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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = SI
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SI 110 — Introduction to Information Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frost,Robert L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Course Objectives: The vaunted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, Net games, and dotcoms. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize those lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information. At the School of Information, we take pride in our tradition, inherited from librarianship, of "user-centeredness" and public access. For this reason, not only will you, the "user" of this course, be given unusual attention, but intellectually, we will approach information technology from the perspective of end-users and their concerns.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-shrinking and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones?), to the practical (what are the basic architectures of computing and networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to understand the politics, economics, and culture of the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of more traditional disciplines.

During the run of this course, we will be systematically eliciting your feedback and analysis. These evaluation procedures are not, however, merely to make "guinea pigs" of you; rather, a key part of our assessments will use leading-edge electronic and information tools, and your ability to use those tools well will also be a key part of the agenda.

Materials for the Course
There are no books to be puchased for this course, as all readings are on-line. (However, if you need help writing, we strongly recommend Diedre McCloskey's Economical Writing. We also make the lecture slides available in Acrobat™ .pdf format and, if requested, we will post them as PowerPoint™ slides as well (Prof. Frost actually uses Apple's Keynote™). We also try to put the audio tracks of the lecture on-line in .mp3 format so that you can have your own podcast version of Prof. Frost screaming in your ear. All postings are done through the relevant syllabus pages.

SI 580 — Introduction to Archival Administration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Conway,Paul L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SI 652 — Electronic Commerce
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sami,Rahul

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The Internet is rapidly changing the way we trade with one another, conduct businesses, and organize financial institutions. This course covers a range of important principles — drawn from computer science, economics, and other disciplines — that influence the design and analysis of Internet commerce systems. The goal is to develop a mastery of the fundamental concepts and approaches through examples, rather than an exhaustive survey of the field. The course is loosely organized as two half-semester modules — "Foundations of E-commerce" and "Online Auctions and Pricing."

The general outline of material breaks trading into three topics — locating buyers and sellers (search), setting terms of trade (negotiation), and verifying and consummating the deal (exchange). The first half-semester will cover search and exchange systems and introduce students to design and analysis methods to make online commerce robust against failures, malicious attackers, and strategic manipulation. The second half-semester will cover negotiation through an in-depth study of online auctions, exchanges, and pricing schemes. Students study the theory and practice of incentive engineering for business or social goals in this rapidly growing area.

Advisory Prerequisite: SI 502 or taken concurrently or Instructor permission

SI 708 — Networks: Theory Complex Systems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Adamic,Lada A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Introduces and develops the mathematical theory of networks, particularly social and technological networks; with applications to important network-driven phenomena in epidemiology of human infections and computer viruses, cascading failure in grids, network resilience and opinion formation. Topics covered: experimental studies of social networks, WWW, internet, information, and biological networks.

SI 719 — Knowledge/Power/Practice in Science, Technology, and Medicine
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Carson,John S; homepage
Instructor: Jackson,Steven J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This graduate readings seminar is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to some of the major themes and issues that occupy the field of Science and Technology Studies. Drawing on scholarship in history, sociology, philosophy, anthropology, and information studies, we will mix theoretical material with more empirically oriented studies. The course will focus particularly on the relation between social, political, and cultural contexts and the development of ideas, practices, tools, and objects within science, technology, and medicine. No particular expertise in a scientific field is expected or required of participants.

Work for the seminar will include reading approximately 200-300 pages per week, brief weekly response papers, two discussion papers based on a week's reading, and a final project of about 15 pages.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
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