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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = SOC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 126 of 126
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SOC 100 — Principles of Sociology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors.

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity). In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to the American family, exploring family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to first and second year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300

SOC 100 — Principles of Sociology
Section 040, LEC

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors.

This survey of sociological principles and problems has as its main purpose to introduce us to the most important theoretical perspectives, concepts and major findings of sociology so as to develop a quality of mind, "the sociological imagination," that would provide us with a better understanding of the subtle and complex connections existing between our own life and the world around us.

We will address such fundamental issues as the Individual, Culture and Society; Socialization, Conformity, and Deviance; Institutions such as Work, the Media, Family and Intimate Relationships; Structures of Power and Inequalities of Class, Race, Gender, Sexuality; as well as issues of Personal Transformation, Social Movements, and Social Change.

Hopefully, the substance of this course and the manner it is taught will inspire all of us to further examine our own lives and the workings of the surrounding society by means of perspectives and insights gained from this introductory course. Course requirements include three non-cumulative exams (20% each), a course portfolio (20% total), and class attendance and participation (20%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to first and second year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300

SOC 101 — Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McNeal,Charlea T

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit for seniors.

Why did every college student involved in a Yale University experiment follow the professor's order to give dangerous shocks to a man who had done nothing wrong? What personality traits and life circumstances distinguish those who risked their lives to save Jews in Nazi Europe? This course begins to answer these and other questions by introducing students to an important sub-field of sociology. Social psychology is the systematic study of behavior, thoughts, and feelings of interacting individuals and of their relationships to groups in society. The core concepts, theoretical approaches, and research methods within social psychology will be presented. Required coursework consists of attending lectures and section meetings, textbook reading assignments, and the reading of classic and contemporary examples of social psychology research and analysis. Grades will be based on three exams, six surprise quizzes, and section meeting attendance and participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 300 or 401.

SOC 102 — Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGinn,Terence James; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through SOC 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different. No credit for seniors.

Sociology is the study of human beings and their social arrangements. One can view the academic discipline of sociology as a method for asking questions, a group of authors, a collection of writings, or a set of issues. This course helps students to explore sociology using contemporary social issues or "problems" as the entry point.

During the Winter ‘07 academic term, the course will begin with a general introduction to the field of sociology, followed by the consideration of three basic social realities and an aspect of each that might be framed as a "problem":

  1. Money, as the globalization of capitalism;
  2. Sex, as the social construction of gender and sexuality; and
  3. religion, as the emergence of contemporary fundamentalisms.

The class will also consider race as a subtext in each of the three issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 300 or 401.

SOC 110 — Introduction to Information Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frost,Robert L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Course Objectives: The vaunted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, Net games, and dotcoms. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize those lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information. At the School of Information, we take pride in our tradition, inherited from librarianship, of "user-centeredness" and public access. For this reason, not only will you, the "user" of this course, be given unusual attention, but intellectually, we will approach information technology from the perspective of end-users and their concerns.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-shrinking and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones?), to the practical (what are the basic architectures of computing and networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to understand the politics, economics, and culture of the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of more traditional disciplines.

During the run of this course, we will be systematically eliciting your feedback and analysis. These evaluation procedures are not, however, merely to make "guinea pigs" of you; rather, a key part of our assessments will use leading-edge electronic and information tools, and your ability to use those tools well will also be a key part of the agenda.

Materials for the Course
There are no books to be puchased for this course, as all readings are on-line. (However, if you need help writing, we strongly recommend Diedre McCloskey's Economical Writing. We also make the lecture slides available in Acrobat™ .pdf format and, if requested, we will post them as PowerPoint™ slides as well (Prof. Frost actually uses Apple's Keynote™). We also try to put the audio tracks of the lecture on-line in .mp3 format so that you can have your own podcast version of Prof. Frost screaming in your ear. All postings are done through the relevant syllabus pages.

SOC 111 — Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Allan,J David; homepage
Instructor: van der Pluijm,Ben A; homepage
Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit for seniors.

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid, interconnected changes now occurring in the Earth system — its climate, human population, resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II — Human Impacts guides students in learning about our natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-supported introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, our impacts on land, air, and water resources, modern energy and climate policy and pressures on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is suitable for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I, its companion course on the physical processes. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning skills, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty. This course is one of three core courses required for the Global Change Minor.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly lab exercises, course participation, a web poster project, midterms, and a final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn, among other topics, about:

Human Population Growth Its History and Social Influences Detection of Global Environmental Change Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Human Impacts on Resources Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources Energy and Climate Issues Urban and Industrial Environments Deforestation and Desertification Biodiversity Achieving Sustainable Development Economics of Development International Treaties and Government Our Common Future Models of the Future

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 003, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 004, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 005, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 006, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 007, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 008, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 009, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 010, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 011, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 012, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 013, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 014, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 015, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 016, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 017, SEM

WN 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 210 — Elementary Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Purkiss,Joel A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405.

In this course we will study the basic concepts and techniques of quantitative data analysis. We will also learn some statistical computing skills using SPSS software. While there will be an emphasis on statistical techniques as they are used by social scientists, the course will provide the foundation needed for any kind of statistical analysis. We will not use math beyond basic algebra, and you do not need previous statistical computing experience. Furthermore, you need not be a "math-oriented" person to do well in this course. Students who apply good study skills — consistently attending class and section meetings, reading assigned texts, and doing all assigned work on time — can expect to do well in the course. Grades will be based on in-class exams, homework assignments, and a few statistical computing assignments. Because statistical analysis of any type involves step-by-step procedures and the presentation of results in standardized ways, some emphasis will be placed upon your general ability to perform analyses and present results as instructed. Therefore, a small portion of your score on assigned work will be determined by its form and presentation. If you come to class regularly, keep up with the coursework, and perform your work in a manner consistent with written instructions, you will learn basic statistics and earn a good grade along the way.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year.

SOC 212 — Sports and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century. There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one — soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

SOC 220 — Political Economy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The course explores human society from an interdisciplinary social scientific perspective anchored in political economic analysis. The primary focus is on modern capitalism, especially as it has developed in the United States. A wide range of social analyses is examined with an emphasis on contemporary contributions. Historical and theoretical points are considered in close relation to current affairs and to potential feasible alternatives to prevailing policies and institutions. Students are encouraged to explore their own interests and ideas as well as to develop their capacities for insightful social analysis. Written work consists of a take-home midterm, a final examination, and a term paper. The course provides extensive opportunities for discussion. (RCSSCI Gateway Course).

SOC 295 — Topics in Sociology
Section 001, LEC
Sociology of Multiculturalism

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to provide students with specific multicultural conflict management and resolution skills. Students will learn techniques that can be useful in identifying, understanding, and solving conflicts in more just, peaceful, sustainable, structural, and ethical ways, particularly among individuals with membership in groups of diverse class, race/ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship, and other identity backgrounds.

Our goal is to create a teaching/learning environment that promotes a deeper understanding of the changing, complex, and conflictive nature of inter-group relations. This environment will promote dialogue, cooperation, learning, and transformation. We will explore mechanisms and strategies that turn stratified, dominant, and unjust differences into differences that enrich personal life, social relationships, our society, and our world.

The course's pedagogy involves students and teachers as partners in learning. It is based on the principle that learning and teaching is a cooperative and dialogic process that incorporates valuable contributions from all. Readings, two exams, keeping a journal, participating in a dialogue-group project, and writing a course portfolio of your learning in this class are among the course requirements.

SOC 295 — Topics in Sociology
Section 002, LEC
The Experience of Social Class in College and Community

Instructor: Lang,Dwight

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course examines how social class inequality is created/encountered in America — particularly as students study in higher education and work in the wider community. We will consider the structural bases of social class stratification including persistent family, educational, occupational and income inequalities. Close attention will be paid to how individuals experience social class in a country theoretically committed to equality of opportunity for all. Both obvious and hidden contradictions for children/students/adults from various social class backgrounds will be reviewed and explored. Two central questions to be answered include: Why do Americans allow social class inequality to exist and persist over time, while simultaneously claiming all have equal social opportunities? Why are we unable to achieve all our meritocratic ideals?

SOC 302 — Introduction to American Society
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In his best-selling book, What's the Matter with Kansas? Thomas Frank speculates on how the Republican Party captured "the Heart of America," despite the fact that Republican economic policy was and is at odds with the interests of working people. While he makes no explicit theoretical claims, Frank nevertheless invokes a famous debate within sociology that is still as yet unresolved, namely, whether parties rule classes or whether classes rule parties. In this course, we will examine the various sides of this debate and apply them to famous moments in American politics: the Jacksonian Era, the Civil War, Populism, the New Deal Era, and the re-election of George W. Bush.

SOC 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE
Other: Theme

Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between the constraints that affect large groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of people to transcend those constraints on the other.

In this course we will examine the ways in which race and ethnicity as social structures have impacted the lives of so-called minority groups both in the United States and abroad. We will also look at how race and ethnicity work in conjunction with other social structures such as class, gender and sexuality. To maximize our sense of what it is like to live life as a member of a racial or ethnic group, we will not only read sociology, but also conduct in-class exercises, analyze films, and read literary fiction.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

SOC 304 — American Immigration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

SOC 305 — Introduction to Sociological Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGinn,Terence James; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

This course provides an introduction to the works of eminent figures in sociological thought and their analysis of various issues in social organization. The historical and intellectual factors that gave rise to sociology as a distinct academic discipline are examined. Attention is also given to the way in which the concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research. Classical theorists including Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Cooley, and Mead are studied, as well as the theories of contemporary sociological schools. The course asks how these thinkers understand the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization; how they account for social change; and how their social location influenced their thinking. In the context of this analysis, students are introduced to various uses of such theoretical concepts as conflict, structure, function, stratification, exchange, etc.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Sociology course.

SOC 310 — Introduction to Research Methods
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Xie,Yu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course teaches the main basic research methods used by social scientists: observation, survey, experimentation, and statistics. It demonstrates the logic (as well as the "illogic") of reasoning in social science. You will learn how to use computers for analyzing survey data and surfing the internet. You will conduct a research project.

Book: Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research

Enforced Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, 105, 195, 202, 300, or 401); or completion of one social science course in Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology or other Sociology course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397.

SOC 315 — Economic Sociology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Krippner,Greta R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The discipline of economics generally treats the economy as separate from social relations. In contrast, economic sociology "unbounds" the economy by considering it as integrally related to culture and politics rather than as a separate "non-social" sphere. In the first part of the course, we develop intellectual foundations for economic sociology by contrasting economic and sociological views of the economy. We then proceed to "unbound" the economy by taking a series of institutions conventionally understood to be "economic" in nature — money, markets, firms, production, consumption, etc. — and analyzing these institutions in sociological terms. In the third and final part of the course, we introduce the notion of economic citizenship through a detailed examination of taxation. This seemingly dry topic is actually rife with sociological significance, and we use taxation to raise questions about gender relations, social inequality, the welfare state, and contemporary politics in U.S. society.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: introductory Economics, Sociology, or Political Science.

SOC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

SOC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

SOC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

SOC 325 — Sociology of Service Learning
Section 001, SEM
Service Learning Leadership (for peer facilitators of SOC 389 seminars).

Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course aims to provide students with a basic understanding of the sociological theories relevant to community service learning, and the best practices developed by those who have done this kind of work over many years. Particular attention is devoted to the challenges and opportunities that students will face as peer-facilitators (PFs) in undergraduate service-learning classes — specifically, sections of SOC 389 (Sociology Practicum — Project Community).

Students in this course will concurrently facilitate a SOC 389 seminar. To apply for a peer facilitator position, please contact Amy Knife Gould, Acting Co-Director of Project Community. She can be reached at akgould@umich.edu or 734.647.8771.

Students who have taken Sociology courses, have participated in community service, and/or have experience facilitating groups should apply!

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 325 — Sociology of Service Learning
Section 002, SEM
This section is only for MCSP students facilitating SOC 389.

Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Designed to give students a formal sociological foundation in the dynamics of students in small groups and in community service learning. This course prepares students to effectively facilitate undergraduate learning in community learning courses. SOC 325 is only for students facilitating SOC 389.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 331 — Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Neidert,Lisa J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

There are two major aims for this course:

  • To develop an understanding of the causes and consequences of the major social and economic trends reshaping the United States. The emphasis will be on population trends as both a cause and consequence of social and economic change. Population trends include family formation and dissolution, fertility, mortality, and internal and international migration.

  • To provide training about the quantitative analysis of contemporary social, economic and demographic trends using data from the Census of Population and Housing. Most of the analyses will be based on data from the 2000 census, but students will have the opportunity to examine trends by using some older census files as well as a recent rolling census.

This is not a statistics course nor is there a presumption that you have taken courses in statistics or methodology. The training you will need to complete the assignments will be presented in the computer lab. You will become familiar with the presentation and analysis of social science data as well as with several statistical procedures.

SOC 344 — Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces students to the many concerns, dilemmas, and issues facing marriage and family in contemporary American society. Issues around marriage and the family are at the core of heated debates about sexuality, spousal violence, child abuse, inter-generational communication, abortion, housework, grand-parenting, same-sex marriage, and a host of other family-related ideals and practices.

These issues are explored within the context of larger historical, economic, political, and cultural processes, like race, class, gender, and sexual orientation, so as to better understand how these social processes help shape family life. We will also examine the many ways in which those family experiences, in turn, shape the social world.

This course will also place special emphasis on marriage and family values, styles, and experiences of members of diverse racial, ethnic, immigrant, and sexual-identity groups.

It is my hope that the manner in which we explore, discuss and analyze these controversial topics will help create a pedagogic environment that fosters critical thinking, an appreciation of diversity, team work, and more profound thinking on our society, our families, and our personal values.

In addition to sociology concentrators, students preparing to be counselors, social workers, teachers, childcare providers, parent educators, family lawyers and professionals in the criminal justice system could benefit from taking this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 345 — Sociology of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC
Sociology of Sexuality.

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Human sexuality is often thought of as a realm of experience outside of or unmarked by society. In contrast, this course introduces students to the myriad ways in which sexual desire and sexual activity are structured by social relations, and to the ways that sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual identities vary in time and space. Social scientific theories of sexuality are considered, and cross-cultural and historical accounts of sexual practices are reviewed. Other topics include the historical emergence and elaboration of forms of sexual desire ("sexualities" and categories of sexual orientation/preference), sexual subcultures and communities; relationships between sexual identity and sexual behavior; sexual hierarchies; sexual ethics; the political manipulation of sexuality; the institutional nature of heterosexuality; and the ways in which sexuality as a social institution intersects with hierarchies of race, class, and gender.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 368 — Criminology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime, criminality, and criminal victimization. We begin our exploration by surveying differing definitions of 'crime', including the politics involved in the creation of new criminal categories such as 'hate crime'. After analysis of the problematic nature of the creation and use of official criminal statistics, we review major theoretical explanations of the nature and causes of crime. The social patterning of criminal acts and criminal victimization is then investigated across a variety of crime types, including violent, property, white collar, public order, and the crimes of elite members of society. Throughout, attention is given to the ways that crime and criminality vary in relation to race, class, gender, and sexual orientation, and to the classed, racialized, and gendered nature of crime categories, criminal activities, and criminal victimization.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 001, SEM


Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Project Community , in collaboration with the Sociology department, offers SOC 389, a service-learning course. Students combine approximately 4 hours of weekly service in community settings with weekly small-group, student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for dialogue, mutual support, planning, and problem-solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm paper/project, and a final paper/project.

Questions should be directed to the Project Community office, 1024 Hill Street, (734) 647-8771, pcinfo@umich.edu.

ALL STUDENTS MUST FIRST VIEW THE section descriptions on the Course Guide WEBSITE PRIOR TO REGISTERING for a SOC 389/Project Community section.

NOTE: All SOC 389 seminars will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, shelters, advocacy agencies, and family care organizations. For details, please see the specific section descriptions on the above website.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office. Please see the website for procedures and regulations around transportation.

A $50 lab fee is charged to all SOC 389 students for program costs.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 100, SEM
Thurston Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, Project Community volunteers will meet during the school day to assist teachers and staff with students at Thurston Elementary School, a K-5 Ann Arbor Public elementary school. Volunteers will spend some of their time assisting lunch staff with elementary students during their lunch and recess. Volunteers eat with the students at lunch and then accompany them to lunch recess where they help engage the students in fun, healthy, and safe outside recess activities. Some of the volunteers' time may also be spent assisting teachers in the classrooms with specific students, small groups, or even circulating to assist the whole class with projects and work. Volunteers may help with a variety of activities in the classrooms, such as reading, math, science experiments, and art projects. Volunteers who have special interests or skills, such as sports and games leadership, music, art or foreign language abilities, are encouraged to share these with Thurston students.

Students will be expected at site approximately 4 hours each week, (not including 10 minute drive time each way). Site times are from 9:00am-3:30pm, Monday-Friday. The school especially needs volunteers during lunchtime, from 11:30am-1:30pm. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 101, SEM
Pittsfield Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, students will work with children at Pittsfield Elementary School in Ann Arbor. They will be placed in a classroom, under the direction of that room's teacher. Their responsibilities may include: running reading groups, working with groups of children on class projects, math tutoring, and one-on-one instruction with children experiencing difficulty with the schoolwork.

Students will be required at site for 4 hours each week between 9:00am-3:35pm, Monday-Friday. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 102, REC
America Reads: Issues in Literacy — 2 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This section is intended for students earning work-study hours as America Reads tutors. The class will explore the current dilemmas facing the U.S. educational system, teach students to critically reflect on their regular interactions with elementary youth, and relate site experiences to the text material. The tutors will be asked to assess what they observe in their community work, what could be improved to create more effective learning environments, and how these changes could be made.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Overrides are given when a tutor applicant is hired. Students should apply to be a tutor at www.umich.edu/~mserve/areads.

Students enrolled in this section of SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar concurrent with participation as America Reads tutors. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 103, SEM
Detroit: Latino Family Services After School Program — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Latino Family Services (LFS) is a community agency that provides and coordinates comprehensive human services to residents of Wayne County with a particular emphasis on its Latino residents. Students in this section will be working with Latino Family Services in Detroit to assist elementary and middle school students in an after-school program focused on homework assistance, mentoring, and recreational activities.

Students will be expected at site one day each week. Site times include Mondays-Thursdays (on site 3:30-6:15pm). In addition, please allow ample driving time (approximately 1 hour each way). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 104, SEM
Detroit: Harding Elementary School — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This course will place students at Harding Elementary, a Detroit public school situated in a predominantly African-American community. Students will be tutors and mentors by assisting with homework and participating in creative activities with the children.

Students should be available 12-5pm for one day each week (select either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday), which will allow time for driving to and from site, as well as the required 3 hours at Harding. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 105, SEM
Detroit: Vetal K-8 School- 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This class will place students at Peter Vetal School, a K-8 Detroit Public School situated in a predominantly African-American community. U-M students will be helping plan and lead a leadership-building program for 5th and 6th grade girls and boys. The program will focus on building behavioral skills and attitudes in areas such as respect, responsibility, self-motivation, ambition, and cooperation.

To fulfill site-related requirements for this section, U-M students will be expected at site once each week (at one of the times mentioned below) and should also plan to meet on campus for an additional hour of program preparation, outside of the class time. This additional hour will be scheduled (around students' other commitments) at one of the first seminars.

For the leadership program, the students will be separated by gender. For the girls' session, U-M students should be available on Thursdays 1pm-4pm, but for the boys' session, U-M students should be available Tuesdays 8:30am-11:30am (these times include driving time to Detroit). U-M students' responsibilities and roles include helping plan activities, helping lead the discussions/debriefing, and most importantly, being a role model (especially as a successful college student) for the children.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 107, SEM
Burns Park Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students will work in a school very close to the U-M campus with students who have difficulties with reading, writing and math due to at-risk factors, special education qualification, or cultural/language difficulties. They will work one-on-one, with small groups, or with whole classrooms of children from kindergarten to fifth grade on basic skills and school habits, and they will be a positive influence, role model, and mentor. The school population is culturally diverse and has largely well-involved parents.

Students will be expected at site for 4 hours each week. Site times are between 9:00am-3:30pm, Monday-Friday. The site would prefer students to do two 2-hour shifts, but one long shift can be accommodated. Also, the site would prefer not to have volunteers 11:30am-12:30pm daily, if avoidable. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 108, SEM
After School Program at Carrot Way Community Center — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will help to develop and implement children's programs in Avalon's newly-built Carrot Way affordable housing development in Ann Arbor. Students will be expected at site once each week. The after-school program at Carrot Way is 4-7pm Mon-Th, (in order of highest to lowest priority are: Th, Wed, Tu, then Mon). Students in this section will need to sign up (on the first day of class) to go to site one day per week at that time. To allow time for traveling to and from site, students should be available 3:30-7:30pm on their selected day of service. Students may need to attend the initial orientation at a different time than their regular service time, but the orientation will be set (by the section facilitator and site contact) considering when students are available.

During the after-school program, students will help the young residents of the Carrot Way community (ranging K-8th grade) with homework, and then participate in an outdoor walk or arts & crafts activity. The participating children go to school in the Ann Arbor Public School system, primarily at Northside Elementary and Clague Middle School.

Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Avalon Housing, a non-profit community development corporation, provides housing and supportive services to extremely low-income residents in Washtenaw County. Many residents have mental and physical disabilities and the majority have been homeless. Avalon's "housing first" philosophy prioritizes permanent affordable housing and minimizes evictions to provide stability for its residents. Carrot Way is one of seventeen sites for Avalon, which is an organization in its 14th year of operation. Carrot Way has 30 units and maintains a focus on families. All support services are optional for residents.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 109, SEM
Detroit: The Guidance Center After School Program- 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, students will be working with The Guidance Center at area schools in Downriver. The work students will do at their site will depend largely on the school where they choose to be placed. However, students can expect to do a mix of one-on-one tutoring with children, behavior management, recreational activity organization, group facilitation on healthy decision-making and violence prevention. Training on the curriculum will be provided to volunteers.

Students will be expected at site once each week from approximately 2:45-5:30pm on either Wednesdays or Thursdays (not including driving time). Each student will be able to select which day works best for him or her. Beyond this site time, there will also be opportunities to participate in Enrichment Activities for the mentees that are usually offered twice each month from 6-8pm (sometimes held during the day). These are cultural, educational, and fun activities; examples include movie nights, bowling, ice skating, and community service events. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 200, SEM
U-M Hospitals — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will interview for a volunteer placement within the University Hospitals Complex located on campus. Medical experience is not needed, but students will need to be comfortable initiating interactions with patients. Students will assist patients and hospital staff as appropriate. On nursing floors, tasks might include visiting with patients, transporting patients, answering call lights, joining families in waiting areas, and responding to floor staff or patient needs. In special units such as the Emergency area, Rehab, Burn, and others, volunteer tasks will vary according to need. Some students may be placed within Mott/Women's where placements include the Women's Health Resource Center, Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation, Pediatric occupational physical therapy, the sibling program, cancer treatment playroom, and bedside visiting and comfort. Overall, the hospital staff is very supportive of the program and will provide orientation sessions to help you learn more about your individual placement. An important asset is a sense of ease and warmth with others as well as the ability to initiate discussion and laughter. In addition, students should be prepared to observe and think critically about the experiences of patients within this health care system.

Students will be expected at site for 40 hours of service over the course of the term and will also be expected to attend the necessary orientation(s) at the beginning of the semester. Weekly site times will be established at the interview.

NOTE: First-year students may not volunteer at the hospital during their first semester because of Volunteer Services policy, so they may not enroll in this section of Project Community.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Amy Knife Gould, Acting Co-Director of Project Community, at akgould@umich.edu for permission to register. Requests for overrides will be accepted on or after November 13, 2006. Once permission has been given, names will be sent to UMHS Volunteer Services, so please be sure of your commitment to taking this course when requesting an override.

After requesting an override, students MUST contact UMHS Volunteer Services to schedule an interview and request an application packet. All of the materials must be completed before your interview. Any student with an incomplete application packet will be asked to reschedule their appointment. Proof of mumps, measles and rubella (MMR) MUST be provided at the time of the interview. Hospital placements fill up very quickly so the sooner you complete your paperwork and have an interview, the more selection you will have. Call volunteer services immediately. Please call (734) 936-4327 to schedule your interview. Questions about the paperwork and/or placements can be sent to UMHS.Volunteer@umich.edu.

NOTE: If the above procedures for contacting the hospital are not followed BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS, you will be asked to drop the class. You MUST have an appointment scheduled with UMHHS Volunteer Services before the first day of class.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 201, SEM
HOPE: Mentoring Youth for Health Occupations — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will be placed at Ypsilanti High School, East Middle School, and/or West Middle School to serve as assistants for the U-M HOPE (Health Occupations Partners in Education) Program. The overall mission of the program is to introduce and educate middle and high school students from the Ypsilanti Public School District to consider health and science professions, and to assist them in preparation for college. The overarching goal of this effort is to identify and nurture those individuals, minority and majority, who are interested in improving the health of minority and disadvantaged populations.

Each week, students will work with middle and high school youth assisting program staff with career interest assessments, study skills, college preparation and hands-on activities.

Students will be expected at site once each week. Options are 2:00-5:00pm Mondays, Tuesdays or Thursdays (includes driving time.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please include the name of the section in your email.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 202, SEM
Elderly: Sunrise Senior Living Community — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with elderly adults at the Sunrise Senior Living Community in Ann Arbor. Students may be matched with a resident in order to develop a relationship and identify a common area of interest to explore together. Students may work as a group to set up activities for some of the residents at Sunrise.

Students will be expected at site for 3 hours each week. Site time is flexible and can be arranged around the student's schedule. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 203, SEM
HIV/AIDS Education — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will focus on HIV/AIDS education through community outreach, testing, and office facilitation, coordinated by the HIV/AIDS Resource Center (HARC) in Ypsilanti (representing all of Washtenaw County). Students will have a choice to volunteer with an outreach van that is located throughout the community several times a week, in the office, or at the testing clinic. Students are encouraged to get a TB and Hepatitis B vaccination, but it is not required. Please note: Students who volunteer with the outreach van are responsible for meeting it at its locations. HARC cannot transport students from the HARC offices.

Students will be expected at site for at least 4 hours each week. Site times are flexible between:

  • Monday — Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm
  • Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 3:00pm-7:00pm
  • Tuesday and Wednesday, 6:00pm-9:00pm
  • Thursday, 7:30am-9:30am
  • Saturday, 10:00am-2:00pm

NOTE: All students registering for this section will be screened by the facility during training. Any student who is not serious about their interest in volunteering at HARC should choose another section.

NOTE: Students participating in this section MUST attend a 1-day HARC volunteer orientation and training on Saturday, January 20, 2007, 9am-5pm. Students who are unable to attend this training will be unable to participate in this section.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 204, SEM
SAWC: Homeless Outreach — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This program is directed at the homeless men and women in Ann Arbor. Students in this section will work with the Shelter Association of Washtenaw County (SAWC) at one of their many shelter programs offering support to the consumers who access their services. The SAWC provides temporary shelter and supportive services in a safe and caring environment, and works with the community to allocate the necessary resources to meet the needs of people who are homeless. The SAWC currently operates the Robert J. Delonis Center, which has both men's and women's shelters within it. They have been providing support to homeless people since 1982, having grown out of a breakfast program in a church basement. Since then, their services for homeless people have grown significantly.

Students will be expected at site for four hours each week. Site times are flexible between 6:00am-11:00pm. Times can be arranged according to student schedules. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: In order to participate in the program, students must attend mandatory volunteer training, which is scheduled for Saturday, January 13, 2007, 1-5pm. You must give the facilitator your email address on the first day of class in order to receive the training packet to read before the training. Students who are unable to attend the training will be unable to participate in this section.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 205, SEM
SOS: After School Program for Homeless Children — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will serve as tutors for an after-school program run by SOS Community Services in Ypsilanti. SOS is one of the few shelters for homeless families in Washtenaw County. This after-school program includes children from 1st to 6th grade, who are homeless, or whose families are participating in services for homeless families at agencies throughout Washtenaw County. Students will act as both tutors and mentors, working with participants on a one-to-one basis with homework and other recreational activities after school.

Students will be expected at site on Thursdays from 3:30-6:30pm. (Please allow an additional 15 minutes each way for transportation.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

A SOS orientation and training is required for this course. The training date is Saturday, January 13, 2007, noon-4pm.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 206, SEM
University Health Service: PULSE — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with PULSE (Peers Utilizing Leadership Skills for Education), a unique residential peer health education program sponsored by University Health Service, University Housing, and Office of Greek Life. PULSE is structured to offer support and resources for healthy decisions among the residents of South Quad, Couzens, East Quad, West Quad, Markley, and Lloyd Residence Halls and some Greek houses. Topics covered by PULSE include media literacy, eating and body issues, sexual health issues, alcohol issues, HIV / AIDS, social justice, nutrition, and more. The activities and interactions that advocates take part in can vary from small and spontaneous to orchestrated presentations in the residence halls.

The program holds weekly meetings of peer health advocates to educate them about important health issues and resources, reflect on peer interactions, brainstorm activities, and facilitate the health education of residents through the advocates. Logs are kept to keep track of the hours of direct service that advocates participate in each week.

Students are expected to attend weekly PULSE meetings and engage in direct service on campus for a total of 4 hours each week. There is also a mandatory 8-hour mid-term training.

NOTE: Participation in PULSE in determined through a nomination process within residence halls and Greek communities. If you are already a member of PULSE or were nominated by you residence hall advisor/Greek Leadership and intend to participate, you may register for this course. Nomination is a requisite for taking this course.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Chinyere Neale directly at 647-4659 for permission to register.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 207, SEM
Ozone House: Teen Shelter — 4 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with Ozone House as a crisis-line volunteer. Ozone House is an agency dedicated to improving the situations of runaway, homeless, and at-risk youth age 10-20 and their families. The organization provides free and confidential services to at-risk and troubled youth.

To participate in this section, students must attend a mandatory orientation session and complete an application for legal purposes. The orientation is Friday, January 5, 2007 at 5:30pm at 1705 Washtenaw. After registering for this class, please contact Mia White at Ozone House and tell her you are from Project Community. She will provide you with further details. The phone number is 734-662-2265.

After attending orientation, each SOC 389 student must complete 40 hours of intensive training to be eligible to be a crisis line volunteer. If you do not complete all training sessions, you will not be able to volunteer at Ozone House. The training dates are as follows.

  • Wednesday, January 10, 6pm-9pm
  • Saturday, January 13, 9am-5pm
  • Sunday, January 14, 10am-6pm
  • Wednesday, January 17, 6pm-9pm
  • Saturday, January 20, 9am-5pm
  • Sunday, January 21, 10am-6pm

After training is completed, students in this section will be expected at site for one 3- or 4-hour shift each week. The possible shifts are 9:00am-1:00pm, 1:00-5:00pm, or 5:00-8:00pm, Monday-Friday, (no 5:00-8:00pm shift on Fridays).

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 300, SEM
Femtors: It's Great to be a Girl — 4 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, undergraduate women volunteer as feminist mentors ("femtors") to work with girls at local area middle schools. The "It's Great to Be a Girl" program was designed by Carole Lapidos and Sally Wisotzkey as a continuance of their "Raising Strong and Confident Daughters" workshop for parents. The co-founders' hope was to provide adolescent girls with positive women role models to help them through their tumultuous middle school years. Chosen femtors organize and facilitate workshops over the course of ten weeks to build the confidence and expand the knowledge of the girls. The four major areas addressed are friendship, teasing and harassment, body image, and dream building.

Students will be expected at site from 2:00–5:00pm, Tuesdays. (Please allow an additional 25 minutes each way for transportation.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Femtors will be required to attend training that will occur during the first 3 meetings at site.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Carole Lapidos directly at (734) 668-7402 for permission to register.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

For more information about the screening process or any other aspect of the program, contact Carole Lapidos at carolelap@aol.com.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 301, SEM
Over the Rainbow: Working in the LGBT Community — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work directly with the University of Michigan's Office of Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Affairs (LGBTA) to influence positive change and create alliances within topic areas affecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and ally community. Depending on their interests, students will be given the opportunity to focus on issues of concern to the LGBT community including education and outreach, event planning, political action and research, and HIV/AIDS programming. Educational objectives will include exploration of gender and sexual identity development in addition to community assessment and action planning around these identities. No previous experience is necessary, but students should be open-minded and enthusiastic about service around LGBT issues.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. Students in this section must participate in approximately four hours of site-related work each week. A student's regular site time will be negotiated when the seminar meets at the beginning of the term, when each student will be asked to share related interests and availability. For the course, students will also complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

This section is override-only. Students interested in enrolling should email Gabriel Javier, Assistant Director of LGBTA, at (javiergc@umich.edu). He will ask each interested student to respond to a few questions to determine if the opportunity is a good fit. If it is, an override will be processed, giving the student permission to enroll in the section.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 400, SEM
Juvenile Detention Center: Writing Tutors — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw Detention Center, a facility for juvenile boys and girls awaiting placement or release. Students will work with the English teacher to develop the youths' communication skills through creative writing exercises or one-on-one tutoring. While the teacher provides guidance throughout the term, the students are ultimately responsible for creating fun and useful exercises that teach the youth how to better express themselves on paper. Creative writing and strong English skills are very helpful, but are not necessary.

Students in this section must attend site once a week from 8:30am-noon. Students may choose which day of the week (Mon-Fri) that works best for their schedules. Students should add 20 minutes onto the site time for driving to and from site. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Due to volunteer requirements at the site, all students in this section must be at least 18 years old to participate. All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area. In addition, all students must show proof of a recent TB test before being allowed to serve at the site.

NOTE: This section is override-only. Interested students should contact Lisa Gottlieb at the Detention Center for a meeting. She can be reached via email at lgott@wash.k12.mi.us.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 401, SEM
Juvenile Detention Center: Recreation — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw Detention Center, a facility for juvenile boys and girls awaiting placement or release. Students will provide structured leisure time through both educational and recreational activities. Theater, music, athletic, confidence building, educational and/or art activities may be incorporated. In the past, we have also held debates, health and nutrition seminars, and sessions on job seeking skills. Students in this section provide positive role models and interactions for the youth, much like a Big Brother or Big Sister.

Students will be expected to go to site Mondays 3:30-6:30pm, (this includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area. In addition, all students must show proof of a recent TB test before being allowed to serve at the site.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 402, SEM
Prison (Men): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in teams to lead creative writing workshops at the Parr Highway Correctional Facility in Adrian on a weekly basis. The facility is a minimum-security prison that houses adult male prisoners who are serving short sentences, or will be eligible for parole within the next 18 months. At the prison, students will help inmates enhance their writing skills and creatively communicate their ideas. Students will be required to submit weekly creative writing assignments as well as fulfill other course requirements. In addition, the group will complete an anthology of inmate writing at the end of the semester that will be distributed to the participants at the prison. No previous experience is necessary.

Students will be expected to go to site on Tuesday evenings 5:30-9:30pm, (includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 403, SEM
Prison (Men): Debate — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in teams to lead a debate club at the Parr Highway Correctional Facility in Adrian on a weekly basis. The facility is a minimum-security prison that houses adult male prisoners who are serving short sentences, or will be eligible for parole within the next 18 months. At the prison, students will organize a weekly debate about a current topic, the goal of which is to strengthen communication skills and knowledge of current issues of both the students and the inmates. No previous debate experience is necessary.

Students will be expected at site on Wednesday evenings 5:30-9:30 pm (includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 404, SEM
Jail (Men): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw County Jail, a facility for adult offenders, located in Ann Arbor approximately 10 minutes from campus. This section will be conducting creative writing seminars for male inmates in minimum-security blocks. No former creative writing experience is necessary, just enthusiasm and an open mind! Students will be expected to bring and share ideas to plan and facilitate the creative writing workshops.

Students will be expected at site 6:30-8:30pm on Mondays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 6pm on Mondays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 405, SEM
Jail (Women): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw County Jail, a facility for adult offenders, located in Ann Arbor approximately 10 minutes from campus. This section will be conducting creative writing seminars for female inmates in minimum-security blocks. No former creative writing experience is necessary, just enthusiasm and an open mind! Students will be expected to bring and share ideas to plan and facilitate the creative writing workshops.

Students will be expected at site 6:15-8:15pm on Tuesdays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 5:45pm on Tuesdays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 406, SEM
Jail (Men): Dialogue on Multiculturalism — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will examine the construction of race and class and how it is manifested in society. It is designed to take a look at Asian American, African American, European American, Hispanic/Latino(a), and Native American social groups present in the United States. They will critically evaluate how racial groups are represented in American society and there intersection with socioeconomic class. Some questions we will address are: How was race and class constructed in the United States? How is the construction maintained? What can we do as individuals to combat inaccurate representations of cultural groups in this country? An important component of this course includes participation and facilitation of a weekly in-service class located at the Washtenaw County Jail. Students will be required to lead discussions on race and class with male inmates at the facility. We believe that issues of race and class are pertinent issues that affect everyone. It is the intention of this course to create an environment that will embrace various viewpoints and seek to provide a deeper understanding of ourselves and others. The success of the course depends upon each individual's participation and willingness to be open, honest, and engaged in course materials and discussion.

Students will be expected at site 6:30-8:30pm on Tuesdays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 6pm on Tuesdays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 407, SEM
Jail (Women): Dialogue on Multiculturalism — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will examine the construction of race and class and how it is manifested in society. It is designed to take a look at Asian American, African American, European American, Hispanic/Latino(a), and Native American social groups present in the United States. They will critically evaluate how racial groups are represented in American society and there intersection with socioeconomic class. Some questions we will address are: How was race and class constructed in the United States? How is the construction maintained? What can we do as individuals to combat inaccurate representations of cultural groups in this country? An important component of this course includes participation and facilitation of a weekly in-service class located at the Washtenaw County Jail. Students will be required to lead discussions on race and class with female inmates at the facility. We believe that issues of race and class are pertinent issues that affect everyone. It is the intention of this course to create an environment that will embrace various viewpoints and seek to provide a deeper understanding of ourselves and others. The success of the course depends upon each individual's participation and willingness to be open, honest, and engaged in course materials and discussion.

Students will be expected at site 6:15-8:15pm on Mondays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 5:45pm on Mondays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 500, SEM
Tutoring Elementary School Students — 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Participants in this section will work with elementary school students at Northside Elementary School in Ann Arbor. Students will primarily facilitate after-school games, art activities and other recreational programs with the children. Students will also assist in the after-school homework club with reading, arithmetic, and other assignments. The after-school club is 3:30pm — 6:00pm Tuesday-Friday. Students are responsible for volunteering twice per week. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 3:00pm on the days they volunteer. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm that will have as its focus and format, intergroup dialogue. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 501, SEM
Mentoring Middle School Students- 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with middle and grade school students through the Peace Neighborhood Center in Ann Arbor. Students will assist with the after-school tutoring program and with other activities as determined by the Peace Center. Students are responsible for volunteering twice per week and will choose from the following: Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday from 4:00pm-6:00pm. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 3:30pm on the days they volunteer. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 502, SEM
Tutoring Middle School Students — 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will be placed at Clague Middle School to work with students in Language Arts, Science, American History, Social Studies, and Math. They will be in the classroom at the same time as a classroom teacher and will be under her/his supervision.

Students will be expected at site twice each week. Site times occur during school hours, 8am-3pm and will be arranged with the liaison from Clague Middle School. Students should plan on 4-6 hours of site time per week including transportation (15 minutes each way). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 503, SEM
UM Hospital: Reach Out and Read -— 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in pediatric waiting rooms at The Corner Health Clinic, the Ypsilanti Health Center, the East Ann Arbor Health Center, and the Briarwood Health Association. Volunteers will read with children before their appointments and maximize literacy activities in health care settings. Students will be trained to use innovative reading techniques. Weekly site times will be established at the interview, but students should expect to complete 4-6 hours of service each week. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

To register for this section, you must first contact Kyle Bavers (kkrause@umich.edu, 734-647-1121) for site information and hours. Kyle will then ask you to contact UM Hospital Volunteer Services to complete the screening process (UMHS.Volunteer@umich.edu, 734-936-4327). After completing these steps, an override will be processed for you to register for the course.

Students are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Wednesdays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 504, SEM
University Living — 2 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will help lead current events discussions with residents of University Living, an assisted living community focused on life-long learning. Volunteers will help facilitate discussions about current topics in the news and media in collaboration with University Living staff as well as participate in these discussions with seniors. Weekly site times are 2:30-3:30pm on Fridays. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 2pm on Fridays. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Wednesdays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 601, SEM
Campus Organizer Leadership Development — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will work together with other campus activists to develop concrete facilitation and organizing skills, learn about the broader context and history of campus activism, and make connections with leaders from other groups. Campus organizations are encouraged to nominate a team of members to participate.

Students who enroll will be responsible for at least four hours per week of work within their organization. The Organizing for Social Justice program area of SOC 389 emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within this section of the Organizing for Social Justice program area are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of organization-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule). In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu) for permission to register. In your email, please identify your student organization affiliations and explain why you would like to take the course.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 602, SEM
Community Organizing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will be working with a variety of community organizations where they will participate in education and organizing work to help address quality of life and social justice concerns through organizing and activism. Past placements have included the Washtenaw County Workers' Center, Metropolitan Organizing Strategy Enabling Strength (MOSES), Lecturers' Employee Organization (LEO), Graduate Employee Organization (GEO), and other organizations in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Detroit.

Although some of these sites may involve some direct service work, the Organizing for Social Justice program area of SOC 389 emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement. Seminars are arranged by topic area with a cluster of site options usually available within that seminar.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within Organizing for Social Justice are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of site-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule). In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

If you have questions about this section, please contact Joe Galura at jgalura@umich.edu.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 603, SEM
Math for Social Change — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will be placed in one of several urban middle schools where they will promote math literacy in after-school programs inspired by the Young Peoples' Project (YPP) component of Bob Moses' Algebra Project. The YPP approach is a unique synthesis of four elements: an experiential approach to math learning; a liberationist classroom pedagogy; the use of college-age students as trainers, and high school students as middle school math workshop facilitators; and an organizing approach to building student, parent and faculty commitment to improving the quality of math education. We will work as closely as possible with the YPP team based in Chicago, but will adapt their ideas to our situation as we judge necessary.

Math for Social Change takes its name from the fact that, following the YPP approach, it situates math literacy work in a larger context of empowering minority and working class students to demand and secure what they need to advance a 21st century civil rights movement for real economic opportunity. The YPP focus on organizing to bring about change at a systemic level, and to this end, on building on the community organizing tradition embodied in civil rights movement's Freedom Schools — these aspects of the approach make Project Community's Organizing for Social Justice program the appropriate home for these sites.

Like the other students enrolled in SOC 389's Organizing for Social Justice program, students in this section are responsible for attending the weekly seminar, Th 4-5:30pm, as well as participating at a designated community site four hours per week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

Students enrolling in this section are encouraged to also enroll in Stephen Ward's new Residential College Social Science course (RC SSCI 461/CAAS 458), "The Algebra Project: Education, Citizenship, and Community Organizing for Social Justice in the 21st Century." The two courses compliment one another in many ways, and students enrolled in both will be eligible for special incentives.

If you have questions, contact Joe Galura (jgalura@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 604, SEM
STAND: Stop Genocide in Darfur — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In their weekly seminar meetings, students enrolled in this section will analyze the dynamics surrounding the genocide, consider how students can educate, organize and mobilize to create change in such a situation, and discuss strategies for getting students and community members involved with Darfur action. With other STAND members, students will then act to implement STAND's program for that term.

This section is part of the Organizing for Social Justice program area within SOC 389. This program area emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within this section of the Organizing for Social Justice program area are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of organization-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule) for STAND. As part of this organizing work, students are expected to attend STAND's regular meetings. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

Students in this section must join the student organization STAND (Students Taking Action Now: Darfur) which seeks to stop the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan. For information on how to join STAND, go to http://uuis.umich.edu/maizepgs/view.cfm?orgID=10004732.

To request an override for this section, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please verify that you are a member of STAND on this campus.

SOC 393 — Survey of East Central Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kennedy,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world. Lectures and discussions.

SOC 395 — Directed Reading or Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member.

SOC 396 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Academic credit for at least 8 weeks of a full-time internship, which must be prearranged. Allows students to apply their sociological skills and knowledge outside the classroom in an experiential learning environment.

SOC 396 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 061, IND

Instructor: Young Jr,Alford A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Academic credit for at least 8 weeks of a full-time internship, which must be prearranged. Allows students to apply their sociological skills and knowledge outside the classroom in an experiential learning environment.

SOC 397 — Junior Honors in Sociology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Burgard,Sarah Andrea; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

A seminar dedicated to help students prepare an original research proposal which is then carried out under the supervision of a faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 210, prior or concurrent enrollment in SOC 310 or 512, Honors standing in Sociology, and permission of instructor.

SOC 399 — Senior Honors in Sociology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Smock,Pamela J

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This is the last course in a three-term sequence leading to the completion of a senior Honors thesis in the Department of Sociology. Students will concentrate on analyzing data collected in the fall and writing up their results for a general audience in sociology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors standing in Sociology. SOC 210 and 310, and permission of instructor.

SOC 410 — The American Jewish Community
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will examine the lively tension between tradition and change within the American Jewish Community as it reviews current issues and explores broadly the sociological literature on American Jewry. Students will first look at the broader context of American society, including issues of democratic values, religious freedom, and social stratification. The class will then examine the conflicts and struggles of American Jews as they strive to maintain themselves in a pluralistic society. In doing so, they will explore topics such as Jewish identity, intergroup and intragroup relations, group survival, relations with Israel and new understandings of diaspora, and community structure and organization. The course will be conducted seminar style with an expectation of active student participation, including discussions and presentations, as well as research and reflection papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 423 — Social Stratification
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

From its inception, a most fundamental concern of Sociology has been the search for an explanation of the social forces that generate and sustain economic, social, and political inequalities among individuals and groups in society. These inequalities promote not only differences in wealth, prestige, and power among these groups but also differences in their experiences and opportunities for a better life. On a more general level, these inequalities in large part determine the course of our history by having an important influence on government policies on issues such as war or peace, the growth or stagnation of our economy, and the future of our democracy.

This course introduces the student to the most important theoretical frameworks that sociologists have utilized to explain the origins, mechanisms, and processes by which these inequalities persist in society, whether it be inequalities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities. This course focuses both on inequalities in the United States as well as global inequalities.

SOC 430 — Introduction to Population Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Barbara A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 530.

This course examines the major population processes: mortality, fertility, and migration. It is an introduction to the technical and substantive aspects of demography.

If you look at the size of the population of a geographic area at two points in time, people are added to that population through births and migrants into the area; people are removed from that population through deaths and migrants out of the area. The study of the determinants of the basic population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration is, thus, actually the study of the determinants of population growth and decline.

There are large differences throughout the world in the rate of population growth and in the level of fertility and mortality of the population. The way fertility, mortality, and migration interrelate to result in population growth is important as a background for understanding many social, economic, and political issues. This course concentrates on the causes of population processes rather than on the effects of population processes.

You will be introduced to basic demographic measures of each of these processes and methods of analyzing them. No formal background in statistics is required, but much of the material is quantitative. The ability to read and understand tables is essential, as well as willingness to try to understand explanations of the results of statistical analyses.

This course does not aim to produce expert population analysts who can do complicated computations. Rather, it aims that students will understand methodological approaches and how to interpret demographic measures and will understand many of the major theoretical perspectives that are important in population research and the evidence that supports or does not support various theoretical perspectives. After taking the course, a student should be able to read an article in a newspaper or magazine that deals with population issues and understand what the issue is about and possess the knowledge and critical perspective to be able to assess the likely validity of the article and what possible problems or additional considerations might be.

There are several in-class exams and one project assignment.

SOC 435 — Urban Inequality and Conflict
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Harding,David James

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from SOC 435 and 535.

This course explores the causes and consequences of urban poverty in the contemporary United States with a particular focus on geographically concentrated poverty and the experiences of minority groups. The course begins with the causes of racial and economic segregation in US cities and then covers a series of topics relating to urban poverty, including joblessness, education, childbearing and marriage, crime and disorder, immigration and immigrant communities, and incarceration. Grading is based on five short papers and a final exam.

Books:

*Wilson, William Julius. 1987. The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner-City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
*Massey, Douglas and Nancy Denton. 1993. American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of an Underclass. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
*Wilson, William Julius. 1997. When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor. New York: Knopf.
*Waldinger, Roger. 1996. Still the Promised City? African Americans and New Immigrants in Post-Industrial New York. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
*Carter, Prudence. 2005. Keepin' It Real: School Success Beyond Black and White. New York: Oxford University Press.
*Anderson, Elijah. 1999. Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City. New York: W. W. Norton.
*Edin, Kathryn and Maria Kefalas. 2005. Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage. Berkeley: University of California Press.
*Young, Alford A, Jr. 2004. The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Life Chances. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
*Bourgois, Philippe. 1995. In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
*Western, Bruce. 2006. Punishment and Inequality in America. New York: Russell Sage.

Advisory Prerequisite: Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 335,435, or 535. Does not meet Soc. doctoral requirements.

SOC 447 — Sociology of Gender
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender that focuses on how gender is embedded in social life. At the individual level, gender is an essential aspect of personhood and personal experience; at the institutional level, gender is a major way that societies differentiate their members. At both the individual and institutional levels, gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality to structure identities, rights, privileges, and opportunities. Specific topics of study include gender identity, how children and adults "become" gendered and "do" their gender(s), gender and sport, gender and desire, the binary nature of the North American gender order, transgenderism, and intersexuality.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 200/301/443/PSYCH 405/WOMENSTD 405/permisson of instructor

SOC 450 — Political Sociology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Paige,Jeffery M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

An introduction to basic concepts in political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationships between the global expansion of capitalism, the revolutionary transformation of societies and the rise of modern political systems. The course first considers the rise (and fall) of the major political systems of the twentieth century, liberal democracy, fascism and communism, with particular emphasis on the European and American experience. It then moves to a consideration of the expansion of capitalism in the Third World, including the contemporary period of globalization, and its political consequences. Particular attention will be given to revolutionary movements in Cuba, Vietnam and Central America. Basic texts include Barrington Moore Jr., Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy; Katherine Verdery, What Was Socialism and What Comes Next; Peter H. Smith, Talons of the Eagle: Dynamics of U.S. Latin American Relations; and Michael Chossudovksy, The Globalization of Poverty.

SOC 454 — Law and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sharphorn,Daniel H

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, law and terrorism, anti-discrimination laws, corporate and governmental deviance, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 475 — Introduction to Medical Sociology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: De Vries,Raymond G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides students with an understanding of the influence of social factors on health, illness and medical treatment. Topics to be covered include: the social nature of disease and illness, the social organization of medical care, medical education, the growth of alternative health care systems, medical ethics/bioethics, the ecology of health care, and the connection between faith, healing and medicine. We will also consider the way society influences our thinking about illness by exploring references to illness in literature and everyday discourse.

SOC 495 — Special Course
Section 001, SEM
Turkish-Armenian Relations in the 20th Century

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J
Instructor: Göçek,Fatma Müge; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to examine the evolution of relations between the Ottoman State/Turkey and Armenians/Armenia. The Genocide of Armenians during the First World War tends to dominate the characterization of these relations and has produced two very opposing narratives. The course will focus on the role of state and non-state actors (European, Turkish and Armenian) in the development of these relations and will consider the role of each discourse in nation and state building.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 495 — Special Course
Section 002, LEC

Health and Aging



Instructor: Jenkins,Kristi R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides an examination of the medical, social, and cultural aspects of health issues related to aging adults. More specifically, it will explore such issues as the social causes of disease in older age, health behaviors, managing illness, medical care, global aging, and end-of-life care.

Satisfies the "Health and Aging" and the "Social Welfare and Social Services" sub-concentrations.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 495 — Special Course
Section 003, LEC
Martial Arts, Culture, and Society

Instructor: Kennedy,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this upper level undergraduate lecture for which there are no prerequisites, we will consider how sociology, and other social sciences, can help us understand martial arts and how martial arts might inform the social sciences.

By comparing the practice, organization, scholarly studies and popular culture around boxing, wrestling, kung fu, karate, taekwondo, judo, aikido, capoeira, and mixed martial arts, primarily within the USA, we shall consider the ways in which these different arts work to realize similar outcomes — increasing awareness and kinesthetic powers — and vary substantially along other dimensions including performance/sport/combat, militarism/pacifism, openness/secrecy, and individuation/group identity formation. Guest lectures and films will supplement lectures and demonstrations by the professor and student participants. Two examinations, a research paper based on archival research or participant observation in martial arts (with any degree of accomplishment), and class contributions based on prior background and preparation for class form the basis for the grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 503 — Race and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lacy,Karyn R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is an introduction to racial/ ethnic and cultural relations in the United States. It is designed to provide participants with a theoretical framework that is sufficient for them to examine and access the relationships between actual or imputed racial or ethnic differences and the resulting inequalities in the distribution of societal resources and rewards. The course is focused on intergroup relations in America. However some comparisons between race/ethnic relations in the U.S. and other societies will be made. Topics covered include: the concepts and definitions of race and ethnicity, theories of assimilation, comparisons of racial and ethnic group experiences in America, the nature of prejudice, changing racial/ethnic attitudes, a retrospective on race/ethnic relations, and prospects for the future.

SOC 506 — Theory and Practice
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mizruchi,Mark S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course is the second of a two-term theory sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. We begin by exploring how classical and contemporary sociologists, representing a variety of perspectives and intellectual orientations, have theorized about several core issues: the nature of society and the social, the individual-society relationship, identity and the self, culture, and social structure. In the second part of the course we examine how sociological theories can illuminate several substantive areas in the discipline, including organizations and the economy, collective action and social movements, and various forms of social inequality.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 522 — Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wherry,Frederick Fitzgerald

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This yearlong course focuses on the analysis of qualitative data. Our principal methods will be participant observation and in-depth interviewing. We will learn how to select cases and how to collect and analyze qualitative data. In the first term we will collect the data, and in the second term we will analyze them; therefore, students are strongly encouraged to formulate ideas for their individual research projects before the course commences. Early in the first term students will submit their proposals for approval by the institutional review board for the protection of human subjects and will complete class exercises to facilitate their fieldwork. In the following term (SOC 523), students will focus on critiquing exemplary studies while analyzing their own data and writing up their results.

Sample Readings:
Michael Burawoy et al., Ethnography Unbound
John and Lyn Lofland, Analyzing Social Settings
Robert S. Weiss, Learning from Strangers
Robert K. Yin, Case Study Research

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 527 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage
Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 532 — Practicum in Comparative Historical Sociology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kimeldorf,Howard A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This two-term sequence (SOC 532-533) is intended as an introduction to the methods of historical and comparative research in sociology. The first term will be devoted to intensive reading and discussion of work that explores some of the key problems, debates, and approaches within this tradition. The main written product for SOC 532 will be a brief but high quality research proposal on a topic of each student's choosing. In SOC 533, the research proposal will guide students in the collection and analysis of primary data that will form the basis of an original research paper incorporating historical and comparative methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 535 — The Urban Community
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Harding,David James

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 535.

This graduate seminar focuses on the causes and consequences of urban poverty In the United States, particularly the intergenerational transmission of poverty and the geographic concentration of poverty. The course examines classic and contemporary research on racial and economic segregation, neighborhood effects, community social organization and institutions, social capital, collective efficacy, the role of immigration in neighborhood dynamics and urban inequality, and the utility of cultural concepts in understanding these issues. The first half of the course prioritizes longstanding or traditional concerns in urban research and urban poverty, while the second half of the course draws on two sociology literatures that are sometimes disconnected from urban poverty research: immigration and culture. A major theme throughout the course will be evaluating the empirical evidence for and against social theories and thereby developing questions for future research.

As with any course, time constraints mean that some important topics cannot be covered. Some of the topics that are not covered (or not covered in detail) include statistical methods for urban research such as multi-level and spatial modeling, health inequalities, urban politics, technology and community, contemporary urban and social policy, urban planning, and communities and crime/incarceration. Students with a strong interest in these areas are invited to explore them in their final papers.

Books:

  • Wilson, William Julius. 1987. The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner-City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Massey, Douglas and Nancy Denton. 1993. American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of an Underclass. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Jargowsky, Paul A. 1997. Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City. New York: Russell Sage.
  • Wilson, William Julius. 1997. When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor. New York: Knopf.
  • Pattillo-McCoy, Mary. 1999. Black Picket Fences: Privilege and Peril Among the Black Middle Class. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • McRoberts, Omar M. 2003. Streets of Glory: Church and Community in a Black Urban Neighborhood. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Waldinger, Roger. 1996. Still the Promised City? African Americans and New Immigrants in Post-Industrial New York. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  • Carter, Prudence. 2005. Keepin' It Real: School Success Beyond Black and White. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Anderson, Elijah. 1999. Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City. New York: W. W. Norton.
  • Newman, Katherine S. 1999. No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City. New York: Vintage and Russel Sage.
  • Young, Alford A, Jr. 2004. The Minds of Marginalized Black Men: Making Sense of Mobility, Opportunity, and Life Chances. Princeton:Princeton University Press.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Undergraduates with permission of instructor.

SOC 555 — Culture and Knowledge
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Göçek,Fatma Müge; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Culture as a concept migrated from anthropology to sociology to emphasize the significance of meaning within and across societies; knowledge became important to highlight the inherent human interests and power relations embedded within it. The course will take a historical/epistemological approach to the topic. Two historical events shape the subfield of culture and knowledge, first the Enlightenment and the advent of modernity, and then the trauma of the Holocaust, and the subsequent emergence of the critical approach. After analyzing various conceptualizations of culture and the significance of these two historical events and their impact on the epistemology of culture and knowledge, the focus turns to the works of the classical thinkers such as Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and Georg Simmel who expounded on the creation of meaning in society as well as others who have elaborated on certain aspects on the former's conceptions such as Raymond Williams, Antonio Gramsci, and William DuBois. This leads to analyses of culture and capital (Pierre Bourdieu, Loic Wacquant), agency (Ann Swidler, Bill Sewell, Jr.), power (Michel Foucault, Timothy Mitchell), imperialism (Edward Said, Liz Curtis), and resistance (Stuart Hall, Partha Chatterjee).

The students in the course will team teach the class every week, presenting the readings and leading the discussion (20%), take a take-home examination (30%), give a presentation on the final paper (10%), and write a final paper (40%)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 560 — Power, History, and Social Change
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Paige,Jeffery M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Core course for the Power, History, Social Change Area. Introduction to the study of large-scale processes of economic, political and cultural change from a comparative and historical perspective. The course begins with an introduction to basic concepts in the study of social change including power, knowledge and the state; nation and nationalism; class and class consciousness; and democracy, civil society and the public sphere. It then turns to a consideration of processes of macro-change at the societal and global level, including development, dependency and globalization, from both political-economy and post-colonial perspectives. It concludes with a consideration of revolution and social movements as processes of change including analysis of communism and post-communism and of future prospects for utopian movements of change in response to globalization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 580 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

SOC 590 — Proseminar in Social Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Anspach,Renee
Instructor: House,James S; homepage
Instructor: Featherman,David L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Providing an overview of the interdisciplinary field of social psychology, this team-taught graduate course broadly canvasses theory and research and focuses mainly upon sociological social psychology. Sections of the course cover metatheoretical foundations, perspectives, and the "faces" of social psychology; intrapersonal processes (psychological social psychology); interpersonal processes (micro-sociological social psychology); and individual in sociocultural context (macro-sociological social psychology). Each weekly class combines an overview lecture, offered by a range of faculty according to topic, with seminar discussions of core and supplemental readings. While designed to lay the foundation of preparation of Sociology graduate students for the preliminary examination in social psychology, the course is open and graduate students from other disciplines are welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Some background in social psychology desirable

SOC 595 — Special Courses
Section 002, SEM
Philosophy of Social Science

Instructor: Little,Daniel E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The philosophy of social science is a discipline that analyzes the logic, methodology, modes of explanation, and methods of inquiry of the social sciences. The past dozen years have witnessed an explosion of valuable debates about foundational issues in sociology and other social sciences. The course is based on the assumption that both philosophers and social scientists will benefit from a better understanding of the conceptual and methodological issues that arise in the conduct of social science research. The course is premised on the assumption that the philosophy of social science should develop its theories and analyses by working closely with strong examples of good social science research. We should frame the defining questions of the philosophy of social science by reflecting upon the large conceptual and methodological issues that have actually been important to social scientists as they conduct their research and theory construction. The course will make use of recent writings by such social scientists as Abbott, Mahoney, Sewell, Steinmetz, Adams, Lieberson, and Shapiro as we explore recent debates about the foundations of social science explanation. Central topics will include the logic of comparative social science, the role of rational choice theory, the cultural turn, the utility of causal mechanisms, hidden assumptions in quantitative reasoning, and the nature of the social. Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, written work, and CTools discussion entries.

SOC 595 — Special Courses
Section 003, SEM
Interpreting Identity

Instructor: Young Jr,Alford A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

How do social contexts affect the ways by which individuals label and categorize themselves and others? What are the social consequences for how and why individuals label themselves and other people? How do social identities relate to self-identities? This course aims to explore these and other questions by considering the myriad ways in which research on identity has been pursued in sociology. Our quest differs from that of psychology, where individual-centered approaches to identity predominate. Instead, we will explore literature that investigates the sociological processes and social consequences of labeling others and of being labeled. Course readings will be drawn from classic and contemporary sociological and social psychological approaches to identity.

Although all of the reading for this course addresses identity in some form or fashion, it is quite wide-ranging and diverse. That is because the sociological literature on identity, unlike other topical areas in the discipline, does not constitute a coherent sub-field. Rather, identity has emerged as a central point of focus in disparate sociological sub-fields such as race and ethnic relations, gender and sexuality, political sociology and social movements, and social psychology. Consequently, we will forego the challenge of explicitly defining and interrogating identity as a coherent sub-field of sociology in order to consider some of the varied ways in which the concept has been employed across these and other sub-fields in the discipline. The common thread that links the ways in which identity has been explored in sociology — and that will serve as our foundation for analysis — is that each approach attends to:

  1. how individuals create boundaries or parameters for identities to emerge and endure, or
  2. how individuals negotiate identities throughout the course of their everyday lives.

With this in mind, our overarching task in examining the questions posed earlier will be to consider how different notions of identity are implicated across varied sociological sub-fields and to evaluate the logic and utility of these efforts.

SOC 595 — Special Courses
Section 005, SEM
Approaches to Feminist Scholarship in the Social Sciences

Instructor: Lal,Jayati

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course charts various feminist approaches to scholarship in the social sciences. It is designed to familiarize graduate students with the methodologies that are used to research questions of gender in the social sciences, as well as to understand the linkages between core theoretical movements (such as poststructuralism, postmodernism, and postcolonialism) that have influenced feminist scholarship, and the challenges that they pose for the practice of feminist inquiry. We will thus be engaged with learning how feminists have responded to questions such as:

  • How do we Know?
  • Who are the (assumed) Knower and the Known in canonical constructions of the disciplines?
  • What difference does it make when the Object and Subject of research are women?
  • What is the object of feminist knowledge and how do feminist politics affect the production of knowledge?
  • How does ‘experience' work as ‘evidence' in feminist epistemological frameworks?
  • What happens when the Knower/Subject of knowledge is not assumed to be ‘Woman' but is geographically sited and historically located as a classed, raced, and sexualized woman from a specific nation?
  • What happens to our notions of Objectivity, Truth, and Politics in feminist social science after postmodernism?

SOC 610 — Statistical Methods
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mizruchi,Mark S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course is the second portion of the two-term sequence required of all graduate students in the department of Sociology. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. This term focuses on multivariate techniques, especially multiple linear regression. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to refine students' statistical computing skills. The course assumes knowledge of the material covered in SOC 510. It assumes no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra, but students will have an opportunity to develop elementary skills in more advanced mathematical techniques.

Advisory Prerequisite: Soc. 510 or equivalent.

SOC 612 — Methods of Survey Sampling
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lahiri,Parthasarathi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Methods of Survey Sampling/Applied Sampling is an applied statistical methods course, but differs from most statistics courses. It is concerned almost exclusively with the design of data collection. Little of the analysis of collected data will be disc

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH,Two courses in statistics.

SOC 622 — Social Stratification
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Burgard,Sarah Andrea; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the contours and distribution of inequality in industrial societies and theoretical frameworks that try to explain the persistence of inequality. The course covers basic concepts and classical sociological theories of inequality as well as more contemporary versions. We will also evaluate empirical studies dealing with the issues of social stratification and social mobility, including: intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status; the effects of family, school, and labor market on socioeconomic achievement, careers, and inequality; gender and ethnic stratification, and the consequences of social stratification and inequality.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 630 — Research Methods in Population and Human Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Barbara A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The demographic perspective has become increasingly important in the social sciences. Demographically-based life table measures of employment, marriage, and other socially important areas have become prominent. The demographic perspective has become extremely important in the sociology of marriage and the family. This course aims for the student to understand the philosophy, the strengths, and the weaknesses of demographically-based measures. An important issue is: What measure is appropriate for addressing what question?

This is a course on methods of demographic analysis. There is no required background in demography, statistics, or mathematics beyond high school algebra. An open mind and a willingness to look at tables and work with numbers are necessary. This course aims to explain the demographic approach to data collection and analysis regardless of students' substantive interests. There will be explanations adequate for students without a background in calculus to understand the material. This course aims to enable students to apply demographic methods in areas such as education, marriage and marital dissolution, labor force analysis, and study of health status, as well as in the classic demographic areas of mortality, fertility, and migration.

For each area considered, it is expected that each student will: (1) Understand the purposes of the measures and methods used, (2) Understand the strengths and weaknesses of the measures and methods used, and (3) Be able to interpret results from the application of the methods. Usually, the student will do a homework assignment in which the measure or approach is applied. Sometimes the student will not actually do problems or calculations applying a given measure or approach but will be able to understand articles that use the measure or approach and will have a conceptual background for further courses or reading based on the measure or approach.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 530 and Graduate standing.

SOC 695 — Directed Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice. An individual instructor must agree to direct such research, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 696 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 710 — Advanced Topics in Quantitative Methodology
Section 001, SEM
causal inference in the social sciences

Instructor: Xie,Yu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we explore and critique methods for conducting causal inference in the social sciences. These methods will be drawn from a wide variety of disciplines, including economics, sociology, statistics, education, psychology, and epidemiology. Particular attention will be paid to causal inference from quasi-experimental and observational research designs. This course is part of the Michigan Methodology Seminar. It provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers and graduate students in several related disciplines at Michigan to be engaged in discussing cutting-edge issues in social science methodology.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 610 or equivalent and Graduate standing.

SOC 711 — Questionnaire Design
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kreuter,Frauke

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is about the development of the survey instrument, the questionnaire. Topics include wording of questions (strategies for factual and non-factual questions), cognitive aspects, order of response alternatives, open versus closed questions, handling sensitive topics, combining individual questions into a meaningful questionnaire, issues related to questions of order and context, and aspects of a questionnaire other than questions. Questionnaire design is shown as a function of the mode of data collection such as face-to-face interviewing, telephone interviewing, mail surveys, diary surveys, and computer-assisted interviewing.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

SOC 810 — Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Xie,Yu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar considers methodological issues that arise in research in the social sciences. Themes arise from ongoing research projects at the UM. Visiting researchers provide a brief account of their aims and data before defining the methodological challenges for which they desire discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501.

SOC 850 — Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health and Illness
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Delva,Jorge; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1.5

Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
Section 001, SEM
Evolutionary Psychology

Instructor: Nesse,Randolph M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 5

This graduate seminar will provide an in-depth assessment of the most recent research and scholarship in Evolutionary Psychology. The main text will be the Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology, edited by David Buss, which should be available at a discount. The chapters in this volume provide a surprisingly broad, readable, and sometimes critical assessment of central issues in the field, but we will also use some recent journal articles and chapters from several books critical of Evolutionary Psychology. The exact final list of topics will be determined by the seminar participants. For each topic, we will ask whether the predictions are really derived from evolutionary theory, or whether evolution is used to explain something that has long been observed. We will devote several sessions to strategies for testing evolutionary hypotheses about behavior, and how proximate studies can and cannot help in this endeavor. This foundation will allow us to assess major programs of research in Evolutionary Psychology. This seminar is intended to bring together graduate students from all areas. To make that possible, seats in the seminar will be allocated in part to achieve diversity among different areas. To request admission, please email Professor Nesse at nesse@umich.edu with information about your area, year of graduate study, and special interests.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
Section 003, SEM
Socio-Cultural Psychology

Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Generally defined as ways of life or folkways, culture influences psychological functions such as cognition, emotion, and motivation. In this course we will examine in detail the role of culture in human psychology. We will start with a general overview of the field of cultural psychology, defining culture, discussing divergent approaches to the study of culture in psychology, and identifying important functions of culture for the humans. We will then discuss a few select topics that have received concerted research attention in the recent years including socialization, culture and cognition, and self. We will then move on to discuss different types of "cultures" including honor culture, American individualism, and global culture. The course concludes with group presentations by students themselves on their own cultures.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SOC 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

SOC 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bergstrom,Cara A

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period. Students who have advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. are required to register for SOC 995 in any term when they are consulting with members of their dissertation committee or using the Library or other facilities of the University. If the student is to be engaged in a period of study away from the University, the student should file a Certification for Detached Study in advance. Students doing dissertation work prior to achieving candidacy should register for SOC 990 for that portion of their schedule spent on dissertation work.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

SOC 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 201, IND

Instructor: Gold,Martin

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period. Students who have advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. are required to register for SOC 995 in any term when they are consulting with members of their dissertation committee or using the Library or other facilities of the University. If the student is to be engaged in a period of study away from the University, the student should file a Certification for Detached Study in advance. Students doing dissertation work prior to achieving candidacy should register for SOC 990 for that portion of their schedule spent on dissertation work.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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