip to Athens, Greece, April 30-May 13.

Cost of travel to Greece will be about $800 plus the cost of air travel and some meals. Eligibility for trip: The instructor requires students interested in the study abroad trip to contact her (aleontis@umich.edu) for an interview as soon as possible. The Study Abroad trip to Athens is supported through an ISAC grant and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year.

MODGREEK 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Undergraduate supervised study in Modern Greek literature. Number of meetings determined by the credits elected. Regular reports and conferences.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MODGREEK 502 — Elementary Modern Greek II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Undergraduate students should elect MODGREEK 102.

The course follows the same pedagogical scheme as MODGREEK 501, with classroom dialogues, non-competitive group games, and improvised scenarios. Instruction in more advanced grammar and syntax is effected through both formal methods and drills. By the end of the term students are exposed to approximately four-fifths of modern Greek grammar and syntax and are expected to be linguistically competent in a variety of everyday contexts.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 501 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

MODGREEK 504 — Second Year Modern Greek II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Undergraduate students should elect MODGREEK 202.

This is the final term of the Modern Greek language sequence. The course focuses on expanding vocabulary through reading more complex journalistic prose and literary texts (20th-century poetry and prose) and discussion of those texts. Special attention is paid to the historical depth of the language through instruction in etymology.

Advisory Prerequisite: MODGREEK 503 or equivalent and Graduate standing.

MODGREEK 506 — Intermediate Modern Greek II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Margomenou,Despina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Undergraduate students should elect MODGREEK 302.

Selections from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural content.

Advisory Prerequisite: CLASSICS,MODGREEK 501, 502 or equivalent

MODGREEK 599 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Supervised study in Modern Greek literature. Number of meetings determined by the credits elected. Regular reports and conferences.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
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