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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = QR/2
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 31 of 31
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111, 115, 130, or 160.

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 006, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111, 115, 130, or 160.

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these obj ects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these obj ects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 101, 115, 120, 130, or 160

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 101, 115, 120, 130, or 160

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 112 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a two-hour evening laboratory period each week. Laboratory sections feature planetarium demonstrations, telescope observations, and applications of astronomical techniques. Basic high school math are a prerequisite.

ASTRO 112 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a two-hour evening laboratory period each week. Laboratory sections feature planetarium demonstrations, telescope observations, and applications of astronomical techniques. Basic high school math are a prerequisite.

ASTRO 142 — From the Big Bang to the Milky Way
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Putman,Mary E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to students who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 112.

This course will trace our progress in understanding the nature of the Universe from the early Greeks to today, with emphasis on our current understanding based on Einstein's relativity. The Big Bang Theory will be presented and origin of matter will be traced from the formation of atoms, to the formation of the first stars, to the build-up of galaxies such as the Milky Way. Dark energy and the ultimate fate of the universe will also be discussed in the context of the recent results from space satellites concerning the cosmic microwave background radiation that fills the universe and the large scale distribution of galaxies that form the cosmic web. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic math and science background.

Intended audience: Introductory course for non-science concentrators with an interest in the evolution of the Universe.

Course Requirements: Assigned reading, six homework assignments with some basic math required, and in-class discussion worksheets. Three exams, short answer and multiple choice.

Class Format: 3 hours of lecture weekly

ASTRO 160 — Introduction to Astrophysics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bregman,Joel N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 112, 120, or 130

Discover the extraordinary nature of the astronomy: stars; black holes; galaxies; dark matter; and the universe. This course uncovers the astrophysics behind the most important and common astronomical phenomena in our universe. A major topic is stars and their lives, which can end violently through supernova explosions, leaving behind black holes or neutron stars. This is followed by the study of the Milky Way and its content, other galaxies, and how unseen "dark" matter shapes the universe we see today. We conclude with the origin of the universe and the limitations of looking back in time. In this course, the professor interacts closely with the students, plus the laboratory will provide practical experience in observational techniques, including use of our telescopes. There will be a midterm, final, homework, and lab assignments.

Intended Audience: Introductory course for either non-science concentrators with some math or physics background, or for science concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 or 160.

ASTRO 210 — The Universe Through the Eyes of Magellan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mateo,Mario L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Learn about forefront astronomy discoveries being made with the Magellan Observatory, one of the largest telescopes in the world and the main University of Michigan observatory. We will discuss a variety of exciting ongoing astronomical projects, learning the background behind each of the programs and the potential rewards of the investigations. Students will learn the properties of the telescope and of the instruments available, and how one goes about setting up an observing run to achieve the best results. The course concludes with groups of students working together to create observing proposals to use Magellan in a research project.

There will be a midterm, final, and homework assignments. This course is intended for either non-science majors or science majors.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASTRO 101/111, 102/112, 160, or any 300 or 400 level ASTRO course

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann
Instructor: Perrine,Trilisa M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Textbooks:
Prin of Micro 5th ed. Taylor
Econ of Public Issues 14th ed. Miller

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Textbooks:
Prin of Micro 5th ed. Taylor
Econ of Public Issues 14th ed. Miller

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Kossoudji,Sherrie A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 is designed to help students understand the economic method through the study of the principles of microeconomics. By the end of the semester, students should understand basic concepts in economics (opportunity cost; comparative advantage; marginal utility and marginal productivity; human, financial, and physical capital; externalities; public goods, income distributions, etc.). More importantly, students will be able to use the basic tools of economics. That is, students will be able to solve basic economic problems (Why are airline tickets on the same plane different prices? Why does Verizon bundle products together? Why are fresh water rights at a premium right now? How does discounting relate to mortgage payments?)

Students who plan to continue in economics will have a solid grounding in basic theory and will be prepared for advanced classes. Students who will never take another economics class will be able to explain pertinent economic dilemmas to mom, dad, relatives, friends, and others they want to impress.

Please note that the midterm exam will be 6-8 PM on Feb 21.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Hogan,Chad Augustine

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics.

Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

The course format consists of 3 lectures and 1 discussion section per week.

Note: MIDTERM EXAMS will be from 8-10 PM on Feb 14, Mar 14, and Apr 17.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 100) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 101-109) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Leeds,Michael A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 400.

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 200) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 201-209) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

The oceans of earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

The oceans of earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Arnaboldi,Michela

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

SOC 430 — Introduction to Population Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Barbara A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 530.

This course examines the major population processes: mortality, fertility, and migration. It is an introduction to the technical and substantive aspects of demography.

If you look at the size of the population of a geographic area at two points in time, people are added to that population through births and migrants into the area; people are removed from that population through deaths and migrants out of the area. The study of the determinants of the basic population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration is, thus, actually the study of the determinants of population growth and decline.

There are large differences throughout the world in the rate of population growth and in the level of fertility and mortality of the population. The way fertility, mortality, and migration interrelate to result in population growth is important as a background for understanding many social, economic, and political issues. This course concentrates on the causes of population processes rather than on the effects of population processes.

You will be introduced to basic demographic measures of each of these processes and methods of analyzing them. No formal background in statistics is required, but much of the material is quantitative. The ability to read and understand tables is essential, as well as willingness to try to understand explanations of the results of statistical analyses.

This course does not aim to produce expert population analysts who can do complicated computations. Rather, it aims that students will understand methodological approaches and how to interpret demographic measures and will understand many of the major theoretical perspectives that are important in population research and the evidence that supports or does not support various theoretical perspectives. After taking the course, a student should be able to read an article in a newspaper or magazine that deals with population issues and understand what the issue is about and possess the knowledge and critical perspective to be able to assess the likely validity of the article and what possible problems or additional considerations might be.

There are several in-class exams and one project assignment.

 
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