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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = THEME_SEM
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 003, SEM
Spoken Word Poetry

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, Theme

Learn the art of performance poetry and spoken word in this new freshman seminar! Each week, we will read contemporary poetry, or watch performances of local and nationally-known spoken word artists, and study the phenomena of Poetry Slam competitions in America. Students will also engage in creative exercises to empower the artist in all of us. No previous poetry experience necessary. For the term project, students will produce a spoken word event and/or poetry publication.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 204 — Themes in American Culture
Section 002, LEC
American Musical Soundscapes: Roots, Routes, and Scenes

Instructor: Stillman,Amy K

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course will examine relationships between music and place throughout the United States. What would "A Day in the Life of Music in the United States" sound like in 2007? What might it have sounded like in 1907 or 1807? Why do some musics remain rooted within their communities, while others find broader audiences and routes of circulation? How does music operate as sonic markers of inclusion or exclusion? Using the case of music in the United States, what does music contribute to our thinking about citizenship?

We will examine a range of musical genres, from placed-based traditions to musics belonging to everyone and no one at the same time. We will also examine a range of book, recording and film/video packaging of "American music/s." We shall weigh tensions between notions of a "musical mainstream" and "musical subcultures," and consider how these tensions around music and music-making promotes social bonding or marginaliation.

This course will provide students with several different types of tools.

  1. Students will acquire techniques and use vocabulary for distinguishing different genres on musical grounds.
  2. Students will gain techniques for surveying community musicmaking activity.
  3. Students will develop critical abilities to analyze the discursive dimensions around what musics get heard, where that happens, how it unfolds — and who and what is not heard.
  4. Students will conceptualize relationships between music and place, and the implications of those relationships for thinking about investments of citizenship.

Required reading will include Music in America by Adelaida Reyes (Oxford 2005) and a coursepack of articles. Students will be responsible for an average of three hours of required listening weekly. Access to a high-speed internet connection will be necessary for much of the assigned listening. There will be writing assignments, including a term project. There will be two objective quizzes, an objective midterm exam, and a final exam. Opportunities for class fieldtrips will be announced at the start of the term.

AMCULT 301 — Topics in American Culture
Section 001, LEC
Asian Pacific Islander American History and the Law. Meets Feb 13 — Mar 20, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 20).

Instructor: Hwang,Roland

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Theme

This course is an overview of how federal and state laws have affected the Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) experience and presence in the United States. The course will cover the APIA historical timeline, exclusion laws, alien land laws, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, affirmative action as it applies to APIAs, civil rights and racial hate crime violence, bilingual issues in education and the workplace, post-9/11 issues, among other topics.

AMCULT 301 — Topics in American Culture
Section 009, LEC
Human Rights & Social Justice Organizing in the U.S.

Instructor: Smith,Andrea Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Recently, social justice organizations, particularly those with a racial justice focus, have begun to work within a human rights frame. They regard human rights as a framework that challenges U.S. hegemony, and also provides an opportunity for U.S. based social justice organizations to make transnational linkages with social justice movements globally. This course would focus on case studies of social justice organizations in the U.S. that are utilizing a human rights framework to assess how the human rights framework impacts organizing around disparate social justice issues. In some cases, this framework helps U.S.-based social movements develop linkages transnationally with non-U.S.-based human rights groups. In some cases, this framework has led to transnational organizing limiting itself to U.N. fora and advocacy at the expense of other forms of transnational organizing. This course will look at what have been the benefits and the costs of building a U.S. Human Rights movement in terms of furthering the cause of social justice. The course will explore how social justice organizations have changed in their stance on human rights, and how they have addressed these initial critiques within their movements. The course will also include guest speakers from diverse social justice movements.

AMCULT 304 — American Immigration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

AMCULT 306 — Community Research
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Creekmore,Phillip M
Instructor: Levin,Dana S

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course involves a community based internship, readings, and a class seminar. The seminar and readings cover research methodologies useful when conducting research on, with and for communities. These include community needs assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. The community experience involves one visit per week to a community-based organization in Detroit to work on projects to improve the well being of children, youth and families. Projects can involve tutoring, developing outreach activities, or working in community education projects. Students in the course will work with one another on a research project designed to meet community interests. Results from this project will be shared with the community-based organizations and the university community through presentations and written reports. Transportation to the community internship is provided.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318/AMCULT 307 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

AMCULT 311 — Topics in Ethnic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Asian Pacific American Literature and Empire

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: Theme

How Does the Empire Write Back? This upper-division course focuses on Asian Pacific American literature and the United States empire. By reading stories, plays, historical documents, poems, and films, students will learn how empire affects the experience of different generations of Pacific Islanders and Asians in America. We will examine the continuing impact of wars in the Pacific that established the U.S. as a global power, focusing especially on Filipino American, Hawaiian, Vietnamese American, and South Asian American texts. This diverse range of writers and artists proposes creative ways of thinking beyond, against, and without the U.S. empire. Most importantly, this course will be an opportunity for students to develop their own research or creative projects, which will contribute to this body of writing. While students are expected to work on individual research topics from the very beginning of the course, the last third of the semester is set aside for the development and presentation of projects. This course satisfies the "Cultural Expression" Requirement for the Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies Minor.

AMCULT 363 — Asian/Pacific American Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in the United States. Texts and films include an introduction to materials by and about Asian/Pacific Islander American (APIA) women, from historical, anthropological, sociological, psychological, musical, and literary perspectives, thereby allowing students to compare and contrast the experiences of different ethnicities and generations. Discussions and assignments will examine the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality in APIA women's lives. Learning critical theories about feminism, immigration, and globalization will show how APIA women have become agents of social change, publicly and privately, at home and in their communities. For the term project, students will have the option of writing an oral history research essay, OR doing a creative project, OR volunteering with New Visions: Alliance to End Violence in Asian/Asian American Communities.

AMCULT 387 — History of American Jews
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Deborah Dash

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).


AMCULT 421 — Social Stratification
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

From its inception, a most fundamental concern of Sociology has been the search for an explanation of the social forces that generate and sustain economic, social, and political inequalities among individuals and groups in society. These inequalities promote not only differences in wealth, prestige, and power among these groups but also differences in their experiences and opportunities for a better life. On a more general level, these inequalities in large part determine the course of our history by having an important influence on government policies on issues such as war or peace, the growth or stagnation of our economy, and the future of our democracy.

This course introduces the student to the most important theoretical frameworks that sociologists have utilized to explain the origins, mechanisms, and processes by which these inequalities persist in society, whether it be inequalities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities. This course focuses both on inequalities in the United States as well as global inequalities.

AMCULT 505 — Sem Latino Std
Section 001, SEM
History of Latinos in Michigan

Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This is a an advanced research seminar on the history of Latino immigrants and Latino-Americans in the state of Michigan. As there is a scarcity of published material on the topic we will be working on primary research in U of M archives and the Institute for Social Research. The goal will be to produce individual research projects while laying the foundations for an ongoing Michigan Latino History Project. Research trips to Wayne State Library, MSU, and Grand Rapids are also planned. Advanced undergraduates, thesis writers, and interested graduate students are all welcome. Some background in Latino Studies or Latino history is recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing/undergrads with permission of instructor

AMCULT 510 — Topics in Ethnic Studies
Section 001, SEM
Cultural Citizenship: A Concept in Theory, Practice, Time, and Place

Instructor: Ellison,Julie

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This class will focus on the concept of cultural citizenship. There are different definitions of this term, all of them grappling with the everyday politics of what citizenship means, the definition of culture (is it the same thing as "the social"?), why cultural practices matter, and how ideas of community and identity are faring in the global cultural marketplace. We will be begin by looking at how the term is used by human rights organizations, scholars in cultural studies and ethnic studies, the European Union, and other groups and individuals.

Then we will turn to five case studies of intellectual and creative projects to which the idea of cultural citizenship and questions of race and ethnicity are central. The first of these, in January, will be Sekou Sundiata's new performance work, "51st (dream) state." Sundiata will be in residence; he will meet at least twice with our class. The class will attend the performance of Sundiata's "51st (dream) state" on January 20th. Other case studies may include: the Animating Democracy Initiative, especially the Critical Perspectives project (Americans for the Arts); the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati; the annual Concert of Colors in Detroit, launched 14 years ago by ACCESS (Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services); and the International Coalition of Historic Sites Museums of Conscience. We will examine four dimensions of each case: agency, language, conscience, and the archive. This will allow us to test the relationship between theory and practice in each project, and to analyze the variables of time and place, including those relating to social identities.

Weekly responses of different kinds are required. A short paper in early February will focus on a critical analysis of the Sundiata residency, connecting it to selected readings. Your final project will consist of an individual case study. For this, you will develop a critical, historical and/or theoretical bibliography that illuminates — and is illuminated by — a specific cultural project. In preparation for writing final paper on this project, you will assign one selection from your project bibliography to the class, to spark discussion when you do a class presentation on your case-study-in-progress. A case study proposal and a partial draft will also be required. Class attendance is mandatory.

Readings will be drawn from as many of the following fields as possible: American Studies, Ethnic Studies, African-American Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Community Cultural Development, Museum Studies, Law, Literature, Cultural Policy, Organizational Studies, Higher and Post-Secondary Education, Politics, Information Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing/undergrads with permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458 — Topics in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Citizenship, Participation, and Democracy

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This advanced undergraduate seminar offers new ways of viewing citizen, participation, and democracy by exploring the intersection of theoretical currents and ethnographic research. Students will read a series of rich ethnographic accounts on themes including participation, international aid organizations, globalization, social movements, and electoral processes. The ethnographies will also generate discussion about engaged research and the work of indigenous intellectuals. We will relate these accounts to theoretical currents including governmentality, hegemony, deliberative democracy, public sphere, civil society, and transnationalism. Readings will cover many parts of the world, and are intended to interest students working in the United States as well as internationally. Classes will primarily involve discussion of assigned texts. Requirements include active participation in class discussion, a presentation of the readings (one week), weekly on-line response papers, and final essay or take-home exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior & above/permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 474 — Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Managan,Jane Kathryn

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Many Americans and Europeans assume that communities normally are, or ought to be, monolingual — that language differences divide people from one another, while a common language unites them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual.

What do language differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? In this course we will consider the relationship between communication and community — particularly as these have been conceptualized (and ideologized) under the rubrics of "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." We will explore what kinds of social groupings those terms might (or might not) label, and how they might (or might not) connect with languages and with communication networks. Our approach will be crossculturally comparative and, where relevant, historical. Through a discussion of selected theoretical works and case studies, we will consider topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and print media; language and the idea of "nation" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in nationalistic movements.

Course readings will consist mainly of journal articles and book chapters, along with books such as Hobsbawm's Nations and Nationalism Since 1780 and Anderson's Imagined Communities. In addition to discussing general issues and some case materials presented in readings and in class, students will independently explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, a take-home test, and a term paper.

No prerequisites, but students should have at least junior class standing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

ANTHRCUL 658 — Special Topics in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
Democracy: Ethnography and Social Theory

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar offers new ways of viewing democracy by exploring the intersection of theoretical currents and ethnographic research. Students will read a series of rich ethnographic accounts on themes including participation, international aid organizations, globalization, social movements, and electoral processes. The ethnographies will also generate discussion about engaged research and the work of indigenous intellectuals. We will relate these accounts to theoretical currents including governmentality, hegemony, deliberative democracy, public sphere, civil society, and transnationalism. Readings will cover many parts of the world, and are intended to interest students working in the United States as well as internationally. Classes will primarily involve discussion of assigned texts. Requirements include active participation in class discussion, a presentation of the readings (one week), weekly on-line response papers, and final essay or take-home exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ARTDES 310 — Outreach Studio Topic
Section 001, LAB
Detroit Connections

Instructor: Smotrich,Hannah

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Connecting A&D students with fourth graders at two elementary schools in Detroit through semester long visual and performance art projects, this class is a combination of work with the children and contextual studies that address issues of urban schools and the radical transformation creative projects have on cognitive development. Working intensively in Detroit every Friday, students learn first hand of the city's history and contemporary culture with field visits and projects. Planning for and reflecting on class projects, students develop close ties with the children and produce vibrant art that transforms the physical nature of the schools, and shared experiences across generations and cultures that transform the nature of connected creative work.

ARTDES 310 — Outreach Studio Topic
Section 002, LAB
Art Workshops in Prisons

Instructor: Even,Tirtza

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The United States is now one of the most incarcerating nations in the world. The prison industry is growing at a rapid rate with increasingly higher percentages of African-American, Hispanic, and Native American men, women and teen-agers serving time. In many states, including Michigan, educational and recreational activities have been eliminated from the prisons. This class gives students the opportunity to work inside a prison in one of two ways:

By participating in a video workshop whereby a group of students will join a group of inmates to produce short videos scripted, directed and edited collaboratively by both teams. The workshop will include tutorials in screen-writing, storyboarding, editing concepts and various other issues illustrated and critiqued through examples demonstrated to both groups (inmates/students).

By maintaining a solid relationship already established between the School of Art and Design with a number of prison facilities in Michigan, students can also themselves facilitate an art workshop for men, women or adolescents. Students opting for this second option will visit in small groups to a local correctional facility or youth facility, and work primarily with drawing and painting in adult correctional facilities, and with clay and collage, as well as drawing and painting, with the adolescent population.

Readings, films and discussion will provide background and training for working in a prison setting. The class will meet once a week to share art projects with each other, and to discuss films, reading material and issues that arise in the workshops, as well as for supervision and discussion with the instructor in small groups.

ARTDES 310 — Outreach Studio Topic
Section 003, LAB
Mental Ecology II: Mind, Body, Environment — Art and Public Health

Instructor: Takahashi,Satoru; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course is a continuation of Mental Ecology I ( Fall 2006). This is a joint project of the School of Art and Design and the School of Public Health. For this project, students will investigate the degree to which art can influence issues of immediate concern to today's society through their studies in public health. During Phase One (in fall 2006) students created plans for art projects using the School of Public Health Building as their testing ground. In Phase Two (winter 2007) we will complete the proposed project for the School of Public health. This new environment will serve to cleanse both body and spirit, while becoming a place for "meditation and mediation," which will foster dialogue on the topic of society.

ARTDES 310 — Outreach Studio Topic
Section 004, LAB
Many Ways of Seeing

Instructor: Inuzuka,Sadashi

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will be taught in collaboration with the Washtenaw County Library for the Blind and Visually Impaired. In this class students will gain a technical knowledge of ceramics. There will be guest speakers, discussion, and one class each week will be held off campus at the Library to allow students to apply their understanding as they assist clients of the facility to create art works using clay. Students will learn alternate modes of perception and the skills to work with people who have limited visual abilities. The objective of this course is that in working together students and clients will gain confidence and find creative outlet through the sculptural potential of clay.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme, FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE
Other: Theme

Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between the constraints that affect large groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of people to transcend those constraints on the other.

In this course we will examine the ways in which race and ethnicity as social structures have impacted the lives of so-called minority groups both in the United States and abroad. We will also look at how race and ethnicity work in conjunction with other social structures such as class, gender and sexuality. To maximize our sense of what it is like to live life as a member of a racial or ethnic group, we will not only read sociology, but also conduct in-class exercises, analyze films, and read literary fiction.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

CAAS 358 — Topics in Black World Studies
Section 004, SEM
"‘One Nation Under A Groove?" Afro-American Expressive Culture, 1970-1979

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will examine representative works of art that were produced by blacks in America during roughly the ten year period following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and what many have viewed as the end of the Civil Rights Movement. Looking at literary texts, popular music, and films in particular, as well as critical and journalistic commentary which they spawned, we will investigate responses to the opportunities and challenges faced by Blacks following the revolutionary decade if the 1960s. As implicit and explicit responses to (among other things) increasing numbers of Blacks entering into the educational, artistic, political, and economic mainstream, the literature, music, and film created during the 1970s reflected — and reflected upon — sometimes-volatile arguments taking place nationally over the meanings and practices of blackness in cities and regions throughout the United States. By looking critically at a selected number of texts and the debates in which they participate about class, gender, history, racial and national identity, family, romance, and other issues, our goal will be to consider the struggles to make or remake "the race" during the first decade in American history in which Afro-Americans were guaranteed equal rights under the laws of the world's model democracy. Course requirements: a five page essay, a midterm examination, a final (10-15 page) research essay, frequent short writing exercises, and active class participation.

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

CAAS 458 — Issues in Black World Studies
Section 008, SEM
The Algebra Project: Education, Citizenship, and Community Organizing for Social Justice in the 21st Century

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the history, philosophy, and pedagogical practice of the Algebra Project. Founded by civil rights veteran and community activist Bob Moses, the Algebra Project is a math literacy program based on the principle that all children deserve an education that encourages and supports them in the development of the knowledge and skills necessary for 21st century citizenship. It draws on the lessons and legacy of the Civil Rights movement, and especially of the movement's "community organizing tradition." We will investigate this tradition and the broader movement history of which it was a part, studying how this history informed the founding and development of the Algebra Project. This will include looking at the ideas and influence of Ella Baker on the movement in general and on Bob Moses and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in particular. Our study of the Civil Rights movement will also focus on the Freedom Schools that activists organized during the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project ("Freedom Summer"). From there we will examine other theories of radical and liberatory educational practice before moving to an examination of current challenges, concerns, and crises in our public education system. All of this will provide the basis for our in-depth analysis of the Algebra Project as well as the Young People's Project (YPP), a youth-initiated and youth-led movement. The YPP has grown out of the Algebra Project to project and expand its vision of education, community organizing, and citizenship for the 21st century.

CAAS 487 — Communication Media in the Black World: Electronic Media
Section 001, SEM
Media & Social Movements.

Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the relationship between media and social movements. After a brief survey of the relevant theoretical literatures, we will look at these questions through a series of case studies, organized thematically. These will include decolonization (focusing particularly on the Algerian war of independence and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa), '60s era social movements in the United States (particularly Civil Rights, anti-war protests), and the "new social movements" (with emphasis on the Zapatista movement in Mexico, broad-based resistance to the negative effects of globalization, and the political efforts by and on behalf of AIDS sufferers in South Africa and the US). Throughout the course we will be interested in how media write history and how social movements utilize/engage with media technologies. We will make extensive use of audio-visual media, and some outside viewing of films is required. In addition to active class participation, requirements include a book and film review as well as a final research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: CAAS 201

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 001, SEM
Supreme Court News Coverage

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 002, SEM
Supreme Court News Coverage

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 001, LEC
Media & Social Movements.

Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the relationship between media and social movements. After a brief survey of the relevant theoretical literatures, we will look at these questions through a series of case studies, organized thematically. These will include decolonization (focusing particularly on the Algerian war of independence and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa), '60s era social movements in the United States (particularly Civil Rights, anti-war protests), and the "new social movements" (with emphasis on the Zapatista movement in Mexico, broad-based resistance to the negative effects of globalization, and the political efforts by and on behalf of AIDS sufferers in South Africa and the US). Throughout the course we will be interested in how media write history and how social movements utilize/engage with media technologies. We will make extensive use of audio-visual media, and some outside viewing of films is required. In addition to active class participation, requirements include a book and film review as well as a final research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 002, LEC
Media & Social Movements.

Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the relationship between media and social movements. After a brief survey of the relevant theoretical literatures, we will look at these questions through a series of case studies, organized thematically. These will include decolonization (focusing particularly on the Algerian war of independence and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa), '60s era social movements in the United States (particularly Civil Rights, anti-war protests), and the "new social movements" (with emphasis on the Zapatista movement in Mexico, broad-based resistance to the negative effects of globalization, and the political efforts by and on behalf of AIDS sufferers in South Africa and the US). Throughout the course we will be interested in how media write history and how social movements utilize/engage with media technologies. We will make extensive use of audio-visual media, and some outside viewing of films is required. In addition to active class participation, requirements include a book and film review as well as a final research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMPLIT 140 — First-Year Literary Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Culture of Criticism, Criticism of Culture

Instructor: Seo,Joanne Mira

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, FYSem

This course will examine the function of criticism in society and how criticism is disseminated through cultural production. We will focus on the poets and critics of democratic Athens (criticism of poetry in the thought of Plato and Aristotle and its relationship to their political philosophies, Aristophanes as a political poet) and compare them with the works of more recent cultural critics such as Robert Warshow, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, as well as contemporary cultural products such as films and novels. To what extent can cultural criticism define and analyze areas beyond the arts, and how do cultural products such as poetry, literature and film critique contemporary culture?

Students will be evaluated on attendance, class participation, the presentation of group work, and brief writing assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

COMPLIT 350 — The Text and Its Cultural Context
Section 001, SEM
Citizenship: Intersection of Art and Politics

Instructor: Igsiz,Zehra Asli; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

What is the relationship between art and politics? How do the intersections of these two realms make us think about conceptualizations of citizenship in different contexts? Consider hip hop artists releasing new video clips calling on their audience to vote just weeks before the elections; documentary filmmakers receiving subpoenas for the use of their documentary as evidence in court; films and books calling attention to critical issues as diverse as genocide, euthanasia, death penalty, and racism; prestigious awards distributed to cultural products about critical issues; censoring and/or challenging certain works of art with critical edge or considered a "threat" to the society…

In this course, we will be analyzing a wide range of materials including music, visual arts, film, and literature about/ from different geographic and political contexts. These cultural products raise questions about the boundaries between life and art and how these boundaries make us think about concepts of citizenry, but also ethics and value in art forms. While keeping these questions in mind, we will approach politicization of art, of cultural products in terms of their content, function, representation, and reception. We will use some theoretical texts to develop models of thinking about citizenship and different aspects of art and politics.

There will be regular responses to the materials covered in class, several term papers, and a final project.

Some cultural products we may examine include: Excerpts from Plato's Republic; fragments from MTV: Behind the Music and Michael Moore's Bowling for Columbine on Marylin Manson's alleged influence on the school shootings in Columbine; some songs by Eminem; Peter Cohen's documentary on Nazi concepts of beauty and art Architecture of Doom; George Orwell's 1984; Bosnian-British filmmaker Jasmin Dizdar's Beautiful People.

COMPLIT 492 — Comparative Literary Theory
Section 002, SEM
Torture

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Early in 2005, to help in the planned revision of Norway's animal protection law, a scientific study funded by the Norwegian government found that worms squirming on a fishhook feel no pain, nor do lobsters and crabs cooked in boiling water. Norway might have considered banning the use of live worms as fish bait if the study had found they felt pain. We don't know what the inarticulate worms and lobsters thought about the whole matter, but we do know that Vice-President Dick Cheney, speaking with a talk show host later in October of 2006, appeared to embrace the suggestion that a "dunk in water" might be useful to get terrorism suspects to talk. "Water-boarding," the "professional" term for dunking, is a torture technique banned under international law. Earlier in October, President Bush had signed a bill outlawing the torture of detainees, but "quietly reserved the right to bypass the law under his powers as a commander in chief," as The Boston Globe put it.

As a reflection on LSA Theme Year on the Theory and Practice of Citizenship, this seminar is meant to encourage good, engaged citizens to think and care and write about the pain and the torture of others, despite the inadequacies of language. Elaine Scarry wrote that "physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it, bringing about an immediate reversion to a state anterior to language, to the sounds and cries a human being makes before language is learned." Through theory, fiction, films, plays, memoirs, testimonies and legal documents, we will examine the ways in which language can(not) articulate the unmaking of the body of worms, lobsters and, especially, humans, through torture and pain — conceptualized, inflicted and narrated.

Students will be asked to write one 5-page essay, triggered by the weekly readings, and to present and discuss it in class; and to submit a substantial term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

DOC 870 — Democracy: Ethnography and Social Theory
Section 001, SEM
Democracy: Ethnography and Social Theory

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar offers new ways of viewing democracy by exploring the intersection of theoretical currents and ethnographic research. Students will read a series of rich ethnographic accounts on themes including participation, international aid organizations, globalization, social movements, and electoral processes. The ethnographies will also generate discussion about engaged research and the work of indigenous intellectuals. We will relate these accounts to theoretical currents including governmentality, hegemony, deliberative democracy, public sphere, civil society, and transnationalism. Readings will cover many parts of the world, and are intended to interest students working in the United States as well as internationally. Classes will primarily involve discussion of assigned texts. Requirements include active participation in class discussion, a presentation of the readings (one week), weekly on-line response papers, and final essay or take-home exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or permission of instructor

ENGLISH 225 — Argumentative Writing
Section 014, REC
questions about citizenship

Instructor: Feigenbaum,Paul T

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This year LS&A has dedicated both Fall and Winter semesters to issues of citizenship, and this course will be linked to that theme. We will discuss and do a lot of writing (both formal and informal) about what it means to be a citizen today, as well as thinking about what civic role students can and should play in local and national communities. Students will observe and analyze local civic activities such as a city council or school board meeting, and we will think about the ways politicians use various media (or the media uses them) to shape their images. Toward the end of the semester students will make some intervention of their choice into the public sphere — possible examples include setting up a blog on a political issue of interest to them, writing a charter for a new student organization, or making a presentation at a City Council meeting.

In the process of addressing these questions about citizenship, we will determine and negotiate our standards for effective argumentation, and write about that experience. This process will include discussions about what an effective argument is, as well as various attendant questions including, but certainly not limited to: What are the standards for judging the quality of an argument? How might these standards differ depending on the context in which the argument is made, as well as the audience? What must be present (and what absent) in an argument in order to be considered effective? This course depends on student involvement and contributions. Your ideas, analyses, creativity and ability to help one another will determine the tone and direction of the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 003, SEM
Life-Stories

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

This course engages students in the practice of writing life-stories. Students read a range of autobiographical essays while developing their own versions of the form; smaller assignments culminate in a larger personal essay due by the course end. In addition, students facilitate life-writing exercises with a group of fifth-graders in a Detroit school; involving five trips total, from the 4th through the 9th week of the term, the school visits take place on Fridays (students choose either a morning or afternoon session; either way, the course requires a Friday time commitment). In class and in writing, students reflect deeply on this community work and their life-writing experiences, and comment on parallel essays by writers such as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How might differences in race, gender, ability, and sexual preference inform life-stories? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? How do writers shape the material of their lives into essay form? Course grade is based on a reflective journal of responses; three (4-page) analytical papers; three (4-page) personal writings; and the larger 10-page personal essay due by the course end; the final paper may be drawn from prior personal writing; it also goes through multiple drafts and is peer-reviewed by the class at large. Course readings are from a collection of personal essays (such as Phillip Lopate's or Dinty Moore's), and/or a supplementary course packet (estimated cost $50).

ENGLISH 326 — Community Writing and Public Culture
Section 001, REC
Community Work

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE
Other: Theme

This course asks that students work at and to some extent write for an area non-profit organization, at the same time they reflect deeply in writing and in discussion about the meaning of this work. Community assignments may involve contributing to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, brochure, or fund-raising letter — all of which will be peer-reviewed in draft form by the class itself. In our meetings, we will discuss issues raised at our community sites and by the related, assigned readings — such as our motives for taking on this work, our respective roles as insider/outsider; the new listening, interactive, and organizational skills that may be required; and our community partner's often differing set of goals and identities. The course provides a way of thinking about community work and social justice not just as service but as interrogating one's own background as well as the professions themselves. How is knowledge produced, both in the university setting and in the non-profit agency? How do we form meaningful and mutually beneficial relationships with our community partners? How might we contribute to the formation of public culture? Readings that approach these issues from a variety of angles (social, historical, personal, statistical) will be available in a course packet (estimated cost $40). In addition to keeping a work log and community journal, students write four (4-page) analytical papers, a fact sheet, a mini-grant proposal that includes research, an organizational analysis, and a (8-page) paper that places the student work within the larger context of social issues encountered at the community site.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 124 or 125.

ENGLISH 407 — Topics in Language and Literature
Section 005, SEM
"‘One Nation Under A Groove?" Afro-American Expressive Culture, 1970-1979

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will examine representative works of art that were produced by blacks in America during roughly the ten year period following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. and what many have viewed as the end of the Civil Rights Movement. Looking at literary texts, popular music, and films in particular, as well as critical and journalistic commentary which they spawned, we will investigate responses to the opportunities and challenges faced by Blacks following the revolutionary decade if the 1960s. As implicit and explicit responses to (among other things) increasing numbers of Blacks entering into the educational, artistic, political, and economic mainstream, the literature, music, and film created during the 1970s reflected — and reflected upon — sometimes-volatile arguments taking place nationally over the meanings and practices of blackness in cities and regions throughout the United States. By looking critically at a selected number of texts and the debates in which they participate about class, gender, history, racial and national identity, family, romance, and other issues, our goal will be to consider the struggles to make or remake "the race" during the first decade in American history in which Afro-Americans were guaranteed equal rights under the laws of the world's model democracy. Course requirements: a five page essay, a midterm examination, a final (10-15 page) research essay, frequent short writing exercises, and active class participation.

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Great American Novel

Instructor: Blair,Sara B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is designed to think about the novel in America: more specifically, how the novel, as a literary form and a cultural institution, has taken part in significant debates about the meanings of culture and citizenship over the course of the nation's history. Beginnings with the context of antebellum American and associated debates about slavery and ranging up through fiction in the contemporary U.S., we'll consider a number of novels whose matter and manner of telling stories raise questions about enfranchisement and belonging, political representation and self-representation, social being and the art of the novel. This not a survey of American novels; rather, we'll focus on an unusually small number of texts in order to make intensive exploration of the historical and aesthetic contexts to which they respond. More broadly, the course is designed to help students sharpen and develop particular skills: use of archival materials; engagement with literary critical traditions; close literary analysis.

Our texts will be drawn from among such nominees for the status of "great American" novel as: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Henry James, The Golden Bowl; William Faulkner, Light in August; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Susan Choi, American Woman; Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex.

Requirements will include a writing portfolio, comprised of four 5-7 page essays and exercises for developing them; discussion leading with other class members; and a final project or exam.

Please note: all students interested in enrolling must attend the first two class meetings. For further information, please contact sbblair@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENVIRON 139 — First-Year Seminar in the Environment
Section 002, SEM
Emerging Diseases

Instructor: Foufopoulos,Johannes; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem, Theme

In this seminar we look beyond the fright created by the popular media and examine the societal, economic, and ecological factors that drive the appearance of new diseases. We learn not only about the fascinating biology of emerging pathogens but also how various processes interact to produce an outbreak.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

HISTORY 387 — History of American Jews
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Deborah Dash

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).


HISTORY 391 — Topics in European History
Section 001, LEC
Hist of European Integration

Instructor: Gaggio,Dario

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The construction of the European Union is arguably the most exciting and controversial political experiment today. This aims to introduce students from a variety of humanistic and social scientific backgrounds to the study of European integration and trans-national identity formation, viewed as contested and contingent historical processes. Rather than viewing the history of European integration as an inevitable, linear, and self-contained institutional movement envisioned by a handful of founding fathers and implemented by their followers, we will focus on the often contentious debates which have surrounded the practices and meanings of political and economic governance, citizenship, and cultural identity. Thus topics include not only a historical overview of the institutional innovations which have led from post-WWII reconstruction to the adoption of a single currency (the Euro) in 2002, but also a discussion of how Europeans have encouraged and resisted integrative processes at the levels of technological change, popular culture, and social movements. Particular attention will also be devoted to the evolving relationships between western Europe and the rest of the world, especially eastern Europe, the U.S., and the post-colonial countries.

HISTORY 468 — Topics in U.S. History
Section 001, LEC
History of Latinos in Michigan

Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This is a an advanced research seminar on the history of Latino immigrants and Latino-Americans in the state of Michigan. As there is a scarcity of published material on the topic we will be working on primary research in U of M archives and the Institute for Social Research. The goal will be to produce individual research projects while laying the foundations for an ongoing Michigan Latino History Project. Research trips to Wayne State Library, MSU, and Grand Rapids are also planned. Advanced undergraduates, thesis writers, and interested graduate students are all welcome. Some background in Latino Studies or Latino history is recommended.

HISTORY 676 — Studies in Modern Japanese History
Section 001, REC
The Concept and Practice of Citizenship

Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

HISTORY 676 is an introductory graduate course for students planning to write a dissertation in modern Japanese studies or take a field in the same area. The course is designed to familiarize students with thematic topics as well as historiographic and theoretical issues in the field of modern Japanese history. While readings are primarily in English language secondary sources, students are encouraged to read specific sources in Japanese. This term, in conjunction with the current LSA Theme Year on citizenship, the course will address the concept and practice of citizenship — in local, national, and global contexts over the course of Japan's modern history. Specific themes and readings will be further elaborated in consultation with graduate students interested in taking the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: JR/SR P.I.

JUDAIC 387 — History of American Jews
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Moore,Deborah Dash

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course traces the historical development of American Jews from their origins as a small outpost in the colonial era to their evolution as the largest Jewish community in the world. It focuses on the centrality of immigration to that history and the significance of several generations of immigrants and their children in mediating the tensions between the demands of American society for adaptation and the requisites of Jewish religion, culture, and ethnic identity. The course looks at how Jews became American and how they redefined what it meant to be Jewish. It examines their social, economic and political choices. The course employs a variety of sources to explore the history of Jews as an American minority group, a dissenting non-Christian religious group, an immigrant and ethnic group, and a cultural group. These sources include first-person accounts and documents and narrative and analytic histories, as well as media artifacts. It will introduce students to visual and aural dimensions of Jewish culture, employing film, photography, music, and radio. Although structured as a lecture course, it will include regular time set aside for discussion. The course does not assume any prior knowledge of Jewish or American history although such knowledge would be helpful.

Intended audience: Sophomores, juniors, seniors

Course Requirements: Five 1-2 page response papers (30%) (250-500 words) to primary documents to encourage students to engage with surviving records of people's experiences and observations. These writing assignments will provide students with an opportunity for critical thinking and allow them to receive feedback on their writing throughout the academic term. There will also be a Midterm Exam (25%), Final Exam (30%) and Attendance and Preparation (15%).


LACS 490 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mini-course
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

LACS 590 — Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, LEC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LHSP 140 — Arts and Humanities
Section 001, REC
Art in Public Spaces: Street Theater Art (START) Initiative

Instructor: Tucker,Mark E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

This course premieres an ambitious immersion into the creation of public street art. The course is divided into two parts: The first 5 weekends of the course students will work with local community theater members from the Burns Park Players to create stage sets for their 2007 musical theater production of Oliver! Simultaneously, students will be designing and producing their own large-scale animated sculpture presentations which will be featured in the first-annual downtown Ann Arbor, Fools Parade, presented by START on April 1st, 2007. As the originators of this artistic spectacle, students in this class will design, organize, and develop START in conjunction with community partners.

This will be a full ‘hands-on' experience which will challenge students' aesthetic assumptions while exploring techniques and tools for the making of large-scale theatrical scenery and sculptural elements. Although this course does not require any previous art experience, due to the public nature of the projects, it will be expected that the student already possess an excellent work ethic as well as the ability to grasp and apply aesthetic principles quickly, in a physically demanding, team oriented, public environment.

This course satisfies LHSP course requirements for Winter 2007; however, this course is not limited to LHSP students.

There is a $150 lab fee for materials required for this course. The lab fee will be billed to your student account.

*Due to the nature and size of the Theater and START projects, additional flexible weekend work hours will be scheduled on an individual/group basis.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Moral Dimensions of the University

Instructor: Krenz,Gary D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, Theme

This course examines moral dimensions of the University and its faculty, students, and staff in their roles as citizens of an academic community. Our goal is to help students think about how to approach participation in this community and develop their deliberative competencies by questioning academic life and the University from moral and social standpoints. We will organize our inquiries into three domains:  academic integrity; the University as an academic community; the University's moral obligations as an institution.

 

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

POLSCI 308 — Law and the Politics of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kirkland,Anna R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme

This course explores the legal regulation of sexuality in the contemporary U.S. We will explore how law both represses and encourages sexuality, examine how it does so, and ask why, and for whom? What kinds of sexual relationships or activities are illegal, and how do these legal statuses organize citizenship in our nation? We will study aspects of constitutional law, criminal law, family law, and employment discrimination law. Specific topics may include sexual orientation discrimination in employment, marriage and family, civil unions, sex work (prostitution), youth sexuality and statutory rape, social movement organizing, sexuality and citizenship in cross-national perspective, and the role of sexual morality in contemporary political debates.

POLSCI 358 — Politics of the European Union
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

The course explores the historical development, political-philosophical justifications & the current political structure and institutional design of the enlarged European Union. The class also deals with theories on European integration, European political competition, parties and selected policy areas, as well as the role of EU member states. Particular attention will be paid to implications of the emerging EU polity for a supra-national European identity and for questions of democratic legitimacy.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 004, REC
Political &Economic DeveIopmetn In Asia (Honors)

Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Theme

It is widely accepted that development is not simply an economic phenomenon. Political processes are intimately tied up with economic development. Consider the following questions.

  • Does the nature of the political system affect development?
  • Does democracy slow down economic growth?
  • What kinds of links between the state and society promote development?
  • What is the relationship between democracy and economic liberalism?
  • As more and more countries have embraced both political freedoms and market-oriented economic reforms, should one expect both to succeed equally?

Consider some comparative questions now.

  • Why have some countries industrialized faster than others?
  • Why do some countries do better at poverty alleviation than others?
  • Why have some countries been successful in solving the problem of food production, while others have not been?
  • Are their different paths to agrarian and industrial development?

Since the Second World War, an enormous amount of intellectual effort has gone into understanding these issues. Asia has been at the heart of much of this literature. We will compare and contract the various Asian countries and models of development around themes identified above.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 007, REC
Hist of European Integration

Instructor: Gaggio,Dario

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The construction of the European Union is arguably the most exciting and controversial political experiment today. This aims to introduce students from a variety of humanistic and social scientific backgrounds to the study of European integration and trans-national identity formation, viewed as contested and contingent historical processes. Rather than viewing the history of European integration as an inevitable, linear, and self-contained institutional movement envisioned by a handful of founding fathers and implemented by their followers, we will focus on the often contentious debates which have surrounded the practices and meanings of political and economic governance, citizenship, and cultural identity. Thus topics include not only a historical overview of the institutional innovations which have led from post-WWII reconstruction to the adoption of a single currency (the Euro) in 2002, but also a discussion of how Europeans have encouraged and resisted integrative processes at the levels of technological change, popular culture, and social movements. Particular attention will also be devoted to the evolving relationships between western Europe and the rest of the world, especially eastern Europe, the U.S., and the post-colonial countries.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 400 — Selected Topics in Political Theory
Section 001, REC
Work, Virtue, Citizenship

Instructor: Manuel,Anne M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

What is the relationship between the work you do and your capacity to be a good citizen? How does work shape citizenship in the contemporary liberal democratic context? We will look at political theory texts and a range of other kinds of texts (films, memoirs, etc.) to analyze this question. Linked to the LSA citizenship theme semester.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 101 or 301 or 302.

POLSCI 495 — Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory
Section 002, SEM
Advanced Topics in Democratic Theory

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Jennifer F; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

For the Winter 2007 semester we will focus on the concept of democracy.

  • What do we mean by the term democracy?
  • How democratic is the American political system?
  • What are the elements of American-style democracy that facilitate or resist "exporting" it to other parts of the world?

To address these questions, we will examine a wide range of democratic theory, paying particular attention the concept of popular sovereignty, the nature of republican governments, the necessity of popular participation, and the role of the rule of law in American politics. We will also examine historical and contemporary events in order to sharpen our theoretical insights and conclusions. This is a reading and writing intensive course designed for political science majors with a strong background in political theory. Class meetings will focus primarily on discussing the readings. Careful preparation and active participation is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing and concentration in Political Science

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 001, SEM
Are Americans Good Citizens?

Instructor: Brader,Ted; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

How well do Americans live up to expectations for citizens in a democracy? We begin by considering a range of perspectives on what democracy demands of citizens. We then review evidence on the actual political behavior of Americans to see how they compare to expectations. Over the course of the academic term, we consider what Americans know about politics, their beliefs and values, their level of civic and political participation, the quality of political discussion, and the manner in which they evaluate policies and political leaders.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 002, SEM
Supreme Court & Public Education

Instructor: Krislov,Marvin; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar will explore how law and policy interact in public education (both K-12 and higher), focusing on significant Supreme Court constitutional rulings involving race and/or religion. We will grapple with several questions:

  1. What theory of judicial review should the Court embrace?
  2. How are Court decisions made?
  3. What impact do Court decisions have on policy and practice?
  4. To what extent does (or should) the law limit policy options in these areas?

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 497 — Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Section 001, SEM
Comparative Constitutional Des

Instructor: Bednar,Jennifer L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Constitutions define the rules by which we are governed. When we write our constitution, we make a contract with one another and with our future selves; we define possibilities and we close doors. This course takes an interest-based approach to the study of constitution-building: through comparisons of nearly a dozen cases we will consider how founders balance short-term (adoption) and long-term (stability) goals. We will examine how different institutional structures create winners and losers in society, and how well founders understand the effect of their designs at the time of adoption. We will study compromises made, evaluating them in terms of both short-term and long-term goals (United States, Israel). We will study constitutional change, thinking about the advantages of meeting the changing needs of society, but also its drawback; the importance of consistency, reliability, legitimacy (Canada, France) We will look at cases where a constitution was imposed upon a society (Japan, Weimar Germany) and where a society borrowed another country's institutional design (Mexico, Argentina), to better understand how local interpretations affect the meaning of the constitution. We will consider the growth of legitimacy as a constitution evolves slowly, and is sometimes not even written (Great Britain, European Union). Many of our cases are federal: one knotty issue is asymmetrical arrangements between the center and the regions (Russia, Canada, European Union). Throughout the course, we will consider the role of courts, of legislatures, and of peoples as interpreters of the constitutional document.

Texts:

  • Constitutions and Political Theory. Jan-Erik Lane. ISBN: 0719046483. Manchester University.
  • The Anti-Federalist Papers and the Constitutional Convention Debates. Ralph Ketcham. ISBN: 0451625250. Mentor Paperback.
  • The Strategic Constitution. Robert Cooter. ISBN: 0691058644. Princeton.
  • The Federalist. Hamilton, Madison, Jay. ISBN: 0140444955. Penguin USA.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem, Theme

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 317 — Community Research
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Creekmore,Phillip M
Instructor: Levin,Dana S

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course involves a community based internship, readings, and a class seminar. The seminar and readings cover research methodologies useful when conducting research on, with and for communities. These include community needs assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. The community experience involves one visit per week to a community-based organization in Detroit to work on projects to improve the well being of children, youth and families. Projects can involve tutoring, developing outreach activities, or working in community education projects. Students in the course will work with one another on a research project designed to meet community interests. Results from this project will be shared with the community-based organizations and the university community through presentations and written reports. Transportation to the community internship is provided.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318/AMCULT 307 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

RCCORE 100 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Unteaching Racism

Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: Theme

Unteaching Racism has the following goals:

  1. to learn some ways that race, ethnicity, country of origin, gender, class, culture, and history have shaped relations between people of color and whites in the United States
  2. to come to grips with the ways that "blatant" and "subtle" forms of racism have shaped us all individually and personally
  3. to expand our knowledge of how racism is taught, learned, practiced and institutionalized
  4. to practice "un-teaching racism" in the local community

Through readings, videos, discussions, speakers, student presentations, and attempts to facilitate conversations in the community, we will look for answers to six broad, deceptively simple questions: What is race? What is racism? How are minority group identities assigned, chosen, and experienced? How significant is racism and stereotyping in the U.S. today? How do we internalize our society's racist assumptions and practices? How can we un-learn and un-teach racism?

Advisory Prerequisite: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

RCCORE 334 — Special Topics
Section 003, SEM
Community Empowerment Through the Arts: an Introduction to Theory and Practice

Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of community-based arts through readings, lectures, discussions, and hands-on work in the community. In the first six weeks of the semester, the course meets twice a week and students explore the field of community-based arts as a sociological, historical, and aesthetic movement. Readings for this section include selections from The Politics of Performance by Baz Kershaw, The Symbolic Construction of Community by Anthony Cohen, Utopia in Performance by Jill Dolan and Theatre of the Oppressed by Augusto Boal. Case studies of community-based visual and performing arts are also examined during this time. In the final eight weeks of this course, students observe and help facilitate arts projects at one of several of the Residential College's partner sites in Detroit, Ann Arbor, or Ypsilanti. During this time students also meet in the classroom once a week and learn the history and sociology of the populations with whom they are working. Students also learn basic techniques to facilitate group communication through creative expression.

RCIDIV 350 — Special Topics
Section 002, SEM
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

RCIDIV 350 — Special Topics
Section 004, SEM
Pills, Politics and the Public Good: Ethical Crossroads in the Pharmaceutical Industry. Meets 1/30-3/27. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 12).

Instructor: Greenspan,Henry

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

This course draws on current debates about ethical practice within the pharmaceutical industry with an eye toward wider questions about corporations, politics, and social responsibility.

Major topics include: A perceived "ethics problem" within the pharm industry, critiques of industry's relationship with the FDA, post-Vioxx concerns about drug safety, statutes shielding drug companies from civil liability (lawsuits), direct-to consumer advertising, direct-to-physician advertising (e.g., "drug reps"), industry-funded research and medical journals, paradigms for medical care that are not drug-centered.

The course will include a number of video excerpts and guest speakers, including representatives from industry, industry critics, the FDA, and practicing physicians. We will also be involved in a major program at the U-M Medical School featuring speakers who have been central in shaping national policy.

Requirements include attending 7 of 8 sessions and completing a series of one-page assignments. Students who want to explore these issues in greater depth (and receive 3 credits in total) may consider also taking RCIDIV 351.001: "Research Seminar on Ethics, Politics, and the Pharmaceutical Industry." The research seminar supplements the mini-course for interested students, but it is perfectly fine to take only the mini-course

This class is partly sponsored by the President's Initiative on Ethics in Public Life and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year. Many thanks to them!

RCIDIV 351 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Research Seminar on Ethics, Politics, and the Pharmaceutical Industry. Meets Jan. 22-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Greenspan,Henry

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Theme

This class supplements the mini-course, "Pills, Politics, and the Public Good: Ethical Crossroads in the Pharmaceutical Industry." It is intended for students who wish to delve more deeply into issues presented in that course through research projects supervised by the instructor. This is a class for people with initiative, independence, and a taste for adventure.

Hours to be arranged for maximum flexibility. Sessions will include whole class meetings, individual research consultations, and a variety of "field trips," most likely including visits with state legislators, industry lobbyists, consumer activists, patient advocates, physicians, research pharmacologists, company representatives, journalists, etc. We will have to be nimble.

There will be an emphasis on learning how to use fieldwork, informants, internet-based investigation, and other resources to explore questions in depth. Thus, a love of "following leads" will also be essential.

PREREQUISITES: Concurrent enrollment in RC IDIV 350.004,"Pills, Politics and the Public Good: Ethical Crossroads in the Pharmaceutical Industry" (or having taken that course in Winter '05) along with permission of the instructor (hgreensp@umich.edu) This class is partly sponsored by the President's Initiative on Ethics in Public Life and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year. Many thanks to them!

RCSSCI 315 — International Grassroots Development
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, SS
Other: Theme

What does "good development" mean to you? Do impoverished communities around the world need democracy? High quality "Western" medicine for all? Spiritual enlightenment? Debt forgiveness? High tech education? Liberation from U.S. corporations? Gender equality? A return to ancient values and practices? Equality on the world stage? Or to just be left alone?

In this course we will look at how different assumptions about the Global South drive conflicting solutions proposed by governments, aid agencies, religious groups, human rights activists, the business community, rebels, idealists, and grassroots organizations. Be prepared for lively discussion, a deep, personal examination of your own beliefs and values, lots of writing — and lots of help with your writing.

Junior or Senior status required. Some previous courses in economics, political science, anthropology, and/or lived experience in the Global South may be helpful.

RCSSCI 461 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Algebra Project: Education, Citizenship, and Community Organizing for Social Justice in the 21st Century

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the history, philosophy, and pedagogical practice of the Algebra Project. Founded by civil rights veteran and community activist Bob Moses, the Algebra Project is a math literacy program based on the principle that all children deserve an education that encourages and supports them in the development of the knowledge and skills necessary for 21st century citizenship. It draws on the lessons and legacy of the Civil Rights movement, and especially of the movement's "community organizing tradition." We will investigate this tradition and the broader movement history of which it was a part, studying how this history informed the founding and development of the Algebra Project. This will include looking at the ideas and influence of Ella Baker on the movement in general and on Bob Moses and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in particular. Our study of the Civil Rights movement will also focus on the Freedom Schools that activists organized during the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project ("Freedom Summer"). From there we will examine other theories of radical and liberatory educational practice before moving to an examination of current challenges, concerns, and crises in our public education system. All of this will provide the basis for our in-depth analysis of the Algebra Project as well as the Young People's Project (YPP), a youth-initiated and youth-led movement. The YPP has grown out of the Algebra Project to project and expand its vision of education, community organizing, and citizenship for the 21st century.

ROMLANG 400 — Topics in Romance Languages and Literature
Section 001, REC
Ethics in Public Life: Social Movements, Presidential Politics and Public Policy in Brazil. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24)

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse, Theme

Since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, diverse social movements have played a crucial role in shaping the return to democracy and defining the ethical basis of the new Brazilian republic. The new republic promised to transform Brazil's political process and social history from one of exclusionary authoritarianism, disguised discrimination, and inequality into one of political transparency, full citizenship, and social and economic justice for all. Yet with the consolidation of democratic institutions in the years immediately following promulgation of the 1988 constitution, these promises remained unfulfilled.

This course will examine the history of the interplay of social movements and national politics in Brazil's new republic, with the goal of understanding how the establishment of democracy has consolidated popular demands for a more just society and more ethical leadership — expressed clearly in each presidential election — and a political system and leadership that seem to breed corruption. We will also use the case of Brazil to address questions that are relevant to other republican systems: What is the role of ethics in contemporary republics? Must citizens be ethical in order for a republic to function effectively? Does political practice become more republican when ethics becomes the major issue of public debate, as it has in Brazil? Is it more effective to push for ethical politics, or for greater control by citizens over state power and institutions?

Flávio Limoncic is Associate Professor of History at Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO). A specialist in the twentieth-century political and economic history of Brazil, he has published widely in major Brazilian political and scholarly journals on the history of the automobile industry, fordism, civil society, contemporary political institutions, immigration, and ethnic identity.

SOC 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Leon,Cedric

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE
Other: Theme

Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between the constraints that affect large groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of people to transcend those constraints on the other.

In this course we will examine the ways in which race and ethnicity as social structures have impacted the lives of so-called minority groups both in the United States and abroad. We will also look at how race and ethnicity work in conjunction with other social structures such as class, gender and sexuality. To maximize our sense of what it is like to live life as a member of a racial or ethnic group, we will not only read sociology, but also conduct in-class exercises, analyze films, and read literary fiction.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

SOC 304 — American Immigration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: Theme

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

SOC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

SOC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme, Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

SOC 325 — Sociology of Service Learning
Section 001, SEM
Service Learning Leadership (for peer facilitators of SOC 389 seminars).

Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course aims to provide students with a basic understanding of the sociological theories relevant to community service learning, and the best practices developed by those who have done this kind of work over many years. Particular attention is devoted to the challenges and opportunities that students will face as peer-facilitators (PFs) in undergraduate service-learning classes — specifically, sections of SOC 389 (Sociology Practicum — Project Community).

Students in this course will concurrently facilitate a SOC 389 seminar. To apply for a peer facilitator position, please contact Amy Knife Gould, Acting Co-Director of Project Community. She can be reached at akgould@umich.edu or 734.647.8771.

Students who have taken Sociology courses, have participated in community service, and/or have experience facilitating groups should apply!

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 001, SEM


Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Project Community , in collaboration with the Sociology department, offers SOC 389, a service-learning course. Students combine approximately 4 hours of weekly service in community settings with weekly small-group, student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for dialogue, mutual support, planning, and problem-solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm paper/project, and a final paper/project.

Questions should be directed to the Project Community office, 1024 Hill Street, (734) 647-8771, pcinfo@umich.edu.

ALL STUDENTS MUST FIRST VIEW THE section descriptions on the Course Guide WEBSITE PRIOR TO REGISTERING for a SOC 389/Project Community section.

NOTE: All SOC 389 seminars will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, shelters, advocacy agencies, and family care organizations. For details, please see the specific section descriptions on the above website.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office. Please see the website for procedures and regulations around transportation.

A $50 lab fee is charged to all SOC 389 students for program costs.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 100, SEM
Thurston Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, Project Community volunteers will meet during the school day to assist teachers and staff with students at Thurston Elementary School, a K-5 Ann Arbor Public elementary school. Volunteers will spend some of their time assisting lunch staff with elementary students during their lunch and recess. Volunteers eat with the students at lunch and then accompany them to lunch recess where they help engage the students in fun, healthy, and safe outside recess activities. Some of the volunteers' time may also be spent assisting teachers in the classrooms with specific students, small groups, or even circulating to assist the whole class with projects and work. Volunteers may help with a variety of activities in the classrooms, such as reading, math, science experiments, and art projects. Volunteers who have special interests or skills, such as sports and games leadership, music, art or foreign language abilities, are encouraged to share these with Thurston students.

Students will be expected at site approximately 4 hours each week, (not including 10 minute drive time each way). Site times are from 9:00am-3:30pm, Monday-Friday. The school especially needs volunteers during lunchtime, from 11:30am-1:30pm. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 101, SEM
Pittsfield Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, students will work with children at Pittsfield Elementary School in Ann Arbor. They will be placed in a classroom, under the direction of that room's teacher. Their responsibilities may include: running reading groups, working with groups of children on class projects, math tutoring, and one-on-one instruction with children experiencing difficulty with the schoolwork.

Students will be required at site for 4 hours each week between 9:00am-3:35pm, Monday-Friday. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 102, REC
America Reads: Issues in Literacy — 2 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This section is intended for students earning work-study hours as America Reads tutors. The class will explore the current dilemmas facing the U.S. educational system, teach students to critically reflect on their regular interactions with elementary youth, and relate site experiences to the text material. The tutors will be asked to assess what they observe in their community work, what could be improved to create more effective learning environments, and how these changes could be made.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Overrides are given when a tutor applicant is hired. Students should apply to be a tutor at www.umich.edu/~mserve/areads.

Students enrolled in this section of SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar concurrent with participation as America Reads tutors. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 103, SEM
Detroit: Latino Family Services After School Program — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Latino Family Services (LFS) is a community agency that provides and coordinates comprehensive human services to residents of Wayne County with a particular emphasis on its Latino residents. Students in this section will be working with Latino Family Services in Detroit to assist elementary and middle school students in an after-school program focused on homework assistance, mentoring, and recreational activities.

Students will be expected at site one day each week. Site times include Mondays-Thursdays (on site 3:30-6:15pm). In addition, please allow ample driving time (approximately 1 hour each way). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 104, SEM
Detroit: Harding Elementary School — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This course will place students at Harding Elementary, a Detroit public school situated in a predominantly African-American community. Students will be tutors and mentors by assisting with homework and participating in creative activities with the children.

Students should be available 12-5pm for one day each week (select either Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday), which will allow time for driving to and from site, as well as the required 3 hours at Harding. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 105, SEM
Detroit: Vetal K-8 School- 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This class will place students at Peter Vetal School, a K-8 Detroit Public School situated in a predominantly African-American community. U-M students will be helping plan and lead a leadership-building program for 5th and 6th grade girls and boys. The program will focus on building behavioral skills and attitudes in areas such as respect, responsibility, self-motivation, ambition, and cooperation.

To fulfill site-related requirements for this section, U-M students will be expected at site once each week (at one of the times mentioned below) and should also plan to meet on campus for an additional hour of program preparation, outside of the class time. This additional hour will be scheduled (around students' other commitments) at one of the first seminars.

For the leadership program, the students will be separated by gender. For the girls' session, U-M students should be available on Thursdays 1pm-4pm, but for the boys' session, U-M students should be available Tuesdays 8:30am-11:30am (these times include driving time to Detroit). U-M students' responsibilities and roles include helping plan activities, helping lead the discussions/debriefing, and most importantly, being a role model (especially as a successful college student) for the children.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 107, SEM
Burns Park Elementary — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students will work in a school very close to the U-M campus with students who have difficulties with reading, writing and math due to at-risk factors, special education qualification, or cultural/language difficulties. They will work one-on-one, with small groups, or with whole classrooms of children from kindergarten to fifth grade on basic skills and school habits, and they will be a positive influence, role model, and mentor. The school population is culturally diverse and has largely well-involved parents.

Students will be expected at site for 4 hours each week. Site times are between 9:00am-3:30pm, Monday-Friday. The site would prefer students to do two 2-hour shifts, but one long shift can be accommodated. Also, the site would prefer not to have volunteers 11:30am-12:30pm daily, if avoidable. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 108, SEM
After School Program at Carrot Way Community Center — 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will help to develop and implement children's programs in Avalon's newly-built Carrot Way affordable housing development in Ann Arbor. Students will be expected at site once each week. The after-school program at Carrot Way is 4-7pm Mon-Th, (in order of highest to lowest priority are: Th, Wed, Tu, then Mon). Students in this section will need to sign up (on the first day of class) to go to site one day per week at that time. To allow time for traveling to and from site, students should be available 3:30-7:30pm on their selected day of service. Students may need to attend the initial orientation at a different time than their regular service time, but the orientation will be set (by the section facilitator and site contact) considering when students are available.

During the after-school program, students will help the young residents of the Carrot Way community (ranging K-8th grade) with homework, and then participate in an outdoor walk or arts & crafts activity. The participating children go to school in the Ann Arbor Public School system, primarily at Northside Elementary and Clague Middle School.

Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Avalon Housing, a non-profit community development corporation, provides housing and supportive services to extremely low-income residents in Washtenaw County. Many residents have mental and physical disabilities and the majority have been homeless. Avalon's "housing first" philosophy prioritizes permanent affordable housing and minimizes evictions to provide stability for its residents. Carrot Way is one of seventeen sites for Avalon, which is an organization in its 14th year of operation. Carrot Way has 30 units and maintains a focus on families. All support services are optional for residents.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 109, SEM
Detroit: The Guidance Center After School Program- 3 credits.

Instructor: Linder,Meadow J
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, students will be working with The Guidance Center at area schools in Downriver. The work students will do at their site will depend largely on the school where they choose to be placed. However, students can expect to do a mix of one-on-one tutoring with children, behavior management, recreational activity organization, group facilitation on healthy decision-making and violence prevention. Training on the curriculum will be provided to volunteers.

Students will be expected at site once each week from approximately 2:45-5:30pm on either Wednesdays or Thursdays (not including driving time). Each student will be able to select which day works best for him or her. Beyond this site time, there will also be opportunities to participate in Enrichment Activities for the mentees that are usually offered twice each month from 6-8pm (sometimes held during the day). These are cultural, educational, and fun activities; examples include movie nights, bowling, ice skating, and community service events. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 200, SEM
U-M Hospitals — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will interview for a volunteer placement within the University Hospitals Complex located on campus. Medical experience is not needed, but students will need to be comfortable initiating interactions with patients. Students will assist patients and hospital staff as appropriate. On nursing floors, tasks might include visiting with patients, transporting patients, answering call lights, joining families in waiting areas, and responding to floor staff or patient needs. In special units such as the Emergency area, Rehab, Burn, and others, volunteer tasks will vary according to need. Some students may be placed within Mott/Women's where placements include the Women's Health Resource Center, Pediatric neuro-rehabilitation, Pediatric occupational physical therapy, the sibling program, cancer treatment playroom, and bedside visiting and comfort. Overall, the hospital staff is very supportive of the program and will provide orientation sessions to help you learn more about your individual placement. An important asset is a sense of ease and warmth with others as well as the ability to initiate discussion and laughter. In addition, students should be prepared to observe and think critically about the experiences of patients within this health care system.

Students will be expected at site for 40 hours of service over the course of the term and will also be expected to attend the necessary orientation(s) at the beginning of the semester. Weekly site times will be established at the interview.

NOTE: First-year students may not volunteer at the hospital during their first semester because of Volunteer Services policy, so they may not enroll in this section of Project Community.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Amy Knife Gould, Acting Co-Director of Project Community, at akgould@umich.edu for permission to register. Requests for overrides will be accepted on or after November 13, 2006. Once permission has been given, names will be sent to UMHS Volunteer Services, so please be sure of your commitment to taking this course when requesting an override.

After requesting an override, students MUST contact UMHS Volunteer Services to schedule an interview and request an application packet. All of the materials must be completed before your interview. Any student with an incomplete application packet will be asked to reschedule their appointment. Proof of mumps, measles and rubella (MMR) MUST be provided at the time of the interview. Hospital placements fill up very quickly so the sooner you complete your paperwork and have an interview, the more selection you will have. Call volunteer services immediately. Please call (734) 936-4327 to schedule your interview. Questions about the paperwork and/or placements can be sent to UMHS.Volunteer@umich.edu.

NOTE: If the above procedures for contacting the hospital are not followed BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS, you will be asked to drop the class. You MUST have an appointment scheduled with UMHHS Volunteer Services before the first day of class.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 201, SEM
HOPE: Mentoring Youth for Health Occupations — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will be placed at Ypsilanti High School, East Middle School, and/or West Middle School to serve as assistants for the U-M HOPE (Health Occupations Partners in Education) Program. The overall mission of the program is to introduce and educate middle and high school students from the Ypsilanti Public School District to consider health and science professions, and to assist them in preparation for college. The overarching goal of this effort is to identify and nurture those individuals, minority and majority, who are interested in improving the health of minority and disadvantaged populations.

Each week, students will work with middle and high school youth assisting program staff with career interest assessments, study skills, college preparation and hands-on activities.

Students will be expected at site once each week. Options are 2:00-5:00pm Mondays, Tuesdays or Thursdays (includes driving time.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please include the name of the section in your email.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 202, SEM
Elderly: Sunrise Senior Living Community — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with elderly adults at the Sunrise Senior Living Community in Ann Arbor. Students may be matched with a resident in order to develop a relationship and identify a common area of interest to explore together. Students may work as a group to set up activities for some of the residents at Sunrise.

Students will be expected at site for 3 hours each week. Site time is flexible and can be arranged around the student's schedule. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 203, SEM
HIV/AIDS Education — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will focus on HIV/AIDS education through community outreach, testing, and office facilitation, coordinated by the HIV/AIDS Resource Center (HARC) in Ypsilanti (representing all of Washtenaw County). Students will have a choice to volunteer with an outreach van that is located throughout the community several times a week, in the office, or at the testing clinic. Students are encouraged to get a TB and Hepatitis B vaccination, but it is not required. Please note: Students who volunteer with the outreach van are responsible for meeting it at its locations. HARC cannot transport students from the HARC offices.

Students will be expected at site for at least 4 hours each week. Site times are flexible between:

  • Monday — Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm
  • Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 3:00pm-7:00pm
  • Tuesday and Wednesday, 6:00pm-9:00pm
  • Thursday, 7:30am-9:30am
  • Saturday, 10:00am-2:00pm

NOTE: All students registering for this section will be screened by the facility during training. Any student who is not serious about their interest in volunteering at HARC should choose another section.

NOTE: Students participating in this section MUST attend a 1-day HARC volunteer orientation and training on Saturday, January 20, 2007, 9am-5pm. Students who are unable to attend this training will be unable to participate in this section.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 204, SEM
SAWC: Homeless Outreach — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

This program is directed at the homeless men and women in Ann Arbor. Students in this section will work with the Shelter Association of Washtenaw County (SAWC) at one of their many shelter programs offering support to the consumers who access their services. The SAWC provides temporary shelter and supportive services in a safe and caring environment, and works with the community to allocate the necessary resources to meet the needs of people who are homeless. The SAWC currently operates the Robert J. Delonis Center, which has both men's and women's shelters within it. They have been providing support to homeless people since 1982, having grown out of a breakfast program in a church basement. Since then, their services for homeless people have grown significantly.

Students will be expected at site for four hours each week. Site times are flexible between 6:00am-11:00pm. Times can be arranged according to student schedules. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: In order to participate in the program, students must attend mandatory volunteer training, which is scheduled for Saturday, January 13, 2007, 1-5pm. You must give the facilitator your email address on the first day of class in order to receive the training packet to read before the training. Students who are unable to attend the training will be unable to participate in this section.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 205, SEM
SOS: After School Program for Homeless Children — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will serve as tutors for an after-school program run by SOS Community Services in Ypsilanti. SOS is one of the few shelters for homeless families in Washtenaw County. This after-school program includes children from 1st to 6th grade, who are homeless, or whose families are participating in services for homeless families at agencies throughout Washtenaw County. Students will act as both tutors and mentors, working with participants on a one-to-one basis with homework and other recreational activities after school.

Students will be expected at site on Thursdays from 3:30-6:30pm. (Please allow an additional 15 minutes each way for transportation.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

A SOS orientation and training is required for this course. The training date is Saturday, January 13, 2007, noon-4pm.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 206, SEM
University Health Service: PULSE — 3 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with PULSE (Peers Utilizing Leadership Skills for Education), a unique residential peer health education program sponsored by University Health Service, University Housing, and Office of Greek Life. PULSE is structured to offer support and resources for healthy decisions among the residents of South Quad, Couzens, East Quad, West Quad, Markley, and Lloyd Residence Halls and some Greek houses. Topics covered by PULSE include media literacy, eating and body issues, sexual health issues, alcohol issues, HIV / AIDS, social justice, nutrition, and more. The activities and interactions that advocates take part in can vary from small and spontaneous to orchestrated presentations in the residence halls.

The program holds weekly meetings of peer health advocates to educate them about important health issues and resources, reflect on peer interactions, brainstorm activities, and facilitate the health education of residents through the advocates. Logs are kept to keep track of the hours of direct service that advocates participate in each week.

Students are expected to attend weekly PULSE meetings and engage in direct service on campus for a total of 4 hours each week. There is also a mandatory 8-hour mid-term training.

NOTE: Participation in PULSE in determined through a nomination process within residence halls and Greek communities. If you are already a member of PULSE or were nominated by you residence hall advisor/Greek Leadership and intend to participate, you may register for this course. Nomination is a requisite for taking this course.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Chinyere Neale directly at 647-4659 for permission to register.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 207, SEM
Ozone House: Teen Shelter — 4 credits.

Instructor: Gilster,Megan E
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with Ozone House as a crisis-line volunteer. Ozone House is an agency dedicated to improving the situations of runaway, homeless, and at-risk youth age 10-20 and their families. The organization provides free and confidential services to at-risk and troubled youth.

To participate in this section, students must attend a mandatory orientation session and complete an application for legal purposes. The orientation is Friday, January 5, 2007 at 5:30pm at 1705 Washtenaw. After registering for this class, please contact Mia White at Ozone House and tell her you are from Project Community. She will provide you with further details. The phone number is 734-662-2265.

After attending orientation, each SOC 389 student must complete 40 hours of intensive training to be eligible to be a crisis line volunteer. If you do not complete all training sessions, you will not be able to volunteer at Ozone House. The training dates are as follows.

  • Wednesday, January 10, 6pm-9pm
  • Saturday, January 13, 9am-5pm
  • Sunday, January 14, 10am-6pm
  • Wednesday, January 17, 6pm-9pm
  • Saturday, January 20, 9am-5pm
  • Sunday, January 21, 10am-6pm

After training is completed, students in this section will be expected at site for one 3- or 4-hour shift each week. The possible shifts are 9:00am-1:00pm, 1:00-5:00pm, or 5:00-8:00pm, Monday-Friday, (no 5:00-8:00pm shift on Fridays).

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 300, SEM
Femtors: It's Great to be a Girl — 4 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In this section, undergraduate women volunteer as feminist mentors ("femtors") to work with girls at local area middle schools. The "It's Great to Be a Girl" program was designed by Carole Lapidos and Sally Wisotzkey as a continuance of their "Raising Strong and Confident Daughters" workshop for parents. The co-founders' hope was to provide adolescent girls with positive women role models to help them through their tumultuous middle school years. Chosen femtors organize and facilitate workshops over the course of ten weeks to build the confidence and expand the knowledge of the girls. The four major areas addressed are friendship, teasing and harassment, body image, and dream building.

Students will be expected at site from 2:00–5:00pm, Tuesdays. (Please allow an additional 25 minutes each way for transportation.) Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Femtors will be required to attend training that will occur during the first 3 meetings at site.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Carole Lapidos directly at (734) 668-7402 for permission to register.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

For more information about the screening process or any other aspect of the program, contact Carole Lapidos at carolelap@aol.com.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 301, SEM
Over the Rainbow: Working in the LGBT Community — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work directly with the University of Michigan's Office of Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender Affairs (LGBTA) to influence positive change and create alliances within topic areas affecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and ally community. Depending on their interests, students will be given the opportunity to focus on issues of concern to the LGBT community including education and outreach, event planning, political action and research, and HIV/AIDS programming. Educational objectives will include exploration of gender and sexual identity development in addition to community assessment and action planning around these identities. No previous experience is necessary, but students should be open-minded and enthusiastic about service around LGBT issues.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. Students in this section must participate in approximately four hours of site-related work each week. A student's regular site time will be negotiated when the seminar meets at the beginning of the term, when each student will be asked to share related interests and availability. For the course, students will also complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

This section is override-only. Students interested in enrolling should email Gabriel Javier, Assistant Director of LGBTA, at (javiergc@umich.edu). He will ask each interested student to respond to a few questions to determine if the opportunity is a good fit. If it is, an override will be processed, giving the student permission to enroll in the section.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 400, SEM
Juvenile Detention Center: Writing Tutors — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw Detention Center, a facility for juvenile boys and girls awaiting placement or release. Students will work with the English teacher to develop the youths' communication skills through creative writing exercises or one-on-one tutoring. While the teacher provides guidance throughout the term, the students are ultimately responsible for creating fun and useful exercises that teach the youth how to better express themselves on paper. Creative writing and strong English skills are very helpful, but are not necessary.

Students in this section must attend site once a week from 8:30am-noon. Students may choose which day of the week (Mon-Fri) that works best for their schedules. Students should add 20 minutes onto the site time for driving to and from site. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Due to volunteer requirements at the site, all students in this section must be at least 18 years old to participate. All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area. In addition, all students must show proof of a recent TB test before being allowed to serve at the site.

NOTE: This section is override-only. Interested students should contact Lisa Gottlieb at the Detention Center for a meeting. She can be reached via email at lgott@wash.k12.mi.us.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 401, SEM
Juvenile Detention Center: Recreation — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw Detention Center, a facility for juvenile boys and girls awaiting placement or release. Students will provide structured leisure time through both educational and recreational activities. Theater, music, athletic, confidence building, educational and/or art activities may be incorporated. In the past, we have also held debates, health and nutrition seminars, and sessions on job seeking skills. Students in this section provide positive role models and interactions for the youth, much like a Big Brother or Big Sister.

Students will be expected to go to site Mondays 3:30-6:30pm, (this includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area. In addition, all students must show proof of a recent TB test before being allowed to serve at the site.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 402, SEM
Prison (Men): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in teams to lead creative writing workshops at the Parr Highway Correctional Facility in Adrian on a weekly basis. The facility is a minimum-security prison that houses adult male prisoners who are serving short sentences, or will be eligible for parole within the next 18 months. At the prison, students will help inmates enhance their writing skills and creatively communicate their ideas. Students will be required to submit weekly creative writing assignments as well as fulfill other course requirements. In addition, the group will complete an anthology of inmate writing at the end of the semester that will be distributed to the participants at the prison. No previous experience is necessary.

Students will be expected to go to site on Tuesday evenings 5:30-9:30pm, (includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 403, SEM
Prison (Men): Debate — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in teams to lead a debate club at the Parr Highway Correctional Facility in Adrian on a weekly basis. The facility is a minimum-security prison that houses adult male prisoners who are serving short sentences, or will be eligible for parole within the next 18 months. At the prison, students will organize a weekly debate about a current topic, the goal of which is to strengthen communication skills and knowledge of current issues of both the students and the inmates. No previous debate experience is necessary.

Students will be expected at site on Wednesday evenings 5:30-9:30 pm (includes driving time). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site for approximately 4 hours each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 404, SEM
Jail (Men): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw County Jail, a facility for adult offenders, located in Ann Arbor approximately 10 minutes from campus. This section will be conducting creative writing seminars for male inmates in minimum-security blocks. No former creative writing experience is necessary, just enthusiasm and an open mind! Students will be expected to bring and share ideas to plan and facilitate the creative writing workshops.

Students will be expected at site 6:30-8:30pm on Mondays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 6pm on Mondays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 405, SEM
Jail (Women): Creative Writing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work at the Washtenaw County Jail, a facility for adult offenders, located in Ann Arbor approximately 10 minutes from campus. This section will be conducting creative writing seminars for female inmates in minimum-security blocks. No former creative writing experience is necessary, just enthusiasm and an open mind! Students will be expected to bring and share ideas to plan and facilitate the creative writing workshops.

Students will be expected at site 6:15-8:15pm on Tuesdays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 5:45pm on Tuesdays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 406, SEM
Jail (Men): Dialogue on Multiculturalism — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will examine the construction of race and class and how it is manifested in society. It is designed to take a look at Asian American, African American, European American, Hispanic/Latino(a), and Native American social groups present in the United States. They will critically evaluate how racial groups are represented in American society and there intersection with socioeconomic class. Some questions we will address are: How was race and class constructed in the United States? How is the construction maintained? What can we do as individuals to combat inaccurate representations of cultural groups in this country? An important component of this course includes participation and facilitation of a weekly in-service class located at the Washtenaw County Jail. Students will be required to lead discussions on race and class with male inmates at the facility. We believe that issues of race and class are pertinent issues that affect everyone. It is the intention of this course to create an environment that will embrace various viewpoints and seek to provide a deeper understanding of ourselves and others. The success of the course depends upon each individual's participation and willingness to be open, honest, and engaged in course materials and discussion.

Students will be expected at site 6:30-8:30pm on Tuesdays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 6pm on Tuesdays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 407, SEM
Jail (Women): Dialogue on Multiculturalism — 3 credits.

Instructor: Hughes,Nicole Michelle
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will examine the construction of race and class and how it is manifested in society. It is designed to take a look at Asian American, African American, European American, Hispanic/Latino(a), and Native American social groups present in the United States. They will critically evaluate how racial groups are represented in American society and there intersection with socioeconomic class. Some questions we will address are: How was race and class constructed in the United States? How is the construction maintained? What can we do as individuals to combat inaccurate representations of cultural groups in this country? An important component of this course includes participation and facilitation of a weekly in-service class located at the Washtenaw County Jail. Students will be required to lead discussions on race and class with female inmates at the facility. We believe that issues of race and class are pertinent issues that affect everyone. It is the intention of this course to create an environment that will embrace various viewpoints and seek to provide a deeper understanding of ourselves and others. The success of the course depends upon each individual's participation and willingness to be open, honest, and engaged in course materials and discussion.

Students will be expected at site 6:15-8:15pm on Mondays. Students must allow for driving time, beginning at 5:45pm on Mondays. Groups that arrive late to the facility may not be allowed to enter. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

NOTE: Students must be at least 18 years old to participate in this section, due to volunteer requirements at the site.

NOTE: All students registering for this section will have a background check run by the facility. Any student who thinks he or she may not be eligible to participate should choose a section in another program area.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar as well as participation at a designated community service site each week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, a midterm assignment, and a final paper/project.

If you have questions, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 500, SEM
Tutoring Elementary School Students — 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Participants in this section will work with elementary school students at Northside Elementary School in Ann Arbor. Students will primarily facilitate after-school games, art activities and other recreational programs with the children. Students will also assist in the after-school homework club with reading, arithmetic, and other assignments. The after-school club is 3:30pm — 6:00pm Tuesday-Friday. Students are responsible for volunteering twice per week. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 3:00pm on the days they volunteer. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm that will have as its focus and format, intergroup dialogue. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 501, SEM
Mentoring Middle School Students- 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work with middle and grade school students through the Peace Neighborhood Center in Ann Arbor. Students will assist with the after-school tutoring program and with other activities as determined by the Peace Center. Students are responsible for volunteering twice per week and will choose from the following: Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday from 4:00pm-6:00pm. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 3:30pm on the days they volunteer. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 502, SEM
Tutoring Middle School Students — 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will be placed at Clague Middle School to work with students in Language Arts, Science, American History, Social Studies, and Math. They will be in the classroom at the same time as a classroom teacher and will be under her/his supervision.

Students will be expected at site twice each week. Site times occur during school hours, 8am-3pm and will be arranged with the liaison from Clague Middle School. Students should plan on 4-6 hours of site time per week including transportation (15 minutes each way). Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Mondays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 503, SEM
UM Hospital: Reach Out and Read -— 3 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will work in pediatric waiting rooms at The Corner Health Clinic, the Ypsilanti Health Center, the East Ann Arbor Health Center, and the Briarwood Health Association. Volunteers will read with children before their appointments and maximize literacy activities in health care settings. Students will be trained to use innovative reading techniques. Weekly site times will be established at the interview, but students should expect to complete 4-6 hours of service each week. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

To register for this section, you must first contact Kyle Bavers (kkrause@umich.edu, 734-647-1121) for site information and hours. Kyle will then ask you to contact UM Hospital Volunteer Services to complete the screening process (UMHS.Volunteer@umich.edu, 734-936-4327). After completing these steps, an override will be processed for you to register for the course.

Students are responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Wednesdays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 504, SEM
University Living — 2 credits.

Instructor: Traxler Ballew,Aaron J
Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this section will help lead current events discussions with residents of University Living, an assisted living community focused on life-long learning. Volunteers will help facilitate discussions about current topics in the news and media in collaboration with University Living staff as well as participate in these discussions with seniors. Weekly site times are 2:30-3:30pm on Fridays. Students should allow for driving time, beginning at 2pm on Fridays. Transportation to and from site is provided by Project Community and coordinated through the section facilitator.

Students are also responsible for regular attendance in a weekly seminar — Wednesdays 4-5:30pm — which will have intergroup dialogue as its focus and format. Students will be asked to complete course readings and assignments as outlined in the syllabus.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 601, SEM
Campus Organizer Leadership Development — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will work together with other campus activists to develop concrete facilitation and organizing skills, learn about the broader context and history of campus activism, and make connections with leaders from other groups. Campus organizations are encouraged to nominate a team of members to participate.

Students who enroll will be responsible for at least four hours per week of work within their organization. The Organizing for Social Justice program area of SOC 389 emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within this section of the Organizing for Social Justice program area are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of organization-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule). In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

NOTE: Participation in this section is by override only. Students should contact Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu) for permission to register. In your email, please identify your student organization affiliations and explain why you would like to take the course.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 602, SEM
Community Organizing — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will be working with a variety of community organizations where they will participate in education and organizing work to help address quality of life and social justice concerns through organizing and activism. Past placements have included the Washtenaw County Workers' Center, Metropolitan Organizing Strategy Enabling Strength (MOSES), Lecturers' Employee Organization (LEO), Graduate Employee Organization (GEO), and other organizations in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and Detroit.

Although some of these sites may involve some direct service work, the Organizing for Social Justice program area of SOC 389 emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement. Seminars are arranged by topic area with a cluster of site options usually available within that seminar.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within Organizing for Social Justice are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of site-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule). In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

If you have questions about this section, please contact Joe Galura at jgalura@umich.edu.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 603, SEM
Math for Social Change — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

Students in this seminar will be placed in one of several urban middle schools where they will promote math literacy in after-school programs inspired by the Young Peoples' Project (YPP) component of Bob Moses' Algebra Project. The YPP approach is a unique synthesis of four elements: an experiential approach to math learning; a liberationist classroom pedagogy; the use of college-age students as trainers, and high school students as middle school math workshop facilitators; and an organizing approach to building student, parent and faculty commitment to improving the quality of math education. We will work as closely as possible with the YPP team based in Chicago, but will adapt their ideas to our situation as we judge necessary.

Math for Social Change takes its name from the fact that, following the YPP approach, it situates math literacy work in a larger context of empowering minority and working class students to demand and secure what they need to advance a 21st century civil rights movement for real economic opportunity. The YPP focus on organizing to bring about change at a systemic level, and to this end, on building on the community organizing tradition embodied in civil rights movement's Freedom Schools — these aspects of the approach make Project Community's Organizing for Social Justice program the appropriate home for these sites.

Like the other students enrolled in SOC 389's Organizing for Social Justice program, students in this section are responsible for attending the weekly seminar, Th 4-5:30pm, as well as participating at a designated community site four hours per week. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

Students enrolling in this section are encouraged to also enroll in Stephen Ward's new Residential College Social Science course (RC SSCI 461/CAAS 458), "The Algebra Project: Education, Citizenship, and Community Organizing for Social Justice in the 21st Century." The two courses compliment one another in many ways, and students enrolled in both will be eligible for special incentives.

If you have questions, contact Joe Galura (jgalura@umich.edu). Please refer to the specific section number about which you are inquiring.

SOC 389 — Practicum in Sociology
Section 604, SEM
STAND: Stop Genocide in Darfur — 3 credits.

Instructor: Vanalstyne,Andrew D
Instructor: Robinson, Ian

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr, Theme

Credit Exclusions: Up to four credits of SOC 389, and a combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396, may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology.

In their weekly seminar meetings, students enrolled in this section will analyze the dynamics surrounding the genocide, consider how students can educate, organize and mobilize to create change in such a situation, and discuss strategies for getting students and community members involved with Darfur action. With other STAND members, students will then act to implement STAND's program for that term.

This section is part of the Organizing for Social Justice program area within SOC 389. This program area emphasizes making change at a systemic level and developing a theory and practice of community organizing and civic engagement.

Like students enrolled in other program areas of SOC 389, those placed within this section of the Organizing for Social Justice program area are responsible for attending the weekly seminar (Th 4-5:30pm) as well as completing four hours of organization-related work per week (at times available in a student's schedule) for STAND. As part of this organizing work, students are expected to attend STAND's regular meetings. In addition, students will complete weekly readings and reflective journal assignments, two other assignments, and a final group project.

Students in this section must join the student organization STAND (Students Taking Action Now: Darfur) which seeks to stop the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan. For information on how to join STAND, go to http://uuis.umich.edu/maizepgs/view.cfm?orgID=10004732.

To request an override for this section, contact Amy Knife Gould (akgould@umich.edu). Please verify that you are a member of STAND on this campus.

SOC 410 — The American Jewish Community
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Schoem,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will examine the lively tension between tradition and change within the American Jewish Community as it reviews current issues and explores broadly the sociological literature on American Jewry. Students will first look at the broader context of American society, including issues of democratic values, religious freedom, and social stratification. The class will then examine the conflicts and struggles of American Jews as they strive to maintain themselves in a pluralistic society. In doing so, they will explore topics such as Jewish identity, intergroup and intragroup relations, group survival, relations with Israel and new understandings of diaspora, and community structure and organization. The course will be conducted seminar style with an expectation of active student participation, including discussions and presentations, as well as research and reflection papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in Sociology.

SOC 423 — Social Stratification
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sfeir-Younis,Luis Felipe

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

From its inception, a most fundamental concern of Sociology has been the search for an explanation of the social forces that generate and sustain economic, social, and political inequalities among individuals and groups in society. These inequalities promote not only differences in wealth, prestige, and power among these groups but also differences in their experiences and opportunities for a better life. On a more general level, these inequalities in large part determine the course of our history by having an important influence on government policies on issues such as war or peace, the growth or stagnation of our economy, and the future of our democracy.

This course introduces the student to the most important theoretical frameworks that sociologists have utilized to explain the origins, mechanisms, and processes by which these inequalities persist in society, whether it be inequalities of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disabilities. This course focuses both on inequalities in the United States as well as global inequalities.

UC 103 — Michigan Community Scholars Program: Academic Decision Making
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Woods,Wendy Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Theme

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review the roles of leadership and decision making as they relate to their academic and professional careers. It will allow students to consider various frameworks of decision making and leadership through various theoretical perspectives and link them to civic responsibility and social change. It is hoped that students will develop a sense of application of one or more of these perspectives and consider how they might shape their own academic, professional, and community leadership careers. The issues and challenges of living and leading in a multicultural society will be examined. The class discussions will focus on relevant research, student perceptions, and university resources. This course is open only to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program. http://www.lsa.umich.edu/mcs/

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission to the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 004, SEM
LUCY: The Lives of Urban Children and Youth Initiative

Instructor: Galura,Joseph A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme, FYSem

This service-learning course explores the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings through traditional coursework integrated with personal reflection and community involvement. We will study the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of children and youth. For example, how have community members helped to create and support positive roles for children and youth. Students will work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that shape social identity and expectations. This course is intended for students with an interest in teaching, or urban and community studies, or both.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 004, LEC
Difficult Dialogues: Faith Identities and Your Campus Experience. Meets March 9-10 and March 18, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 12).

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Theme

This course will provide an opportunity in a safe, inclusive space for students to explore their own thinking, histories, and beliefs around religion and spirituality. It will give students the opportunity to have honest conversations around the impact of religion and spirituality in popular, every day issues and for students to explore how power, privilege and oppression effect different religious and spiritual identities. Students from all spiritual or religious traditions (including those without spiritual practice) are encouraged to enroll. Our class discussions will be richer with a variety of faith perspectives represented.

One-credit minicourse meets March 9, 2007, 5:30-9 pm (includes dinner); all day March 10 & 18 (weekend sessions include lunch in the residence halls). Please contact Kelly Maxwell at kmax@umich.edu or 936-1875 for information on how to enroll.

Students interested in this course may also be interested in UC 170.005, World, Community, and Self: Building Skills and Knowledge for Intercultural Competence.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 005, LEC
World, Community, and Self: Building Skills and Knowledge for Intercultural Competence. Meets Jan. 28 and Feb. 3 & 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Feb. 2).

Instructor: Bessette,Jeanine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Theme

This introductory course is designed to encourage students to explore issues of social justice and social identity in the context of engaged citizenship. In a participatory, educational manner, students will examine themselves and others as they begin to navigate the University of Michigan campus and the rich diversity offered here. Students will learn skills such as how to communicate with others, how to manage and engage in conflict, how to explore values and opinions different than their own and how to reach beyond the United States for learning. Being in community and being an engaged citizen is not a given in our society — through this class, we will help students explore the richness of race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, etc., and the power and privilege in our society. Students are looking for opportunities to discuss and learn with people from diverse backgrounds — this course will give them the chance to do that.

Course Outcomes and Goals:

  • To provide a safe, inclusive space for students to explore their own thinking, histories, and beliefs around the concepts of social identity and social justice.
  • For students to have the opportunity to explore their role as citizens in a global context through personal reflection, experiential learning and selected pedagogy.
  • To introduce identity development models as a way for students to understand their own social identity development and the development of other individuals.
  • To give students the opportunity to have honest conversations around the impact of social identities in individual, institutional and structural systems.
  • For students to gain an understanding of how power, privilege and oppression have an effect on how individuals are viewed in society.
  • For students to explore values and beliefs in countries other than the United States and to understand the differences and similarities in the context of social justice work.

Course Requirements:

  1. Full attendance at all 3 course meetings: Sunday, 1/28/07, 5:30-8 pm; and Saturdays, 2/3/07 and 2/17/06, 10 am-5 pm.
  2. Attendance at one event that helps the student explore an issue that he or she has not been exposed to in the past. Event is discussed with instructor prior to attending.
  3. One project/assignment to be done outside of class — this project will be a group experience that allows the student to explore one of the following — social justice and public policy, social justice and the global impact, or a topic determined by the student relating to the goals of the course. The end result will be a paper of no less than 10 pages.
  4. Required readings.

Students interested in this course may also be interested in UC 170.004, Difficult Dialogues: Faith Identities and Your Campus Experience.

WOMENSTD 308 — Law and the Politics of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kirkland,Anna R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme

This course explores the legal regulation of sexuality in the contemporary U.S. We will explore how law both represses and encourages sexuality, examine how it does so, and ask why, and for whom? What kinds of sexual relationships or activities are illegal, and how do these legal statuses organize citizenship in our nation? We will study aspects of constitutional law, criminal law, family law, and employment discrimination law. Specific topics may include sexual orientation discrimination in employment, marriage and family, civil unions, sex work (prostitution), youth sexuality and statutory rape, social movement organizing, sexuality and citizenship in cross-national perspective, and the role of sexual morality in contemporary political debates.

WOMENSTD 343 — Special Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Human Rights & Social Justice Organizing in the U.S.

Instructor: Smith,Andrea Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Recently, social justice organizations, particularly those with a racial justice focus, have begun to work within a human rights frame. They regard human rights as a framework that challenges U.S. hegemony, and also provides an opportunity for U.S. based social justice organizations to make transnational linkages with social justice movements globally. This course would focus on case studies of social justice organizations in the U.S. that are utilizing a human rights framework to assess how the human rights framework impacts organizing around disparate social justice issues. In some cases, this framework helps U.S.-based social movements develop linkages transnationally with non-U.S.-based human rights groups. In some cases, this framework has led to transnational organizing limiting itself to U.N. fora and advocacy at the expense of other forms of transnational organizing. This course will look at what have been the benefits and the costs of building a U.S. Human Rights movement in terms of furthering the cause of social justice. The course will explore how social justice organizations have changed in their stance on human rights, and how they have addressed these initial critiques within their movements. The course will also include guest speakers from diverse social justice movements.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 363 — Asian/Pacific American Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in the United States. Texts and films include an introduction to materials by and about Asian/Pacific Islander American (APIA) women, from historical, anthropological, sociological, psychological, musical, and literary perspectives, thereby allowing students to compare and contrast the experiences of different ethnicities and generations. Discussions and assignments will examine the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality in APIA women's lives. Learning critical theories about feminism, immigration, and globalization will show how APIA women have become agents of social change, publicly and privately, at home and in their communities. For the term project, students will have the option of writing an oral history research essay, OR doing a creative project, OR volunteering with New Visions: Alliance to End Violence in Asian/Asian American Communities.

 
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