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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = RE
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 331 — Introduction to Arab Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed to give students an extensive survey of the cultural characteristics of the Arab world by situating the practices and traditions of the Arab world into their own unique setting. The material chosen, both for the lecture and for reading, focuses on issues of ethnic diversity that define the Arab world in particular and place into a greater multi-cultural realm. Special attention will be given to family, gender relations, national and religious minorities, East-West cultures and relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arabic art and music. The course material will be explored through lectures and videos supported by listening and viewing guides in addition to discussion based upon the assigned readings. In both their writings and in the class discussions, students discuss the meaning of culture and ethnicity and how misunderstanding these principles can lead to forms of stereotyping, intolerance, and racism. There will be emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Moreover, the course is accompanied by an interactive website utilizing the UM Course Tools Software. Grades will be based upon class participation, short essays, and a final project. Material: Course pack and website.

AMCULT 100 — Rethinking American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Daligga,Catherine Elizabeth

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

What is an American? It is a simple question to ask, but a deceptively difficult one to answer. Most of us believe we have some notion of what constitutes our American identity. Upon closer examination, however, we uncover a myriad of identities, each existing in contested political, economic, and cultural spaces. So who decides what an American is and why? How do we make sense of American Identity, and why should we try anyway? This course will attempt to answer these and many other questions by examining the evolution and transformation of American identity (or identities) from the early days of the American republic to the present. Classical as well as marginal views on American identity will be covered, along with an examination of the contested landscapes of contemporary American culture through critical readings on select institutions and practices.

AMCULT 201 — American Values
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hass,Kristin Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, HU

The Problem of the "We"

This course will explore the riot of ideas, conflicts, and material realities that have defined and shaped culture in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present. Focusing on the relationship between ideology, culture, and power in U.S. history, the course will draw on a range of methods and sources — including fiction, music, movies, architecture, historical research, and images in art — to reconstruct a history of ways in which Americans have imagined their nation and the ways in which this "imagined community" has been continually transformed.


AMCULT 235 — From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Alsultany,Evelyn Azeeza

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course provides an overview of representations of Arabs and Arab-Americans in the U.S. media, and specifically Hollywood cinema. Through an examination of Hollywood films over the last century, such as The Sheik (1921), Harum Scarum (1965), and True Lies (1994), it traces a shift in stereotypes from the rich Arab sheik with a harem to the Arab terrorist. Through this process, the course examines the connection between representations and the historical and political moment in which they are created and disseminated, from European colonization of the Arab world, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, the Iran hostage crisis, to 9/11. How have international relations, political events, and foreign policy influenced representations in Hollywood filmmaking? What is the impact of stereotypes? How do film representations become part of American culture? Through examining these questions, we analyze the changing landscape of race, gender, and politics in film. We also examine the counter-current of filmmaking via unusual Hollywood films, documentaries, low-budget feature films, short films, and other genres.

Intended audience: Undergraduate students with general interest in learning to analyze media, the impact of stereotypes, and the relationship between the U.S. and the Middle East.

Course Requirements: Weekly film screening and short response papers. Midterm take-home exam would ask students to select a film from a list and write about representations of Arabs and the Middle East in the film, applying some of the theories learned in class. Or it might ask them to write an essay that compares films from two different time periods that we have seen in class, analyzing how the representation has changed based on the historical and political era and drawing from the readings in class. A final exam would ask students to work on an art-as-resistance project.

Class Format: Class comprises 3 hours lecture per week, with a 1 hour discussion section with GSI support (graded component), plus weekly required film viewing.

AMCULT 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

A survey introduction to the critical, theoretical, and historical study of women and gender in America from a feminist perspective. Readings range across a wide body of feminist scholarship in order to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within the field. The course aims to sharpen critical awareness of how gender operates in institutional and cultural contexts, in students' own lives and the lives of others. Two questions are central to the course: How is gender created and maintained through social practices (e.g., ideology or media representations)? How do these gendered social practices intersect with other social categories, such as race and ethnicity, social class and sexuality? Because Women's Studies grew out of women's activism, this course explores the relationship between the generation of knowledge about women and gender, and how to bring about gender equity in a society where race and ethnicity matter. Most of the course materials are drawn from the U.S. context; however, several weeks' readings and lectures address feminist work in other parts of the world and transnationally. Attendance at both lectures and discussion sections is mandatory.

AMCULT 304 — American Immigration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

AMCULT 311 — Topics in Ethnic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Asian Pacific American Literature and Empire

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: Theme

How Does the Empire Write Back? This upper-division course focuses on Asian Pacific American literature and the United States empire. By reading stories, plays, historical documents, poems, and films, students will learn how empire affects the experience of different generations of Pacific Islanders and Asians in America. We will examine the continuing impact of wars in the Pacific that established the U.S. as a global power, focusing especially on Filipino American, Hawaiian, Vietnamese American, and South Asian American texts. This diverse range of writers and artists proposes creative ways of thinking beyond, against, and without the U.S. empire. Most importantly, this course will be an opportunity for students to develop their own research or creative projects, which will contribute to this body of writing. While students are expected to work on individual research topics from the very beginning of the course, the last third of the semester is set aside for the development and presentation of projects. This course satisfies the "Cultural Expression" Requirement for the Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies Minor.

AMCULT 318 — Greek-American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lambropoulos,Vassilios; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

While Greek culture, thought, and values have always been studied and revered in the U.S., the actual Greeks who immigrated to this country were received differently. They faced many forms of discrimination and exclusion that often led them to protests, marches, strikes, demands for equal rights, and alliances with minority groups. This course studies that particular migrant group, a unique case in American race history: the arrival and settlement of Greeks, a people admired in theory and reviled in practice.

The story is one of dissociation between image and reality, identity and ethnicity, discourse and experience, as the American public distinguished the cultural legacy of Hellenism from the immigrating Hellenes. While Greece stood as an abstract ideal, the actual Greeks appeared dark, barbaric, Eastern (as opposed to Western), lazy, intemperate, dishonest, and above all racially and mentally degenerate in sharp contrast to those they claimed as ancestors. Sometimes even Greeks themselves began treating each other in similar terms.

By examining Greek American history, culture, practices, and institutions, this course studies a test case of complex discrimination that includes racial, ethnic, religious, linguistic, gender, class, cultural, and several other elements. It analyzes the successes and the pitfalls of collective identity as it has been understood in this country over the last two centuries by following the Greeks' gradual ascendancy to whiteness, Hellenization, Europeanization, middle class status, heterosexual normality, public recognition, and assimilation. Students will be required to complete assigned readings and write two 8-page papers based on drafts.

This dissociation between modern Greeks and "real," that is ancient, Greeks is still evident today in course offerings everywhere as College listings distinguish between "Modern Greek" and "Greek" classes whereby the latter, apparently considered "more authentically Greek," do not require to be qualified as "Ancient."

AMCULT 399 — Race, Racism, and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Countryman,Matthew J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

An interdisciplinary course critically investigating the concept of race, racism, and ethnicity.

ANTHRARC 285 — Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Young,Lisa C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology examines interpretations of archaeological remains popular in the media but that archaeologists view as fringe or "pseudoscientific" ideas. We focus particularly on claims that cultural achievements by indigenous peoples are a consequence of contact with superior beings, such as "more advanced" civilizations and even extra-terrestrials. We will examine the logical flaws and problematic evidence used to support these claims, along with the racist assumptions that underlie them. The goal of this course is for students to learn critical thinking skills that will enable them to assess popular interpretations of archaeological remains in the future. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, participation, and two exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries (5th edition). Students will also read websites and articles available on ctools to supplement the text.

ANTHRBIO 361 — Biology, Society, and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Van Arsdale,Adam Paul

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, RE

This course will provide an anthropological perspective on the intersection between human biology and society, past and present, in three topical areas. The first unit will focus on human genetic diversity and the increasing use of genetic information in society. Included in this unit will be discussions of genetic ancestry testing and what genes can and cannot tell us about where we come from. The second unit will examine the topic of "missing links" in human prehistory. This will include missing links in the fossil record, the use of missing links to understand the connection between modern and past populations, and the ethics of studying recent human skeletal material. The final unit will look at the relationship between humans and our environment. What is the human environment, how has our environment changed throughout prehistory, and what changes are occurring today? Carrying through all of the units will be the themes of understanding the relationship between human past and present, human diversity, and the ethical issues surrounding intersections between biology and society. The class will be a reading-based, lecture course. Grades will be based on three exams, several short writing assignments, and participation in discussion sections. The focus of the course will be predominantly biological, but is open to students with varying degrees of scientific and biological familiarity. For further information on the course, feel free to contact Professor Adam Van Arsdale (avanarsd@umich.edu).

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 362 — Problems of Race
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brace,Charles L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, RE

An analysis of the problems arising from racial classification, migration of peoples, and race mixture. Biological and genetic aspects of race.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fricke,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. In doing so, the course lays stress on concrete examples of human cultural and ethnic diversity and the interactions leading to structures of dominance, inequality, and resistance. In order to understand and counter negative assessments of diversity, it stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and, perhaps a short paper.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 026, LEC

Instructor: Chivens,Thomas H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes students to the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts and methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic perspective. It introduces students to various ways of learning and thinking about human cultural and biological diversity, across both time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; race and ethnicity; human genetics, biological evolution, and the fossil record; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; the emergence of agriculture, ancient cities, and states; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship, and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and the emergence of the world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and two additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. There will be two multiple choice exams, each covering one half of the course; the second exam will be given on the last day of class. There will also be several quizzes and short writing assignments (no more than ten pages total) due in section.

ANTHRCUL 272 — Language in Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in comparative social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include:

  • What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How and to what extent does speaking a particular language construct a culturally specific model of the social and natural world, a sense of 'reality'?
  • How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class and gender?
  • How do linguistic practices and perceptions of language reinforce social divisions and relationships of unequal power?

In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how linguistic practices contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. We will consider how judgments about "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" speech are ultimately grounded in social rather than linguistic factors.

Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are:

  • Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change;
  • the relationship between language and social life, particularly relations of race, class and gender;
  • issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development of official and unofficial standard languages, and the social consequences of language change and language death.

Throughout the course, we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this class. Requirements for the class include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include textbook(s) and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

ANTHRCUL 447 — Culture, Racism, and Human Nature
Section 001, LEC
Culture, Racism, and Human Nature

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require. The course looks at human Biophobia — the denial, defiance, and defilement of our animal kinship. This biophobia and denial gives humans an inferiority complex that is only assuaged by classism, racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, sectarianism, ageism, nationalism, disableism, speciesism, and power (CRESSANDS-POWER). The present stockpile of human weapons, the rage of international terrorism, and the oppression that CRESSANDS-POWER creates requires a new human revolution — THE ECOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. In that revolution the human body and the Earth will have such value that we can develop a new human-global community and end the human plague that CRESSANDS-POWER has brought upon our species.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme, FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 111 — Introduction to Africa and Its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Squires,Catherine R
Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

Introduces basic concepts and methods involved in the study of Africa and its Diaspora. This team-taught course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach using maps, cultural artifacts, films, art, music, archival documents, literary texts, and key scholarly readings from both the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisite to the CAAS concentration and minor.

CAAS 202 — Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

Caribbean poet Lorna Goodison will teach this introductory course. Readings will include poems by Derek Walcott, V.S. Naipaul, Jean Rhys, and other Caribbean poets.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111.

CAAS 214 — Introduction to African-American Art
Section 001, LEC
Twentieth Century African-American Art: An Introduction Survey

Instructor: Francis,Jacqueline R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course covers key issues regarding the last century's African-American painting, sculpture, photography, and mixed media art. Moving through the material chronologically, we will discuss a variety of styles, cultural and social history, patronage, and critical reception. We will also examine the benefits and problems of studying the production of artists of color as a separate field, considering alternatives to the broad category of "African-American art" and the outlook for new, critical methodologies. The course is an opportunity for students to expand their descriptive and analytical skills through oral participation in class and reasoned writing on exams and in short papers.

IV. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111 or permission of instructor

CAAS 247 — Modern Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Diouf,Mamadou; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial and the postcolonial periods and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship.

The course has three following objectives:

  • to provide students with basic information about the period
  • to train students to think critically and historically
  • to develop general education skills

Course Requirements: Students are expected to (1) participate in class discussion (15%), (2) write one critical book review of a recommended monograph [approximately 4-5 pages] (25%). There will be a midterm (25%) and a final examination(35%).

Article and book chapter required readings are on reserve at University Reserves. Required texts are available for purchase at Shaman Drum bookstore.

CAAS 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE
Other: Theme

Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between the constraints that affect large groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of people to transcend those constraints on the other.

In this course we will examine the ways in which race and ethnicity as social structures have impacted the lives of so-called minority groups both in the United States and abroad. We will also look at how race and ethnicity work in conjunction with other social structures such as class, gender and sexuality. To maximize our sense of what it is like to live life as a member of a racial or ethnic group, we will not only read sociology, but also conduct in-class exercises, analyze films, and read literary fiction.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

CAAS 458 — Issues in Black World Studies
Section 009, SEM
Culture, Racism, and Human Nature

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require. The course looks at human Biophobia — the denial, defiance, and defilement of our animal kinship. This biophobia and denial gives humans an inferiority complex that is only assuaged by classism, racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, sectarianism, ageism, nationalism, disableism, speciesism, and power (CRESSANDS-POWER). The present stockpile of human weapons, the rage of international terrorism, and the oppression that CRESSANDS-POWER creates requires a new human revolution — THE ECOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. In that revolution the human body and the Earth will have such value that we can develop a new human-global community and end the human plague that CRESSANDS-POWER has brought upon our species.

CLCIV 350 — Topics in Classical Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Ancient Slavery

Instructor: Forsdyke,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

Slavery was widespread in ancient Greece and Rome and was crucial to the social, economic and cultural flourishing of these societies. Nevertheless, the ugly reality of ancient slavery is seldom confronted directly in studies of the ancient world. This course aims to redress this imbalance by offering a detailed examination of the role of slavery in Greek and Roman society. We will begin with the question of how slaves were acquired and what needs (social, economic, and ideological) they satisfied in these cultures. Of particular concern will be the question of how these societies justified the exploitation of slaves and developed (pseudo-) scientific theories and ideologies in support of slavery. Aristotle's theory of natural slavery stands as a particularly infamous example of these justifications. Forms of racist thought, however, can be traced back at least to the fifth century BCE and are based on ethnic prejudices and stereotyping that were prominent throughout antiquity. A major part of the course will be to examine how ancient racist attitudes were constructed (though social practice, discourse and visual representations). In this context we will examine competing modern definitions of racism, and, in particular, the differences between ancient and modern racism.

Along with the ideological aspects of slavery and racism, we will explore the pragmatics of social control and rebellion. For example, we will explore the techniques that masters used to control their slaves, and investigate instances when this control failed, i.e., slave revolts. We will also examine modes of slave resistance (e.g., deliberate negligence, dilatoriness and theft) and the ways that slaves formed a distinctive identity and culture separate from that imposed on them by their masters. Readings about other slave societies (e.g., the American South, Brazil and the Caribbean) will provide crucial comparative evidence and models for exploring aspects of ancient slavery.

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, weekly in-class response papers and quizzes, and take-home midterm and final exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: CLCIV 101 and 102

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 005, LEC
Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television: Black Comedy

Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course will focus upon representation of race and ethnicity in televisual fiction since the late sixties. By examining the representations of specific communities — marginalized in terms of ethnicity and race — students will be asked to interrogate how these images are constructed, by whom and for whom. The course is designed to make students think about the in mainstream network television, and by doing this we can begin to understand the conflicted and conflictual nature of the interplay between the formation of fluid and multiple identities and how — and by whom — notions of identity are being televisually constructed.

In the winter of 2007, rather than offering a broad survey of ethnic and racial groups as well as genre, the course will focus primarily on African American comedy. Students should note that the required screenings include material that contains profanity, humor of a sexually explicit nature and other subject matter that might be considered both socially and politically controversial.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

DUTCH 492 — Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
Section 001, SEM
ANNE FRANK IN PAST AND PRESENT.

Instructor: Broos,Antonius J M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE
Other: WorldLit

The first part of this course will deal with the history of Anne Frank in the Netherlands, her hiding and arrest, her famous diary, its popularity, and the attacks on its authenticity. Special attention will be given to the reception of Anne Frank in the USA and the image of Anne Frank in film and on stage and TV.

In the second part of the course, we will look at the Holocaust, as portrayed in other accounts, diaries, stories, and films, with special emphasis on survivors and their problems, children of survivors, etc. Although some of the literary examples will be taken from the Dutch, all literature will be read in English and the course will be conducted in English. Requirements are summaries of given articles, a midterm paper, a short oral presentation, a final exam, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussions.

Required reading:

  • Anne Frank, The Diary.
  • H.A. Enzen, Anne Frank. Reflections on her Life and Legacy Chicago, 2000.
  • Eric Heuvel A Family Secret Zaandam, 2005

  • EDUC 118 — Introduction to Education: Schooling and Multicultural Society
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Gere,Anne Ruggles; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    Education affects the lives of everyone in this country. As future professionals, voters, teachers, parents, and leaders, students at the University of Michigan will help shape the quality of life in the United States, and education will matter — a lot. This course will introduce students to the role of education in today's world. Topics will include the implications for schooling our increasingly diverse population; principles of how kids learn; ways schools facilitate student achievement (or not); and the changing nature of literacy in the information age. In addition to readings and discussions, there will be opportunities for hands-on experiences and interactions with K-12 students in schools.

    ENGLISH 313 — Topics in Literary Studies
    Section 015, LEC
    Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

    Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
    Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE, HU

    In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

    GERMAN 322 — The Origins of Nazism
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

    Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

    Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

    HISTART 214 — Introduction to African-American Art
    Section 001, LEC
    Twentieth Century African-American Art: An Introduction Survey

    Instructor: Francis,Jacqueline R

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    This course covers key issues regarding the last century's African-American painting, sculpture, photography, and mixed media art. Moving through the material chronologically, we will discuss a variety of styles, cultural and social history, patronage, and critical reception. We will also examine the benefits and problems of studying the production of artists of color as a separate field, considering alternatives to the broad category of "African-American art" and the outlook for new, critical methodologies. The course is an opportunity for students to expand their descriptive and analytical skills through oral participation in class and reasoned writing on exams and in short papers.

    IV. 4

    Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 111 or permission of instructor

    HISTORY 208 — Topics in History
    Section 005, LEC
    Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

    Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
    Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

    HISTORY 211 — Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500
    Section 001, LEC
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity

    Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE, SS

    This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

    HISTORY 247 — Modern Africa
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Diouf,Mamadou; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: SS, RE

    This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial and the postcolonial periods and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship.

    The course has three following objectives:

    • to provide students with basic information about the period
    • to train students to think critically and historically
    • to develop general education skills

    Course Requirements: Students are expected to (1) participate in class discussion (15%), (2) write one critical book review of a recommended monograph [approximately 4-5 pages] (25%). There will be a midterm (25%) and a final examination(35%).

    Article and book chapter required readings are on reserve at University Reserves. Required texts are available for purchase at Shaman Drum bookstore.

    HISTORY 322 — The Origins of Nazism
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M
    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered and interdisciplinary approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the First World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the regime's propaganda culture and entertainment industry as well as the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

    Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

    Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

    HISTORY 348 — Latin America: The National Period
    Section 001, LEC
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity

    Instructor: Alberto,Paulina Laura

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE, SS

    Latin America's history is tremendously, and increasingly, significant to global politics, culture, and economic trends. Sharing a hemisphere with the United States, Latin Americans have had especially close and complex relationships with their northern neighbor. Yet many in the United States possess only a superficial understanding of the region's diverse multicultural societies. This course will introduce students to how modern Latin American nations were formed after the region's independence, focusing especially on how people of diverse ethnic, political, and economic affiliations have struggled to shape their societies' politics and cultures.

    Lectures include selections from Latin American music, film, art, journalism, photography, legal texts, and other primary sources. Readings include a concise interpretive textbook, an array of primary documents, a novel, short stories, and memoirs.

    *Students proficient in Spanish may earn one additional credit by enrolling in the Spanish discussion section 004. This section, conducted entirely in Spanish, will include discussion of the regular course readings as well as short Spanish texts.

    There are no prerequisites for this course.

    HISTORY 358 — Topics in Latin American History
    Section 001, LEC
    Brazilian History

    Instructor: Caulfield,Sueann
    Instructor: Johnson,Paul Christopher

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    Brazil is a place of paradoxes and contrasts. The fifth most populous nation, it boasts one of the world's largest economies and an advanced industrial sector, but suffers income disparity and regional economic imbalances that are among the world's most dire. Its constitution guarantees broad social and economic justice and protects the rights of historically disenfranchised groups, but the implementation and enforcement of the law is hobbled by special interests and police corruption. It is a nation that celebrates its rich multi-ethnic cultural heritage, but remains stratified by perceived racial and regional differences.

    In this course, we will examine the historical roots of these paradoxes, focusing particularly on how racial, ethnic, and regional distinctions have been continually re-constructed since the sixteenth-century European invasion. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and post-emancipation social relations; the celebration of racial democracy and the reality of racism in the twentieth century; religious expression and competition; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production, particularly in the areas of dance and music. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression. For example, students will explore the history of the Brazilian martial art capoeira and participate in a workshop led by a Bahian capoeira master. A highlight of the course will be our study of Black cultural movements since the 1970s, with a special focus on the impact of the music of Gilberto Gil, currently Brazil's Minister of Culture. The class will attend a Gilberto Gil concert in March.

    The course will conclude by looking at how Brazil's current governing party (the Workers' Party), led by a former laborer from the impoverished northeastern region of Brazil (President Luiz Inacio da Silva, "Lula"), has successfully campaigned with a platform emphasizing the goal to transform the history of exclusion that has characterized the nation's racial and social history, and the political culture of corruption that is obstructing this effort.


    HISTORY 371 — Women in American History Since 1870
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE

    This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

    HJCS 281 — Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
    Section 001, LEC
    Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

    Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
    Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

    JUDAIC 281 — Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
    Section 001, LEC
    Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

    Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
    Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

    LING 272 — Language in Society
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: SS, RE

    This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in comparative social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include:

    • What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How and to what extent does speaking a particular language construct a culturally specific model of the social and natural world, a sense of 'reality'?
    • How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class and gender?
    • How do linguistic practices and perceptions of language reinforce social divisions and relationships of unequal power?

    In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how linguistic practices contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. We will consider how judgments about "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" speech are ultimately grounded in social rather than linguistic factors.

    Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are:

    • Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change;
    • the relationship between language and social life, particularly relations of race, class and gender;
    • issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development of official and unofficial standard languages, and the social consequences of language change and language death.

    Throughout the course, we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this class. Requirements for the class include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include textbook(s) and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

    MEMS 211 — Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500
    Section 001, LEC
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity

    Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE, SS

    This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

    MODGREEK 318 — Greek-American Culture
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Lambropoulos,Vassilios; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    While Greek culture, thought, and values have always been studied and revered in the U.S., the actual Greeks who immigrated to this country were received differently. They faced many forms of discrimination and exclusion that often led them to protests, marches, strikes, demands for equal rights, and alliances with minority groups. This course studies that particular migrant group, a unique case in American race history: the arrival and settlement of Greeks, a people admired in theory and reviled in practice.

    The story is one of dissociation between image and reality, identity and ethnicity, discourse and experience, as the American public distinguished the cultural legacy of Hellenism from the immigrating Hellenes. While Greece stood as an abstract ideal, the actual Greeks appeared dark, barbaric, Eastern (as opposed to Western), lazy, intemperate, dishonest, and above all racially and mentally degenerate in sharp contrast to those they claimed as ancestors. Sometimes even Greeks themselves began treating each other in similar terms.

    By examining Greek American history, culture, practices, and institutions, this course studies a test case of complex discrimination that includes racial, ethnic, religious, linguistic, gender, class, cultural, and several other elements. It analyzes the successes and the pitfalls of collective identity as it has been understood in this country over the last two centuries by following the Greeks' gradual ascendancy to whiteness, Hellenization, Europeanization, middle class status, heterosexual normality, public recognition, and assimilation. Students will be required to complete assigned readings and write two 8-page papers based on drafts.

    This dissociation between modern Greeks and "real," that is ancient, Greeks is still evident today in course offerings everywhere as College listings distinguish between "Modern Greek" and "Greek" classes whereby the latter, apparently considered "more authentically Greek," do not require to be qualified as "Ancient."

    NURS 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: SS, RE

    In this course we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and socio-cultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risks for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors, which influence the physical, biological, and psychological well-being of women.

    PHIL 355 — Contemporary Moral Problems
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Jacobson,Daniel

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 455.

    In contemporary life, we are faced with many questions that have moral dimensions, only some of which may be obvious to us. In this course, we will delve into the moral dimensions of a range of contemporary issues, including affirmative action, freedom of expression, abortion, recreational drug use, poverty, civil disobedience, and the treatment of animals. In the process, we will also be examining different conceptions of morality and justice, and the presuppositions about human nature, society, and value that underlie them. Throughout the course, we will be concerned with issues of race and gender and how these categories interplay with the moral issues that we grapple with in contemporary society.

    PHIL 455 — Contemporary Moral Problems
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Jacobson,Daniel

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 355.

    The purpose of this course is to explore the moral issues confronting us in our daily lives and in our special disciplines. Topics discussed may include abortion, sex and sexual perversion, drugs, death and suicide, civil disobedience, punishment, pacifism, war, problems in medical ethics (eugenics, euthanasia, sanctity of life, organ transplants, defining death), environmental ethics, and the ethics of scientific research.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Not open to Graduate students in Philosophy.

    POLSCI 342 — Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform
    Section 001, REC
    East European Politics

    Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE, SS

    A survey of the political and social development of Eastern Europe before, under, and after socialism. Major themes include the political cultures of the area, the communist accession to power, totalitarianism and its erosion, elite-mass relations, the role of public opinion and interest groups, and economic and political change. We examine the "transitions" away from socialism and assess current developments in the formerly Communist states.

    Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

    PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, SEM
    I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

    Instructor: Behling,Charles F

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE, SS
    Other: FYSem, Theme

    Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

    Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

    Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

    PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

    RCHUMS 305 — Cultural Confrontation in the Arts
    Section 001, LEC
    Issues in Race & Ethnicity

    Instructor: Walton,Susan Pratt

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE, HU

    People of color are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture. The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative artistic works that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own. The artistic works examined in the class will give students first-hand exposure to the unique problems and viewpoints that artists of color experience in relationship to mainstream culture, including issues of conflict, compromise, assimilation and resistance. The course focuses on the three main minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans and African-Americans). This course satisfies part of the requirement for the Arts and Ideas Concentration in the RC. Non-RC students are welcome!

    Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

    RCHUMS 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    SAC 365 — Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television
    Section 001, LEC
    Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television: Black Comedy

    Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: HU, RE

    This course will focus upon representation of race and ethnicity in televisual fiction since the late sixties. By examining the representations of specific communities — marginalized in terms of ethnicity and race — students will be asked to interrogate how these images are constructed, by whom and for whom. The course is designed to make students think about the in mainstream network television, and by doing this we can begin to understand the conflicted and conflictual nature of the interplay between the formation of fluid and multiple identities and how — and by whom — notions of identity are being televisually constructed.

    In the winter of 2007, rather than offering a broad survey of ethnic and racial groups as well as genre, the course will focus primarily on African American comedy. Students should note that the required screenings include material that contains profanity, humor of a sexually explicit nature and other subject matter that might be considered both socially and politically controversial.

    Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

    SLAVIC 281 — Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
    Section 001, LEC
    Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas

    Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M
    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail
    Instructor: Levinson,Julian Arnold

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    In this course students will examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students will have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and re-shaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions. The development of Jewish life from the late 18th century to the present offers a microcosm for the study of race, ethnicity, and racism in the modern world and the course will illustrate how deeply embedded racial, ethnic, and religious discourses are in any discussion of Jews. This course is team-taught by three professors: Julian Levinson from English Language and Literature; Shachar Pinsker from Near Eastern Studies; and Mikhail Krutikov from Slavic Studies. This course fulfills the New Traditions and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Requirements include short response papers, a midterm, and final paper.

    SLAVIC 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    SOC 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: SS, RE
    Other: Theme

    Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between the constraints that affect large groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of people to transcend those constraints on the other.

    In this course we will examine the ways in which race and ethnicity as social structures have impacted the lives of so-called minority groups both in the United States and abroad. We will also look at how race and ethnicity work in conjunction with other social structures such as class, gender and sexuality. To maximize our sense of what it is like to live life as a member of a racial or ethnic group, we will not only read sociology, but also conduct in-class exercises, analyze films, and read literary fiction.

    Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

    SOC 304 — American Immigration
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE, SS
    Other: Theme

    That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

    Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

    SOC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: RE

    This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

    WOMENSTD 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: SS, RE

    In this course we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and socio-cultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risks for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors, which influence the physical, biological, and psychological well-being of women.

    WOMENSTD 235 — From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Alsultany,Evelyn Azeeza

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    This course provides an overview of representations of Arabs and Arab-Americans in the U.S. media, and specifically Hollywood cinema. Through an examination of Hollywood films over the last century, such as The Sheik (1921), Harum Scarum (1965), and True Lies (1994), it traces a shift in stereotypes from the rich Arab sheik with a harem to the Arab terrorist. Through this process, the course examines the connection between representations and the historical and political moment in which they are created and disseminated, from European colonization of the Arab world, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, the Iran hostage crisis, to 9/11. How have international relations, political events, and foreign policy influenced representations in Hollywood filmmaking? What is the impact of stereotypes? How do film representations become part of American culture? Through examining these questions, we analyze the changing landscape of race, gender, and politics in film. We also examine the counter-current of filmmaking via unusual Hollywood films, documentaries, low-budget feature films, short films, and other genres.

    Intended audience: Undergraduate students with general interest in learning to analyze media, the impact of stereotypes, and the relationship between the U.S. and the Middle East.

    Course Requirements: Weekly film screening and short response papers. Midterm take-home exam would ask students to select a film from a list and write about representations of Arabs and the Middle East in the film, applying some of the theories learned in class. Or it might ask them to write an essay that compares films from two different time periods that we have seen in class, analyzing how the representation has changed based on the historical and political era and drawing from the readings in class. A final exam would ask students to work on an art-as-resistance project.

    Class Format: Class comprises 3 hours lecture per week, with a 1 hour discussion section with GSI support (graded component), plus weekly required film viewing.

    WOMENSTD 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: HU, RE

    A survey introduction to the critical, theoretical, and historical study of women and gender in America from a feminist perspective. Readings range across a wide body of feminist scholarship in order to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within the field. The course aims to sharpen critical awareness of how gender operates in institutional and cultural contexts, in students' own lives and the lives of others. Two questions are central to the course: How is gender created and maintained through social practices (e.g., ideology or media representations)? How do these gendered social practices intersect with other social categories, such as race and ethnicity, social class and sexuality? Because Women's Studies grew out of women's activism, this course explores the relationship between the generation of knowledge about women and gender, and how to bring about gender equity in a society where race and ethnicity matter. Most of the course materials are drawn from the U.S. context; however, several weeks' readings and lectures address feminist work in other parts of the world and transnationally. Attendance at both lectures and discussion sections is mandatory.

    WOMENSTD 371 — Women in American History Since 1870
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: RE

    This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

     
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