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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = RCHUMS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 44 of 44
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RCHUMS 220 — Narration
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 221 — The Writing of Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly. RC students have priority for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 230 — Biblical, Greek, and Medieval Texts: Original Works and Modern Counterparts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we shall study foundational texts from the Greek, Old Testament, New Testament, and Medieval worlds and a number of modern works — books, essays, and films — that employ the themes and situations originally set forth in these classical works.

First, we shall examine literature central to the world view of four cultures that have helped shape and continue to inform modern Western consciousness and art. Our focus will be on questions and perspectives concerning the individual's relationship to the divine order, to earthly society, and to the private self that are embodied in such works as: (I) Greek literature: Homer (The Iliad or The Odyssey); Sophocles (Oedipus, Antigone); Euripedes (Medea), Plato (Socratic dialogues); (II) Old Testament: (Genesis, Job); (III): The New Testament (The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. John); (IV): Medieval literature: Dante's The Inferno, Gottfried's Tristan.

In conjunction with these works, we will examine, where feasible, modern counterparts (or adaptations or recreations) of the classic stories or conflicts found in these classical texts. We will read essays and novels, and see films which deal with the same or similar-and perennial-ideas and conflicts. (We will also examine those values and experiences expressed in the original works that seem alien to modern consciousness.) Some of the modern works we will scrutinize are Roman Polanski's Chinatown, Max Frisch's Homo Faber, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ, Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal.

The chief merit of our approach, besides giving the student the opportunity to read and see important and exciting stories, is in the juxtaposing of the old and the new so as to make the student more appreciative of the rootedness in the past of many of our current ideas, problems, and situations. There will be two papers and a midterm and final exam.

RCHUMS 236 — The Art of the Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Von Moltke,Johannes Eugen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The Art of the Film examines the dramatic and psychological effects of the elements and techniques used in film making and television, and some of the salient developments in film's artistic and technological history. This course provides students with the basic tools and methods for film appreciation and study. A lab fee of $50.00 is assessed to pay for the film rentals.

RCHUMS 250 — Chamber Music
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Ervamaa,Katri Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

All students interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two credit hours at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is required for placement in ensembles.

Every student must register for section 001; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit will be enrolled for section 002 as well. For one credit hour, students must participate in one ensemble; for two credit hours, in two or more ensembles.

Additionally, students must participate in class activities, which may include master classes, in-class performances, run-out concerts, etc. Responsibilities include 3-4 hours of weekly practice and one weekly rehearsal/coaching per credit; attendance, punctuality and commitment are mandatory and will be strictly enforced. The end-of-the-year performance is required for all ensembles. Course may be used to satisfy the RC Arts Practicum Requirement.

This is not a mini-course! Students are advised to sign up early in order to facilitate a timely audition and ensemble assignment.

RCHUMS 250 — Chamber Music
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Ervamaa,Katri Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

All students interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two credit hours at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is required for placement in ensembles.

Every student must register for section 001; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit will be enrolled for section 002 as well. For one credit hour, students must participate in one ensemble; for two credit hours, in two or more ensembles.

Additionally, students must participate in class activities, which may include master classes, in-class performances, run-out concerts, etc. Responsibilities include 3-4 hours of weekly practice and one weekly rehearsal/coaching per credit; attendance, punctuality and commitment are mandatory and will be strictly enforced. The end-of-the-year performance is required for all ensembles. Course may be used to satisfy the RC Arts Practicum Requirement.

This is not a mini-course! Students are advised to sign up early in order to facilitate a timely audition and ensemble assignment.

RCHUMS 251 — Topics in Music
Section 001, SEM
Death, Heroism, and Female Characters in the 19th-Century Italian Opera

Instructor: Yoshida,Shinobu

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Before the 1800s, few female characters die at the end of the opera. In the 19th century, however, increasing number of Italian operas featured heroines who for one reason or another expired at the end of the story. In this course we will examine the phenomenon of deaths of female characters in the 19th-century Italian opera, studying the implications of the survival and the kinds of deaths — suicide, murder, illness. While death seems to be the victimization of women, we will question this concept by rethinking the idea of heroism. How is the agency of the female character demonstrated? How is heroism measured?

In this class, we will study works that are performed on today's stages to see how these works affect the way we understand the historical view of heroines as well as our contemporary perspective. These works include Bellini's Norma, Verdi's Rigoletto, Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor, Verdi's La traviata, and Puccini's La bohème.

RCHUMS 253 — Choral Ensemble
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Trotter,John William

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

RCHUMS 255 — Film Experience
Section 001, LEC
Political Dissent in East and Central European Film

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In the years following WWII, the film industries of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Yugoslavia were nationalized, placed under the control of the Communist governments with censorship mechanisms in place at several stages of a film's production process. In spite of this, many filmmakers managed to make films that were politically critical. How they used the visual potentials of film language to do this will be the subject of our discussions in this seminar. In addition, students will be able to improve their skills in writing analytical essays about cinema (four required medium length essays; no exams).

RCHUMS 256 — Studying and Playing Southeast Asian Music
Section 001, SEM
Studying and Playing Southeast Asian Music.

Instructor: Walton,Susan Pratt

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions — all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian and animist traditions. This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact have Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand? How do Indonesian youths transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as do the Javanese, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cyclicity is evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

This course satisfies the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

Book: Balinese Music, Michael Tenzer

RCHUMS 260 — Art of Dance
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Husain,Naghma

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth and twentieth century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film. Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris.

RCHUMS 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
Baxter (language);
Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
Heinrich (modern culture, film)
Lam (music);
Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
Ning (religious art);
Laing (art history);
Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
Robson (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

RCHUMS 272 — 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath
Section 001, LEC
Modernism, the Avant Garde, the Aftermath

Instructor: Potts,Alexander D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, we shall be exploring the many different kinds of work produced by European and American artists during the 20th century. We shall begin with the avant-gardes of the early part of the century, then focus on various forms of modernism and realism produced in the mid-century, and finish with the postmodernism and late modern art of the end of the century. Two issues dominate the survey. First, we shall be studying ways in which modern artists have redefined the nature of the image and art object, both with new forms of painting and sculpture, but also with photographic work and hybrid forms of art such as environments and assemblages. Secondly, we shall be discussing how these various forms of art responded to the political and social realities of the times in which they were made, whether by offering a picture of these realities, or by seeking to make some kind of political intervention in them. The relationship between artistic radicalism and political radicalism will be a key concern, as will artists' strategies for negotiating modernization and consumerism. The course is taught by way of lectures and discussions in sections. There is no course reader, but you will need to buy three textbooks from the Yale University Press series Art of the Twentieth Century (total cost $90). Any further set readings not in these textbooks will be made available on electronic reserve.
Art of the Avant-Gardes, edited by Steve Edwards and Paul Wood.
Varieties of Modernism, edited by Paul Wood.
Themes in Contemporary Art, edited by Gill Perry and Paul Wood.

IV. 4

RCHUMS 280 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Woods,Leigh A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

RCHUMS 281 — Introduction to Comedy and Tragedy
Section 001, LEC
Inside the Dramatic Experience: Script Analysis & the Elements of Theater Production

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 280.

An intensive introduction on how to read a play and interpret it for live stage production. Students will engage the viewpoints of director, actor, and dramaturge (literary/historical specialist) in practical exercises and prepared scenes. Work will begin with Edward Albee's The American Dream and the Midterm will focus on Richard Nelson's collection of scenes Roots in Water. The second half of the semester will concentrate on Caryl Churchill's Cloud Nine. Theoretical readings and written exercises will complement these Midterm and End-of-Term studio productions which will be acted and directed by the members of the course under the direct supervision of the instructor.

RCHUMS 305 — Cultural Confrontation in the Arts
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Walton,Susan Pratt

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU

People of color are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture. The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative artistic works that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own. The artistic works examined in the class will give students first-hand exposure to the unique problems and viewpoints that artists of color experience in relationship to mainstream culture, including issues of conflict, compromise, assimilation and resistance. The course focuses on the three main minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans and African-Americans). This course satisfies part of the requirement for the Arts and Ideas Concentration in the RC. Non-RC students are welcome!

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

RCHUMS 312 — Central European Cinema
Section 001, LEC
Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

  1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
  2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
  3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
  4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

RCHUMS 315 — Representations of History in the Literature and Visual Arts of Rome
Section 001, SEM
The Representation of History in the Literature and Visual Arts of Rome

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course will examine the way in which Romans of the imperial period represented to themselves their history and their Empire. These writers hesitated between different narrative models.

  • Was the Empire divinely ordained as a quasi-aesthetic unfolding of episodes with an origin, a trajectory and a final destiny?
  • Or was it a concatenation of random events?

Different narrative models provided different opportunities for the writer's personal engagement, from vigorous participation to philosophic detachment. Writers did more than gather and arrange information; at times they were forced to confront their own direct implication in the events they described.

  • Opportunities for pride are always welcome, but how does one deal with a story of shame?
  • Why tell that story in the first place?

Interestingly enough, historical narratives were frequently saturated with myth.

  • Does ancient myth provide a suitable (or convenient) political cover for an historian with something to hide?
  • How available is ancient myth to opportunistic revision?

Finally, the course will explore the ways in which ethnic, cultural, or political "others" were inserted into the narrative of Roman history.

  • What role can Jews, Christians, and barbarians play in this story?
  • Is their presence intended to confirm or disrupt Roman power?

Because this course is interdisciplinary, we will be examining both literature and the visual arts.

Literature:

  • Cicero, On the Nature of the Gods;
  • Livy, The Early History of Rome (selections);
  • Virgil, The Aeneid;
  • Suetonius, The Lives of the Caesars;
  • Flavius Josephus, The Jewish War (selections);
  • Tacitus, Agricola and Germania;
  • Marcus Aurelius, The Meditations;
  • The Passion of St. Perpetua and St. Felicitas.

Visual Arts:

  • Roman portrait sculpture;
  • the Sebasteion of Aphrodisias;
  • the Arch of Titus;
  • Roman battle sarcophagi;
  • the columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius;
  • the Arch of Constantine.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 333 — Art and Culture
Section 001, SEM
Art & Poetry of Michelangelo.

Instructor: Willette,Thomas Chauncy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature and cultural theory of Humanism. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention in order to grasp the rhetorical strategies and poetic "figures" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his eloquent marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the primary source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry — notably the sonnet, the madrigal and the epitaph — as well as the language employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. We will study a considerable portion of his production in sculpture, painting and architecture while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome.

Course Requirements: Short assignments given in class; 4-5 short papers (2-3 pgs); midterm blue-book exam; substantial term paper, with preliminary draft.

Intended Audience: Upper-class undergrads

Class Format: 3 contact hours per week in seminar format

RCHUMS 333 — Art and Culture
Section 003, SEM
The Symphonic Century: Music and Revolution in the 19th Century

Instructor: André,Naomi A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Punctuated by revolutions, the 19th century was an era marked by social, political, and economic unrest. From the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century through the multiple rebellions in 1848, the Franco-Prussian War in 1871, and the instability that led to the first World War, the spirit of revolution ran strong in the 19th century.

This course looks at the evolution of one of the premiere musical genres of the 19th century — the symphony — within the larger context of its time. How do the early beginnings that emphasize a strict adherence to musical form reflect the social upheaval brought on through the French Revolution? In a time of strong juxtapositions, how does the symphony articulate the aesthetics of the sublime and the beautiful, the monumental and the miniature, the public and the private, the individual and the nation?

In this class we will examine the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz, Tchaikovsky, Dvořák, Brahms, and Mahler. Attention to musical form and style, composer biography and placement in music history, and contemporary musicological methodologies will be presented in a way that engages those from all musical backgrounds (no prerequisites required).


RCHUMS 342 — Representing the Holocaust in Literature, Film and the Visual Arts
Section 001, SEM
Holocaust Literature

Instructor: Goertz,Karein K

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

No memory or physical trace of the Holocaust was meant to survive. Yet in its wake, the genocide left a vast body of literature by survivors and their children. This writing demands active moral, intellectual and emotional engagement; it calls upon readers to become co-witnesses. This seminar explores the various forms bearing witness has taken over several generations — from personal testimonies and memoirs to novels, poems, films and the visual arts.

What are the particular merits and pitfalls of each genre? How do autobiographical and imaginary accounts enhance, transform or compromise the historical document? We will examine the transition from history into story, memory to postmemory to ascertain how and what generations born after the Holocaust, in a time still plagued by war and genocide, can learn from this event. Our readings will draw on larger discussions in the fields of historiography, psychology, film and literary criticism about the disruptive effect of trauma on memory and representation.

Additional Class sessions: We will meet on Wednesday evening five times during the academic term for film screenings. A visit to the Holocaust Memorial Center in West Bloomfield is also being planned.

Required Books:

  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz;
  • Charlotte Delbo, Days and Memory;
  • Ruth Kluger, Still Alive;
  • Tadeusz Bobrowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentleman;
  • Peter Weiss, The Investigation;
  • Jerzy Kosiński, The Painted Bird;
  • Georges Perec, W or the Memory of Childhood;
  • Henri Raczymow, Writing the Book of Esther;
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus; and
  • a course packet.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

RCHUMS 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC
Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

RCHUMS 350 — Creative Musicianship
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Kirschenmann,Mark Steven

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

This music theory/composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the class will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some will already be composers. All are welcome. 15 students will be accepted. Each student works at his/her own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony).

The course meets for 4 class hours. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RCHUMS 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

RCHUMS 351 — Creative Musicianship Lab
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Kirschenmann,Mark Steven
Instructor: Ervamaa,Katri Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: CE

This is a required lab course to be taken with RCHUMS 350; however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, sight-singing, and computer lab programs. The class will be divided into two sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. Advanced students in RCHUMS 350 may be exempted from taking this lab by permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 350.

RCHUMS 372 — The Subject in the Aftermath of Revolution
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

What happens when your revolution fails? What is it like to live in the aftermath, even in the ruins of great hopes and aspirations? For artists and writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, this question was especially urgent, because the language they used to explain their projects was often based on a revolutionary discourse. What do you do with the language when events themselves have falsified it? Can you build a new language — and perhaps a new art — out of the remnants of the old? How does nostalgia color and inform memories of revolutionary ardor? Is the rhetoric of revolution essentially nostalgic? In this interdisciplinary course, we will explore works of literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. There are no prerequisites except for an open mind, a strong degree of intellectual courage, and a lively curiosity about history.

Literature: Goethe,The Sorrows of Young Werther; Bü chner, Danton's Death; Conrad, The Secret Agent; Weiss, Marat/Sade; Kundera, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting.
Philosophy: selections from Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit; Camus, The Rebel.
Visual Arts: Painting and sculpture by Friedrich; David; Géricault; Richter; Abakanowicz

RCHUMS 410 — Upperclass Literature Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Writing Life

Instructor: Stainton,Leslie Anne

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

By now you've spent the better part of your adult life writing. You've turned out essays and reports, book reviews, job applications, letters, blogs, e-mails, exams, thank-you notes and grocery lists. You've tried your hand at poems and stories, maybe a speech or two. Perhaps you've published something in a newspaper or magazine, or you've embarked on a memoir or even written a book. One way or another you've experienced a "writing life." But what does the term really mean? And where do you go from here? Once you're out of college, how can you continue to make writing a meaningful part of your life?

In this RC senior seminar we'll examine the writing life from a variety of perspectives. Not everyone who writes is a best-selling author — or even a published writer. Think of preachers and rabbis, politicians, historians, scientists, musicians, dancers, visual artists, architects, college presidents, schoolteachers and CEOs, many of whom write every day as part of who they are and what they do. We'll hear from some of these people in class, along with published authors, booksellers, editors, journalists, and publishers. We'll read memoirs by writers such as Eudora Welty, Anne Lamott, and Stephen King. You'll also go out into the community and talk to people for whom writing is a vital part of living, and you'll report back to the class on what you find. You'll also read and submit a written review of one book of your own choice that in some way addresses "the writing life."

Throughout the semester, you'll develop a significant piece of writing in which you explore and articulate your own sense of what it means to write. This may be a single work or a series of works and may be take the form of a memoir, a play, a work of fiction, an extended piece of literary journalism, a biography or history, a prolonged essay or series of essays, or a combination of genres. The aim of this project is for you to arrive at a significant understanding of how writing can enrich your post-undergraduate life. This seminar is open to RC juniors and seniors; while it should be of particular interest to creative-writing majors, all majors are welcome and indeed encouraged. If we are to learn how diverse a field writing is, and how broadly relevant it can be, it's critical that we engage as many different voices as possible.

*This course satisfies the RC Arts Practicum Requirement*

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

PLEASE NOTE:Only RC Creative Writing Concentrators can use RCHUMS 425 to fulfill the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

PLEASE NOTE:Only RC Creative Writing Concentrators can use RCHUMS 425 to fulfill the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 480 — Dramatic Theory and Criticism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Explores major dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present, treating such questions as plotting, characterization, generic conventions, and the effect of particular styles on an audience.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 280 and three drama courses.

RCHUMS 481 — Play Production Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Theater of War

Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In this intensive upper level drama course, students participate in the full process of research, script analysis and rehearsal on a major work of dramatic literature. Students will have the opportunity to do dramaturgical work on the period and place of the play, to collaboratively develop a conceptual frame for the work and evolve a production design to express it. Importantly, all the actors have the time to do thorough and detailed character and scene analysis. This year's play will be chosen from one of the classic Greek plays about the Trojan War, adapted to a contemporary context. Under consideration are recent plays such as Brendan Kennelly's "The Trojan Women" and Ellen McLaughlin's "The Persians", as well as an original adaptation created through the process of class collaboration. Admission is by interview with the instructor. Students with an interest in acting, directing, design, as well as playwriting and dramaturgy, are encouraged to apply.

RCHUMS 482 — Drama Interpretation II: Performance Workshop
Section 001, SEM
Director and Text

Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In this hands-on workshop, students will learn the essential elements involved in directing a theatre production. They will be assigned a series of exercises on staging and will work in collaboration with designers to create production concepts. Directors will have opportunities to explore script analysis, character work and improvisation. The course will challenge students to work with a wide range of dramatic material and there will be opportunities to present work through exercises, scenes and the final process on a one-act play. This year's final project may be in conjunction with the Play Production Seminar "Theater of War" Admission by interview only.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 280 and either RCHUMS 282 or playwriting.

RCHUMS 484 — Seminar in Drama Topics
Section 001, SEM
Performing the Verse of Whitman, Ginsburg and the Beats

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

This is an early evening workshop in verse-speaking for writers, actors, musicians, and students of literature, based on the works of Walt Whitman and his 20th-century descendants, the "Beat" poets: Alan Ginsburg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Gregory Corso, etc. Students will be turned loose on Leaves of Grass and the poetry of the Beat Generation. Passages will be selected weekly, "rehearsed," and brought into class for presentation, critiques and coaching, whereupon pieces will be selected for further development (including dips into the critical literature) and repeat presentation. Stage-oriented vocal exercises will be a regular feature of the course as students learn how to increase their vocal range and interest, how to "score" a text, and how to "deliver" a live performance. A repertory of verse performance-pieces will thus be evolved in the course of the academic term which will in turn lead to a group performance of Ginsburg's Howl for its 50th anniversary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, RCHUMS 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses.

RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
Section 001, SEM
Richard III / Ta'ziyeh Project

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: WorldLit

This minicourse will serve as the academic anchor for an experimental theater project in which the distinguished Iranian director Mohammad Ghaffari will adapt Shakespeare's Richard III in the idiom of the traditional Shi'ite Passion Play or Ta'ziyeh. Students will be introduced to this unique Islamic theatre form as well as studying Shakespeare's famous history play. All students will be expected to participate in some capacity in the project itself.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
Section 002, SEM
Acting Workshop

Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: WorldLit

In this two-credit course students will have a chance to work on a number of creative exercises and challenging scene assignments as an "in-house" acting company for directors from RCHUMS 482, "Director and Text". Actors will have the opportunity to learn about the audition process from the director's perspective and to explore how to work on a diverse set of characters from a wide range of dramatic material. All acting students will participate in improvisations and staging exercises as well as experience intensive scene study and the sustained rehearsal process for a production at the end of the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

 
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