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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = RUSSIAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 27 of 27
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RUSSIAN 101 — First-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Shkolnik,Nina

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 111.

In this course, the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, RUSSIAN 103.

Textbook: Nachalo I.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 101.

RUSSIAN 102 — First-Year Russian, Continued
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lehoczky,Elek R
Instructor: Rogovyk,Svitlana; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103, 111, or 112.

In this course, the sequel to RUSSIAN 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Nachalo II.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 102.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 101

RUSSIAN 102 — First-Year Russian, Continued
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Dearman,Victoria Chamine
Instructor: Rogovyk,Svitlana; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103, 111, or 112.

In this course, the sequel to RUSSIAN 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Nachalo II.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 102.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 101

RUSSIAN 122 — Scientific Russian II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Besprozvany,Vadim

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course, a continuation of RUSSIAN 121, is designed for students in science and/or engineering. Work consists of reading and translation of a wide variety of scientific texts, with specific emphasis on communication in a scientific environment.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 101 or 121

RUSSIAN 201 — Second-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Madorskaya,Marina

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (RUSSIAN 101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 102 or 103/RCCORE 193

RUSSIAN 202 — Second-Year Russian, Continued
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lomakina,Mariya Dmitrievna

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture, and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 201

RUSSIAN 202 — Second-Year Russian, Continued
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Shevchenko,Mila Borisova

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture, and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 201

RUSSIAN 203 — Intensive Second Year Russian
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Alina Udalchenko

WN 2007
Credits: 8
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201 or 202.

An intensive course meeting eight hours a week + Language lunch table and Russian Tea, this course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms in RUSSIAN 201 and 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary building. The course is proficiency oriented and is especially recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies and who want to gain rapid mastery of Russian. The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency examination. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker in spoken and written language. Students must understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. V puti: Russian Grammar in Context by Olga Kagan and Frank Miller, Prentice Hall, 1996. (PAK includes textbook, workbook and labtapes).
  2. Stories from Today's Russia: A Reader from Today's Russia by Derevyanchenko, Tschakh and Kokoryshkina, National Textbook Company, 1997.
  3. Course pack, available for purchase at Ulrich's.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials:

  1. The Russian Reference Grammar: Core Grammar in Functional Context by J. Watzke, J.Sweigert, Jr., Kendall/Hunt1997, ISBN 0-7872-4467-8.
  2. Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

Cost: over $100

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 102 or 103 or RCLANG 193.

RUSSIAN 302 — Third-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Shkolnik,Nina

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303.

During the course of the academic term, we will continue to work on the development of all four skills — readings, writing, speaking, and listening. We will review difficult grammatical points and work on the expansion of both passive and active vocabulary in the areas of politics, political news, national security, and economics. Students will be introduced to more complex vocabulary and syntactic structures typical of political texts.

Upon the completion of this course the student should be able to understand feature-length unabridged political texts from Russian printed media, understand short reports (four- to five-minute newscasts as well as political speeches), and to carry out a prolonged conversation with a native speaker, show developing argumentative and hypothetical skills, discuss social and political events and abstract notions, write three- to four-page essays on political topics.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. Political Russian (Third Edition) by N. Simes and R. Robin, 2002. ACTR/Kendall Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-9270-2.
  2. On the Air: Russian Television and Politics by N. Simes, R. Robin and L. Guslistov, 1999. ACTR/SAIS/Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-6035-5.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials:

  1. The Oxford Russian Dictionary: English-Russian, Russian-English, edited by Paula Falla. Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN 0198601530.
  2. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar by T. Wade, Blackwell, 1997. ISBN 0-63117502-4.
  3. A Grammar Workbook by T. Wade, Blackwell, 1996. ISBN 0-63119381-2.

Cost: over $100

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 301

RUSSIAN 325 — Russian for Heritage Speakers II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rogovyk,Svitlana; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

RUSSIAN 325 is designed for students who have completed RUSSIAN 225 or heritage speakers who have attended Russian schools for more than 5 years. This course focuses on professional usage of Russian and is aimed towards an advanced level of language proficiency. Students will work on improving their skills in creative writing, reading and grammar. Topics include broad swaths of the humanities and social sciences (history, education in Russia, relationships in Russian society, business, Russian media, etc.). Students who complete RUSSIAN 325 successfully may advance to fourth-year level Russian, including content courses in literature and area studies. Students are evaluated based on homework, in-class tests including a midterm and final, class participation and attendance.

Students are evaluated based on homework, in-class tests including a midterm and final, class participation and attendance.

Course Requirements: Intended for students with near-native Russian knowledge who would like to augment their grammar and writing skills in the academic, business and public spheres.

Advisory Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSSIAN 225 or permission of instructor

RUSSIAN 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC
Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

RUSSIAN 355 — Supervised Reading of Russian Literature
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credits elected, but must correspond to writing expectations of upper-level department courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. CHRM.

RUSSIAN 402 — Fourth-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Makin,Alina Udalchenko

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403.

Continued work on vocabulary combined with the mastery of oral fluency and freedom of self-expression in speech and writing. Readings taken from Russian short stories and the press.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 401.

RUSSIAN 462 — Dostoevsky
Section 001, LEC
Life and Work of Fedor Dostoevsky

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course studies the life and work of Fedor Dostoevsky, locating him and his oeuvre in the cultural and intellectual history of Russia, while also examining an extensive and representative sample of his prose fiction in detail. It is intended both for those with a general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Dostoevsky.

Poor Folk, The Double, Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov are read and analyzed. His contribution to literary and literary-political discussions of the time is assessed.

RUSSIAN 477 — Russian Culture and National Ideology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Throughout the 19th century, Russian social consciousness as well as official ideology searched for a new image of national unity to suit their current identity and to represent the Russian empire as a coherent, homogeneous society. Thinkers of otherwise very different outlooks appealed to the same cultural myths to create a renewed national narrative designed both to provide the basis for national unity and to emphasize the continuity of Russian history. It is the task of this course to discuss issues such as how national memory tended to unite people, why Russian thinkers projected their desires for national unity and continuity onto the past, how specific sociocultural situations served as a point of departure for the circulation of certain myths. Emphasis will be placed on the symbolic dimension and metaphoric representation of the desired national unity and identity. The focus will be on the cultural language used in public commemorations, in literary texts, in government documents, and in journalistic articles. Lecture format. A knowledge of Russian is not required. Taught in English. All readings in English. Required class presentation, final paper (15-20 pages).

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

RUSSIAN 479 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years
Section 001, LEC
Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Russian is not a prerequisite (all readings in English).

RUSSIAN 482 — Ten Masterpieces of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC
Ten Masterpieces of Russian Prose-Shorter Fiction

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: WorldLit

Pushkin, The Stationmaster,The Shot, The Queen of Spades
Lermontov, Taman, The Fatalist
Gogol, Viy, The Overcoat
Turgenev, The First Love
Dostoevsky, The Dream of a Ridiculous Man
Tolstoy, Hadji Murat
Chekhov, The Anonymous Story [Rasskaz neizvestnogo cheloveka]
Nabokov, The Circle

No knowledge of Russian is required.

Midterm take-home exam. Final essay.

An optional 1 credit hour Independent Study is available (for a total of 3 credits for the course).

RUSSIAN 492 — Senior Honors Course
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of RUSSIAN 491 and 492.

During RUSSIAN 492 (the second half of the year-long Honors course) the student produces a draft of a thesis of fifty to one hundred pages on a topic in literary or linguistic studies, and then, in consultation with a thesis supervisor and the Honors advisor, the final version of the thesis. Regular meetings with supervisor, participation in informal seminars, and successful submission of thesis lead to the award of an Honors degree in Russian. An oral defense may be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Approval of departmental Honors Committee and permission of instructor.

RUSSIAN 499 — Advanced Seminar in Russian
Section 001, REC
Advanced Seminar in Russian: What is Art?

Instructor: Khagi,Sofya

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In Russia "a poet is more than a poet." As much applies to artists at large — writers, composers, painters, filmmakers. If there is one trait of Russian culture that distinguishes it from the major cultures of the West, it is Russian art's persistent claim to an exceptional status. The seminar investigates the many unique associations that have accrued to the notion of art in Russia. How has Russian art acquired such an exceptional social and spiritual role? What is "genuine" art? What is the "true" calling of the artist? What turns the artist into a powerful opponent and even rival of political authority? How does artist relate to man? Does art have its detractors as well? What are their arguments? Some of the heated cultural debates we will explore: veneration vs. nihilist condemnation of art; utilitarian view of art vs. "art of art's sake"; genius vs. craftsmanship; art and eros vs. art and death. Authors to be read: Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Blok, Bulgakov, Brodsky, etc. Movies by Tarkovsky, Mamin, and Sokurov. Over the course of the term, we will trace the evolving, complex, and ever-fascinating mythology of Russian art from the rise of modern culture to contemporary times. The course is taught in Russian. All assignments are in Russian.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351.

RUSSIAN 502 — Fifth-Year Russian: Contemporary Issues
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Besprozvany,Vadim

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This advanced language course is designed for students wishing to achieve high-level proficiency in spoken and written Russian. Drawing in diverse instructional materials about socio-cultural, political, and/or economic issues in contemporary Russian, this course is accessible to students in range of disciplinary and professional degree programs.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 501.

RUSSIAN 510 — Language Teaching Pedagogy Lab
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Rogovyk,Svitlana; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course, destined for GSI's teaching in the Russian language program, investigates strategies to present points of grammar and to strengthen communicative skills among undergraduates; studies testing techniques appropriate for proficiency-based teaching; and broadens knowledge in existing theories of second-language acquisition. Grades are based on oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 522 — Scientific Russian II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Besprozvany,Vadim

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 122.

This course, a continuation of RUSSIAN 521, is designed for students in the sciences and/or engineering. Work consists of reading and translation of a wide variety of scientific texts, with specific emphasis on communication in a scientific environment.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 121 or 521.

RUSSIAN 652 — Directed Reading in Russian Literature
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of the chair of department.

RUSSIAN 795 — Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A research seminar on topics in Russian and East European Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

RUSSIAN 856 — Seminar in Russian Literature
Section 002, SEM
Life and Work of Fedor Dostoevsky

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course studies the life and work of Fedor Dostoevsky, locating him and his oeuvre in the cultural and intellectual history of Russia, while also examining an extensive and representative sample of his prose fiction in detail. It is intended both for those with a general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Dostoevsky.

Poor Folk, The Double, Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov are read and analyzed. His contribution to literary and literary-political discussions of the time is assessed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

RUSSIAN 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

RUSSIAN 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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