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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = RELIGION
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 14 of 14
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RELIGION 122 — Introduction to the New Testament
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Although it has influenced the Western world more than any other book, the New Testament — having originated almost 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean world — is not easy to understand. This course will, first of all, introduce the student to the historical, religious, and social setting of the New Testament. Then, we shall look at the various New Testament writings. They must be allowed to speak for themselves and not be clouded by any denominational or sectarian program. The student will be introduced to the insights and methods of modern scholarship when dealing with questions such as: What did the various New Testament writings really intend to say? How did they say it? Why did they say it? Finally, the problem of the development of early Christian doctrine will be addressed, albeit briefly. Why were some of the early Christian writings excluded from the New Testament canon? There will be two midterms and a final exam.

RELIGION 202 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pranke,Patrick Arthur

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of Asian religions. It aims to cover the historical development (from ancient times down to the present) of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Shinto, etc., in cross-cultural settings that will include India, China, Korea, and Japan. Readings will include both primary texts (concerning doctrine, philosophy and religious practices) in English translation and secondary scholarship.

RELIGION 204 — Introduction to Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the Reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas.

RELIGION 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

RELIGION 381 — Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Collins,Derek B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon. We examine witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives, trace the development of witchcraft and the witch stereotype in history, literature, and art from classical antiquity, through the middle ages, to the early modern period in Europe and America.

RELIGION 387 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: Only one course from RELIGION 380, 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

Designed to accommodate students who are unable to take listed offerings and have special reasons for undertaking directed reading.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

RELIGION 402 — Topics in Religion
Section 001, SEM
Missionary Media and Promotional Performance: The Propagation of Faiths in Contemporary Southeast Asia

Instructor: Arps,Bernard

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The use of media and performance for religious propagation in contemporary Southeast Asia, more specifically Indonesia, stands central in this course. There is much similarity between religion, spiritualities that do not or cannot lay claim to the status of "religion," and other complexes of beliefs and practices such as political ideologies or consumerism. It is theoretically helpful therefore to consider the missionary uses of media and performance in the broader context of ‘promotion,' a notion that covers propaganda, publicity, conscientization, enculturation, and kindred processes. We will devote part of the course to the use of media and performance in promotion generally, though most attention will go to the promotion of religious thought and practice strictly speaking. Much of the case material we will examine derives from Indonesia and is to do with the propagation of Islam and responses to it in Christian and Hindu and Buddhist circles, but we will also discuss analyses of the promotional use of media and performance elsewhere in Asia, and even in Africa and the USA. Course requirements include a research paper, a presentation, and classroom participation.

This course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

RELIGION 448 — Psychology and Spiritual Development
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mann,Richard D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115, and permission of instructor.

RELIGION 467 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

RELIGION 471 — Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
Section 001, SEM
Hebrew Modernism 1900-1930: Tradition, Modernity, Language, Space

Instructor: Pinsker,Shahar M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The literary works of Hebrew Modernism were created during the early decades of the 20th century, mainly in the urban centers of Eastern and Central Europe, before Hebrew was solidified as a vernacular in Mandatory Palestine. The formation of Hebrew Modernism is one of the most puzzling chapters in the history of Hebrew and Jewish literature.

Many crucial questions concerning Hebrew Modernism remain open: How did modernist Hebrew fiction and poetry arise before the language became a vernacular? What poetic and historic shifts enabled its development? What are the modernist elements, and what (if anything) is specifically Hebrew or Jewish in this literary project? What are the relations between Hebrew and Yiddish Modernism, and the various movements of European Modernisms (Decadence, Impressionism, Expressionism, Naturalism, Stream of the Consciousness Narrative, etc.)? How to understand Hebrew Modernism in the contexts of the competing political and ideological movements of Jewish nationalism, Zionism and Socialism? What is the place of traditional/religious Jewish texts and language in the formation of Hebrew Modernism? The seminar will deal with some of these questions by exploring the main works of Hebrew literature in the last decade of the 19th century (the fin de siècle) and the first three decades of the 20th century. We will read fiction and poetry by S.Y. Abramovitz, Y.L. Peretz, M.Y. Berdichevsky, Ch. N. Bialik, Y.Ch. Brenner, U.N. Gnessin, Gershon Shofman, Dvora Baron, Yaacov Shteinberg, Avraham Ben-Yitzhak, David Fogel, Rachel Bluvstein and Esther Rabb, as well as theoretical and historical writing about Modernism in general (Adorno, Benjamin, Raymond Williams, Richard Sheppard) and Hebrew Modernism in particular (Kurzweil, Miron, Harshav, Kronfeld).

Special attention will be given to the ways in which Hebrew modernist writers were engaged with "the crisis of language," with "radical reinvention of Jewish traditions," as well as shifting perceptions of gender and erotic desire, space and place, geographical and metaphorical journeys, the Diaspora as a mental place, etc.

RELIGION 476 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
Section 001, LEC
Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

RELIGION 481 — The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Ralph G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isaiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

RELIGION 487 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: Only one course from RELIGION 380, 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

Designed to accommodate advanced students who are unable to elect a listed offering and who have special reasons and/or interests in directed readings and research.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

RELIGION 497 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a staff member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors admitted to the Honors concentration program with permission of instructor.

 
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