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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = POLSCI
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
POLSCI 101 — Introduction to Political Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course offers an introduction to some of the major — and even some minor — figures in Western political thought, from ancient Greece to our day. Our goal is to understand how the contributions of various thinkers at different times have helped people answer enduring questions about political life: What is justice? Must we obey political authorities? What may we do in our pursuit of our political goals? The course will combine historical with contemporary readings, as well as a variety of genres (plays, treatises, speeches, etc.).

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for fist and second year students

POLSCI 111 — Introduction to American Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lupia,Arthur; homepage
Instructor: Hutchings,Vincent L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An introduction to American politics with emphasis on the electoral process, the functioning of political parties, and the decision-making process in the national congress, the presidency, and the federal courts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for fist and second year students

POLSCI 140 — Introduction to Comparative Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An introduction to the comparative study of political systems with a focus on the sources, effects, and varieties of democracy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

POLSCI 160 — Introduction to World Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sprinz,Detlef Friedrich

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An introduction to the concepts and theories used to analyze the interaction among actors in world politics. Topical coverage includes military security, international institutions, international political economy, international environmental politics, corruption, and long-term policy issues.

POLSCI 299 — Introductory Internship in Political Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

POLSCI 299 allows political science concentrators to receive credits for a full-time internship of at least eight weeks or the equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Declared political science concentrator.

POLSCI 299 — Introductory Internship in Political Science
Section 018, IND

Instructor: Inglehart,Ronald F; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

POLSCI 299 allows political science concentrators to receive credits for a full-time internship of at least eight weeks or the equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Declared political science concentrator.

POLSCI 300 — Contemporary Political Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Markus,Gregory B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

POLSCI 300 takes up issues that are the focus of contemporary political debate in the U.S., such as taxes and spending, poverty, healthcare, and relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world. Curiosity, initiative, and a willingness to examine ideas and "facts" critically are the essential prerequisites. We will read, discuss, write, and do a lot. You will write seven 1000-word papers over the course of the academic term, worth 70 points altogether. The other 30 points is based on your contribution to class discussions and your documented participation in relevant out-of-class activities. We do not grade on a curve.

POLSCI 302 — Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Manuel,Anne M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The principle theorists who have influenced political thought and development in the period from the seventeenth century to the late nineteenth century.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 101.

POLSCI 308 — Law and the Politics of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kirkland,Anna R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme

This course explores the legal regulation of sexuality in the contemporary U.S. We will explore how law both represses and encourages sexuality, examine how it does so, and ask why, and for whom? What kinds of sexual relationships or activities are illegal, and how do these legal statuses organize citizenship in our nation? We will study aspects of constitutional law, criminal law, family law, and employment discrimination law. Specific topics may include sexual orientation discrimination in employment, marriage and family, civil unions, sex work (prostitution), youth sexuality and statutory rape, social movement organizing, sexuality and citizenship in cross-national perspective, and the role of sexual morality in contemporary political debates.

POLSCI 314 — American Political Parties and Electoral Problems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walton Jr,Hanes; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In this course we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 111.

POLSCI 318 — American Constitutional Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Greene,Lawrence R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

American constitutional law is such a complex subject that it could not be covered in an entire year of study. Therefore, it is my intention, this academic term, to limit the materials discussed in this class to those pertaining to Articles I through VII and portions of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the United States. Those constitutional materials cited herein pertain to the concepts of separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism and judicial review. A thorough understanding of these topics will enable the student to review and understand all other aspects of the Constitution. We will also spend a great deal of time this academic term discussing interpretations of cases, involving constitutional issues by the judiciary from the trial courts to the Supreme Court of the United States. Additionally, time will be spent examining opinions of these courts, having great political ramifications. Some of the cases to be discussed are:

  • Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803),
  • McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. 316 (1819),
  • Luther v. Borden, 48 U.S. 1 (1849),
  • Dred Scott v. Sanford, 60 U.S. 393 (1856),
  • Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896),
  • Coleman v. Miller, 307 U.S. 433 (1939),
  • Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954),
  • Brown v Board of Education, 349 U.S. 294 (1955) and
  • Baker v. Carr, 369 U.S. 186 (1962).

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 111.

POLSCI 324 — Black Americans and the Political System
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Walton Jr,Hanes; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. The course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. Finally, the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science and CAAS 201.

POLSCI 326 — American State Government
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rivers,Lynn N

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

A survey of state government, with emphasis on constitutional development, legislative, executive, and judicial processes; administrative functions; personnel and fiscal problems; nation-state, interstate, and state-local relations; and the future of the states in the federal system.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 336 — Comparative Politics
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Woo,Meredith Jung-En; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Theory and research in the comparative study of political systems. Emphasis on theoretical approaches to comparative politics, models of political change, and empirical cross-national research.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 342 — Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform
Section 001, REC
East European Politics

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS

A survey of the political and social development of Eastern Europe before, under, and after socialism. Major themes include the political cultures of the area, the communist accession to power, totalitarianism and its erosion, elite-mass relations, the role of public opinion and interest groups, and economic and political change. We examine the "transitions" away from socialism and assess current developments in the formerly Communist states.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 353 — The Arab-Israeli Conflict
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Packer,Robert B

WN 2007
Credits: 4

An analysis of the conflict between Israel and Palestinian nationalism as compounded by competition among regional powers and superpowers. Students simulate the roles of the various protagonists in an open-ended game and then critically analyze their performance in light of reality.

POLSCI 358 — Politics of the European Union
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

The course explores the historical development, political-philosophical justifications & the current political structure and institutional design of the enlarged European Union. The class also deals with theories on European integration, European political competition, parties and selected policy areas, as well as the role of EU member states. Particular attention will be paid to implications of the emerging EU polity for a supra-national European identity and for questions of democratic legitimacy.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 363 — International Organization and Integration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: von Stein,Jana Kristen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The first half of this course explores the theoretical literature on international law and institutions. What is international law? When and why do states make international legal commitments? Why do they create international organizations? When and why do states comply with their international legal obligations? The second half of the course is more empirical, seeking to answer the questions outlined above by examining cases in various issue areas such as the environment, trade, human rights, monetary and aid policy, and security.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 001, REC
Terrorism, War and Due Process

Instructor: Greene,Lawrence R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Throughout the history of the United States, in time of national crisis, the federal government has made decisions relating to the protection of the nation from both internal and external forces. One common denominator applicable to all periods of crisis has been the suppression of the guarantees of "due process" mentioned in the Constitution. In this course, we will discuss terrorism, war, and due process. At the conclusion of the term, we should be able to decide if Americans have more to fear in time of national crisis from its elected government or from an enemy force.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 002, REC
Comparative Elections

Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines the problem of how politicians and policies are selected by citizens. The mechanics of elections (rules, procedures) have enormous impact on what sorts of choices voters are offered, what sorts of coalitions politicians form, whose interests get represented in the policymaking process, and, ultimately, what policies are chosen. For this reason, politicians fight tenaciously to shape the rules under which they compete. This course will investigate what rules matter, and why, and will draw from a broad array of cases to examine the most important issues at stake in current electoral reforms, both in the United States and abroad.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 003, REC
The Evolution of Societies

Instructor: Inglehart,Ronald F; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This undergraduate seminar will examine the impact of a wide variety of factors on the evolution of civilizations. The underlying goal is to understand how the societies we live in are changing and are likely to change in the long term, and to understand the choices that will face us. We will examine the impact of a wide range of factors, from genetic evolution to epidemics, variations in agriculture and climate, technological change, economic development, and cultural evolution.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 004, REC
Political &Economic DeveIopmetn In Asia (Honors)

Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Theme

It is widely accepted that development is not simply an economic phenomenon. Political processes are intimately tied up with economic development. Consider the following questions.

  • Does the nature of the political system affect development?
  • Does democracy slow down economic growth?
  • What kinds of links between the state and society promote development?
  • What is the relationship between democracy and economic liberalism?
  • As more and more countries have embraced both political freedoms and market-oriented economic reforms, should one expect both to succeed equally?

Consider some comparative questions now.

  • Why have some countries industrialized faster than others?
  • Why do some countries do better at poverty alleviation than others?
  • Why have some countries been successful in solving the problem of food production, while others have not been?
  • Are their different paths to agrarian and industrial development?

Since the Second World War, an enormous amount of intellectual effort has gone into understanding these issues. Asia has been at the heart of much of this literature. We will compare and contract the various Asian countries and models of development around themes identified above.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 005, REC
Theory & Practice Community Organizing

Instructor: Markus,Gregory B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to develop your capacities as "leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future." (That phrase is from the official mission statement of the University of Michigan.) Through readings, discussion, writing, and practical action, you will learn how to develop organizations that build the leadership capacities of individuals and the democratic power of communities to advance their shared interests. In addition, you will gain insight into how this work can inform basic knowledge about political participation, democratic theory and practice, and organizational processes — and vice versa. Expect to devote approximately 20 hours (plus travel time) to participating in activities and events in metropolitan Detroit as part of this course, in addition to reading, classroom discussions, and periodic writing assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 006, REC
Stalin & Stalinism

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Arguably, Stalin was the most powerful man in the world at the time of his death. He controlled not only the Soviet Union and much of Eastern Europe but also had enormous influence over the near billion people of China. He had turned the revolution of 1917 into an authoritarian dictatorship based on terror and police infiltration, yet was admired by intellectuals and activists around the world and adored by millions of his own citizens. This course will explore the roots of Stalinism, first through the biography of the dictator himself, then through a study of the ideology and practices of the Soviet system in the Stalinist years (1928-1953). Special emphasis will be placed on the Cold War and Stalin's foreign policy, but other topics will include the collectivization of the peasantry, the Great Terror of 1936-1938, and the Soviet struggle against Nazism in World War II.

Besides historical and political science works, students will read some fiction dealing with the period, as well as watch a film from the Soviet Union. The course will be run largely through discussions, though half-period lectures will be interspersed to cover various subjects. The course is appropriate for Honors students both as an introduction into the historical literature on a crucial period of twentieth century history and as a means to understand a society that stands at the opposite pole from democratic capitalist countries. Questions raised by studying the rise and maintenance of a powerful dictatorship, the major opponent of the United States in the Cold War, can help dedicated students to understand the variety of political solutions to problems of social transformation.

Requirements:

  1. All students will complete the readings and participate in the discussions.
  2. All students will prepare a mid-term paper (6-8 pages, typed, double spaced), which will analyze the readings to date.
  3. All students will report on their research and write a final research paper (12-15 pages, typed, double spaced) based on a topic that has been discussed with the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 007, REC
Hist of European Integration

Instructor: Gaggio,Dario

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The construction of the European Union is arguably the most exciting and controversial political experiment today. This aims to introduce students from a variety of humanistic and social scientific backgrounds to the study of European integration and trans-national identity formation, viewed as contested and contingent historical processes. Rather than viewing the history of European integration as an inevitable, linear, and self-contained institutional movement envisioned by a handful of founding fathers and implemented by their followers, we will focus on the often contentious debates which have surrounded the practices and meanings of political and economic governance, citizenship, and cultural identity. Thus topics include not only a historical overview of the institutional innovations which have led from post-WWII reconstruction to the adoption of a single currency (the Euro) in 2002, but also a discussion of how Europeans have encouraged and resisted integrative processes at the levels of technological change, popular culture, and social movements. Particular attention will also be devoted to the evolving relationships between western Europe and the rest of the world, especially eastern Europe, the U.S., and the post-colonial countries.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 010, LEC
Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

WN 2007
Credits: 4

After centuries of expansion, the tsarist empire collapsed in political crisis and military defeat. Within months the Bolsheviks had come to power in Russia and established what they claimed to be the first socialist government in history. This course will explore the fate of that government and the people it ruled, the seventy-four years of "socialist" experimentation, industrial transformation of a backward peasant economy, the establishment of a new type of party-state dictatorship, and the attempts after 1985 to transform the Soviet system that led to the collapse of the state.

Various critiques and explanations of Soviet society, ranging from Western sovietological Marxist, will be introduced and examined through the semester. The goal of the course is to establish the basis for a broader and deeper understanding of Soviet history and to provide material for analysis of the USSR, Russia, and the successor states from a variety of viewpoints.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 390 — Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the "Michigan Journal of Political Science". In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 390 — Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science
Section 104, IND

Instructor: Kinder,Donald R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 396 — Survey of East Central Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kennedy,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world. Lectures and discussions.

POLSCI 400 — Selected Topics in Political Theory
Section 001, REC
Work, Virtue, Citizenship

Instructor: Manuel,Anne M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

What is the relationship between the work you do and your capacity to be a good citizen? How does work shape citizenship in the contemporary liberal democratic context? We will look at political theory texts and a range of other kinds of texts (films, memoirs, etc.) to analyze this question. Linked to the LSA citizenship theme semester.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 101 or 301 or 302.

POLSCI 401 — Feminist Political Theory
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course offers an introduction to feminist theory as it enhances and complicates the study of politics. We will read alternative accounts of the politics of gender, accounts that situate different issues and concerns at their center: e.g., sexuality, domestic and reproductive labor; transnational differences in women's situation and experience, etc. Throughout the course we will be considering how feminist analyses shed light (and sometimes heat) on political concepts of enduring significance: freedom, power, obligation, citizenship, and justice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

POLSCI 410 — Washington Experience Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Goldenberg,Edie N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

The goal of this course is to prepare participants in the Michigan in Washington Program for a semester in the nation's capital. Students review the basic principles of American national government, both structure and process. The course readings are designed to give students a more "hands-on" understanding of politics in D.C. than other usual courses.

POLSCI 463 — War and the Environment: A Lethal Reciprocity
Section 001, SEM
Please send two writing samples and a copy of your transcript to Prof. Singer at jdsinger@umich.edu.

Instructor: Singer,J David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Many of us study, and perhaps worry about, war. Many of us study, and perhaps worry about environmental degradation. But few of us study or worry about them at the same time. In this not-such-fun upper-class seminar, students will do exactly that. We begin with the recognition that: a) war and the preparation for war typically lead to depletion and degradation of the biosphere; and b) resource mal-distributions, depletion, and degradation can frequently lead to armed conflict within and between territorial states. The success of the weekly seminar meetings will be largely dependent on student preparation, in the care and thought that they put into the required and personally selected readings, as well as their ability to engage in lively and mature conversation. My ability to guide and inform the discussion will also help, but more than forty years of fairly competent experience should create a constructive but skeptical, and friendly but precise mode of conversation. Frequency and quality of student participation will account for about 10% of their grade.

Course Requirements: Participation in weekly discussions including, but not limited to, the ability to summarize and evaluate assigned readings orally. One five page paper. One 8-page paper. Optional abstract assignment.

Intended Audience: Junior and seniors in Program in the Environment, Political Science, or other departments with interests in environmental issues and international politics.

Class Format: One 3 hour seminar, once per week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Coursework in environment or political science

POLSCI 481 — Junior Honors Proseminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Discussion of key issues in the various areas of political science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing.

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 001, LEC
Turkish-Armenian Relations in the 20th Century

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J
Instructor: Göçek,Fatma Müge; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to examine the evolution of relations between the Ottoman State/Turkey and Armenians/Armenia. The Genocide of Armenians during the First World War tends to dominate the characterization of these relations and has produced two very opposing narratives. The course will focus on the role of state and non-state actors (European, Turkish and Armenian) in the development of these relations and will consider the role of each discourse in nation and state building.

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 003, LEC
Austrian Politics

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Like many small countries, Austria too has been massively neglected by political and social sciences. Being in the shadow of Germany, Austria — if studied at all — becomes an appendage, an afterthought of its much larger and dominant neighbor. This course will attempt to rectify the situation by placing Austria onto center-stage.

Deeply informed by history, the course will highlight Austria's political, social, economic and cultural development from the 19th century until today. In the process, such key concepts of political science as "consociationalism", class conflict, ethnic divisions, catch-all parties, neutrality, right-wing populism and the European Union as a new federation will be studied in detail.

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 004, LEC
Law & Social Change

Instructor: Bernstein,Richard Howard

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A senior level course taught by faculty on advanced topics in political science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 490 — Game Theory and Formal Models
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Page,Scott E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this class, we will cover the basics of game theory as well as other types of models relevant to political systems. Students must be able to solve systems of linear equations and to take simple derivatives. The analytic models that we cover in class are applied to politically relevant topics.

POLSCI 494 — Senior Honors Proseminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Honors

Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a member of the Department of Political Science faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to senior Honors concentrators.

POLSCI 495 — Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory
Section 001, SEM
Politics and the Arts

Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will explore the relationship between political life and artistic creation. Our focus will be two-fold. First, we will consider how political thinkers — from the ancient, modern, and postmodern traditions — have understood the political contributions (and on occasion the political disruptions) made by poets, dramatists, painters, and the like. Second, we will consider how political thinkers have used various artistic forms to elaborate or develop their own political vision.

Prerequisite: POLSCI 101 or any upper division political theory course.

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing and concentration in Political Science

POLSCI 495 — Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory
Section 002, SEM
Advanced Topics in Democratic Theory

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Jennifer F; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

For the Winter 2007 semester we will focus on the concept of democracy.

  • What do we mean by the term democracy?
  • How democratic is the American political system?
  • What are the elements of American-style democracy that facilitate or resist "exporting" it to other parts of the world?

To address these questions, we will examine a wide range of democratic theory, paying particular attention the concept of popular sovereignty, the nature of republican governments, the necessity of popular participation, and the role of the rule of law in American politics. We will also examine historical and contemporary events in order to sharpen our theoretical insights and conclusions. This is a reading and writing intensive course designed for political science majors with a strong background in political theory. Class meetings will focus primarily on discussing the readings. Careful preparation and active participation is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing and concentration in Political Science

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 001, SEM
Are Americans Good Citizens?

Instructor: Brader,Ted; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

How well do Americans live up to expectations for citizens in a democracy? We begin by considering a range of perspectives on what democracy demands of citizens. We then review evidence on the actual political behavior of Americans to see how they compare to expectations. Over the course of the academic term, we consider what Americans know about politics, their beliefs and values, their level of civic and political participation, the quality of political discussion, and the manner in which they evaluate policies and political leaders.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 002, SEM
Supreme Court & Public Education

Instructor: Krislov,Marvin; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar will explore how law and policy interact in public education (both K-12 and higher), focusing on significant Supreme Court constitutional rulings involving race and/or religion. We will grapple with several questions:

  1. What theory of judicial review should the Court embrace?
  2. How are Court decisions made?
  3. What impact do Court decisions have on policy and practice?
  4. To what extent does (or should) the law limit policy options in these areas?

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 003, SEM
The Regulatory Process. MIW course in WA, DC

Instructor: Dyk,Sally Katzen

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in American government and politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 497 — Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Section 001, SEM
Comparative Constitutional Des

Instructor: Bednar,Jennifer L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Constitutions define the rules by which we are governed. When we write our constitution, we make a contract with one another and with our future selves; we define possibilities and we close doors. This course takes an interest-based approach to the study of constitution-building: through comparisons of nearly a dozen cases we will consider how founders balance short-term (adoption) and long-term (stability) goals. We will examine how different institutional structures create winners and losers in society, and how well founders understand the effect of their designs at the time of adoption. We will study compromises made, evaluating them in terms of both short-term and long-term goals (United States, Israel). We will study constitutional change, thinking about the advantages of meeting the changing needs of society, but also its drawback; the importance of consistency, reliability, legitimacy (Canada, France) We will look at cases where a constitution was imposed upon a society (Japan, Weimar Germany) and where a society borrowed another country's institutional design (Mexico, Argentina), to better understand how local interpretations affect the meaning of the constitution. We will consider the growth of legitimacy as a constitution evolves slowly, and is sometimes not even written (Great Britain, European Union). Many of our cases are federal: one knotty issue is asymmetrical arrangements between the center and the regions (Russia, Canada, European Union). Throughout the course, we will consider the role of courts, of legislatures, and of peoples as interpreters of the constitutional document.

Texts:

  • Constitutions and Political Theory. Jan-Erik Lane. ISBN: 0719046483. Manchester University.
  • The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates. Ralph Ketcham. ISBN: 0451625250. Mentor Paperback.
  • The Strategic Constitution. Robert Cooter. ISBN: 0691058644. Princeton.
  • The Federalist. Hamilton, Madison, Jay. ISBN: 0140444955. Penguin USA.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 497 — Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Section 002, SEM
Research ProbEastAsianPolitics

Instructor: Woo,Meredith Jung-En; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in comparative and foreign governments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 498 — Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Koremenos,Barbara

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in international politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 499 — Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Jackson,John E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

POLSCI 499 is an introduction to methods for empirical research in Political Science. The course addresses strategies for conducting empirical analysis in a non-experimental discipline and discusses the limitations of these analyses. Students are expected to do their own statistical analyses, but previous work in statistics is not required.

POLSCI 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage
Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 585 — Political Environment of Policy Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Parthasarathy,Shobita

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on the political environment within which policy analysis takes place. In the United States, public policies are formulated and implemented in a political system of widely-shared power by participants with many different, and often conflicting, goals. To be effective, policy analysts and public managers must understand this political system. The goal of this course is to provide the student with some of the background necessary to develop strategies for dealing effectively with the political environment of policy and administration.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

POLSCI 592 — Advanced Internship in Political Science
Section 003, IND

Instructor: Edwards,Sheryl L

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6
Other: Expr

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science at the 400-level or above and concentration in Political Science; or Graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor.

POLSCI 592 — Advanced Internship in Political Science
Section 030, IND

Instructor: Page,Scott E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6
Other: Expr

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science at the 400-level or above and concentration in Political Science; or Graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor.

POLSCI 592 — Advanced Internship in Political Science
Section 047, IND

Instructor: Maoz,Zeev

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6
Other: Expr

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science at the 400-level or above and concentration in Political Science; or Graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor.

POLSCI 592 — Advanced Internship in Political Science
Section 096, IND

Instructor: Howard,Margaret Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 6
Other: Expr

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science at the 400-level or above and concentration in Political Science; or Graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor.

POLSCI 603 — Modern Political Thought
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar serves as a medium-depth introduction to some important western political theorists in the modern period. We will focus on theorists not covered in this seminar in winter 2006, so people who took the seminar before may find it worthwhile repeating it. At the same time, no prior experience is necessary. The focus will be on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the primary theorists will be Montesquieu, Hume, Kant, Hegel, and Nietzsche.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 609 — Proseminar in Twentieth Century Political Thought
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to selected approaches and problems in contemporary continental political theory and 20th-century continental political philosophy. Authors include, among others, Theodor W. Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Carl Schmitt, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Jü rgen Habermas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 617 — Proseminar in Legislative Behavior
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hall,Richard L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces graduate students to the research literature on legislative behavior and institutions, focusing primarily on the U.S. Congress. Topics include: representation, including race, ethnicity and gender in representation; roll-call voting decisions, legislative participation, interest group influence, legislative organization, party leadership, agenda-setting, presidential-congressional relations, congressional oversight, Congress and APD.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 626 — Foundations of Institutional Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bednar,Jennifer L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Institutions — from formal mechanisms like separation of powers to informal ones such as culture — coax, constrain, and provide opportunities to individuals. We cannot understand human political behavior without understanding the institutions that create their incentive environment. As such, much of the theoretical science of politics is about the study of institutions. But how much do we understand about them? This course will give us a chance to think about the function and design of institutions and their effect on individual and mass behavior (often called "positive political theory" or the "new institutionalism"). We will consider institutions as information providers, focal points, sanctioning devices, and veto gates. We will study classic problems such as institutional resolutions to collective action problems and the creation of stability through conflict, with theories of institutions that are static (equilibrium-based) as well as dynamic or evolutionary. We will think about institutional interdependence and the consequence of institutional imperfection.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 638 — Field Training
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Svejnar,Jan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

The Integrated Policy Exercise provides students with a week long opportunity to work intensively on a policy issue. The course is held the first week in January. All students participate as part of a team representing different constituencies with an interest in the problem being studied. Working in groups of 7 to 10, students are assigned a role such as lobbying firm or political operative, or economic group. Groups prepare a political strategy to achieve their clients' objectives and to develop policy positions for their group. The week culminates in a negotiation process among all the groups involved. Topics vary each year. (Link to IPE)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 641 — Proseminar in Comparative Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Inglehart,Ronald F; homepage
Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Proseminar designed to provide the participants with an overview of important topics in comparative politics. Each week, the participants will discuss an area of the scholarly literature, usually focusing on a major theoretical controversy. The seminar examines basic methodological questions, competing or alternative conceptual frameworks, and the development of theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 652 — Jewish Political Thought and Experiences: Eastern Europe, America and Israel
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

While there seems to be no systematic Jewish political theory or practice, there are political ideas in ancient, medieval and modern Jewish sources such as the Bible, Talmud and Jewish philosophers. We examine how the ideas have played out under conditions of sovereignty and diasporas, ranging over ancient and modern Israel, Eastern Europe and the United States, with some reference to medieval Spain and modern Western Europe. Communal politics, Bundism, Zionism, and Jews' relationship to Liberalism, socialism and Communism are analyzed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 666 — International Political Economy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focuses on major developments in international monetary and trade relations. Evaluates both theoretical explanations and empirical evidence for current trends. Among the topics studied are how the introduction of the Euro affects international monetary and commercial relations and whether regionalization enhances or diminishes both prospects for global liberalization and the stability of the international system. Explores the role of international institutions in monetary and trade relations and the interaction between domestic politics and international negotiations.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 660 or permission of instructor and Graduate standing.

POLSCI 677 — Proseminar in Southeast Asian Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the politics and political economy of Southeast Asia for graduate students in political science and other departments. The course presents an overview of 5 of Southeast Asia's eleven states (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and Thailand.) In the final weeks of the course we draw on the tools of comparative analysis to place the countries of SEA in a broader comparative perspective. We draw comparisons between the states within SEA as well as between the states of SEA and states outside of the region. We consider the impediments to development and why some states in SEA have been able to overcome these impediments while others have not. Time is devoted to discussing and debating the causes and consequences of the Asian economic miracle and the Asian economic crisis that followed. We also consider the political economy of development in Southeast Asia. Finally, we examine elections, authoritarianism, and democracy across the region.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 680 — Proseminar in Behavioral Research Methods
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kinder,Donald R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed as an introduction to study design, strategies, data collection, and measurement in empirical political science. Emphasis is placed on eclecticism and demonstration by example. Oral presentations and discussion are a regular part of the course. Requirements include a series of brief papers plus a longer paper due at the end of the term, which usually takes the form of a complete, detailed, and polished research proposal.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 681 — Proseminar in Empirical Theory and Method
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lupia,Arthur; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce you to the use of formal models in political science. Most of the course will focus on decision theory and game theory, and we will finish the course with discussions of institutional design, given the strategic interaction of rational agents.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 688 — Selected Topics in Political Science
Section 001, SEM
Asian Security Issues

Instructor: Lieberthal,Kenneth G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar explores security issues in Asia with a focus on the major players: the United States, Japan, the ROK, China, and India. In a region as vast, complex, and diverse as is Asia, there is an enormous tension between covering key countries in greater depth and seeking broader coverage on a more superficial level. This seminar opts for greater depth regarding major players, but in the process it will bring into consideration every part of the region. The seminar will also take up broad functional issues and trends involving the region as a whole.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 688 — Selected Topics in Political Science
Section 002, SEM
Politics in India

Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will present Indian politics in a comparative and theoretical framework. It will focus on five themes:

  • British India and Indian Nationalism;
  • India's democratic experience;
  • politics of ethnic and religious diversity;
  • political economy; and
  • security and foreign policy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 688 — Selected Topics in Political Science
Section 003, SEM
International Environment Policy

Instructor: Sprinz,Detlef Friedrich

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the theories, methods, and approaches to study international environmental policy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the management of long-term environmental issues, the design of institutions, and the evaluation of the performance of international institutions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 692 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

A direct reading on a topic of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 699 — Statistical Methods in Political Research II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Franzese Jr,Robert J; homepage
Instructor: Corrigan,Bryce Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the quantitative empirical methodology of the social sciences. A thorough introduction to linear-regression analysis is complemented by a more preliminary introduction to the analysis of non-linear functional relationships (especially those associated with binary dependent variables). Teaches students how to construct, estimate, and interpret empirical models which match their theoretical counterparts and maximize leverage from available data for the empirical evaluation of those theoretical propositions. Classic linear regression model, extensions thereof, specifications and data issues therein (such as omitted variables, multicolinearity, and multiplicative interactions), criticism of such models, and some introduction to time-series and binary-dependent-variable models.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 599 or equivalent and Graduate standing.

POLSCI 734 — Public Policy in Postsecondary Education
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bastedo,Michael Nelson

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines contemporary higher education public policy issues and provides a general introduction to the policymaking process in the United States. It illustrates the creative tension that characterizes the American federal system and the interplay of different levels and branches of government as they formulate and implement higher education policy. The course will focus on state policy issues as well as on federal higher education policy. Special attention will be given to the topic of affirmative action and public policy. The course will include presentations by guest speakers who will address current issues relating to public policy and higher education. The course has two parts. The first consists of readings and class discussions about public policymaking in general and major higher education policies in particular. The second part consists of in-depth policy analysis briefings that will be conducted by the students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 782 — Political Behavior
Section 001, SEM
Emotions and Politics

Instructor: Brader,Ted; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

This seminar examines a growing body of research on the role of emotion in politics. In the first part of the course, we will consider recent work on emotion in public opinion, participation, elections, and political communication. The second part of the course will serve as a workshop in which participants and guests present work in progress for feedback and discussion of future directions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 795 — Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A research seminar on topics in Russian and East European Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 892 — Directed Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

POLSCI 994 — Candidacy Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Grzymala-Busse,Anna
Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Participants in this workshop seminar circulate and present works in progress, such as funding proposals, dissertation prospecti, conference articles and thesis chapters. Graduate students and invited faculty discussants in comparative politics critique and comment.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

POLSCI 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

 
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