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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = PSYCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 208 of 208
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Malley,Brian Edward

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

Psychology is the study of the mind that is our common and unique inheritance as human beings. It is an exciting field, where our understanding of ourselves is constantly examined, challenged, and extended. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with basic psychological perspectives and theories, to consider the application of psychology to daily life, and to increase understanding of oneself and others. Class consists of two hour-long lectures each week and one two-hour discussion section. Assessment will involve three exams, quizzes, and written assignments.

PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 030, LEC

Instructor: Skibbe,Lori E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

Designed to introduce students to the major topics studied by psychologists including sensation, perception, learning, motivation, physiological and cultural bases of behavior, development, personality, and social psychology.

PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 060, LEC

Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

An introduction to psychology as a broad survey course which explores the various theoretical bases for the understanding of human behavior. Students will learn about the biological processes of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory as well examine the theories of personality, psychopathology, cognitive and social development. Practical applications and contemporary topics will also be explored.

PSYCH 114 — Honors Introduction to Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Inglehart,Marita Rosch

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 112, or 115.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the methods used to study these issues are equally numerous. In order to achieve these objectives, this course will cover a broad area of topics:

Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four levels of analysis, namely (a) on a biological level (brain, behavioral genetics, and evolutionary psychology), (b) a "basic processes" level (perception, learning, memory, information processing, motivation, emotion), (c) on a level considering the person as a whole (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally (d) on a "social / cultural" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social / cultural context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and inter group processes).

In Part 3, we will study one specific problem, namely stress in college, and how psychologists study this problem on a biological level (stress and health, sleep, eating behavior), on a basic process level, on a person-centered level (are there personal styles that might make coping with stress easier?), and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to stress?).

Required text: Gleitman H., Fridlund AJ, & Reisberg D., Psychology. W.W. Norton Company. 2004, 6th edition. A course pack will be available.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors Students

Advisory Prerequisite: Non-honors students must obtain permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem, Theme

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Twins and what they teach us

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar will focus on twinship. Throughout historical time, and across many cultures, twins have been the source of much fascination. In literature, they have served as a metaphor to explore identity, good vs. evil, multiple life options, symmetry, and soul mates, and in science, they have been used to disentangle genetic and environmental influences on health and behavior.

In order to gain an understanding of the experience, influences, and impact of twinship, we will examine literature and films that have used twins, we will interview twins, and parents, siblings, and spouses of twins, and we will consider theory and research on the biology and psychology of twins, and on the impact of recent increases in the incidence of twinning. A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with weekly reading and written assignments. In addition, there will be several group projects and a final exam. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 003, SEM
Global Perspectives on Social Justice: 100 Year Korean American Experience

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar is an interdisciplinary course that explores contemporary experiences of Korean Americans in the United States from a social justice perspective. In the context and course of the first century of Korean-American history, 1903-2003, it examines the unique contributions, struggles, and challenges for social justice in a multiethnic and multicultural America. This class will be conducted in a seminar consisting of lectures, presentations, creative projects, student interaction activities, interactive learning experiences, and discussions. Practical opportunities for socio-cultural teaching and learning experience will be included in the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 004, SEM
Creative work and social change

Instructor: Creekmore,Phillip M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Artists, craftspeople, and cultural knowledge-makers have been instrumental but not acknowledged as creators of social change through the practice of "everyday politics". This seminar will explore several types of creative activities, especially those that involve both visual and narrative materials (pictures and stories). We will study how those activities have produced social change, especially among disadvantaged or stigmatized groups (like youth, persons with brain disorders, prisoners, the elderly, people with HIV/AIDS) in the United States and South Africa. Students will themselves develop the skills to combine creative materials with narrative writing to produce social change.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM
The Human Mind & Brain

Instructor: Polk,Thad A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

How are mental processes like memory, language, and attention implemented in the brain? What is the neural basis of insanity? Of sleep? Of depression? What, if anything, can the brain tell us about consciousness? Within the last few decades, science has made significant progress on these and related questions by studying the effects of brain damage and by recording brain activity in intact individuals. In this seminar, we will survey this exciting field. We will first familiarize ourselves with the structure of the human brain and then learn what is being discovered about how the brain implements a variety of mental processes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

PSYCH 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

PSYCH 200 — Independent Study in Psychological Issues
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Allows students to work closely with a faculty member to study a topic of interest beyond the classroom setting. Students work closely with faculty to design their independent study projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, 120, or 121.

PSYCH 203 — Psychology Honors Seminar: Topics in Social Science
Section 001, SEM
Separation, Loss and Reunion in the Life Cycle

Instructor: Cain,Albert C

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

The course will explore the role of separation, loss, and reunion experiences through the life cycle. Beginning with discussion of the nature and development of attachment, we will explore: the early development of separation anxiety and separation tolerance; normative loss experiences through the life cycle; coping and pathological responses to loss; special forms of loss (adoption, bereavement, divorce, marked geographic mobility, immigration, urban ‘renewal' relocation, the refugee experience); ritual management of loss experiences, societal conceptions of human bonds and their severance as incorporated in laws regulating divorce, removal of parental rights, and adoption; loss experiences as seen in dying patients; the notion of death as ultimate loss or final reunion; and the role loss experiences may play in shaping creativity.The centrality of themes of separation, loss and reunion in human experience will be selectively illustrated from epic poems to "tear-jerker" movies, from classic tragedies to modern light comedy, from pop tunes to operas, short stories, myths, legends, modern poetry. Primary sources of reading will be from psychology and more broadly from the social sciences, the arts, recent history, and clinical case studies, with additional materials from family law. Students will be expected to read widely, participate actively in class discussion, prepare several short papers and presentations, conduct one ‘loss' interview or media analysis, plus a major term paper.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors students and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 001, SEM
Working with Preschool Children

Instructor: Abraham,Shalini Elza

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. This course may only be repeated if a different section is selected.

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions.

The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are three credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the University Online Schedule of Classes for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. All sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children. Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Section 002 — Big Sibs. Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood. Lecture/Discussion time for this section will be Tuesday 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Section 003 — Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society. Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers. Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

More information about Project Outreach can be found at: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/projectoutreach

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 002, SEM
Big Sibs

Instructor: Jaffa,Miriam Nicole

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. This course may only be repeated if a different section is selected.

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions.

The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are three credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the University Online Schedule of Classes for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. All sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children. Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Section 002 — Big Sibs. Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood. Lecture/Discussion time for this section will be Tuesday 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Section 003 — Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society. Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers. Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

More information about Project Outreach can be found at: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/projectoutreach

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 003, SEM
Juvenile and Criminal Justice

Instructor: Arents,Emily Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. This course may only be repeated if a different section is selected.

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions.

The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are three credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the University Online Schedule of Classes for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. All sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children. Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Section 002 — Big Sibs. Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood. Lecture/Discussion time for this section will be Tuesday 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Section 003 — Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society. Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers. Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

More information about Project Outreach can be found at: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/projectoutreach

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 004, SEM
Health, Illness, and Society

Instructor: Marshall,Jennifer Diane

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. This course may only be repeated if a different section is selected.

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions.

The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are three credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the University Online Schedule of Classes for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. All sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children. Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Section 002 — Big Sibs. Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood. Lecture/Discussion time for this section will be Tuesday 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Section 003 — Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society. Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers. Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

More information about Project Outreach can be found at: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/projectoutreach

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 005, SEM
Exploring Careers

Instructor: De Bourg,Pamela M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. This course may only be repeated if a different section is selected.

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions.

The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are three credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the University Online Schedule of Classes for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. All sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children. Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Section 002 — Big Sibs. Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood. Lecture/Discussion time for this section will be Tuesday 4:00-6:00 p.m.

Section 003 — Juvenile and Criminal Justice. Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society. Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers. Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

More information about Project Outreach can be found at: http://www.sitemaker.umich.edu/projectoutreach

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 218 — Sophomore Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM
Foundations of Intergroup Relations.

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This introductory course will examine the theory behind how social identity groups form, how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination) and how people come to understand their own social identity group membership in the context of a society where privilege and power exist. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology or similar social science.

PSYCH 218 — Sophomore Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Learning & Diversity

Instructor: Hagen,John W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Reqs: SS

This seminar introduce students to topics of interest in the field of psychology. Content includes material drawn from current research and scholarship on topics specific to faculty research interests. The goal is to help students understand how the theory and methods of the Social Sciences discipline are applied to particular issues in psychology.

Intended audience: Sophomore or second-term freshman students with an interest in Psychology and related disciplines.

Course Requirements: Varies per instructor, but will include classroom exercises and 2-3 short papers.

Class Format: 3-4 hours per week in seminar format.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology or similar social science.

PSYCH 230 — Introduction to Biopsychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Baron,Scott P

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course surveys the field of biopsychology, an area of study concerned with biological and evolutionary explanations of perception, cognition, and behavior. Because these functions depend on the nervous system, a major focus of the course will be on the structure and function of the brain with an emphasis on brain-behavior relations.

Topics will include: evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behavior; anatomy and development of the brain; neural signaling (neurotransmitters, drugs, hormones); and neural mechanisms of sensory processing, motor control (movement, action), motivated behavior (feeding, drinking), emotion, mental disorders, learning and memory, and language and cognition.

Students must register for the lecture and one discussion/practicum session. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in biopsychology.

Enforced Prerequisites: (PSYCH 111 or 112 or 114 or 115) or (BIOLOGY 162 or 163)

Advisory Prerequisite: Basic familiarity with biology and chemistry

PSYCH 240 — Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gehring,William J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, or 116.

PSYCH 240 — Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Section 020, LEC

Instructor: Cappell,Katherine A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, or 116.

PSYCH 242 — Language and Human Mind
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Epstein,Samuel D
Instructor: Coetzee,Andries W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ID

Students will be introduced to inquiry into the nature of the human mind (cognitive psychology) with particular focus on the Chomskian Revolution in Linguistic Theory. Under this approach, "language" study constitutes a revealing inquiry into the nature of human cognitive capacities. The kinds of questions to be examined include:

1. What is (a) language? What is English? Where is it? Is it inside your head?

2. What is the human mind? Is it the same thing as your brain? Are the words that you are reading now getting in (or coming out) of your brain? What is cognition?

3. Close your eyes; Think of and/or visualize the exact route you would take from your current location back to your dorm. Is there a little movie **in your head**? Is there a map **in your head**? and you "read" it?

4. Suppose I say John hit the clown with the twinkie on his head yesterday. What does that mean? Does it have just one meaning — or more? How can a single stimulus, have multiple meanings? Is there something in your head? How did you "learn" what you know about it, even though you've never heard it before? Did someone give you a lesson about this exact sentence?

PSYCH 250 — Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rowley,Stephanie J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255.

This course provides an introduction to the milestones of human development from conception to death. We describe physical, cognitive, and social growth of normal children with special attention to various cultural contexts of development and the rich diversity of individuals. The content is primarily drawn from research and theories in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. In addition, we will discuss implications for child-rearing, education, and social policy-making so that you can apply the knowledge to meaningful problems. Students will write one major paper and take three in-class exams.

Students will attend two lectures and one discussion section per week.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 250 — Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Section 020, LEC

Instructor: Monk,Christopher Stephen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255.

This course provides an overview of the milestones of human development from conception to death. We examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of children, adolescents, and adults, and the various factors (e.g., genetics, parenting, peer groups, and schooling)that influence development. Our goal is to give you an initial introduction to the main issues, central theories, and dominant research methods in developmental psychology. Although the content is primarily drawn from research and theories in developmental psychology, this course will emphasize the biological mechanisms of development and will integrate relevant neuroscience findings. Requirements include multiple-choice exams and papers.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 270 — Introduction to Psychopathology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hansell,James H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This is an introductory overview of Abnormal Psychology. There will be a two hour lecture and two hour discussion section per week. Grades will be based on in class exams and section assignments. Hansell and Damour's Abnormal Psychology (Wiley Plus edition) will be the primary text. Further information about the course can be found through Coursetools.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 280 — Introduction to Social Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such topics as: social inference, schemas, attribution, conformity and obedience, altruism, stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal attraction, aggression, and attitudes and persuasion. Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 290 — Introduction to the Psychology of Personality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This 4-credit course is intended to be a general overview of the contemporary study of personality and its theoretical background. Great emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with current research and theory on specific personality topics. Examples of some of the topics covered in this course are: personality research methods and assessment; cybernetic and neurobiological approaches to personality; motivation and emotion; learning theory; units of personality (traits, motives, and cognitions); personality development; personality and health; and sociocultural context and personality.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 111 or 112 or 114 or 115

PSYCH 303 — Research Methods in Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This writing-intensive course provides an overview of the how's and why's of research in psychology as a social science, and it covers such topics as ethics, library research, case studies, observations, surveys and questionnaires, laboratory experiments, APA-style writing, and statistics. It consists of a weekly 75-minute lecture on Monday, in which general ideas about research will be presented, and a weekly 75-minute lab in which research projects will be planned and presented.

Prerequisites: A 'gateway' course in psychology as a social science. A basic statistics course (e.g., STAT 350) is required. You should not take this course if you have already taken one of the psychology as a social science lab courses (e.g., organizational, personality, psychopathology, social).

Grades: Final grades are based on three 'objective' quizzes covering terms and concepts covered in class and readings (15% each) and written assignments for the lab (70% total). Each written assignment will be weighted more-or-less by its page length. We encourage you to write drafts of any and all assignments prior to the due dates. If you wish to avail yourself of this option, you will need to work out a mutually-agreed timetable with your lab instructor well in advance of the due date. Attendance per se at lab is not graded but is required: A student cannot pass this course without participating in lab activities and exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 304 — Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups
Section 233, LAB

Instructor: Miller,Jerome

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This class provides instruction and practical experience in teaching or leading a group under the supervision of department faculty. The course extends knowledge of small group behavior and the management and facilitation of small groups, and develops the skills and knowledge necessary to an undergraduate teaching assistant in undergraduate classes at the University of Michigan. This section is only open to students having mentored through PSYCH 305 during a previous term.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 304 — Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups
Section 471, LAB

Instructor: Quart,Ellen J

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This class provides instruction and practical experience in teaching or leading a group under the supervision of department faculty. The course extends knowledge of small group behavior and the management and facilitation of small groups, and develops the skills and knowledge necessary to an undergraduate teaching assistant in undergraduate classes at the University of Michigan. This section is only open to students having mentored through PSYCH 305 during a previous term.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 304 — Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups
Section 537, LAB

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This class provides instruction and practical experience in teaching or leading a group under the supervision of department faculty. The course extends knowledge of small group behavior and the management and facilitation of small groups, and develops the skills and knowledge necessary to an undergraduate teaching assistant in undergraduate classes at the University of Michigan. This section is only open to students having mentored through PSYCH 305 during a previous term.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 001, LAB
Child Care Pract Pound House Course requires practicum hours at Pound House Children's Center. Contact Jasmine Boster, jkboster@umich.edu, (734) 998-8399 for application info.

Instructor: Volling,Brenda L

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development.

All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. Contact Jasmine Boster, jkboster@umich.edu, (734) 998-8399 at Pound House.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 002, LAB
Michigan Mentorship Program Admission is by application and interview. Contact equart@umich.edu for registration information..

Instructor: Quart,Ellen J

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper.

Admission is by application only. Email Dr. Quart (equart@umich.edu) for dates and times of the general informational meetings. Applications are distributed at those meetings.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 003, LAB
 Developmental Lab: SRCD Research Conference

Instructor: Hagen,John W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This class is designed to prepare students to attend the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) conference in Boston, MA from 12:00 noon on Thursday, March 29th, to 12:00 noon on Sunday, April 1st, 2007. More than 5,000 scholars and students attend this conference, which is held every two years. Over 3,000 presentations will be made over a wide range of topics and issues by leading researchers, policy makers, and practitioners from the U.S. as well as many other countries. Prior to attending the conference, students will learn about topics, as well as design and methods in current developmental research. Course material will be presented through readings, lectures, and discussions. Students will choose topics of particular interest to explore in depth before the conference and will attend sessions specific to these interests. Students will also attend sessions on a broad range of topics. Requirements include a conference logbook, article and/or lecture critiques, and a term paper that, along with class participation, are used in determining the grade. For more information on the conference, refer to www.srcd.org.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Students participate in a practicum setting as well as classroom lecture and discussion. Includes completion of readings, journals, projects, papers and examinations as required.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 010, LAB
Alcholism & Other Behav disord Call Stephanie Herzberg, 998-7454 ext. 300 for registration information.

Instructor: Zucker,Robert A
Instructor: Blow,Frederic C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. The Substance Abuse Section (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/index.htm) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide an opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies.

Current projects include: a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involve the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families; other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants.

Students should have an interest in social sciences or health sciences; ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public.

Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening.

Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Students should have a strong interest in learning about research in communities. Fluency in Spanish is desirable, but not required. A car is not required, but is helpful. Candidates must be interviewed before they can register. Interested applicants should contact: Stephanie Herzberg shz@med.umich.edu or call 998-7454.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 306 — Project Outreach Group Leading
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Miller,Jerome

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

A course pack will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 211 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 307 — Directed Experiences with Children
Section 001, LAB
Working with Children at U-M Children's Center. For registration information call 647-6647 or email psych-307@umich.edu

Instructor: Demare,M Ann
Instructor: Blanchard,Beth A

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with children ages 18 months through kindergarten in the UM Children's Centers laboratory preschool programs on campus. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations). This practicum meets laboratory requirements. A lecture relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held bi-weekly. A course pack (under $30) accompanies the lectures, along with several brief written assignments. There is a meeting between the Master/Head Teacher and student at midterm and final designed to guide and reflect the classroom experience and the students growth and development in their interactions with children. Permission of Instructor: contact psych-307@umich.edu

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 308 — Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Davis,Nancy B

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology and Brain, Behavior, and Cognition concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising. Students are selected through an application and interview process. Applications are available in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall, and should be turned in by Monday, November 13, 2006.

Students are required to work 3-4 hours per week as peer advisors in the Undergraduate Office, as well as to attend a weekly, two-hour class on Wednesdays from 4:00-6:00. A required training in peer facilitation and the psychology concentration is scheduled on the first Sunday after classes begin, which is continued in a required extended class period on the second Wednesday after classes begin.

Participation in class discussion and willingness to actively engage in providing and receiving feedback on advising work is of primary importance for this course. Other requirements include weekly readings, short essays, written records of peer advising work, organization and production of Undergraduate Forums on topics of general interest, and an administrative project. The course is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, interactive experiential learning, and supervision of the practicum.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing in the Psychology or Brain, Behavior and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 317 — Community Research
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Creekmore,Phillip M
Instructor: Levin,Dana S

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course involves a community based internship, readings, and a class seminar. The seminar and readings cover research methodologies useful when conducting research on, with and for communities. These include community needs assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. The community experience involves one visit per week to a community-based organization in Detroit to work on projects to improve the well being of children, youth and families. Projects can involve tutoring, developing outreach activities, or working in community education projects. Students in the course will work with one another on a research project designed to meet community interests. Results from this project will be shared with the community-based organizations and the university community through presentations and written reports. Transportation to the community internship is provided.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318/AMCULT 307 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 007, IND

Instructor: Seidler,Rachael D

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 010, IND

Instructor: Rosenblum,Katherine Lisa

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 014, IND

Instructor: Lustig,Cindy Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 099, IND

Instructor: Langenecker,Scott A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 322, IND

Instructor: Becker, Jill

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 351, IND

Instructor: Peterson,Christopher M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 352, IND

Instructor: Olson,Sheryl L

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 363, IND

Instructor: Ellsworth,Phoebe C

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 367, IND

Instructor: Giordani,Bruno J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 419, IND

Instructor: Zhang,Jun

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 422, IND

Instructor: Bieliauskas,Linas A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 458, IND

Instructor: Gehring,William J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 473, IND

Instructor: Polk,Thad A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 524, IND

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 574, IND

Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 579, IND

Instructor: Deldin,Patricia J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 581, IND

Instructor: Garcia,Stephen M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 601, IND

Instructor: Conrad,Frederick G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 006, IND

Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 043, IND

Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 055, IND

Instructor: Hagen,John W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 070, IND

Instructor: Nesse,Randolph M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 188, IND

Instructor: Gone,Joseph P

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 329, IND

Instructor: Gelman,Susan A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 352, IND

Instructor: Olson,Sheryl L

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 361, IND

Instructor: Stewart,Abigail J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 363, IND

Instructor: Ellsworth,Phoebe C

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 370, IND

Instructor: Graham-Bermann,Sandra A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 425, IND

Instructor: Volling,Brenda L

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 431, IND

Instructor: Schwarz,Norbert W

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 457, IND

Instructor: Gutierrez,Lorraine M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 461, IND

Instructor: Ceballo,Rosario E

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 462, IND

Instructor: Crocker,Jennifer K

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 477, IND

Instructor: Ybarra,Oscar

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 481, IND

Instructor: Ward,Lucretia M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 488, IND

Instructor: Gonzalez,Richard D

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 490, IND

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 510, IND

Instructor: Chang,Edward C

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 524, IND

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 527, IND

Instructor: Rowley,Stephanie J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 535, IND

Instructor: Cortina,Lilia M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 538, IND

Instructor: Pole,Nnamdi

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 541, IND

Instructor: Morrison,Frederick J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 544, IND

Instructor: Lord,Catherine

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 574, IND

Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 576, IND

Instructor: Evans,Evelyn Margaret

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 581, IND

Instructor: Garcia,Stephen M

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 590, IND

Instructor: Grant,Adam Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 601, IND

Instructor: Conrad,Frederick G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 326 — Faculty Directed Early Research for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A student may elect a combined maximum of 6 credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 326 and 327.

The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, collects and analyzes data and produces a written report as directed by the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290 with at least a grade of C.

PSYCH 327 — Faculty Directed Early Research for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A student may elect a combined maximum of 6 credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 326 and 327.

The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, collects and analyzes data and produces a written report as directed by the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290 with at least a grade of C.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 014, IND

Instructor: Lustig,Cindy Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 373, IND

Instructor: Lee, Theresa ; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 473, IND

Instructor: Polk,Thad A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 579, IND

Instructor: Deldin,Patricia J

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 588, IND

Instructor: Brown,Stephanie L

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 329 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 329 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 461, IND

Instructor: Ceballo,Rosario E

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 331 — Laboratories in Biopsychology
Section 001, LEC
Applications for Psych 331 are available in 4017 EH and 1343 EH.

Instructor: Mahoney,Megan Marie; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS

The purpose of this course is three-fold:

(1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the Biopsychology Program or in the Cognition and Perception Program with his/her on-going research;

(2) to introduce students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior) or cognitive science;

(3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists or cognitive scientists in laboratory research.

Grades are based on a student's: (1) performance in an individual faculty member's lab; (2) an oral presentation; and (3) term paper that describes the student's research experience.

Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab.

Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4017 East Hall). Students concentrating in Biopsychology and Cognitive Science will receive priority.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. STATS 350 or 425 and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 341 — Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research. The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240 or 345; and STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425

PSYCH 344 — Second Language Acquisition
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Nicholas C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This is an introductory course in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). How adults learn, or fail to learn, a second language is a fascinating question. It involves much of what we know about human cognition, psychology, and language. How best to help learners acquire a second language is an equally important educational issue. In addition to all of the factors which play a role in child language acquisition, SLA also involves effects of variation in second language educational, social and usage environments, ages of acquisition, levels of learner cognitive and brain development, motivation, and language transfer.

This introductory course describes the development of Second Language Acquisition as a research discipline and then reviews current cognitive, linguistic, psychological, educational, and interactional perspectives. The relevance of all of these disciplines motivates the cross-listing of the course across the Departments of Linguistics, Psychology, and the English Language Institute, and one goal of the course is to learn from each others' perspectives. Topics include the description of patterns of second language development and the degree to which there is consistency or variation across learners and languages, the question of modularity and the possibility of contributions of innate linguistic, cognitive, and functional universals, the degree to which language is learned and regularity emerges, connectionist and usage-based approaches to language acquisition, learning and instruction, critical periods and language acquisition, and sociocultural and sociolinguistic determinants.

There are two texts, the first which presents an overview of different theoretical perspectives on SLA, the second which applies SLA research and its implications in classroom contexts. The course is a lecture format with 2 exams and an empirical project, undertaken in groups, which investigates one aspect of SLA. There will be much opportunity for class discussion and participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211

PSYCH 346 — Learning and Memory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Meyer,David E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course covers basic aspects of human memory, as well as advanced topics such as autobiographical memory, emotion and memory, repressed memory, eye-witness testimony, and the neuropsychology of memory. The focus will be on a combination of experimental laboratory research and everyday practical experience. Study of these topics will be pursued through reading of relevant books and journal articles. Class meetings will be devoted to lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and videos. Grades will be based on in-class performance, written exercises, quizzes, exams, and a term paper.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240 or 345

PSYCH 348 — Psychology of Thinking
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shah,Priti R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course reviews our knowledge about higher-level cognition, including thinking, reasoning, decision-making, and problem solving. Multiple approaches to these topics will be considered, including laboratory research, computational models, and developmental, individual differences, and cross-cultural perspectives. Readings will include a textbook as well as original research reports. The course will involve a combination of lectures, discussions, and some hands-on activities including conducting mini in-class experiments and developing computational models. The class will involve regular homework assignments (either problem-solving activities or writing assignments), a midterm, and a final exam.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240

PSYCH 351 — Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Evans,Evelyn Margaret

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture, discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual, group, and class research projects. Students are provided with hands-on research opportunities, conducting observational studies with preschool children, and experimental studies with school-aged children. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement. Course grades will be basedon: three quizzes, an article critique, completion of PEERRS modules, one oral and three written research papers and reports. Attendance at both the lecture and lab sections is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 353 — Social Development
Section 001, LEC
Social Development

Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course will explore the social, emotional and physical development of children in the broader social context. The class will identify the various influences on a child's development and socialization by looking at individual child factors (temperament, resiliency, gender); the role of parents and the extended family, as well as looking to the broader social network available to the child (schools, peers). The class will also investigate cultural and historical events which impact the socialization of the child. Specific topics to be covered include: bonding and attachment; sex-role development; peer relationships; the role of the media; children's literature; day-care and dual-career couples; divorce and single-parenthood; death; childhood illness; traumatic life-events and war.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 250

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250.

PSYCH 359 — Psychology of Aging
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Questions about aging are becoming increasingly important at both an individual and societal level. As life expectancy increases, personal life plans should be reconceptualized, and as the number and proportion of older adults in our society increases, expectations about population needs and potential should to be re-evaluated.

This course will examine adulthood constancies and changes in biology, behavior, and thought. We will learn about typical adult aging patterns, explore the variability, causes, and plasticity of these patterns, and consider the individual and societal implications of them. Throughout the course gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity in aging will be considered. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the usual and possible patterns of development and aging in adulthood. They should have new understanding of changes that they are likely to experience as they get older, and things that they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain an understanding of the needs of older persons and of their potential value to society.

We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S., including discussion of attitudes about the old, demographics of past, present, and future older populations, and conceptual issues relevant to theory and research methods of development and aging. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be considered include physical capacities, health, health care, death and dying, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, wisdom, personality, self concept, emotions, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. We will end the course with an examination of societal services, policies, and careers related to the old.

The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student discussion, but also will include videos, instructor lectures, group work, and student presentations. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 361 — Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Wierba,Elizabeth E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed: to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience; to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 260

PSYCH 371 — Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology
Section 010, LAB

Instructor: Zucker,Robert A
Instructor: Blow,Frederic C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is the first term of a two-term practicum sequence (continuing for a second term is optional). The two-term sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. The Substance Abuse Section (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/index.htm)and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide an opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include:

  • a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women;
  • a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families;
  • other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

    A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants.

    Students should have an interest in social sciences or health sciences; ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening.

    Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

    Students should have a strong interest in learning about research in communities. Fluency in Spanish is desirable, but not required. A car is not required, but is helpful.

    Candidates must be interviewed before they can register. Interested applicants should contact: Stephanie Herzberg shz@med.umich.edu or call 998-7454.

    Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270

  • PSYCH 385 — The Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: De Young,Raymond K

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will explore the techniques available for changing individual environmental stewardship behavior with a focus on achieving durable change. It will be argued that individuals require information and motivation before they are willing to alter their behavior. Furthermore, only certain types and combinations of information and motivation result in long-lasting behavior change. A portion of the course will focus on mind-body techniques and their role in promoting mental restoration and integrated wellness. These states are discussed as possible pre-conditions to deep environmental awareness, concern and stewardship. Students participate in team-based research in which they investigate walking routes in Ann Arbor neighborhoods. The research goal is to design behavior change techniques that encourage regular walking along routes identified as having the potential to enhance mental restoration and environmental awareness.

    PSYCH 400 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, LEC
    Experimental Learning & Memory

    Instructor: Baron,Scott P

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    Course Goals:

    This course is focused on the many aspects of experimental methods of learning and memory, particularly methods of classical and operant conditioning. This course will also prepare students to continue in psychology studies at the under-graduate and graduate levels; it would also be appropriate for neuroscience majors. Students will learn and understand the tenants of Learning Theories and the tools to study such behaviors through textbook readings, original literature, class discussion and exercises and several writing assignments. At the end of the course students should be able to cogently discuss and write research/academic papers and review scientific papers and be able to begin writing their own journal papers.

    Writing Assignments:

    There will be writing assignments throughout the course.

    1. short, in-class assignments will be graded and comments provided by the instructor. Content and organization will be the primary focus of comments.
    2. semi-weekly discussion papers — comments and grades will be based upon clarity of language, language mechanics, as well as content and organization. These will be returned for single revisions which will then be further graded and commented upon.
    3. One Research/Academic Paper: a relatively long (2000 -3000 word) paper to focus on the empirical study of learning. Comments will be made and papers returned for revision. APA format will be used. This paper will be assigned within the first 1/3 of the course.
    4. Experimental Poster: Students will work in groups of two or three to construct posters for in-class presentation. Data will be provided to students from studies similar to those discussed in class. APA journal format will be used. Comments will be made and a revision turned in prior to presentation to the class. Because so much of scientific presentations are done in poster format.

    Writing Instruction:

    Students will be using the APA publication manual, Strunk & White, a text for writing for science as well as tools provided by Sweetland Writing Center to aid in the mechanics and basics of writing. The instructor will be reviewing papers and guiding writing through in-class examples and discussions of students' papers provided anonymously by the students. Comments from the instructor will be provided for each writing assignment. In addition, extra-class discussions with the instructor will be available and the instructor will schedule these if students are not meeting expectations.

    Faculty Role:

    The instructor for this class will provide lectures and reading materials. The instructor will also lead discussions, facilitate small-group discussions, guide writing and comment on writing assignments.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115; and 230, or 240

    PSYCH 400 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 002, SEM
    Neurophysiology of Decision-Making

    Instructor: Berke,Joshua Damien

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: BS

    People and animals alike are constantly faced with decisions, ranging from simple perceptual classifications to complex social games. This seminar will address how the brain manipulates signals in the service of choices, with a strong emphasis on the contributions of individual neurons and neuronal circuit properties. The specific papers covered will depend in part on the interests of participants, but will include studies on the information encoded by cortical, basal ganglia and dopamine neurons, and how such signals reflect processes of evaluation, expectancy and response competition.

    Each student will present 1-2 papers on the neurophysiology of decision-making. This presentation will count for most of the grade, and will require corresponding in-depth background reading and preparation. This is primarily a graduate course but advanced undergraduates may be allowed to enroll if they have an adequate background in neuroscience and cognitive science. Total student enrollment is limited to 24 and is by permission of instructor.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115; and 230, or 240

    PSYCH 401 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, SEM
    Why do people believe in gods?

    Instructor: Malley,Brian Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    From prehistoric times to the present, in diverse societies across the globe, people have believed in gods and other spirits. What is it about these notions that makes them so popular? This class investigates recent research suggesting that these and other widespread religious forms spread because they activate specific predispositions in the human mind. Work in cognitive psychology and cognitive anthropology suggests that religious ideas activate particular memory structures and attentional biases that make them especially likely to be communicated and remembered. Evaluations of student learning will be carried out by means of short essays and weekly assignments.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

    PSYCH 401 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 002, SEM
    Psychology and Consciousness

    Instructor: Mann,Richard D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4

    This course will examine the evolution of human consciousness, as a collective development of increasing awareness and as an individual process moving through stages of increasing subtlety and scope. We will explore the uses of artistic expression, personal narrative, and abstract conceptualization. The work of Ken Wilber, Robert Kegan, Jenny Wade, Don Beck and others present the integral approach to theory, but the primary task of the course is to find uniquely personal, meaningful, and expressive ways to exemplify the many stages and stages of consciousness. Understanding the various means for seeking personal and collective transformation and the numerous obstacles to such development will be a major goal of our work together.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

    PSYCH 401 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 003, SEM
    Health Psychology

    Instructor: Roth,Randy Scott

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will describe the expanding role of psychology in health care. The major topic areas will include the contribution of personality, mood, and socio-cultural factors in medical illness; behavioral approaches to the treatment of medical disorders and chronic physical disability; psychoneuroimmunology; health beliefs and behaviors; and the integration of biological and psychological processes to promote a biopsychosocial model of health care. Specific content areas will further include the prevalence of psychological disturbance among medically ill populations and the effect of psychological intervention on health care utilization. A wide range of medical disorders will be reviewed including heart disease, cancer, stress-related illness, chronic diseases, and pain.

    This course is intended to broaden the student's view of the role of psychology in health care. Student's will be exposed to the growing impact of psychology on conceptualizations of disease and illness and the application of psychological concepts and behavioral therapies in the investigation and remediation of physical illness.

    Student evaluation will include three noncumulative multiple choice and essay examinations and a ten-page research paper on a topic of the student's choice in health psychology.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

    PSYCH 404 — Field Practicum
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 12
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 404 — Field Practicum
    Section 055, IND

    Instructor: Hagen,John W; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 12
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 404 — Field Practicum
    Section 458, IND

    Instructor: Gehring,William J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 12
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 404 — Field Practicum
    Section 534, IND

    Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 12
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 405 — Field Practicum in a University Setting
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 5
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 405 — Field Practicum in a University Setting
    Section 052, IND
    Social Psychology in Community Settings

    Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 2
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    This class presents theories and research on intergroup relations within residence hall communities. Students taking the course have been accepted in a staff position (or as an alternate) in the residence halls for the next academic year, and may register with an override only. Residence staff at Michigan are involved on a daily basis in the articulation and enforcement of community living standards. This course provides social science materials and opportunities for in-depth discussion on building supportive and stimulating multicultural communities in the residence halls. PSYCH 405 uses readings, large group sessions, small group discussions, classroom exercises, and practical experience to enhance each student's ability to analyze approaches to building positive multicultural communities, differences and commonalities among cultural groups, foundations of justice and injustice, and young adult personal and social development.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 405 — Field Practicum in a University Setting
    Section 457, IND

    Instructor: Gutierrez,Lorraine M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 5
    Other: Expr

    Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 411 — Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Robinson,Amorie Alexia

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    The aim of this course is to introduce students to the analysis of group work and facilitation using a multicultural perspective/context. Attention will be given throughout the course to the influence of the intersections between gender, race, attractional orientation, and other identities that can affect group process and facilitation. Theory, research, and cultural, personal, and life experiences of individuals and groups will be explored for the purposes of developing a fuller understanding and appreciation of varying populations that group facilitators may encounter. This course is designed as an experiential process in which what is learned is also experienced and using these experiences for the foundation for learning the concepts and principles presented. Upon completion of this course, you are expected to have built skills for effective analysis of and participation in group work in a multicultural context.

    Through experiential learning and theoretical analysis, we will examine the impact and consequences of social norms, practices, inequities, personal experiences, and psychosocial stressors of those who have been historically stigmatized in American society such as women of color, gay men/lesbians, etc., in order to better understand and appreciate the psychological and emotional struggles they might bring with them into the group process. How best to effectively work with groups regardless of their composition is a goal of this course for each student. Focus will be on the experience of short term groups that are generally formed out of the need for support, education, and consciousness-raising.

    This course is designed as a training course for students intending to facilitate small groups through WOMENSTD 420 (Group Facilitation in Women's Studies). It may also be used as supplementary training for other types of facilitation experiences (i.e., Intergroup Relations and Conflict, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center, Project Community, or Lesbian Gay Bi Affairs Office). As a student in WOMENSTD 419, you are encouraged to apply to participate as a facilitator in WOMENSTD 420 which is a direct application of the WOMENSTD 419 curriculum.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or Psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended.

    PSYCH 416 — Psychology of Asian Americans
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Akutsu,Phillip D; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will provide a critical review of the field of psychology that focuses on Asian Americans and their families and analyze historical, political, and cultural influences that contribute to this research. The course will also examine the reasons for why Asian Americans have received little attention from "mainstream" psychology and the consequences of this practice on current knowledge about Asian American groups and their respective communities. Specific topics that will be discussed in the course include: 1) methodology and research limitations; 2) children/youth and parental relations; 3) family dynamics and intergenerational stress; 4) women and gendered roles; 5) the elderly and role hierarchy; 6) interracial marriages and mixed-heritage children; 7) acculturation and ethnic identity; 8) achievement and the "model minority" stereotype; 9) prejudice, discrimination, and violence; 10) mental health status and treatment; 11) family violence and addictions; and 12) sexuality and sexual orientations.

    Advisory Prerequisite: 1 intro PSYCH

    PSYCH 418 — Psychology and Spiritual Development
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Mann,Richard D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

    • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
    • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
    • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

    By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 420 — Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a natural science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on undergraduate Studies and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

    PSYCH 421 — Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

    PSYCH 422 — Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Reqs: BS
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on undergraduate Studies. STATS 350 or 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 302, 331, 341, or 342.

    PSYCH 423 — Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Other: INDEPENDENT

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies. STATS 350 or 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 302, 303, 331, 341, 342, 351, 361, 371, 381, 383, or 391.

    PSYCH 424 — Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Reqs: BS
    Other: Honors

    The primary focus in Senior Honors I is the development of a research plan in collaboration with the Honors advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the Honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Psychology Honors Program, STATS 350 or 425, and prior research experience

    PSYCH 425 — Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Other: Honors

    The primary focus of this course is the development and execution of a social science research project in collaboration with the Honors mentor.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Psychology Honors Program, STATS 350 or 425, and prior research experience

    PSYCH 426 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Reqs: ULWR, BS
    Other: Honors

    Primary focus is the implementation of an Honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 424 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

    PSYCH 427 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    The primary focus of this course is the writing of an honors research thesis on the honors project.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 425 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

    PSYCH 436 — Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior
    Section 001, LEC
    Drugs of Abuse

    Instructor: Robinson,Terry E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: BS

    This course provides a basic introduction to the neuropsychopharmacology of drug abuse and addiction, and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behavior, mood, cognition, and neuronal function are discussed, and material from studies with humans is integrated with basic studies on the neurobiological basis of drug action and drug abuse — including detailed coverage of synaptic transmission and the distribution, regulation, and integration of brain neurotransmitter systems. The focus is on addictive or illicit drugs, and all the major classes are discussed, including: opiates (heroin, morphine, opium), sedative-hypnotics (alcohol, barbituates, chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline), hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA), and dissociative anaesthetics (PCP). A lecture format is used, with required readings from a text. The course is intended primarily for juniors or seniors concentrating in biopsychology, biology, or the biomedical sciences (e.g., pre-med). Required Text: JS Meyer and LF Quenzer, Psychopharmacology: Drugs, the Brain and Behavior, 2005. Exams and Grading: The course grade will be based on the outcome of three multiple choice/short answer type exams.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230

    Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 and a chemistry course.

    PSYCH 438 — Hormones and Behavior
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cummings,Jennifer A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: BS

    This course will discuss hormonal influences on human and animal behavior. The relations between hormones, brain and behavior will be discussed in a variety of species — from humans to frogs and moths. This class will cover both the diversity in nature, as well as the common threads that govern interactions between hormones and behavior in all animals. Mechanisms mediating the effect of hormones in the brain will be presented. Behaviors to be discussed include hormonal influences on sexual behavior, courtship behavior, parental behavior, aggression, learning and memory, thirst, feeding, cognitive functions, and stress responses.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230 or 240

    PSYCH 442 — Perception, Science, and Reality
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. Since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do, the course is a broadly based course that examines the study of perception from a number of different perspectives: Cognitive psychology and information processing; philosophy of mind and phenomenology; history of psychology and philosophy of science. Particular topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation. The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade. Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu. Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    PSYCH 447 — Current Topics in Cognition and Perception
    Section 001, LEC
    Emotion

    Instructor: Preston,Stephanie D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: BS

    Emotion as a topic in psychology has transitioned in the past ten years from something that was considered by most to be untestable, unscientific and down right embarrassing, to something that can be empirically rigorous, theoretically generative, and downright sexy.

    Thus, many traditional theories in psychology are being altered to account for more recent findings that integrate "cold" cognitive processes with "hot" emotional processes. In order to understand this paradigm shift in psychology, this course will cover a broad range of material on emotion including a historical perspective, evolutionary theories of emotion centering on Darwin, and data from empirical studies looking at behavior, psychophysiology, hormone systems, and neural substrates. We will cross disciplines and cover material in clinical, developmental, social, biological, cognitive, and the neurosciences in order to create an integrated understanding of the role of emotion in psychological processes.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230, 240, or 345

    PSYCH 447 — Current Topics in Cognition and Perception
    Section 010, SEM
    Complexity and Emergence. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

    Instructor: Holland,John H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: BS

    Prerequisites: Either familiarity with programming (no particular language required), or a course in finite mathematics. All technical topics will be defined in class.

    Course Organization: This is a highly interactive class with students from all over campus. You will be expected to contribute to the class discussion and will be graded accordingly. There will be a final paper which you will present to the class.

    Topics: Much of our investigation will center on complex adaptive systems (cas). A cas consists of adaptive (learning) agents with conditional interactions. Typical examples are the central nervous system, a market, the immune system, and the internet. Because of evolution and adaptation, cas exhibit perpetual novelty in their structure and behavior.

    "Complexity" and "emergence" are difficult topics with different meanings in different areas. Rather than trying to provide precise definitions of these terms, we will develop a range of ideas, examples, and intuitions that provide a deeper understanding.

    The order of topics will depend partly upon particular interests of the class, but the following topics, at least, will be covered

    1. Performance systems [sets of condition/action rules].
    2. Signal-passing systems — their pervasiveness from cell biology to language.
    3. Parallelism — systems with many rules active simultaneously.
    4. Agent-based models (models with multiple interacting agents).
    5. Credit assignment — strengthening stage-setting and predictive rules.
    6. Rule discovery — genetic algorithms.
    7. Building blocks — their role in everything from perception to invention.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230, 240, or 345

    PSYCH 458 — Psychology of Adolescence
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cortina,Kai Schnabel; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an overview of current theory and research regarding adolescent development. We will cover many aspects of adolescence and emerging adulthood, including biological, cognitive, and social change; family, peer, and school influences; and both normative and problematic psychosocial development.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

    PSYCH 473 — Developmental Disturbances of Childhood
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cain,Albert C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 270

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

    PSYCH 477 — Current Topics in Clinical Psychology
    Section 002, SEM
    The Scientific Basis of Psychotherapy

    Instructor: Pole,Nnamdi

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Psychotherapy is one of the most commonly used methods to address a host of behavioral, emotional, and existential problems. Current projections estimate that one third of all U.S. citizens will seek psychotherapy at some point in their lives. But what do we really know about psychotherapy? This seminar will provide a guided tour through the scientific literature on psychotherapy. We will begin with a historical overview of the field including a review of the major systems of psychotherapy (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic). We will then devote some time to developing critical skills for reading the scientific literature. These skills will be nurtured throughout the semester as we move through the major research on psychotherapy "outcome" and "process." Outcome research traditionally asks the question, "Does psychotherapy work?" We will explore the field's current position on that question and demonstrate that it leads naturally to the process question, "How does psychotherapy work?" We will discuss the current literature on this question and gain some "hands-on" experience with psychotherapy process measures. Course readings will be supplemented with videotapes and transcript material from actual psychotherapies.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270.

    PSYCH 477 — Current Topics in Clinical Psychology
    Section 003, SEM
    Gender & Sexual Identity in Current Theory & Cinema

    Instructor: Hansell,James H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will explore the psychology of gender and sexual identity through the medium of popular cinema. We will begin with theoretical readings that will provide a context for our analysis of various films dealing with gendered aspects of identity, coming of age issues for males and females, and the psychodynamics of gender and sexual identity development. Students will be expected to write on these topics.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270.

    PSYCH 477 — Current Topics in Clinical Psychology
    Section 010, LEC
    Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence

    Instructor: Olson,Sheryl L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide a broad survey of the field of child and adolescent psychopathology. The primary emphasis is on understanding how and why disorders of childhood and adolescence initially develop and persist across time. Major topics include development of childhood conduct disturbances, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, anxiety disorders, depression, autistic spectrum disorders, responses to traumatic stress, and eating disorders. We also consider approaches to treatment and prevention of these disorders.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270.

    PSYCH 481 — Media and Violence
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Huesmann,L Rowell

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4

    This course examines the theoretical and empirical research bearing upon the connections between mass communication and aggressive behavior. Analyzes depictions of violence in contemporary media and the possible mechanisms through which these depictions can influence attitudes toward violence and violent behavior. The course is designed to explore in-depth the literature on the prevalence of violent themes in television, film, and other popular media, and to investigate the psychological and social mechanisms through which media portrayals might influence attitudes and behavior. The main focus is on media and violence in contemporary American culture, but cross-national comparisons and historical trends are examined as well. Critical attention is given to the linkages between the research literature and issues of media policy.

    Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

    PSYCH 485 — Gender, Mentoring, and Technology
    Section 001, SEM
    Mentoring Gender & Technology

    Instructor: Marra,Tiffany Vera

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Expr

    This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender, and technology and adolescent girl's development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the SmartGirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the Smartgirl.org project. This class will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender).

    PSYCH 485 — Gender, Mentoring, and Technology
    Section 002, SEM

    Instructor: Marra,Tiffany Vera

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Other: Expr

    This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender, and technology and adolescent girl's development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the SmartGirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the Smartgirl.org project. This class will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender).

    PSYCH 487 — Current Topics in Social Psychology
    Section 001, SEM
    Socio-Cultural Psychology

    Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Generally defined as ways of life or folkways, culture influences psychological functions such as cognition, emotion, and motivation. In this course we will examine in detail the role of culture in human psychology. We will start with a general overview of the field of cultural psychology, defining culture, discussing divergent approaches to the study of culture in psychology, and identifying important functions of culture for the humans. We will then discuss a few select topics that have received concerted research attention in the recent years including socialization, culture and cognition, and self. We will then move on to discuss different types of "cultures" including honor culture, American individualism, and global culture. The course concludes with group presentations by students themselves on their own cultures.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 280.

    PSYCH 532 — Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Mahoney,Megan Marie; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4

    Every Winter Term, the Reproductive Science Program offers a course in Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology (MRE 541) which is part of the curriculum of three departments (Cell and Developmental Biology, Biology, Physiology and Psychology). This is a four-credit course for graduate and upper level undergraduate students.

    Mammal Reproductive Endocrinology: A study of the physiological and behavior actions for reproductive hormones, which are responsible for the regulation of the reproductive systems and behavior. Topics include: The properties and mechanisms of action of pituitary gonadotropin and sex steroid hormones, the anatomy and endocrine regulation of the reproductive tracts (reproductive & maternal behavior), mechanisms of fertilization, implantation and development, the (neuro) endocrinology of mating and maternal behavior, pregnancy, and contraception.

    Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415.

    PSYCH 541 — Advanced Topics in Cognition and Perception
    Section 001, SEM
    Design Process Models

    Instructor: Papalambros,Panos Y; homepage
    Instructor: Seifert,Colleen M; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: BS

    Interaction and coordination of decisions based on multi-discipline design analyses is studied in the context of a newly developed artifact. Innovation and creativity are addressed as elements of the design process. Enterprisedesign decisions made on functionality and business criteria are analyzed within organizational, cultural and social models.

    Students propose and test novel analysis methods and design process models.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 240.

    PSYCH 571 — Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology
    Section 001, SEM
    development of behavior problems in toddler- and preschool-age children

    Instructor: Olson,Sheryl L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This seminar focuses on the development of behavior problems in toddler- and preschool-age children. Major topics include the developmental foundations of behavioral adjustment in young children, and biological, psychological, and social contextual risk factors that increase the likelihood that a young child will develop chronic symptoms. Treatment, prevention, and social policy implications also will be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to work in cooperative research teams, and to develop individual projects.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270 and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 614 — Advanced Statistical Methods II
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Gonzalez,Richard D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4

    This course is a continuation of PSYCH 613. Topics covered in this course include multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, principal components, factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance and canonical correlation. A brief introduction to reliability theory, structural equations modeling and hierarchical linear modeling will also be provided.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 613, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 619 — Supervised Research I
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4

    The intent of this requirement is that each student, early in his or her graduate career, undertake a research project roughly the equivalent in scope to a Master's thesis. This individual instruction course requires enrollment under a faculty section number. The First Year 619 Research Project, after written, must be evaluated by two readers. Students can obtain an override from the Graduate Office.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 634 — Human Neuropsychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Reuter-Lorenz,Patricia A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4

    In a seminar format, this course will cover classic and recent works in human neuropsychology. The empirical evidence and theoretical accounts from the study of brain damage will be considered in light of neuroimaging and other cognitive neuroscience evidence pertaining to the same cognitive operations. Our goal will be to compare and contrast the evidence deriving from these different methodologies in order to understand the strengths, weaknesses, and conclusions that can be drawn from each.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 640 — Neural Models and Psychological Processes
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Kaplan,Stephen; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This is a conceptually (as opposed to computationally) oriented course that focuses on the learning process. Unlike many psychological processes, understanding learning is difficult without some familiarity with the behind-the-scenes activities of neurons that make learning possible. The purpose of this course is to explore a set of possible mechanisms that underlie the interaction of mind and environment in the integration, storage and efficient retrieval of adaptively useful information.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 642 — Obesity and Eating Disorders
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Sandretto,Anita M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Metabolic, physiological, and psychological determinants of diet choice and dietary behavior. Disorders in regulation of food intake and different intervention strategies will be discussed. Course integrates readings from experimental literature of both psychology and medicine and provides opportunity to develop and analyze intervention strategies.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    PSYCH 655 — The Psychology of Women
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cortina,Lilia M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course will address key themes in contemporary scholarship on the psychology of women and gender. Samples topics include: women's mental health; sex roles, stereotypes, and discrimination; women's development across the lifespan; gender, work, and achievement; and violence against women. Throughout, we will examine epistemological and methodological issues as they affect the study of these and other psychological phenomena, and we will consider how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality, and other social dimensions. An effort will be made to ensure that coverage in this course links with that in related undergraduate courses (e.g., Psychology of Women; Gender and the Individual), to prepare graduate students for future teaching assignments.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 670 — Research Design and Evaluation in Clinical Psychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Peterson,Christopher M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course covers research methods in psychopathology and clinical psychology. It does so on two integrated levels. The first entails a (relatively) abstract overview of general research issues and the second a (relatively) concrete examination of specific research skills and strategies. Course assignments include a series of exercises that will prepare you to do a research project suitable for the PSYCH 619 (masters) requirement in Clinical Psychology here at the University of Michigan. Class grade is based on satisfactory completion of assignments, class attendance, and sincere participation in discussions.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 674 — Clinical Assessment of the Adult
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Lauer,Roger E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This is the second of a two-semester sequence, with an associated lab (677). Its central focus is the assessment of psychopathology in children and adults. It addresses issues in the structure and use of major clinical instruments, of clinical inference, patterns of cognitive, affective and interpersonal disturbance, conceptual formulations bearing on the psychological development and disturbance, and relevant research.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 677 — Clinical Assessment Laboratory
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Antonucci,Ami

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    This laboratory follows Clinical Assessment Laboratory I and accompanies Clinical Assessment 674. One new instrument is introduced, the Rorschach inkblot test. In this term each student completes two assessments including the Rorschach, the WISC or WAIS, story-telling techniques and other instruments as needed, and participates in the intensively supervised analysis of 4-6 others.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 674. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 678 — Topics in Clinical Psychology: Ethics and Professional Issues
    Section 001, SEM
    Class will meet the first two Thursdays of each Month:

    Instructor: Deldin,Patricia J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    Topics in Clinical Psychology is a two semester course designed to introduce first-year clinical psychology graduate students to the profession of clinical psychology. This course is designed to help you make the transition from "undergrad student" to scientist and clinician. For this second half of the class, we will focus on activities required of therapists.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 681 — Survey of Social Psychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ellsworth,Phoebe C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    This three-term sequence addresses basic professional issues of scientific conduct and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to the first year cohort of the social psychology area and joint program students admitted to social psychology. The first term provides a general orientation to graduate level research in social psychology and focuses on issues like literature searches, the development of research ideas, IRB procedures, the use of the subject pool, and the nature of the publication process. At the end of the first term, students present an extended abstract of their first year research project (619). The second term provides an overview of current faculty research projects. In addition, students regularly discuss progress on their 619 projects with the cohort. During the third term (fall of the second year), students make a more formal presentation of their 619 findings in class, in preparation for their presentation at the social psychology brown bag. Throughout, issues of scientific responsibility are addressed.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 685 — Social Psychological Theories
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    This course is for students who are planning to take the preliminary exam in social psychology during the spring-summer term. It covers the central issues of social psychology based on textbooks and primary sources. Enrollment is limited to students taking the prelim exam.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 682; Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 687 — Methods of Survey Sampling
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Lahiri,Parthasarathi

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Methods of Survey Sampling/Applied Sampling is an applied statistical methods course, but differs from most statistics courses. It is concerned almost exclusively with the design of data collection. Little of the analysis of collected data will be discussed in the course. The course will concentrate on problems of applying sampling methods to human populations, since survey practices are more widely used in that area, and since sampling human populations poses a number particular problems not found in sampling of other types of units. The principles of sample selection, though, can be applied to many other types of populations.

    The course is presented at a moderately advanced statistical level. While we will not develop the mathematical aspects of sampling theory, statistical notation and outlines of some algebraic proofs will be given. A sound background in applied statistics is necessary, since a few algebraic derivations will be presented. Little emphasis will be placed on the derivations. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the notation and results will be needed.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH,Two courses in statistics.

    PSYCH 689 — Culture and Cognition
    Section 001, SEM
    Evolution and Culture

    Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    This ongoing seminar is open only to students actively participating in the Culture and Cognition Training Program. The program encourages the study of thinking in cultural contexts. The goal is to prepare students to explore how cognition is contingent on historical forces and socially situated on the one hand, and to discover how mental processes alter and shape the content of cultural forms on the other. Seminars form the discussion core for the program, but students are also expected to take content and methodology courses in anthropology and to do interdisciplinary research.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology or permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 706 — Tutorial Reading
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4

    Independent study.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 711 — Questionnaire Design
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Kreuter,Frauke

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course is about the development of the survey instrument, the questionnaire. Topics include wording of questions (strategies for factual and non-factual questions), cognitive aspects, order of response alternatives, open versus closed questions, handling sensitive topics, combining individual questions into a meaningful questionnaire, issues related to questions of order and context, and aspects of a questionnaire other than questions. Questionnaire design is shown as a function of the mode of data collection such as face-to-face interviewing, telephone interviewing, mail surveys, diary surveys, and computer-assisted interviewing.

    Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

    PSYCH 719 — Supervised Research II
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 5

    Permission of instructor. This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 719, students must use the individual section number of a faculty member. Overrides can be obtained in the Psychology Graduate Office.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 721 — Mathematical Psychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Zhang,Jun

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This graduate seminar will examine several mathematical techniques in modeling psychological processes. Topics to be covered will include:

    1. Theory of measurement (scale type, extensive/conjoint structure, multidimensional scaling);
    2. Signal detection theory (detectability, bias, ROC analysis, parametric and non-parametric indices);
    3. Social choice and voting theories (ranking, Borda score, Condorcet winner, Arrow's impossibility theorem);
    4. Game theory (matrix game, Nash equilibrium, bounded rationality, theory-of-mind);
    5. Response time theory (counter model, diffusion/random walk model, distributional analysis).

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 745 — Psychology of Language
    Section 001, LEC
    The Mind and Brain of Linguistic Processing

    Instructor: Lewis,Richard L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    How does the mind/brain comprehend and produce language? This course will be a graduate level exploration of major research topics in human language processing, mixing classic results in the field and discussion of current major theoretical debates and state-of-the-art empirical results and methods. We will focus primarily on lexical and sentential levels: how do you compute word meanings and recover or produce the grammatical and semantic relations in a sentence in real time? How do these functions relate to other aspects of cognition? How does context affect these processes? How is memory involved? We will consider both theories of computational function, and theories of how those computational functions are realized in the brain (e.g., what is Broca's area doing exactly?) The course will be interdisciplinary but accessible to students with a range of backgrounds in psychology, linguistics, and cognitive neuroscience, and computer science.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs.

    PSYCH 757 — Social Development
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Sameroff,Arnold J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the factors that play a role in the social development of the child using a transactional ecological framework. The transactional perspective will permit interpreting the relative importance of what the child brings to the situation, the experience that the environment provides, and how each is affected by the other. The ecological perspective permits an analysis of the social environment into subsystems that influence the child including family, school, peer group, ethnicity and economic status. Specific topics to be considered include temperament, attachment, mental health, parenting, social relationships, and alternative family structures.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 759 — Proseminar in Developmental Psychology
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Keating,Daniel P

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    The course is intended for first year students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor. Student must register for both Fall and Winter semesters to receive a grade.

    Advisory Prerequisite: The course is intended for first year Graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor. Student must register for both Fall and Winter semesters to receive a grade.

    PSYCH 779 — Practicum on Ethics
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Pole,Nnamdi

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 2

    This is a two semester course for clinical psychology doctoral students only. It is designed to integrate early clinical experiences with the academic mission of the clinical psychology program and to provide focused didactic training on the ethical principles that govern the practice of professional psychology. We will devote part of each class to group supervision, which will begin with individual "check-ins" followed by in-depth discussion about clinical issues that have emerged during your practicum placements. We will also devote part of each class to reviewing ethical guidelines and dilemmas. You will learn how to apply the ethical guidelines to answer multiple choice questions that will be similar to those that you will encounter on the national licensing exam. You will also apply the ethical guidelines to complex case vignettes that may require more open ended answers. Finally, you will prepare an oral presentation of one of your clinical cases by the end of the semester.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to applicants for the PhD specializing in clinical psychology. Permission of practicum supervisor required

    PSYCH 787 — Psychology of Emotions
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ellsworth,Phoebe C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of research and theory on emotions that cuts across traditional psychological subdisciplines. Emotions are complex, multiply-determined phenomena — they influence our experience, our thinking, our actions, our relationships, as well as our mental and physical health. The character of emotions also changes over the lifecourse and reflects individual differences. This complexivity and significance makes the study of emotion an especially exciting and challenging task for researchers. Three recurring themes will emerge in our discussions over the course of the semester: (1) the functions of emotions, in both present day and ancestral circumstances; and (2) the ways people respond to and regulate their own emotion experiences; and (3) the extent to which cultural and gender-related differences in emotion exist.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

    PSYCH 795 — Integrative Seminar in Development and Mental Health
    Section 001, SEM
    Developmental Psychopathology of Depression and Anxiety Across the Lifespan

    Instructor: Antonucci,Toni C
    Instructor: Lord,Catherine

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 2

    This seminar is going to address the developmental psychopathology of depression and anxiety across the lifespan. The students will prepare a program project grant, including projects of their choice that have some relevance to the topic, and then we will have a site visit and a mock study section to review the grants. We hope to expose the students both to diverse approaches to the psychopathology of mood disorders as well as provide practice with feedback in the process of grant preparation.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 001, SEM
    Decision Consortium

    Instructor: Yates,J Frank

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 3

    This seminar is the primary forum for the Decision Consortium, a University-wide distributed center for scholarship on decision making. Each session involves a vigorous discussion of new ideas and research on problems that have significant decision making elements. The typical session is led by a member of the Consortium who presents recent developments in his or her research program. The session also features discussants who study similar issues who offer their views and suggestions about the problems the presenter seeks to solve. Sessions emphasize vigorous participation by all in attendance, including students.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 002, SEM
    Cognitive Aging: Mechanisms, Interventions, and Implications

    Instructor: Smith,Jacqueline Elizabeth

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Some behavioral aspects of cognitive aging begin early in adulthood whereas others occur in advanced old age. In addition, trajectories of performance on cognitive tasks during adulthood and old age are multidirectional. This graduate seminar will consider experimental, cross-sectional, and longitudinal research about age-related differences and changes in memory, learning, decision-making, and knowledge-based performance. We will discuss theories and findings about basic mechanisms underlying change (e.g., perceptual slowing, interference, system errors), interventions to modify change, and implications for everyday life and society. The course is for graduate students in psychology and related disciplines. As background reading, I recommend Park and Schwarz (Eds.) (1999). Cognitive Aging: A Primer. Philadelphia, PA: Psychology Press.

    Topics will include: What basic aspects of cognitive performance change after age 20: When and why? Can an old dog learn new tricks? Do age/cohort differences inform us about age-related change on cognitive tasks? Does wisdom come with age? Does expertise (knowledge) in a domain compensate at a behavioral level for the effects of brain-related change? Individual differences in level and change in performance: Effects of education, attitudes, lifestyle, and health. Use it or lose it: True or false? The role of motives and emotion in cognitive aging. The role of stereotypes about cognitive decline. Can we separate "normal" from pathological change in advanced old age? Behavioral versus medication intervention strategies: What works? Implications for an aging society (e.g., design of machines, workplace, financial, voting, and communication systems).

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 003, SEM
    Neurophysiology of Decision-Making

    Instructor: Berke,Joshua Damien

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    People and animals alike are constantly faced with decisions, ranging from simple perceptual classifications to complex social games. This seminar will address how the brain manipulates signals in the service of choices, with a strong emphasis on the contributions of individual neurons and neuronal circuit properties. The specific papers covered will depend in part on the interests of participants, but will include studies on the information encoded by cortical, basal ganglia and dopamine neurons, and how such signals reflect processes of evaluation, expectancy and response competition.

    Each student will present 1-2 papers on the neurophysiology of decision-making. This presentation will count for most of the grade, and will require corresponding in-depth background reading and preparation. This is primarily a graduate course but advanced undergraduates may be allowed to enroll if they have an adequate background in neuroscience and cognitive science. Total student enrollment is limited to 24 and is by permission of instructor.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 004, SEM
    Psychology of Teaching & Learning. Jan 19-

    Instructor: Paris,Scott G

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2

    This course is designed to enrich the professional development of graduate students and to enhance the teaching skills of GSIs in Psychology courses. Students in this course will examine and discuss psychological features of teaching and learning that are relevant to college classrooms and students. We will analyze theories, strategies, and resources related to the teaching of psychology courses. This course will capitalize on the expertise of graduate students and faculty in the department as well as other units at UM. We will use a variety of resources and model multiple teaching styles. Students are welcome to enroll in this course or attend occasionally for professional development before or while they are GSIs. The class will meet on 9 Friday afternoons, but please note, the first class will be on January 19th.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 005, SEM
    Bilingualism; Cognition, Development and Education

    Instructor: Ellis,Nicholas C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    We read about and discuss bilingualism, its impact upon cognition and development, and its education. Topics, prioritized by student interest, will be sampled from: the bilingual mind; bilingualism and intelligence; the cognitive consequences of bilingualism — attention, problem solving, and creativity; biliteracy; bilingualism and metalinguistic knowledge; the bilingual lexicon; second language acquisition (SLA) and bilingual first language acquisition; bilingualism and language change; critical periods in SLA; instructed and naturalistic SLA; brain representation in bilinguals; bilingualism and thought; cross-linguistic transfer; cognitive linguistics and SLA; code switching, selection, and control. Students will be expected to read and participate in the discussion of all articles, write a term paper on a topic discussed with the instructor (either a literature review or a research proposal with some pilot work), and present the work from their term paper at the end of the course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 006, SEM
    Complexity and Emergence. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

    Instructor: Holland,John H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Prerequisites: Either familiarity with programming (no particular language required), or a course in finite mathematics. All technical topics will be defined in class.

    Course Organization: This is a highly interactive class with students from all over campus. You will be expected to contribute to the class discussion and will be graded accordingly. There will be a final paper which you will present to the class.

    Topics: Much of our investigation will center on complex adaptive systems (cas). A cas consists of adaptive (learning) agents with conditional interactions. Typical examples are the central nervous system, a market, the immune system, and the internet. Because of evolution and adaptation, cas exhibit perpetual novelty in their structure and behavior.

    "Complexity" and "emergence" are difficult topics with different meanings in different areas. Rather than trying to provide precise definitions of these terms, we will develop a range of ideas, examples, and intuitions that provide a deeper understanding.

    The order of topics will depend partly upon particular interests of the class, but the following topics, at least, will be covered

    1. Performance systems [sets of condition/action rules].
    2. Signal-passing systems — their pervasiveness from cell biology to language.
    3. Parallelism — systems with many rules active simultaneously.
    4. Agent-based models (models with multiple interacting agents).
    5. Credit assignment — strengthening stage-setting and predictive rules.
    6. Rule discovery — genetic algorithms.
    7. Building blocks — their role in everything from perception to invention.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
    Section 007, SEM
    Topics Cognitive Neurosci

    Instructor: Weissman,Daniel Howard

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    A seminar on special topics in psychology. Content varies by term and instructor.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 809 — Logic and Methods of Medical Care Research
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Alexander,Jeffrey A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Principles of the scientific method and the logic of the research process. The logic and methodologies of problem formulation, development of hypotheses and objectives, research design, sampling, operationalism and measurement, coding and analysis strategies.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH,Graduate standing.

    PSYCH 817 — Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Xie,Yu; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1

    This seminar considers methodological issues that arise in research in the social sciences. Themes arise from ongoing research projects at the UM. Visiting researchers provide a brief account of their aims and data before defining the methodological challenges for which they desire discussion.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501.

    PSYCH 819 — Supervised Research III
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4

    This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member. Overrides can be obtained in the Psychology Graduate Office.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 831 — Seminar in Physiological Psychology
    Section 002, SEM
    Evolutionary Psychology

    Instructor: Nesse,Randolph M; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 3

    This graduate seminar will provide an in-depth assessment of the most recent research and scholarship in Evolutionary Psychology. The main text will be the Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology, edited by David Buss, which should be available at a discount. The chapters in this volume provide a surprisingly broad, readable, and sometimes critical assessment of central issues in the field, but we will also use some recent journal articles and chapters from several books critical of Evolutionary Psychology. The exact final list of topics will be determined by the seminar participants. For each topic, we will ask whether the predictions are really derived from evolutionary theory, or whether evolution is used to explain something that has long been observed. We will devote several sessions to strategies for testing evolutionary hypotheses about behavior, and how proximate studies can and cannot help in this endeavor. This foundation will allow us to assess major programs of research in Evolutionary Psychology. This seminar is intended to bring together graduate students from all areas. To make that possible, seats in the seminar will be allocated in part to achieve diversity among different areas. To request admission, please email Professor Nesse at nesse@umich.edu with information about your area, year of graduate study, and special interests.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 731, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 831 — Seminar in Physiological Psychology
    Section 003, SEM

    Instructor: Berridge,Kent C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This is a laboratory course in how to obtain and interpret neural signals from freely-moving animals. It will consist of short lectures followed by hands-on construction of electrode assemblies, implantation and recording of individual neurons and local field potentials. Topics covered will depend partly on the interests of participants, but will include the genesis of electrical signals in the brain, firing patterns of distinct neuronal subtypes, and the oscillatory properties of cortical and hippocampal neural circuits. The objective is for each participant to directly observe activity patterns associated with sleep and awake states, and to record hippocampal "place cells" and theta rhythm using advanced tetrode recording techniques. There will also be an introduction to neurophysiological data analysis techniques. We will meet formally for three hours/week, but this is a highly demanding course that will likely require additional time each week. Preference will normally be given to graduate students, but advanced undergraduates with neuroscience research experience may also be considered. Enrollment is strictly by permission of the instructor and is limited to 12 students;

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 731, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 854 — Seminar in Advanced Personality: Research Techniques
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Lee,Fiona

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    The main objective of the course is to help build a repertoire of research skills that students can bring to bear on their own research interests. As such, the course is designed to provide students with an overview of several methods associated with personality psychology. Particular emphasis will be placed on those methods currently utilized by faculty in the personality area. In addition, the course is designed to expose students to professional issues related to conducting and publishing their research in psychology-related outlets.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 862 — Proseminar in Education and Psychology
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Blumenfeld,Phyllis C; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This second term of the proseminar is a continuation of first term discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning; motivation; and psychoeducational assessment. A major focus is placed on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first year research projects. A required core course in Education for CPEP students.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 875 — Introduction to Child Therapy
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ceballo,Rosario E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    The course will focus on the evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents presenting a wide array of problem behavior and symptomology. Treatment approaches from several different theoretical perspectives will be highlighted — including cognitive behavioral, family systems, psychodynamic, and social learning theory. Discussions will include case material covering a broad spectrum of topics typically encountered in child work, such as ADHD, child abuse and neglect, depression, defiant behavior and delinquency, divorce, sexual abuse, suicidality, and trauma. Clinical material will highlight the importance of gender, race, and cultural issues in the therapeutic process. Collateral work with parents, play therapy, the use of different modalities, and brief treatment approaches will also be addressed. Finally, this course will touch upon other related interventions and efforts at prevention that may be school or community based.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 878 — Psychopathology Through the Lifespan II
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pole,Nnamdi

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This discussion-based course will focus on a critical examination of notable theoretic and scientific issues involved in the study of adult psychiatric disorders as represented in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (4th edition). Performance in this course will be based on a number of sources, including regular participation in class discussions, short thought papers based on assigned readings, an in-class presentation, and a research proposal related to the study of a specific adult disorder. Information regarding required textbooks and other reading materials will be indicated on the first day of class.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 890 — Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health and Illness
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Delva,Jorge; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1.5

    Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 948 — Special Seminar in Psychological Processes
    Section 001, SEM
    Language and Human Perception

    Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4

    This seminar will examine the relationship between language and human perception through the work of the philosopher Donald Davidson. Davidson was arguably one of the most important philosophers of language of the 20th century. On the basis of Davidson's work, an alternative to contemporary cognitive psychology can be considered that is based in the problem of meaning (linguistic and existential) and its relation to thinking and perception. Rather than making language a phenomenon that is derivative from a theory of cognitive functioning, this alternative approach takes language as its focal point and develops a concept of mind that is derivative from a conception of meaning.

    The seminar will be conducted as an informal reading group, with no individual presentations assigned. Each enrolled student will meet individually with the instructor to develop a project or paper. Students from all areas of the psychology department are encouraged participate. Students from other departments are also welcome. The first meeting of the seminar will be Tuesday, January 9 at 4:00 in 1265 East Hall. At this first meeting we will arrange for a regular meeting time that will fit the schedule of the participants. Interested participants (especially those who cannot attend the first meeting) should contact Bob Pachella (pachella@umich.edu or 764-9440).

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology.

    PSYCH 958 — Special Seminar in Personality and Development
    Section 001, SEM
    Sex and Gender: A Developmental Perspective

    Instructor: Ward,Lucretia M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This seminar examines gender role development and sexual socialization, focusing on how children and adolescents come to acquire attitudes, behaviors, and identities related to gender roles and sexuality. Course content will address theories behind gender role development, processes of gender and sexual socialization, sexual identity development, and adolescent sexual behavior. Theoretical explanations of gender role development and sexual identity development will include biological, socialization/social constructionist, cognitive developmental, and gender schema theories. Discussions of agents of gender and sexual socialization will focus on the contributions of parents, peers, and the media. Course requirements include regular thought papers, a short critique, and a larger term paper.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 958 — Special Seminar in Personality and Development
    Section 002, SEM
    Longitudinal and Developmental Methods

    Instructor: Cortina,Kai Schnabel; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    This class introduces traditional and more recently developed multivariate methods for the statistical analysis of change. Starting with theoretical considerations about the concepts of "stability" and "change", particularly in the social sciences and psychology, we will apply different statistical models to real data sets. A deeper understanding of what statistical technique to use given a specific research question will be the focus of this seminar. Reading assignments include nontechnical method papers and chapter and published journal article in which techniques were applied. Cost for the students: $50-$100

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 958 — Special Seminar in Personality and Development
    Section 003, SEM
    Foundations in Teaching & Learning

    Instructor: Miller,Kevin F

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Situated at the intersection of teaching, learning, and subject matter, this course supports understanding of basic theories of learning and development, and the role of psychological and educational theory in the: (a) design of curriculum, (b) conduct of teaching, (c) assessment of learning.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 958 — Special Seminar in Personality and Development
    Section 004, SEM
    Education Psychology Advanced Proseminar: Advanced Issues in Education for Psychologists

    Instructor: Blumenfeld,Phyllis C; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    (Program students are required to sign up for three credit hours.) An advanced seminar on issues in education perspectives for psychologists. It is primarily for third- and fourth-year program students and is a required course. The seminar is designed to identify and review issues critical to "educationalists": researchers, those concerned with issues of training, policy specialists, and practitioners. The major focus is to become broadly conversant with the range of issues associated with the study and practice of education and to use this knowledge to analyze and reflect upon those issues. Participants will be encouraged to relate their scholarly interests to matters of practical significance.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 978 — Special Seminar in Clinical Psychology
    Section 370, SEM
    Child Trauma Practicum

    Instructor: Graham-Bermann,Sandra A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 4

    This course is designed to provide students who already have a good working knowledge of psychopathology in general and the DSM in particular, with specific diagnostic skills. Current issues in psychiatric diagnosis will be discussed and particular attention will be devoted to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Clinical syndromes and interviewing techniques will be illustrated using videotapes and extensive diagnostic practice will be provided. The aim of the course is to provide students with the skills needed to make reliable diagnostic assessments for research and clinical purposes, using the SCID.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
    Section 001, SEM
    Evolutionary Psychology

    Instructor: Nesse,Randolph M; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 5

    This graduate seminar will provide an in-depth assessment of the most recent research and scholarship in Evolutionary Psychology. The main text will be the Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology, edited by David Buss, which should be available at a discount. The chapters in this volume provide a surprisingly broad, readable, and sometimes critical assessment of central issues in the field, but we will also use some recent journal articles and chapters from several books critical of Evolutionary Psychology. The exact final list of topics will be determined by the seminar participants. For each topic, we will ask whether the predictions are really derived from evolutionary theory, or whether evolution is used to explain something that has long been observed. We will devote several sessions to strategies for testing evolutionary hypotheses about behavior, and how proximate studies can and cannot help in this endeavor. This foundation will allow us to assess major programs of research in Evolutionary Psychology. This seminar is intended to bring together graduate students from all areas. To make that possible, seats in the seminar will be allocated in part to achieve diversity among different areas. To request admission, please email Professor Nesse at nesse@umich.edu with information about your area, year of graduate study, and special interests.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
    Section 003, SEM
    Socio-Cultural Psychology

    Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3

    Generally defined as ways of life or folkways, culture influences psychological functions such as cognition, emotion, and motivation. In this course we will examine in detail the role of culture in human psychology. We will start with a general overview of the field of cultural psychology, defining culture, discussing divergent approaches to the study of culture in psychology, and identifying important functions of culture for the humans. We will then discuss a few select topics that have received concerted research attention in the recent years including socialization, culture and cognition, and self. We will then move on to discuss different types of "cultures" including honor culture, American individualism, and global culture. The course concludes with group presentations by students themselves on their own cultures.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 8

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to candidate status. Obtain an override from the Psychology Graduate Office.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    PSYCH 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
    Section 001, IND

    WN 2007
    Credits: 8

    Candidacy enrollment. Open only to those students formally admitted to Candidacy status. Obtain an override from the Psychology Graduate Office.

     
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