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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = SAC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 50 of 50
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SAC 236 — The Art of the Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Von Moltke,Johannes Eugen

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The Art of the Film examines the dramatic and psychological effects of the elements and techniques used in film making and television, and some of the salient developments in film's artistic and technological history. This course provides students with the basic tools and methods for film appreciation and study. A lab fee of $50.00 is assessed to pay for the film rentals.

SAC 272 — Classical Film Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Studlar,Gaylyn

WN 2007
Credits: 3

As one of the primary mass media and art forms of the twentieth century, film attracted the attention of many observers and observer-participants who sought to understand the medium beyond the fact of its obvious commercial value. This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts and intellectual preoccupations of these philosophically-minded commentators from the first half of the twentieth century whose work constitutes what is now known as "classical film theory." Attention will be given to major theorists and theorist/practitioners such as Hugo Muum;;nsterberg, Sergei Eisenstein, Rudolf Arnheim, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Andreacute; Bazin, and others. We will engage with their writings and seek to understand how they theorized the existing function and future possibilities of film as an art form, as a medium perceived as having a special link to "reality," as a phenomenon of mass culture, and as a technology implicated in the cultural and industrial changes associated with modernity, especially as the latter was perceived as radically changing art forms and their reception by viewers. Emphasis will be given to the application of these ideas to films that appeared during the period in which these theorists wrote with the supplement of some films more recently produced.

SAC 272 — Classical Film Theory
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Saks,Lucia A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to introduce the basic concepts and intellectual preoccupations of what is now known as "classic film theory." Attention is given to major theorist/practitioners of the first half of the twentieth century such as Sergei Eisenstein, Rudolf Arnheim, Vsevolod Pudovkin, and others.

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hardacker,Jennifer

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Hardacker,Jennifer

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 005, LEC

Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 300 — Filmmaking I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Building on previous filmmaking experience, this course examines the technical and creative potentials of the moving image using 16mm film. Students will work in small groups to create short films. Some potential approaches may include narrative, documentary, or experimental forms.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 300 — Filmmaking I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Building on previous filmmaking experience, this course examines the technical and creative potentials of the moving image using 16mm film. Students will work in small groups to create short films. Some potential approaches may include narrative, documentary, or experimental forms.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 301 — Video Making I
Section 001, LEC


Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Building on previous video experience, this course continues to explore single camera video production and aesthetics and focuses on video as a creative form through examination of historical and contemporary video art works. Students will work independently or in small groups on short projects that provide hands-on experience with digital cameras and non-linear digital editing.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 306 — Digital Animation I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McNamara,Christopher E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to animation and digital media production techniques and practices. Using 2D imaging, compositing and editing software students work individually or in small groups to plan and create short time-based works and engage in exercises and projects that explore the aesthetic and technological potentials of the new and emerging digital media.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 290. Students should have basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop, and digital video.

SAC 309 — The Screenplay as Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fanucchi,Victor T

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focuses on developing an appreciation of great film screenplays as dramatic literature and an understanding of what characterizes them as such. Reading progress from screen play adaptations and their source materials to original screenplays, covering a broad range of themes and genres.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 310 — Screenwriting
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lawson,Terry J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay. Students begin with the development of a concept, proceed to writing a treatment, and then spend the majority of the term working on the full script. Students read and critique each other's work.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 310 — Screenwriting
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Shere,Daniel Adam

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay. Students begin with the development of a concept, proceed to writing a treatment, and then spend the majority of the term working on the full script. Students read and critique each other's work.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 311 — Screenwriting for Television
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thornton,Oliver Reid

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course teaches students to write full length teleplays for various small-screen formats. The class has rotating formats so students focus on one genre or serial format during a given term, such as sit-coms, dramas, soap-operas, etc.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 331 — Film Genres and Types
Section 001, LEC
Westerns

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

For decades Westerns were Hollywood's most popular genre, appealing not only to Americans but to people world wide. This extraordinary popularity fell off in the United States in the 1970s largely due to the effect of the Viet Nam war on our notions of heroism and of good and evil. The 1990s, however, showed a renewed interest in Westerns — two won Academy Awards for best picture during that decade: Dances with Wolves (1990) and The Unforgiven (1992) — and Westerns continue to be made with some regularity.

Some of Hollywood's greatest films have been Westerns and every important Hollywood male star appeared in them: Gary Cooper, Henry Fonda, John Wayne, James Stewart, Clint Eastwood, Kevin Costner. In this course we will view and analyze many of the classic Westerns: Stagecoach, The Ox-Bow Incident, Red River, Shane, High Noon, One-Eyed Jacks, The Wild Bunch, Once Upon a Time in the West, Tombstone, to mention just a few. We will also read the novel, All the Pretty Horses.

In class we will first critique these films as dramas — their stories, characters, and structures. We will also consider why it is that Westerns have and continue to captivate people, young and old, urban and rural, American and foreign. We will also examine the Western's concept of heroism and masculinity as well as the role women have played in Westerns — and trace how both male and female roles have changed over the decades.

Films will be shown on Tuesday nights at 7:00pm. There will be two papers, a midterm and final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 236 or SAC 236

SAC 351 — Film History, Origins to 1929
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bertellini,Giorgio; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Introduces students to the history of silent cinema from its technological and cultural origins in the late nineteenth century to the impact of the development of sound on film. The objective is to orient students to a wide range of cinemas and establish the relations between films from different aesthetic, industrial, and national contexts, and to illuminate the development of narrative form and film style.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 352 — Film History, 1930-1959
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Examines the history of film during a period of time characterized by the dominance of narrative film and the studio system. The focus is on technological, institutional, and aesthetic developments evidenced broadly in the international scene and on specific historical and national contexts of production and reception.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 365 — Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television
Section 001, LEC
Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television: Black Comedy

Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU, RE

This course will focus upon representation of race and ethnicity in televisual fiction since the late sixties. By examining the representations of specific communities — marginalized in terms of ethnicity and race — students will be asked to interrogate how these images are constructed, by whom and for whom. The course is designed to make students think about the in mainstream network television, and by doing this we can begin to understand the conflicted and conflictual nature of the interplay between the formation of fluid and multiple identities and how — and by whom — notions of identity are being televisually constructed.

In the winter of 2007, rather than offering a broad survey of ethnic and racial groups as well as genre, the course will focus primarily on African American comedy. Students should note that the required screenings include material that contains profanity, humor of a sexually explicit nature and other subject matter that might be considered both socially and politically controversial.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 366 — Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture
Section 001, LEC
Sex, Society, & Censorship in Classical Hollywood

Instructor: Studlar,Gaylyn

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will offer a social history of the relationship between U.S. films and society through the lens of censorship. The desire to control the content of film was expressed almost as soon as movies began being exhibited, and in 1915, movies were placed in a vulnerable position by the U.S. Supreme Court decision that they were outside the free speech protections of the First Amendment. This course will trace the legal, moral, political, and economic attempts to regulate or reform U.S. cinema from its beginning, through the heyday of the studio system, and up to the adaptation of the voluntary ratings system in 1968. We will concentrate on three primary aspects of Hollywood representation that provoked social anxiety and public controversy throughout the twentieth century: violence, sexual content, and political commentary. We will establish the social and institutional context for the creation of "scandalous cinema" and then explore how the American film industry responded to various crises of confidence in Hollywood moral norms, both on screen and off. We will pay particular attention to the tensions and opportunities created by Hollywood's systemization of moral self-regulation in the years 1922-1968 through the efforts of the so-called "Hays Office" and the Production Code Administration. We will also explore the process of constructing textual conventions for representing sex, violence, and politics in film and the impact of these representational practices on various genres and production venues.

TEXTBOOKS (tentative list only: may change depending on availability)

  • Gregory Black, Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics, and the Movies, Cambridge Up, 1994
  • Lee Grieveson, Policing Cinema: Movies and Censorship in Early Twentieth-Century America, University of California Press, 2004
  • Matthew Bernstein, editor. Controlling Hollywood: Censorship and Regulation in the Studio Era, Rutgers UP, 1999.
  • Raymond Chandler, Double Indemnity (any edition)
  • Stephen Prince, Violence in Classical Film, Rutgers UP, 2003

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS: Midterm exam and comprehensive final exam. TWO research papers, 1st: minimum of eight pages; 2nd: minimum of ten pages

SAC 366 — Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture
Section 003, LEC
Science Fiction in Film, TV & Popular Culture

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the genre of Science Fiction across multiple media. We will base our discussion in film, but we'll also look at television, literature, and graphic novels. We will explore how Science Fiction extrapolates the trends of the present to imagine possible future worlds, and trace the genre's tendency to imagine past worlds in which technology has not yet usurped nature. We will locate the genre's dominant themes within the context of specific scientific, technological, and social developments across the late 19th century and into the new millennium, and will discuss the form's re-imagining of dominant narrative scenarios such as time travel, the post-apocalyptic future, artificial intelligence, space adventure, and alien encounters.


Screenings may include Forbidden Planet, The Quatermass Experiment, Panic in Year Zero, The Omega Man, The Outer Limits, Star Trek, and Colossus: The Forbin Project.

Authors may include Ellison, Matheson, Asimov, Bradbury, and Miller.

SAC 367 — Introduction to Digital Media Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Murphy,Sheila C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Surveys the technologies, representations, and experiences that constitute digital media culture. Course goals are to understand the aesthetic, political, and cultural roles of digital media by reading diverse texts and entering into the debates around new technologies and the ways that we imagine them.

SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 376 — Digital Media Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Murphy,Sheila C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Surveys the major theories of digital media culture from theories of media convergence to "cyberfeminist" analysis of identity politics and accounts of the formal properties of digital media.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 381 — Latinas/Latinos and the Media
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Benamou,Catherine L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Examines access and contributions of Latinas/os to the U.S. media from an historical perspective, with a culminating emphasis on the contemporary period. The cultural scope is pan-Latino, covering a range of genres and formats, from documentary to experimental film and television.

Advisory Prerequisite: AC 213 or FV 236 or AC/FV/SP 380

SAC 400 — Filmmaking II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hardacker,Jennifer

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class explores filmmaking on an intermediate level. Students learn experimental and artistic forms of filmic expression as well as traditional movie-making techniques. Students work on exercises, in small groups, to learn about shot-by-shot storyboards, cinematography, and lighting and to understand motion and pace in editing.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 300, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only.

SAC 404 — Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Visual Media
Section 001, LEC
Videodance

Instructor: Sparling,Peter D
Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

From Maya Deren to Merce Cunningham, to music video and beyond, this course will explore the unique challenges of capturing and creating dance for the camera. Through class screenings of film and video work, class exercises, reading and discussion, students will learn about various historical and contemporary issues and approaches in combining dance and the moving image. Students will work alone and in small collaborative groups to create their own works integrating dance and video. At the end of the course, students should be able to articulate meaning in dance on film or video and discuss, analyze, and critique both student projects and "professional" dance screen works. Through creative projects, students will develop their own visual style and an increased proficiency with digital video cameras and editing.

Advisory Prerequisite: A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: FILMVID/SAC 300, 301, 302, or 306; and permission of instructor.

SAC 406 — Digital Animation II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McNamara,Christopher E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Advanced investigation in animation and digital media production techniques and practices. Using 2D imaging, compositing and editing software students work individually or collaboratively to plan and create personal time-based projects. Emphasis is placed on motion graphics, special effects, digital sound and music and multi-media production.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 306

SAC 410 — Screenwriting II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Burnstein,James S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 310, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only.

SAC 422 — Topics in Avant-Garde Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An introduction to films, creative practitioners, and aesthetic tendencies which have functioned in opposition to the narrative and commercial structures of Hollywood cinema from the silent period to the present. Diverse European, American, and Asian cinematic avant-gardes (German Expressionism, Surrealism, Soviet theorists of montage, the city symphony, the works of Maya Deren, the New American Cinema, structural films by Michael Snow and Hollis Frampton, the diary cinema movement, Andy Warhol, essay films by Chris Marker and Jean-Luc Godard, and recent explorations of gender, Yvonne Rainer, Bette Gordon, Sadie Benning) will be studied in relation to corresponding developments in 20th-century cultural history. Readings in aesthetic theory, film theory, and film history. Course requirements include a midterm examination and a final project.

SAC 230/236 is heavily recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236

SAC 423 — Practicum for the Screenwriter
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W
Instructor: Burnstein,James S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class is a writing practicum where the students learn the role of the screenwriter in the greater process of the production media. Each student participates in the various creative steps involved in bringing a narrative script to the screen.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 290, 310, and 410

SAC 427 — Screenwriting III
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Burnstein,James S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An advanced screenwriting course that provides individual and small group instruction to select students who have completed basic (SAC 310) and intermediate (SAC 410) screenwriting. Students will write a final draft of a revised original screenplay and a first draft of a new screenplay.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 310 & 410

Advisory Prerequisite: Limited to students whose work is judged as showing outstanding potential in writing for the screen. Permission of instructor.

SAC 441 — National Cinemas
Section 001, LEC
Indian Cinema: Bollywood & Beyond

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course simultaneously provides an introduction to the diverse cinemas of India and investigates the concept of "national cinema" through the history, aesthetics, and cultural politics of cinema in the country that annually produces the highest number of films in the world. Focusing on Indian films from the post-independence era, we will explore how Indian films both participate in and unravel the grand narratives of Indian nationalism; examine how they re-imagine the nation and how the nation is re-imagined around them; ask how they mediate heterogeneous experiences of modernity, and class, gender, and sexual identities; track their movements across national borders; and use them to scrutinize and evaluate existing theoretical debates about image-making and the nation.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 or 360

SAC 441 — National Cinemas
Section 003, LEC
African/South African Cinema

Instructor: Saks,Lucia A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the theories, films, filmmakers and themes that comprise the cinemas of Africa. Often taken to be a monolithic category, the cinemas of Africa are unique and reflect the concerns of the individual filmmakers. This is not surprising considering the geographic dispersion and massive size of the continent. Yet, they are also linked in many of their thematics and their positioning of the cinema as a social tool for societal change and redress. Issues of homeland, nation, identity, race, gender, and the exploration of history are foregrounded in many of the films. The course will examine African films from the early sixties (the beginning) to the present, thus noting the changes that have taken place during this time. It will also include films made in Africa by transnational filmmakers such as Raoul Peck. There will be a special emphasis on the "newest" African cinema, namely South African cinema, which has become a major player on the continent since the end of apartheid.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 or 360

SAC 455 — Topics in Film Studies
Section 001, LEC
Shakespeare and Film

Instructor: Hodgdon,Barbara C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores "Shakespeare and film," concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We will be reading plays by Shakespeare, watching films and videos based on those plays, and considering problems and issues connected with the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. We shall be looking at early as well as recent Shakespeare films (in English and in other languages) and at films that stick close to conventional conceptualizations of "Shakespeare" as well as films which move towards erasing Shakespeare. Transposing different forms of Shakespearean textualities (printed, theatrical) to cinema/video produces a phenomenon whose cultural meanings — meaning as Shakespeare and meaning as film — will be the subject of our investigations. Plays of the season will include Macbeth, King Lear, Twelfth Night, The Taming of the Shrew, Henry V as well as others. Screening lab required. Grade based on two papers (8-10 pages each, 60%); short responses (20%); attendance and participation (20%). Course pack, approximately $50.00.

This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

This section does not require permission of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236

SAC 455 — Topics in Film Studies
Section 003, LEC
Dialogue of Violence

Instructor: Nornes, Abé Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3


This course will explore the relationship of WWIIs Pacific Theater to moving image media in two movements. First, a comparative history of Hollywood and Japanese filmmaking during the war explores issues of race, nationality, propaganda, and violence. The second half of the course continues to analyze these problems by turning to post-1945 (and post-9/11) attempts to remember, critique and commemorate (or forget) WWII in media as disparate as television, video art, and the internet.

Dialogue of Violence will screen propaganda by Frank Capra, Kurosawa Akira, John Ford, Bruce Conner, Imamura Shohei and others to ask questions like:

  • Do nations have their own, distinct languages of violence?
  • What makes a hero?
  • What's Fordian about John Ford's Sex Hygiene?
  • How many women does it take to build one B-29 a minute?
  • Are stereotypes actually a mundane part of everyday life?
  • What does a mushroom cloud mean?
  • Is memory a form of history?
  • What happens when racism and global warfare meet?

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 012, IND

Instructor: McNamara,Christopher E

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 013, IND

Instructor: Burnstein,James S

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 016, IND

Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 034, IND

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 036, IND

Instructor: Hardacker,Jennifer

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 489 — Senior Screenwriting Tutorial
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is one of the options for the capstone experience required of Dramatic Writing concentrators who choose the screenwriting sequence. Students write a screenplay as a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 410, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 490 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Candidates for honors work independently with a faculty member in the Program on a thesis or on a film or video project during their senior year.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC Concentrators only.

SAC 499 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Does not count toward concentration requirements. Must be approved by the department in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SAC 500 — Directed Study in Screen Arts and Cultures
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SAC 602 — Seminar in Film or Electronic/Digital Media Historiography
Section 001, SEM
Writing Cinema History

Instructor: Abel,Richard

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar we will study a range of approaches and methodologies involved in writing cinema history. Each week we will focus on a specific area of investigation, specific texts/authors, and specific questions about the practice of historiography. At the same time that the seminar privileges meta-textual concerns, it will offer the opportunity for graduate students to develop a detailed and nuanced knowledge of cinema history — specifically, the first sixty years of American cinema history. Throughout, our analyses of specific approaches and methodologies will be accompanied by investigations of available resources, archives, and databases essential for primary and secondary cinema historical research. We also will address such pertinent issues as: intermediality or cinema's relationship to other forms of commercialized leisure, the whys and hows of periodization, the importance of institutional discourse (catalogues, advertisements, fan magazines, newspaper pages, and reviews), the significance of stars, the study of exhibition and audiences, the place of textual analysis, and questions of national identity, class, gender, race, and ethnicity as they apply to constructions of cinema history.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 414 and Graduate standing.

SAC 631 — Advanced Seminar in Theories of Film or Electronic/Digital Media
Section 001, SEM
Kracauer & Film Theory

Instructor: Von Moltke,Johannes Eugen

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Shortly before his friend's and mentor's death in 1966, Theodor Adorno wrote of the Siegfried Kracauer, the "curious realist": "He thinks with an eye that is astonished almost to helplessness but then suddenly flashes into illumination." This course is devoted to an in-depth look at Kracauer's writings in an effort to reconstruct the parameters of such "visual thinking." Always keeping in mind the primacy of the visual in Kracauer's many pursuits as a cultural theorist, we will probe the different facets of his work from the early writings on film and popular culture during the Weimar Republic through the posthumously published History: The Last Things Before the Last. For although he is perhaps best remembered today for his influential 1947 history of Weimar Cinema, entitled From Caligari to Hitler, Kracauer was in fact a wide-ranging cultural theorist who took material, visual culture as a starting point for philosophical and sociological reflection. In this regard, his work directly intersects with the formative period of Frankfurt School Critical Theory, even as it appears to pave the way (at least retrospectively) for more recent trends in Cultural Studies. We will thus study Kracauer's work in relation to the thinking of Georg Simmel, Theodor Adorno, and Walter Benjamin; and we will trace how Kracauer's lifelong work on cinema intersected with an equally sustained interest in other areas of visual and popular culture. An architect by training and an autodidactic philosopher, a journalist for the FrankfurterZeitung and a cultural critic at large in the Weimar Republic, an occasional novelist and a major film theorist, and a posthumous historian, Kracauer remains a unique and incisive cultural theorist whose work warrants re-reading.

SAC 700 — Directed Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Each student will carry out a research project in screen cultures that represents the culmination of her or his graduate work. Based on individual reading and screening lists, this written project normally will serve as a preliminary stage of the student's dissertation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. FILMVID 600 and 601, permission of advisor and FILMVID Graduate Committee.

 
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