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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = MUSICOL
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 30 of 30
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
MUSICOL 122 — Intro World Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Castro,Christi-Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

For students who wish an introduction to musical cultures of a few, select musical areas of the world (such as the Caribbean, West Africa, India, China, and Japan).

Advisory Prerequisite: NON-MUS ONLY

MUSICOL 123 — Introduction to Popular Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course offers a broad survey of 20th-century popular music, exploring a diverse set of genres and musical artists from the Tin Pan Alley era to the present. The course places the musical conventions, key performers, and aesthetic shifts that mark the history of popular music in social, cultural, technological, and musical context. Designed to develop listening and analytical skills, the course aims to help students to understand, describe, interpret, and write about popular music.

MUSICOL 130 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC
Opera

Instructor: Stein,Louise K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This new course is designed for students outside the School of Music who are interested in learning about, listening to, celebrating, and thinking about opera. This is an introductory level course in music and theater, open to everyone — opera fans as well as those for whom opera will be a completely new experience. Although our primary focus is the music of opera, the course does not require musical literacy or the ability to read music. Students will learn to look at a vocal score of an opera without fear, but no training in music theory is presumed.

Through a selection of operas chosen from the whole span of the genre's history, we will listen to, watch, and study opera critically, as music, as theater, as spectacle, as performance medium, and as cultural expression. Our focus is on viewing, listening, analyzing, and debating, rather than on the history of opera, although the works studied will be treated for the most part in chronological order. Readings will provide a varied set of approaches to operatic criticism.

Special topics for Winter 2007 will include operatic eroticism, opera's arrival in the Americas, the politics of opera, and the singer's art. Most of the lectures and assignments will involve whole operas, their musical dramaturgy, and impact and reception in performance. Composers to be studied include Berg, Bizet, Bolcom, Cavalli, Handel, Monteverdi, Mozart, Puccini, Rossini, Verdi . . . and others.

The assignments in this course will involve listening to and watching operas, to be supplemented by readings from materials on reserve and written work. Grades will be based on written work and class participation.

A class "outing" to see an opera will be arranged, and a two-page written "review" of the performance will be required.

MUSICOL 140 — History of Music
Section 001, LEC
Music Here and Now

Instructor: Clague,Mark Allan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: HU

MUSICOL 140 examines musical thought with an emphasis on recent times (the twentieth century) and nearby places (the United States). The course builds on the general concepts concerning music and world culture introduced in MUSICOL 139 and works to prepare students for the one-year Western music survey of MUSICOL 239–240. Most important, we reflect on the writing of music history and the application of history to the creative work of musicians.

Creative assignments encourage students to examine cogent themes of historical thought against the background of American music (especially jazz, folk, pop, and classical). Such themes include modernism, style, genius, nationalism, race, class, gender, popular culture, economics, performance, authenticity, and the state of music today. Assignments are designed to hone a musician's historical toolkit: sets of questions, facts, and skills such as listening, critical reading, writing, analyzing, interpreting, discussing, collaborating, performing, etc.

The overall argument of the course is that in a musical life today that is characterized by incessant cultural mixture of time, place, identity, and purpose, history can be understood as a series of stories — narrative games — that offer powerful raw material and creative inspiration for musicians here and now. The intent of MUSICOL 140 is to inspire an active and creative engagement with music in our lives and the world around us.

Advisory Prerequisite: S M STU ONLY

MUSICOL 240 — History of Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Geary,Jason Duane; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: HU

History of music from the end of the Baroque era to WWI.

Advisory Prerequisite: S M STU ONLY

MUSICOL 346 — History of Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mengozzi,Stefano; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A survey of European music from ca. 1750 to the present. The main goal of the course is to lead students to develop an in-depth appreciation of Classical, Romantic, and 20th-century music, and to engage in a critical reflection on the status and role of "art music" in the contemporary world. A number of readings will be taken from recent studies on individual composers and musical works. No musical background is necessary. Active listening, however, will be a basic ingredient of both home assignments and in-class activities.

Advisory Prerequisite: NON-MUS ONLY

MUSICOL 406 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC
Music, Ecstasy and the Brain

Instructor: Becker,Judith O; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the phenomenon of musical ecstasy from the perspectives of cultural context, musical structures, the phenomenology of ecstasy, and the physiology of ecstasy. A few examples of musical ecstasy within the context of religious ceremonies will be the focus of the course. These will include Muslim ecstatic practices from the Middle East and from North India, a Hindu ecstatic practice from Indonesia, a Christian ecstatic practice from Michigan, and time permitting, other examples as well. The course will include readings on the theory of ritual, the theory of musical ecstasy, readings on the specific rituals under discussion, and readings on the physiology of the brain.

Students will be graded on class participation, listening exams and papers covering all perspectives presented in the course.

This course will provide more questions than answers.

MUSICOL 414 — 19-20th Cent Opera
Section 001, LEC
HISTORY OF 19th- AND 20th-CENTURY OPERA

Instructor: Geary,Jason Duane; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Western operatic repertoire by considering roughly two dozen operas from Rossini to Philip Glass. Its aim is to highlight significant developments in the genre by exploring these operas within a broad musical, cultural, and historical framework. At the center of this exploration will be basic questions surrounding the relationship between music and drama as well as the manner in which this relationship has been approached by composers at different times and coming from diverse national or regional operatic traditions. Grading for this course will be based on class participation, a few short quizzes, and one or two research papers to be undertaken in consultation with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG ONLY

MUSICOL 423 — 20th C Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Designed as a survey of Western concert music in the twentieth century, this course traces major shifts in musical style, aesthetics, and function, and places them in social, cultural, and historical context. Among those composers addressed are Debussy, Schoenberg, Webern, Berg, Stravinsky, Ives, Crawford, Still, Bartok, Revueltas, Hindemith, Babbitt, Stockhausen, Cage, Reich, Oliveros, and Dun. Coursework includes reading, listening, score study, brief analytical assignments, a midterm, and a final.

MUSICOL 523 also requires the completion of a term-length independent research paper.

Prerequisite: MUSICOL 240 or equivalent.

Advisory Prerequisite: 240/EQ.

MUSICOL 467 — Music of Asia II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Castro,Christi-Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will survey some of the better known musical traditions from West Asia (the Arab World, Turkey, and Iran), South Asia (India and Pakistan), and Southeast Asia (Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines).

MUSICOL 467 is open to music majors and minors as well as non-majors, and a background in music is NOT required. Only graduate students may enroll in MUSICOL 567.

MUSICOL 477 — Medieval Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class will survey European sacred and secular repertories of monophony and polyphony. It will begin by tracing the origins of Gregorian Chant in Rome and the Frankish Kingdom and conclude by examining the musical climate of late fourteenth-century Avignon in the early period of the Schism. It will also explore relevant cultural issues, such as the impact of cultural dynamics on music and music theory, and the rise of the individual and its impact on polyphonic composition, motets in particular. Students who complete the course successfully will have gained:

  1. experience with representative examples of medieval music;
  2. an introduction to medieval music notation;
  3. some understanding of medieval compositional procedures, particularly those used in Gregorian chant and thirteenth- and fourteenth-century polyphony; and
  4. an introduction to the forms of medieval Christian worship.

The instructor assumes that enrolling students will have completed core music literature courses (MUSICOL 139-240 or their equivalent at another institution), and will be able to sight-sing from standard modern music notations. Prior knowledge of Latin or French, medieval literature, history, or religion is welcome but not expected. Grading will be based on midterm and final essay examinations, two writing assignments, class attendance and preparation. "Preparation" is demonstrated by students' readiness and ability to contribute constructively to discussions and in-class rehearsals and performances by the schola cantorum.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG ONLY

MUSICOL 481 — Special Projects
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: UG W P.I.

MUSICOL 502 — Res Techniques
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Whiting,Steven Moore; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a graduate seminar devoted to developing good habits of research as well as critical skill in reading, writing, and thinking about music and research. The objective of this course is to improve each student's ability to plan, carry out, and write persuasively about a critical and bibliographical research project.

The work of the course entails weekly reading and writing assignments, including critical reading of scholarly essays or articles, and the preparation of various parts of a research project from short abstract to finished paper. Some will relate to a central theme for the whole class and others to a topic of your choice to be developed through the term. All written assignments are to be turned in as carefully edited prose. Class reports will be coordinated with readings and written assignments. Attendance and class participation are required.

Advisory Prerequisite: G.STD.

MUSICOL 505 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC
Music and Cultural Theory

Instructor: Clague,Mark Allan; homepage
Instructor: Anderson,Paul A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

"No theory is good except on condition that one use it to go on beyond."

— André Gide (1869–1951), 1913

MUSICOL 505 "Music and Cultural Theory" (Winter 2007) will be taught by Professors Paul Anderson (American Culture and Center for Afro-American and African Studies) and Mark Clague (Musicology) and surveys the intellectual development of cultural theory as it has engaged with music. This reading intensive graduate seminar will present influential studies in the cultural analysis of music including authors (and texts) such as:

  • Theodor Adorno (Essays on Music),
  • Amiri Baraka (Blues People),
  • Aaron Fox (Real Country),
  • Paul Gilroy (Essays on Music),
  • Kevin Korsyn (Decentering Music),
  • Susan McClary (Feminine Endings),
  • Leonard B. Meyer (Music, the Arts, and Ideas),
  • Ingrid Monson (Saying Something),
  • Fred Moten (In the Cut),
  • Christopher Smalls (Musicking), and
  • Gary Tomlinson (Metaphysical Song).

In addition, we will study the work of Karol Berger (A Theory of Art) ( in preparation for his lecture at Rackham on Friday, March 9, 2007 as well as the ideas of Lawrence Kramer (Musical Meaning) who will speak on campus on February 17, 2007.

Short classic readings by the thinkers who influenced each of the authors examined will prepare seminar members not only to understand the content of each book, but to experience the ideas and traditions of discourse that have influenced and are in turn transformed by them. While it is all too common just to "drop names" of influential theorists in academic discourse today, a useful, working knowledge of these analytical strategies requires an appreciation of their conceptual chemistry and the interactions of authors and ideas in historical context. Cultural theory developed over the course of centuries in often noisy, conjectural, and contingent conversations among philosophers, historians, sociologists, literary critics, and others, including musicologists and ethnomusicologists. Being able to participate in this broader discourse, transforms isolated notions quoted out of context into a web of conceptual threads that can be stretched and rewoven to address new research problems. By getting into conversation with theoretical writings and testing them against sounding art, seminar participants aim to find inspiration not only as wordsmiths and music analysts, but as designers of critical tools and sculptors of ideas.

Course projects include leading discussion, reaction essays, and a major term paper, developed during the course of the seminar. Paper topics will generally address the application of theoretical tools to a student's planned dissertation or other research with the goal of developing a publication.

MUSICOL 505 meets on Central Campus (room tba) with AMCULT 699.002 — Music and Cultural Theory, on Mondays and Wednesdays from 12:30–2:00 pm (3 credits).

This is a heavy reading course.
Undergrads will be able to elect MUSICOL 505 version only with permission of Professor Clague.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 506 — Special Course
Section 001, LEC
Music, Ecstasy and the Brain

Instructor: Becker,Judith O; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the phenomenon of musical ecstasy from the perspectives of cultural context, musical structures, the phenomenology of ecstasy, and the physiology of ecstasy. A few examples of musical ecstasy within the context of religious ceremonies will be the focus of the course. These will include Muslim ecstatic practices from the Middle East and from North India, a Hindu ecstatic practice from Indonesia, a Christian ecstatic practice from Michigan, and time permitting, other examples as well. The course will include readings on the theory of ritual, the theory of musical ecstasy, readings on the specific rituals under discussion, and readings on the physiology of the brain.

Students will be graded on class participation, listening exams and papers covering all perspectives presented in the course.

This course will provide more questions than answers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 514 — Hist Opera 19-20c
Section 001, LEC
HISTORY OF 19th- AND 20th-CENTURY OPERA

Instructor: Geary,Jason Duane; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the nineteenth- and twentieth-century Western operatic repertoire by considering roughly two dozen operas from Rossini to Philip Glass. Its aim is to highlight significant developments in the genre by exploring these operas within a broad musical, cultural, and historical framework. At the center of this exploration will be basic questions surrounding the relationship between music and drama as well as the manner in which this relationship has been approached by composers at different times and coming from diverse national or regional operatic traditions. Grading for this course will be based on class participation, a few short quizzes, and one or two research papers to be undertaken in consultation with the instructor.

MUSICOL 523 — 20th C Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garrett,Charles Hiroshi; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Designed as a survey of Western concert music in the twentieth century, this course traces major shifts in musical style, aesthetics, and function, and places them in social, cultural, and historical context. Among those composers addressed are Debussy, Schoenberg, Webern, Berg, Stravinsky, Ives, Crawford, Still, Bartok, Revueltas, Hindemith, Babbitt, Stockhausen, Cage, Reich, Oliveros, and Dun. Coursework includes reading, listening, score study, brief analytical assignments, a midterm, and a final.

MUSICOL 523 also requires the completion of a term-length independent research paper.

Prerequisite: MUSICOL 240 or equivalent.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 567 — Music of Asia II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Castro,Christi-Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will survey some of the better known musical traditions from West Asia (the Arab World, Turkey, and Iran), South Asia (India and Pakistan), and Southeast Asia (Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines).

MUSICOL 467 is open to music majors and minors as well as non-majors, and a background in music is NOT required. Only graduate students may enroll in MUSICOL 567.

MUSICOL 577 — Medieval Music
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

This class will survey European sacred and secular repertories of monophony and polyphony. It will begin by tracing the origins of Gregorian Chant in Rome and the Frankish Kingdom and conclude by examining the musical climate of late fourteenth-century Avignon in the early period of the Schism. It will also explore relevant cultural issues, such as the impact of cultural dynamics on music and music theory, and the rise of the individual and its impact on polyphonic composition, motets in particular. Students who complete the course successfully will have gained:

  1. experience with representative examples of medieval music;
  2. an introduction to medieval music notation;
  3. some understanding of medieval compositional procedures, particularly those used in Gregorian chant and thirteenth- and fourteenth-century polyphony; and
  4. an introduction to the forms of medieval Christian worship.

The instructor assumes that enrolling students will have completed core music literature courses (MUSICOL 139-240 or their equivalent at another institution), and will be able to sight-sing from standard modern music notations. Prior knowledge of Latin or French, medieval literature, history, or religion is welcome but not expected. Grading will be based on midterm and final essay examinations, two writing assignments, class attendance and preparation. "Preparation" is demonstrated by students' readiness and ability to contribute constructively to discussions and in-class rehearsals and performances by the schola cantorum.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 581 — Special Projects
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 585 — Ethnomusicological Transcription
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Stillman,Amy K

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course combines bi-weekly exercises in ethnomusicological transcription and presentation, readings of significant scholarly contributions, critique of existing notational systems, and discussion related to the visual representation of performed musical sound.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 591 — Musicol Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6

THIRD-TERM REVIEW: RESEARCH PAPER. Beginning in the second term and extending into the third term, a student will develop the topic for his or her third-term paper. In consultation with members of the faculty, the student will chose a research topic that will be original in material or in approach, and will demonstrate the student's ability to pursue a rigorous program of research and writing reflecting contemporary scholarly paradigms. The recommended length for this paper is 35-40 pages of prose, in addition to the bibliography, with appendices, musical examples or transcriptions as needed. Three copies of the paper are to be submitted to the departmental Director of Graduate Studies by September 15 (or the first business day thereafter) of the second year of study. After faculty critique, a revised version will be submitted six weeks thereafter.

Advisory Prerequisite: Master's students only.

MUSICOL 625 — Notation&Editing
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Borders,James M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

After briefly addressing some preliminary questions, this doctoral-level seminar will survey music editions to establish editorial criteria useful to contemporary musicians and scholars. We will then examine current approaches to musical source criticism. Having completed some group editing assignments, students will work on projects of individual interest using the resources of the music library, among others (as available). The instructor has arranged for visits of School of Music faculty who themselves are involved first-hand in editing music. Grading will be based on student participation as well as relative success in completing the assignments, including the final project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSICOL 641 — Early Renaiss Music
Section 001, LEC
The Motets of Josquin Desprez: Function, Style, and Rhetoric

Instructor: Mengozzi,Stefano; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Josquin's fame as a composer is tied to his motets, which include some of the most accomplished and celebrated works of the European Renaissance. In this seminar we will approach Josquin's motets not only from a stylistic point of view, but also in the context of specific Renaissance cultural themes and practices, such as religious devotion, mourning, the blending of sacred and secular, humanism, patron-artist relationship, etc. We will also pay close attention to issues of performance practice. The course is in seminar format: our meetings will consist for the most part of individual presentations and class discussions on topics from the extended secondary literature available.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUSICOL 649 — St Asian Mus:Chin
Section 001, LEC
Chinese Music

Instructor: Lam,Joseph S C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines issues of music and masculinity through Chinese cases.

Students in the course will read current studies on Chinese masculinity, English translations of classical texts on Chinese music and male roles, and biographies of prominent musicians, such as those for Jiang Kui (1155-1221), Zhu Quan (1378-1448), and Mei Lanfang (1894-1961). Students will also analyze selected Chinese musical masterpieces which sonically project notions of Chinese masculinity. These works include, for example, the "Ambush" for the pipa (lute), the "Questions and Answers between the Fishman and Woodcutter" for the qin (seven-string zither), and "Scolding Cao Cao," a theatrical piece.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 760 — Colloq in Ethnomus
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Becker,Judith O; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

The field of ethnomusicology is currently involved in many of the same issues that are redefining anthropology, history, and cultural studies, such as the use of multiple theories of interpretation and discourse, issues of writerly authority, positioning of the scholar in reference to her work, feminism, post-colonialism, and all the other "post...isms" of the turn of this century. This colloquium will provide a forum for the discussion of some of these contemporary issues. Short readings will be assigned each week. The colloquium is required for all incoming graduate students in ethnomusicology. All graduate students in ethno­musicology are strongly urged to enroll; the course is repeatable for credit. Other graduate students may enroll with permission of instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MUSICOL 881 — Special Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6

Individual work and reading for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: For Ph.D. students only.

MUSICOL 900 — Preliminary Exam
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This examination normally includes a listening exam and two essays, the general sense and limits of which have been discussed in advance with the prospective dissertation advisor. One essay will cover the entire period of research. The second will be more closely focused on the proposed dissertation topic.

MUSICOL 990 — Diss-Precand
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. The dissertation proposal will consist of a carefully researched and written description of the proposed topic (approximately 20-25 pages) that will argue for its relevance, feasibility, and originality as a scholarly contribution to the field of musicology. The proposal should also describe the plan of research and indicate as precisely as possible the objectives of the project, the sources to be consulted, the current state of research, and the cultural, musical, methodological, historical, aesthetic, anthropological, critical, analytical and social issues relevant to the topic. If the project involves fieldwork, the proposal should indicate how it will be carried out and what criteria will be applied in the evaluation of data.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

MUSICOL 995 — Diss-Cand
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period. While researching and writing the dissertation, each Ph.D. candidate will present a lecture in a public forum before an audience of students and departmental faculty. This dissertation oral presentation will describe the topic, methodology, and results of his or her dissertation research to date. This lecture will customarily be presented at a point when the candidate can benefit most from the exchange: after enough research has taken place to define the chief issues of the topic but before a large portion has been written. The dissertation in historical musicology must make a significant and original contribution to the field, and otherwise conform to the standards of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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