< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = RCLANG
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 19 of 19
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RCLANG 191 — Intensive German I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Goertz,Karein K

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or 103.

The goal of these courses is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Please note: The class will be cancelled on two afternoons: Thurs. Feb. 22 and Fri. Feb. 23. There will be class, as usual, on the mornings of those dates. Students will be required to attend one evening film at a date mutually agreeable to all members of the class.

RCLANG 194 — Intensive Spanish I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lopez-Cotin,Olga Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 101, 102, or 103.

The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic but solid knowledge of Spanish morphology and syntax, functional vocabulary, and practice in speaking and writing. The lecture gives a thorough introduction to Spanish grammatical structures as used in cultural contexts, and students meet in small discussion groups in the afternoon to practice this material in a more focused, intensive manner. Upon completion of this course students will be able to understand simplified written texts or short oral passages without the aid of a dictionary. Students will also be able to carry on a short, elementary conversation.

RCLANG 290 — Intensive French II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Butler-Borruat,Dominique M

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232.

The goal of these courses is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCLANG 190.

RCLANG 291 — Intensive German II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Goertz,Karein K

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 231, or 232.

The goal of these courses is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCLANG 191.

RCLANG 293 — Intensive Second Year Russian
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Alina Udalchenko

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201 or 202.

An intensive course meeting eight hours a week + Language lunch table and Russian Tea, this course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms in RUSSIAN 201 and 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary building. The course is proficiency oriented and is especially recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies and who want to gain rapid mastery of Russian. The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency examination. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker in spoken and written language. Students must understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. V puti: Russian Grammar in Context by Olga Kagan and Frank Miller, Prentice Hall, 1996. (PAK includes textbook, workbook and labtapes).
  2. Stories from Today's Russia: A Reader from Today's Russia by Derevyanchenko, Tschakh and Kokoryshkina, National Textbook Company, 1997.
  3. Course pack, available for purchase at Ulrich's.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials:

  1. The Russian Reference Grammar: Core Grammar in Functional Context by J. Watzke, J.Sweigert, Jr., Kendall/Hunt1997, ISBN 0-7872-4467-8.
  2. Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

Cost: over $100

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 102 or 103 or RCLANG 193.

RCLANG 294 — Intensive Spanish II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rodriguez,Maria I

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232.

RCLANG 294 is a second-year intensive course designed to achieve proficiency in Spanish. The lecture component emphasizes understanding of advanced grammatical structures and syntax, whereas the discussion is devoted to the critical analysis of authentic texts addressing issues relevant to Hispanic experiences in the United States. Through their interaction with the text and instructors, both in formal and informal contexts, students develop their speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to read journalistic or academic prose with ease as well as write essays of an academic nature with a minimum of English interference.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCLANG 194.

RCLANG 295 — Intensive Latin II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Soter,Gina Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 8

This course meets for two hours per day four days per week and covers in one academic term the equivalent of two at the level of a non-intensive second-year collegiate course. Through the reading and study of primary texts from Latin authors, students will develop their understanding of grammatical and syntactical structures of Latin, increase their vocabulary and expand their knowledge of the Roman world. Readings revolve around the intersections of gender politics, insurrection and rhetoric. In addition, students will work with earlier material remains, such as inscriptions and documentary papyri. The course will conclude with literature from Medieval Latin. Skills will be enhanced through writing, hearing, and speaking the language; content and format alike will encourage students to consider ways in which Latin continues to be very much a part of our world today.

Advisory Prerequisite: LATIN 102, 103, or 193/504, or RCLANG 195.

RCLANG 296 — Intensive Japanese II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sato,Tetsuya

WN 2007
Credits: 10
Other: Lang Req

This course is designed for you to learn Novice-High/Intermediate-Low-level Japanese language in an intensive, semi-immersion setting. It is "intense" because we will study a normally two-term amount of materials in one. It is "semi-immersion" in that in our classroom we constantly simulate authentic communicative interactions with speakers of Japanese, and will use the target language as much as possible while minimizing the use of English. Through extensive communication practice in classroom activities, we will work on developing all four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing, using hiragana, katakana and approximately 350 kanji) along with cultural understanding. Most course-related activities are collaborative in nature. You will learn to acquire a sentence/paragraph-level command in various topics around everyday life for college students and beyond. You are also required to attend minimum three hours of co-curricular activities, such as the Lunch Tables and Conversation Tables, per week. (Prerequisites: successful completion of RCLANG196/ASIANLAN129: Intensive Japanese I or its equivalent. In order to undertake ASIANLAN325: Third Year Japanese, you must pass the Placement Test at the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures).

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 129 or RCLANG 196

RCLANG 310 — Accelerated Review-French
Section 001, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to bring students to a level of proficiency in the four linguistic skills. It is designed for students who have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course RCLANG 290 to do so. It is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with weekly individual meetings with the instructor. In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed through weekly conversation sessions on current topics. Writing skills are refined through a review of grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style. Exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCLANG 314 — Accelerated Review-Spanish
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Espinoza-Pino,Christhian C

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four academic terms of language but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this class is the discussion of primary source materials of a literary, cultural and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency in listening and reading comprehension, language structure, and composition.

RCLANG 320 — Seminaire en français
Section 001, SEM
Food and Culture: a French Perspective

Instructor: Anderson-Burack,Carolyn

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Food has long been celebrated and enjoyed as an important aspect of French culture. What are the origins of this celebrated cuisine? How are French attitudes towards food different from our own? How are these attitudes reflected in French literature? We will also look into nutrition and health issues. Do the French have different ideas about what foods are considered "healthy"? What are their concerns about the safety of what they eat, such as genetically modified foods? What is the so-called "French paradox"? Through readings from a variety of sources, we will attempt to answer these and other questions. After reading about the development of the French interest in gastronomy starting with the Gauls, we read texts from La Fontaine, Dumas, Baudelaire, Proust, and Duras among others. Other readings will be current articles from newspapers and magazines such as France-Amérique and Sciences et Avenir. Readings, discussions and written work will be in French. Students will give two oral presentations and complete a final research project. Students will also prepare two French meals. Course evaluation will be based on both creative and analytical papers, oral presentations, class participation and preparation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test and permission of instructor.

RCLANG 320 — Seminaire en français
Section 003, SEM
Existentialism: The Human Condition and the Absurd

Instructor: Butler-Borruat,Dominique M

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Far from being a doctrine, Existentialism is fundamentally a philosophical tendency. Born of a reaction against Hegelian rationalism, the different existentialist tendencies come together in the rehabilitation of freedom, subjectivity and individual existence. In this course we will attempt, through our readings, to discern the characteristics of various existentialist concepts. After a brief survey of the precursors and the "founders" of existentialism, we will focus on two members of what has been called the Philosophical School of Paris, namely Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, as well as on Albert Camus. Our first readings by Jean-Paul Sartre will allow us to familiarize ourselves with the main existentialist themes. The study of Albert Camus' conception of the human condition and the absurd will offer us a diametrically opposed perspective to Sartre's systematic approach, and de Beauvoir's critique of Sartre's conception will shed new light on the concepts of freedom and responsibility.

Students will be asked to write essays on the readings and to participate actively in class discussions.

Assigned works:

  • Jean-Paul Sartre:

    • L'Existentialisme est un humanisme
    • La Nausée (excerpts)
    • Les Mouches
    • Le Mur

  • Albert Camus:

    • Le Mythe de Sisyphe (excerpts)
    • Caligula
    • L'Etranger

  • Simone de Beauvoir:

    • Les Bouches inutiles
    • Tous les hommes sont mortels

Film:

  • Luis Puenzo

    • La Peste

Audio-visual materials:

    • Sartre par lui-même
    • Simone de Beauvoir
    • Albert Camus: A Self-Portrait

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test and permission of instructor.

RCLANG 321 — Readings in German
Section 001, SEM
The Romantic Experience

Instructor: Paslick,Erica Kuhra

WN 2007
Credits: 4

During this seminar we will ask, how did the German Romantics interpret the human experience? We will seek answers by sampling some of their theoretical writings as well as their artistic expressions in poetry, drama, song cycles and paintings. At the same time we will reinforce our ability to read, write and speak German. Students will be asked to create their own "Romantic Journal" in which they will record their responses, essays, notes, commentary and sketches. The seminar meets three times a week as a group, but students are also expected to regularly work on an individual tutorial basis with the instructor throughout the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 321 — Readings in German
Section 002, SEM
German Theater Play Production Seminar

Instructor: Shier,Janet Hegman

WN 2007
Credits: 4

In this course, students will read several modern German plays and will become familiar with the 20th century German theater that grew out of the Cabaret tradition. In addition to reading 6-7 plays, students will read several of Brecht's writings about epic theater, do scene work using Brecht's "Lehrstueck" model, and will ultimately participate as technical crew and actors in a multi-media play production of RC "Deutsches Theater" in March/April. In addition to participating in all rehearsals and the final performances, students will be required to give one oral "Referat" on a topic relevant to course readings and to keep a course portfolio containing reflections on readings and scene work, original sketches and materials collected for possible inclusion in the production. Students may travel at their own expense with the course instructor to Munich over Spring Break to see theater productions. RC German readings is a pre-requisite for this course, but some students who have not had German Readings may be eligible to participate with permission of the instructor. Students who have participated in RC "Deutsches Theater" in the past are welcome to enroll in the course again.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 324 — Readings in Spanish
Section 001, SEM
Women Writers in Latin America: Home, Nation and Identity in the 20th Century

Instructor: Lopez-Cotin,Olga Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to different constructions of the female subject in relation to the physical, and metaphoric spaces depicted by several Latin American women writers. The first part of the course focuses on the home as a conventional repository of the female identity and refuge from an external world perceived as hostile, and explores how writers have subverted this public/private duality to create multiple meanings: the physical and psychological barriers of the bourgeoisie home, the imaginary natural spaces of eroticism as vehicles for alternative realities. In the latter part of the course, we will focus on several geographical areas in Latin America to explore how women writers have defied institutional violence: race and class conflicts in the Caribbean, social unbalance generated by poverty in Central America, and the Southern Cone military dictatorships. These social conflicts have brought along a redefinition of the home as a fragmented and dispersed space by the absence of those disappeared; the disorder of objects and daily gestures; the imprisonment and sexual/political violence exerted on the female body. Along with some theoretical reflections on the notion of space and discussion of the specific historical processes, we will read essays, fiction and poems by María Luisa Bombal, Rosario Castellanos, Nancy Morejón, Rosario Ferré, Claribel Alegría, Luisa Valenzuela, Cristina Peri Rossi, and others.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 324 — Readings in Spanish
Section 002, SEM
Tango: Forging Social Identities Through Music

Instructor: Rodriguez,Maria I

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course will use tango music, literature based on tango, and academic articles on the subject to explore Argentine history, society and culture. Initial analysis will focus on Argentine history, paying particular attention to immigration and the racially hybrid lower and working class structure that fused into a new culture with its own musical expression. Specific areas of study include gender roles and power structure, the morality of tango, and the projection of the "Argentine" character through tango lyrics. The course will conclude with new forms of tango in the international scene, how they have been marketed and modified for a new public.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 324 — Readings in Spanish
Section 003, SEM
Understanding Globalization: New and Old Relations Between USA and Latin America

Instructor: Espinoza-Pino,Christhian C

WN 2007
Credits: 4

The term "globalization" can be found in most current publications related to the study of society, culture, economics, finances etc. It is a common word in media and private conversations as it is often referred to in the context of "globalization of the world in which we live" or "the challenges of living in a global society" or "the benefits of the changes imposed by globalization". At the same time, the simple use of the word "globalization" may lead to numerous and passionate discussions since, for one sector of the debate, globalization is the process that will finally bring development to millions of people, while others may conclude that this process will only result in additional problems, especially for the poorest countries in the world. The present course will focus on the importance, advantages and disadvantages of the globalization and how it is affecting the life of millions of women, children and men in Latin America by looking at those changes beyond economic reforms that recently took place in most of the countries. In the course, we will analyze the more important process of social and economic integration as exemplified in NAFTA, MERCOSUR, etc., as well as both the institutional structures that support this integration (IMF, World Bank, OMC) and those organizations that oppose globalization. In addition, the impact of globalization for Latin America in areas such as economic development, human rights, migration, and environmental pollution will be analyzed in more detail through study cases.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 324 — Readings in Spanish
Section 004, SEM
Poverty, Violence and Exclusion in Latin America

Instructor: Menard,Nathalie K

WN 2007
Credits: 4

How could 51,960 Quechua speakers die without notice of the Peruvian government? During last decades Latin America has been living the emergence of insurgent groups of different political tendencies. Therefore, the Peruvian Armed Conflict (1980-2000) is only one of many stories of violence, death and injustice that beat the region's poorest population. In 2003 the Peruvian State knew that the Armed Conflict caused the death of 69,280 victims. Of the total of victims, 75% were Quechua people who were living in rural areas practicing subsistence agriculture and cattle rising as main economic activities, far away from power and political centers. Peruvian population was not affected equally. The war especially affected indigenous people. This course will discuss and reflect about the Peruvian Armed Conflict and his actual meaning for the region. Within the course we will analyze the historical conditions that allowed the emergence of this conflict; and the conflict process in different Peruvian regions. We will search to analyze of State's role, changes within armed group's strategies and civilian groups' responses. This course has the aim to discuss about Latin America Contemporary History, thinking about State's role, insurgent groups; and the historical conditions and consequences of armed conflicts, focusing especially on the indigenous population.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proficiency test. permission of instructor.

RCLANG 334 — Tutoring Adults and Bilingual Children: Working wih the Latino Community
Section 001, SEM
Tutoring Bilingual Children — Working with the Latino Community in Ann Arbor

Instructor: Espinoza-Pino,Christhian C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

The economic and social conditions in Michigan have attracted many families from different Latin American countries, which have led to a growing Latino community in the Ann Arbor area. Children of these families are enrolled in the city school system and for many, succeeding academically is a difficult task due to a series of factors. This independent study will be based on the work carried out by PALMA, a University of Michigan student organization that focuses on helping Latino children to improve their learning skills and succeed in school. This course is oriented towards advanced students of Spanish who want to use their language skills by directly and personally engaging with members of the Latino community in Ann Arbor. Students will hold tutoring lessons twice a week and will meet once a week to discuss assigned articles and debate specific topics and situations dealing with their experiences as tutors. A weekly journal and a final report will summarize the different experiences and challenges of tutoring, and will allow the students to analyze different learning strategies, problems and solutions obtained during the course in order to make well-supported recommendations directed towards improving the results of the community work carried out by Palma.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must pass RC Spanish Proficiency Test

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 19 of 19