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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = PHIL
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
PHIL 160 — Moral Principles and Problems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Railton,Peter A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course introduces students to principles of moral philosophy, and provides them with an opportunity to apply what they learn to real-life situations. The overarching goal is to enable students to develop the conceptual resources and argumentative skills they need to think about controversial ethical issues in a critical way. The lecture will offer a systematic introduction to moral theory, aimed at providing students with the resources to analyze moral problems and develop their own moral positions. The primary focus will be normative ethics, that is, philosophical theories about the nature and principles of moral rightness and wrongness. The dominant traditions in normative ethics — natural rights theory, social contract theory, and consequentialism — will be our main focus, though we may also consider egoism, divine command theories, virtue theories, and moral particularism. Some topics from meta-ethics will also be discussed, such as relativism vs. absolutism, subjectivism vs. objectivism, non-cognitivism vs. realism, and the question, "Why be moral?" Throughout an effort will be made to tie questions in ethics to empirical issues in psychology and social theory. Discussion sections will seek both to promote understanding of the lectures and to introduce students to moral issues that arise in some topic of special moral concern. Different discussion sections will focus on different topics: international justice (sections 002, 003), religion and morality (sections 004, 005), and health care (sections 006, 007). Students should enroll in the discussion section that best suits their interests.

PHIL 180 — Introductory Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacPherson,Brian C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

PHIL 180 is a combination of formal and "informal" logic. It covers diagramming argument structures, fallacy theory, Mill's methods, intensional vs. extensional definitions, syllogistic logic, and propositional logic.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Sax,Greg M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Aesthetics: Artistic Value from a Dual Perspective of Philosophy and Art History

Instructor: Moscovici,Claudia

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar is for students who enjoy art, and are curious about why they enjoy it. It combines philosophical analysis of art with our actual appreciation of it — which includes a visit to the museum, oral presentations and artistic projects. Aesthetics — a name derived from the Greek word aesthesis meaning "sense experience" — concerns itself with the study of art. Aesthetic philosophy seeks to understand the principles that underlie our value judgments:

  • What is beauty? Is it objective in any way? How is aesthetic pleasure related to perception?

  • What is artistic talent or genius? What makes something be art?

Such philosophical questions also have a historical dimension, and cannot be answered only in the abstract. Thus, philosophy can benefit from art history. Art historians attempt to answer such questions as:

  • What constitutes artistic value for a given period, group or set of artists?

  • What perceptual/aesthetic problems were specific artists working on?

  • Who sponsored them, and why? How did critics respond to them?

This seminar introduces students to the question of artistic value from a dual perspective, informed by philosophy and art history. Perhaps in this way we can better understand our own responses to art.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Sax,Greg M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our problem: Humans are free. Nothing makes us do a free act. So, if circumstances determine an act, it isn't free. The universe is different. Causes determine every event in accord with natural laws. But humans are parts of the universe. So, every action is determined by its causes. Thus, humans aren't free.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Moral Dimensions of the University

Instructor: Krenz,Gary D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, Theme

This course examines moral dimensions of the University and its faculty, students, and staff in their roles as citizens of an academic community. Our goal is to help students think about how to approach participation in this community and develop their deliberative competencies by questioning academic life and the University from moral and social standpoints. We will organize our inquiries into three domains:  academic integrity; the University as an academic community; the University's moral obligations as an institution.

 

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 005, SEM
fundamental questions

Instructor: MacPherson,Brian C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

We will examine answers given by philosophers through the ages and in contemporary times to fundamental questions such as the existence of God, death and immortality, the nature of right and wrong, and what constitutes art and beauty. This is a discussion-based course where each student will be asked to give an oral presentation on assigned articles. Additional course requirements will include writing short discussion papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Carbonell,Vanessa

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Locke,Dustin Troy

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Locke,Dustin Troy

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Carbonell,Vanessa

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Allers,Michael Collins

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Allers,Michael Collins

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Sundell,Timothy Robert

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Sundell,Timothy Robert

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Staihar,Jim C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Staihar,Jim C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 232 — Problems of Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Proops,Ian N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 234, or 297.

This course is open to students from all areas of the University. No previous work in philosophy is assumed. First-term undergraduates are welcome. The course will provide an introduction to some fundamental philosophical problems drawn from a variety of branches of philosophy. The course also seeks to develop, through written work and intensive discussion, skills in critical reasoning and argumentative writing. Topics will be selected from among the following:

  • determinism, free will, and moral responsibility;
  • arguments for and against the existence of God;
  • egoism, altruism, and the nature of moral obligation; and
  • the ethics of belief and nature of faith.

There will be two required papers and a final in-class writing exercise. Texts are to be determined.

PHIL 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
Baxter (language);
Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
Heinrich (modern culture, film)
Lam (music);
Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
Ning (religious art);
Laing (art history);
Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
Robson (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

PHIL 296 — Honors Introduction to Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 203, 303, or 296.

Logic is typically understood as the systematic and rigorous study of inference and argument — the science of figuring out what follows from what, and why. Formal logic does this by thinking about systems of inference in a mathematical way. We will build on this idea. But logicians aren't just in Mathematics and Philosophy departments anymore. Logic has become an important tool across disciplines. So we will set ourselves two goals: understanding the basic tools of formal logic, and understanding how those tools are developed, extended, and deployed to shed light on problems in philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 297 — Honors Introduction to Philosophy
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Swanson,Eric Peter; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234.

This course considers some distinctively philosophical questions about what we believe and do. In particular: What should you believe? Can you choose what to believe? In what sense are you responsible for what you believe? What should you do? Can you choose what to do? In what sense are you responsible for what you do? Readings will be drawn from classical and contemporary authors.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 303 — Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 203, 296 or 414.

Symbolic logic uses mathematical methods to study reasoning. It creates and studies artificial languages and forms of reasoning that make use of the representations that these languages provide.

Symbolic logic began by studying mathematical reasoning, and is an important part of mathematics to this day. Logical ideas have become an important part of philosophy, and also they form the basis for theoretical computer science.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the field, by studying two important systems of logic: (1) the logic of Boolean connectives (not, or, and), and (2) the logic of quantifiers (in which general statements like "Every triangle has three sides" can be formed).

Unlike most symbolic logic courses, this course will stress connections to computational ideas; for instance, we will explain how Boolean logic provides a basis for the design of digital computers. We will also stress the art of formalization, and will develop general methods for representing reasoning in common sense domains.

Part of the course will deal with the mathematical theory of logical systems. During this portion of the course, students will be asked to master proofs by mathematical induction.

There will be regular homework assignments, a midterm examination, and a final examination.

PHIL 345 — Language and Mind
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

A study of the structure of language; the psychological mechanisms underlying language; the nature of meaning; and the relations among language, thought, and the world.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy course.

PHIL 355 — Contemporary Moral Problems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jacobson,Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 455.

In contemporary life, we are faced with many questions that have moral dimensions, only some of which may be obvious to us. In this course, we will delve into the moral dimensions of a range of contemporary issues, including affirmative action, freedom of expression, abortion, recreational drug use, poverty, civil disobedience, and the treatment of animals. In the process, we will also be examining different conceptions of morality and justice, and the presuppositions about human nature, society, and value that underlie them. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with issues of race and gender and how these categories interplay with the moral issues that we grapple with in contemporary society.

PHIL 366 — Introduction to Political Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Curley,Edwin M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will survey the history of political philosophy in the early modern period by reading five central figures: Machiavelli (The Prince and The Discourses on Titus Livy), Hobbes (Leviathan), Locke (The Second Treatise on Government and the Letter on Toleration), Montesquieu (The Persian Letters and The Spirit of the Laws), and Rousseau (Discourse on the Origins of Inequality and On the Social Contract). Among the topics we'll focus on will be: the relation between politics and morality, the relation between politics and religion, social contract theory, and republicanism. For further information, consult the professor's website: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/emcurley/courses

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction.

PHIL 389 — History of Philosophy: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Loeb,Louis E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This intensive survey examines the development of modern philosophy in Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a critical formative period in modern Western philosophy. Considerable attention is devoted to each of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The focus is on epistemological and metaphysical issues; the figures' moral and political philosophies are not discussed. The course is planned with the needs of philosophy majors and minors in mind; however, the sole prerequisite is one introductory philosophy course.

Topics to be covered include: skepticism about the existence of the material world, theories of perception and of the nature of material objects, the problem of induction, the nature and limits of a priori knowledge, innate knowledge, empiricist theories of meaning, analytic and synthetic truth, necessary and contingent truth, God, substance, causation, free will and determinism (time permitting), the self, the relationship between mind and body, and personal identity. The required reading is in primary philosophical sources, with optional reading in secondary sources recommended.

Students are evaluated on the basis of three papers and a final examinations. There are three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

There will be a CTools (https://ctools.umich.edu/portal) site for PFIL 389 accessible to those who register. A list of books for the course and information about purchasing them will be posted on the site by December 20.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction.

PHIL 399 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 002, SEM
VALUES AND THE ARTS

Instructor: Walton,Kendall L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This seminar will address a cluster of related issues concerning values of various kinds and the arts. We will investigate the nature of aesthetic value, how (and whether) aesthetic value differs from value of other kinds (e.g., moral value), how it is related to other kinds of value (e.g., Do moral failings of a work of art affect its aesthetic value?), and what other-than-aesthetic values works of art, or some of them, might be especially well suited to serve. We will also consider worries about dangerous effects that works of art may have. Readings will be taken from a variety of mostly contemporary and recent sources.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 005, SEM
Freedom of the will.

Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This is a seminar-format course for students with some experience in philosophy. The purpose is to provide advanced training in reading and interpreting philosophical texts and in developing, organizing, and presenting original philosophical ideas.

This term, the seminar will concentrate on the problem of the freedom of the will; we will read texts by St. Augustine, Jonathan Edwards, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Requirements: four short writing assignments and one long research paper. Students may be asked to revise papers in light of comments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 409 — Philosophy of Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Swanson,Eric Peter; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

How can a sentence, a belief, or a picture represent something? This problem — the problem of intentionality — is of fundamental importance to analytic philosophy. We will discuss the problem of intentionality as it presents itself in language, focusing in particular on reference. In so doing we will compare the semantics of proper names ('Fido'), quantifier phrases ('most dogs'), definite descriptions ('the dog in the corner'), and demonstratives ('this').

Readings will include classic work by Frege, Russell, Strawson, Searle, Kripke, and Kaplan.(/P)

The prerequisite for this course is PHIL 345 or PHIL 383, and one course in formal logic. The logic course may have been taken in a computer science or math department.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHIL 345 or 383.

PHIL 414 — Mathematical Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sklar,Lawrence; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

The course will cover propositional logic and predicate logic, with an introduction to the methods of logic and proofs of metatheorems about the systems. There will also be introductory material on logicism, set theory and a proof of the undecidability of predicate logic.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 303 or Grad with a grade of C- or better

PHIL 420 — Philosophy of Science
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Joyce,James M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course offers upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students a broad overview of the philosophy of science. It seeks to clarify the nature of the "scientific method" and to explain its great success. Topics to be covered include: the processes by which scientific hypotheses are confirmed by empirical data evidence, the nature of scientific laws and their role in explanation, the logical and semantic structure of scientific theories, the realism/instrumentalism debate concerning the ontological statue of the unobservable entities and processes that science postulates, the objectivity of science, the distinction between science and non-science. Students will be asked to read about 40 pages of material per week, to write two 10-12 page papers and to take a midterm examination and a final.

PHIL 433 — History of Ethics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Darwall,Stephen Leicester; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The modern period in moral philosophy began with Thomas Hobbes, whose Leviathan (1651) shook the traditional foundations of ethics and forced those who would defend ethics against (what they saw to be) Hobbes' nihilism to do so in a broadly naturalistic framework that took serious account of recent advances in science. Thus began a period of exciting and fruitful moral philosophy that stretched through the end of the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth. Indeed, debates now current in moral philosophy almost always can be traced back to origins in this period. This course will be a study of several of the central writers and texts of this "enlightenment" and post-enlightenment period. In addition to Hobbes, we shall read some of Hutcheson, Butler, Hume, Kant, Bentham, Rousseau, and Adam Smith, and end with a radical critic of this broad tradition: Nietzsche.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 361 OR 366, or Grad with a grade of C- or better

PHIL 439 — Aesthetics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walton,Kendall L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the arts — painting, music, literature, photography, theater, film, etc. — from a philosophical per­spective. We will consider what art is, and will investigate the nature of creation, criticism, interpretation, evaluation, and appreciation. What, if anything, is distinctive about art and aesthetic experience, and how are they important in our lives? What similarities and differences are there between art and aesthetically regarded natural objects? What emotional effects does art of various kinds have on appreciators? How do emotions evoked by works of art relate to the emotions of "everyday life"? In what ways do paintings, novels, music, theater, convey information, promote understanding, help us in acquiring concepts, alter our perspectives or attitudes, or transform our "conceptual scheme"? How do works of art distort or mislead? Does the value of works of art consist in their capacity to move us emotionally, in their capacity to teach, or change attitudes, or in something else?

Advisory Prerequisite: PHIL,One philosophy introduction.

PHIL 455 — Contemporary Moral Problems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jacobson,Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 355.

The purpose of this course is to explore the moral issues confronting us in our daily lives and in our special disciplines. Topics discussed may include abortion, sex and sexual perversion, drugs, death and suicide, civil disobedience, punishment, pacifism, war, problems in medical ethics (eugenics, euthanasia, sanctity of life, organ transplants, defining death), environmental ethics, and the ethics of scientific research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Not open to Graduate students in Philosophy.

PHIL 492 — Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Proops,Ian N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An examination of the work of three major figures in the development of analytic philosophy, paying special attention to their views on the nature of language, logic, and logicism. Topics include:

  • Russell's anti-idealism, his logicism, his conception of the proposition, Russell's paradox and his attempts to resolve it, and the famous "theory of descriptions";
  • Frege's distinction between sense and reference, the "concept horse problem," Frege's logicism;
  • the early Wittgenstein's critiques of Russell and Frege, his logical atomism, his picture theory of the proposition, his views on the inexpressibility of logical category distinctions and the nature of nonsense.

Since there is some small amount of mathematical content in the course, a prerequisite is PHIL 303 or an equivalent course in symbolic logic. There will be two papers and an in-class writing exercise.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 303 or Grad with a grade of C- or higher

PHIL 499 — Senior Honors in Philosophy
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of department.

PHIL 517 — Topics in the History of Philosophy
Section 001, SEM
Spinoza

Instructor: Curley,Edwin M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In The Radical Enlightenment (2001) Jonathan Israel wrote that "the question of Spinozism is… indispensable to any proper understanding of Early Enlightenment thought." This course will look at two works — Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (1670) and his Political Treatise (1677) — which strongly influenced the Enlightenment critique of traditional views in religion and politics. For further information see the professor's website: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/emcurley/courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 596 — Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A faculty-directed independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 598 — Independent Literature Survey
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An independent literature survey in which a student reviews basic literature in a given area of philosophy and writes an extended bibliographic essay that sets forth a range of major positions within that area, indicates how various philosophers fit within this range of positions, and provides critical commentary on the positions, indicating, for example, the chief advantages and disadvantages of each, resulting in a critical bibliographic essay. Students must seek guidance from a faculty member in selecting a reasonable range of works for study. Students are encouraged to carry out such surveys during the summer months. If the ILS is to commence in the Spring/Summer or Fall, initial guidance should be sought the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, initial guidance should be sought no later than the preceding December. The bibliographic essays will be evaluated by the faculty member and may, if appropriate, be certified for distribution

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 599 — Candidacy Reading Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

A faculty-directed candidacy reading course in which a student — having already successfully completed an independent literature survey in the area of his or her projected dissertation — works toward identifying a specific thesis topic and writing a dissertation prospectus, and begins to write material which can be expected to represent some component of the dissertation. If the reading course is to commence in the Fall, students should arrange for faculty direction the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, students should arrange for faculty direction no later than the preceding November. Faculty service in this capacity does not commit the student to asking the faculty member to serve on his or her dissertation committee, nor does it commit the faculty member to agreeing to do so. A student wishing to elect PHIL 599 must submit a proposed plan of study no later than the beginning of the term for which the course is elected. (Students are urged to consult with their advisors and prospective faculty sponsors as early as possible during the planning of their Reading Course). The plan must be accepted by the faculty sponsor of the course within a week of the beginning of the term. A plan will normally not be acceptable if it overlaps significantly with a departmental course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 600 — Advanced Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Independent study program arranged between instructor and student.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 602 — Seminar in Philosophy of Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sklar,Lawrence; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All of our fundamental physical theories have multiple "interpretations." Why do theories need interpretations? What constitutes an interpretation? How is the process of "giving an interpretation" to a theory integrated into the more standard parts of methodology such as accumulating evidence, framing hypotheses and testing hypotheses against the evidence?

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 610 — Seminar in History of Philosophy
Section 001, SEM
Aristotle's philosophy of mind

Instructor: Caston,Victor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This term will focus on Aristotle's philosophy of mind. We will read On the Soul and the short psychological essays collected as the Parva naturalia, especially in light of the controversies of the past two decades, concerning issues such as functionalism, mental causation, his theory of perception, and consciousness.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 615 — Seminar in Philosophy of Language
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ludlow,Peter; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will cover two prima facie distinct topics in the philosophy of language. First, we will look at generalized quantifier theory, and recent extensions of the theory, covering subtopics that include the relation between generalized quantifier theory and logic generally. This will include a description of a class of infinitary languages in which the key properties of generalized quantifiers can be construed as properties of the syntax of those languages, and we will consider the plausibility of taking some of those infinitary languages as describing the syntax of natural language. Second, we will consider the possibility of a generalized expressivist semantics for natural language. The idea will be to give an expressivist account for not only normative claims, but for all natural language constructions. In other words, we will try to treat natural language semantics as being a compositional theory of how complex attitudes are expressed by our utterances. But guess what? We will need to understand generalized quantifier theory to make this work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 640 — Seminar in Ethics
Section 001, SEM
sentimentalist metaethical theories

Instructor: Jacobson,Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar we will explore the revival of interest in sentimentalist metaethical theories. These theories hold that at least some emotions are not mere sensitivities to independently existing values (as perhaps fear is to danger), but play a constitutive role in creating values or giving content to evaluative judgments. Such disparate views as the sensibility theories of McDowell and Wiggins, as well as the expressivism of Gibbard and Blackburn, share this sentimentalism framework. We will be exploring the foundations of such views, paying special attention to their commitments to the rational appraisal of the sentiments. We will also consider relevant issues in the philosophy of emotion: in particular, cognitivism, the phenomenon of recalcitrant emotions, and issues concerning putative "standing" emotions which are not bouts of feeling but long-term attitudes. The course will be organized around an eponymous book manuscript in progress, coauthored with Justin D'Arms.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

PHIL 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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