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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Reqs = ULWR
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 331 — Introduction to Arab Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed to give students an extensive survey of the cultural characteristics of the Arab world by situating the practices and traditions of the Arab world into their own unique setting. The material chosen, both for the lecture and for reading, focuses on issues of ethnic diversity that define the Arab world in particular and place into a greater multi-cultural realm. Special attention will be given to family, gender relations, national and religious minorities, East-West cultures and relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arabic art and music. The course material will be explored through lectures and videos supported by listening and viewing guides in addition to discussion based upon the assigned readings. In both their writings and in the class discussions, students discuss the meaning of culture and ethnicity and how misunderstanding these principles can lead to forms of stereotyping, intolerance, and racism. There will be emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Moreover, the course is accompanied by an interactive website utilizing the UM Course Tools Software. Grades will be based upon class participation, short essays, and a final project. Material: Course pack and website.

AAPTIS 474 — An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

In the period under discussion (16th-20th Centuries), Armenian literature flourished mostly in the Armenian dispersion. Alongside traditional literature in Classical Armenian, there had long emerged a new, secular literary trend, expressed in Middle Armenian. Responding to a growing national awareness, Armenian writers in the 19th century revised some of the principal elements of Armenian identity and placed a greater emphasis on its political aspects. Such trends and many innovative ones continued into the 20th century, but the Genocide of 1915 brought Western Armenian literature to an abrupt end. This tradition survived in the post-Genocide dispersion, at the same time as a new literature began to emerge in Soviet Armenia. This course will focus on a wide range of issues that reshaped Armenian letters in the modern period: from recovered and fresh ideas, renewed awareness and genres throughout the 16th-18th centuries, to the clash, in subsequent centuries, of old and new values; identity, legitimacy and continuity; nationalism, nationhood, and literary reactions to violence; and cultural, aesthetic and social concerns, all against a historical background.

AMCULT 345 — American Politics and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Meisler,Richard A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

Studying current political controversies and social problems will stimulate the search for insight into deeper questions of politics and society. We will follow selected political and social issues using newspapers, magazines, electronic and entertainment media, and the Web. There also will be readings from more scholarly sources in the social sciences. Students will write papers, do class projects, and participate in discussions. There will be frequent quizzes. Class attendance is required, and classes will be devoted to discussion, conversations with guests, and occasional films.

ANTHRARC 386 — Early Civilizations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wright,Henry T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, SS

The earliest civilizations in both Eastern and Western hemispheres are the focus of this course. The civilizations of most ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Mexico, and Peru will be points of emphasis. The course begins with brief discussions of the work of archaeologists, of the evolution of complex societies, of the spread of human populations in the planet's many environments, and the beginnings of our agricultural systems. We then consider the geography, economic and political development, and ideologies of each early civilization, based on archaeology and the evidence of the earliest written texts. No special background is assumed. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week. The textbook is IMAGES of the PAST by Gary Feinman and T.D. Price, McGraw-Hill, For those with further interests PATTERNS in PREHISTORY by Robert Wenke and Deborah Olszewski, Oxford University Press, may be of interest. There will be electronic resources and in-class handouts. There will be In-Class Midterm and Final Exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ARMENIAN 416 — An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

In the period under discussion (16th-20th Centuries), Armenian literature flourished mostly in the Armenian dispersion. Alongside traditional literature in Classical Armenian, there had long emerged a new, secular literary trend, expressed in Middle Armenian. Responding to a growing national awareness, Armenian writers in the 19th century revised some of the principal elements of Armenian identity and placed a greater emphasis on its political aspects. Such trends and many innovative ones continued into the 20th century, but the Genocide of 1915 brought Western Armenian literature to an abrupt end. This tradition survived in the post-Genocide dispersion, at the same time as a new literature began to emerge in Soviet Armenia. This course will focus on a wide range of issues that reshaped Armenian letters in the modern period: from recovered and fresh ideas, renewed awareness and genres throughout the 16th-18th centuries, to the clash, in subsequent centuries, of old and new values; identity, legitimacy and continuity; nationalism, nationhood, and literary reactions to violence; and cultural, aesthetic and social concerns, all against a historical background.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 001, SEM
Theories of the Post Colonial

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Over the last two decades, postcolonial studies has had a significant impact on how literary critics, anthropologists, and historians analyze colonial relationships and the political and cultural legacies of colonialism. This course introduces students to the key concepts, methods, and debates in the field and explores their relevance to Asian studies. Topics to include: Orientalism and its critics, anticolonial nationalisms, nation and gender, subalternity and representation, colonial and postcolonial modernity, globalization and diaspora, the political and intellectual stakes and contexts of the field of postcolonial studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 002, SEM
Crit Approach to Asian Studies

Instructor: Zwicker,Jonathan E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Intended to familiarize students with major theories of interdisciplinary study in literature and history and provide a critical context for the study of Asia. We will think about how critical models and methods can broadly inform work on Asian history, literature, and cultural studies and how these tools can be brought to bear on archival material in the research collections of the University of Michigan.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

BE 440 — Risk Management and Insurance
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Huntington,Curtis E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

Background and Goals: This course is designed to allow students to explore the insurance mechanism as a means of replacing uncertainty with certainty. A main goal of the course is to explain, using mathematical models from the theory of interest, risk theory, credibility theory and ruin theory, how mathematics underlies many important individual and societal problems.

Content: We will explore how much insurance affects the lives of students (automobile insurance, social security, health insurance, theft insurance) as well as the lives of other family members (retirements, life insurance, group insurance). While the mathematical models are important, an ability to articulate why the insurance options exist and how they satisfy the consumer's needs are equally important. In addition, there are different options available (e.g. in social insurance programs) that offer the opportunity of discussing alternative approaches. This course may be used to satisfy the LSA upper-level writing requirement.

Alternatives: none Subsequent Courses: none

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, junior standing, and permission of instructor.

CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Race and Class in Detroit

Instructor: Lacy,Karyn R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This research seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of urban culture and representations of the city by Black people in the United States. Beginning with the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago and ending with the Los Angeles riots/uprising in 1992, the course emphasizes the transition from a utopic (though ambivalent and racist) view of the city in the 19th century to a harshly racialized and apocalyptic view of urban life by the end of the 20th century.

In this course, we will address such ideas as the racialization of urban space, the gendering and racialization of poverty, cultural articulations of "ghetto life" in Black texts, and the production and consumption of urban cultural forms like hip hop and public graffiti.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Building Black Communities

Instructor: Quinn,Kelly Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

In Building Black Communities, we will examine how African American women, men, and children created, maintained, negotiated, and performed community life historically, with an emphasis on the period from the Reconstruction to the dawn of the 21st century. We will consider how African Americans have contended with internal and external tensions and challenges. And, we will explore various strategies of self-determination as we engage such subjects as protest, migration, urbanization, and modernity. Our readings and lectures will take us to "real" and imagined in places such as Atlanta, Georgia; Birmingham, Alabama; Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Michigan; Mississippi Delta; New York, New York; Richmond, California; Richmond, Virginia; and Washington, D.C. Through our class discussions, small group activities and other assignments, we will investigate primary sources including maps, music, letters, photographs, architectural plans, and the built environment. Additionally, this course may include at least one field trip and one evening performance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CHEM 495 — Professional Development in the Chemical Sciences
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Gland,John L; homepage
Instructor: Roll,Mark Francis

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR, BS

A "studio" format course for students in the chemical sciences wishing to enhance their writing, speaking, and analysis skills. The course includes critical analysis and proficiency of written and oral communication and an introduction to the multi-faceted features of professional life.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 461.

CLCIV 480 — Studying Antiquity
Section 001, LEC
The Worlds of Alexander the Great

Instructor: Schmalz,Geoffrey C R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

This course is devoted to exploring the conquests and worlds of Alexander the Great — the worlds of the East that he encountered and conquered, and the new Greco-Persian world that he attempted to create before his early death. It is also about the ‘Internal World' of Alexander himself: the conflicting bibliographic portraits (ancient and modern) of the Great Conqueror in hagiographic terms as a humane and gentle man, and a man of divine destiny and power (a ‘New Achilles'); or as a brilliant but deeply flawed individual, an increasingly delusional victim of his own success, and even a disassociative drunk. The course takes a source-based approach, with a close and comprehensive reading of the two principal ancient biographies of Alexander, Arrian's Anabasis (representing the ‘Official' Alexander tradition) and Curtius Rufus' History of Alexander the Great (representing the ‘Unofficial' or ‘Vulgate' tradition); supplemented by selective fragments of the earliest Alexander sources. Along the way we will also explore the physical and cultural world of Alexander and his legacy for the Hellenistic East, with readings from Michael Wood's In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great.

Enforced Prerequisites: Open only to concentrators in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology, Classical Language and Literature, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Modern Greek.

COMM 351 — Structure and Function of Media Systems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines research and scholarship focused on existing media institutions, their genesis and current lines of development, institutional arrangements, organization and operation, economic structure, and characteristic communications "output." Course topics may include: the history of media systems; media and government, including legal, regulatory and free-expression issues; media economics; international media systems; technologies; media organizational routines; and the values and behavior of media professionals. The course investigates the ways in which institutional, economic, and organizational arrangements affect professional behavior and media content, with attention to media system changes over time and in comparative contexts. May not be repeated for credit.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 361 — Processes of Mediated Communication
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Campbell,Scott Walker

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines general phenomena involved with the creation, dissemination, and reception of mediated information. Course topics may include: information processing, including message encoding and decoding; media priming and framing of evaluations and decisions; influences of message structure and communication modalities on processing; media use and reception, including interpretive processes; information flow and control, focusing on influences of communication networks, message diffusion, and information gate-keeping; and communicative processes of learning, persuasion and social influence. The emphasis is on the development and testing of general theories explaining how mediated communication works, even though research examined will center on particular cases (e.g., studies of priming in political communication). May not be repeated for credit.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 371 — Media, Culture, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Vaillant,Derek W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course explores social and cultural approaches to the study of mass communication. Course topics studied may include: communication and social identity, including race, ethnicity and gender; media's role in defining and reflecting culture; the equity of community, state, and worldwide information systems, including debates over the "new world communication order," post-colonialism, and globalization; media audiences as interpretive communities; media and social movements; and the role of media in altering and maintaining political and social order. Research on mass communication is examined in connection with broader questions about the relations between cultural systems and social formations, and about the dynamics of social and cultural change and contestation.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 381 — Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Greenwood,Dara N

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course critically evaluates research and scholarship focused on the impact of mass communication in a variety of substantive domains including the impact of media on knowledge, social values, and behavior. Policy applications of media effects research and the use of mass communication in public information campaigns are also reviewed. Media impact is treated both in theoretical and applied terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: social values; educational development; political behavior; violence and aggressive behavior; consumer behavior; and public opinion. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMPLIT 490 — Comparative Cultural Studies
Section 001, SEM
Conflict of Interpretations

Instructor: Clej,Alina M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course proposes to familiarize students with different, and sometimes conflicting ways of reading and representing stories and events. We will discuss well-known cases, such as Shakespeare's The Tempest, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, as well as the various interpretations or translations these works have received over time in different cultural settings. This exploration will allow us to better understand the production of cultural works — Shakespeare's Tempest and Conrad's Heart of Darkness, for instance, are themselves complex literary interpretations of other texts and historical events — and their reproduction and diffusion through re-writing, translation, and transposition in a different medium (e.g., film).

Literary works include:

    Shakespeare, The Tempest;
  • Aimé Césaire's A Tempest;
  • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre;
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea;
  • Conrad, Heart of Darkness;
  • Nabokov, Lolita, and
  • Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Teheran.

We will also discuss cinematic interpretation of these works, such as:

  • Peter Greenway's Prospero's Books,
  • Francis Coppola's Apocalypse Now, and
  • Stanley Kubrick's Lolita.

Evaluation will be based on regular attendance and participation in class discussion, keeping a regular reading and viewing journal, a midterm assignment, and a final paper. Students from all disciplines are welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ECON 490 — Current Topics in Economics
Section 001, LEC
Beyond Business Cycles

Instructor: Kimball,Miles S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Analyzes the medium-run and long-run response of the economy to technology shocks, preference shocks, and shocks to government policy (especially capital and labor taxes and government purchases). This class will satisfy the upper-level writing requirement, based on short weekly papers relating the theory in the class to current issues. The draft syllabus gives more detail.

Wolverine Access may list the class as CLOSED, but I expect to be able to admit everyone who wants to take the class, since many students may drop when they see how rigorous the class is. Please look carefully at the syllabus to see if this class is right for you, then just show up on the first day of class.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405.

ECON 492 — World Economic History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chabot,Benjamin Remy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Examines the causes and consequences of world economic development. Topics include: the effects of the agricultural and industrial revolutions, law, global integration, and finance on economic growth and standards of living.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 406

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 001, SEM
Applied Micro Modeling

Instructor: Salant,Stephen W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This seminar will illustrate how elementary microeconomic tools can be used to illuminate observed real-world phenomena and to evaluate alternative policy interventions. Each student will complete a problem set and writing assignment. In addition, students will be required — as part of a team of three — to investigate in depth a single local, national, or international topic. Students on the same team who want to use their project toward honors will be encouraged to focus on different aspects of the overall topic. Students will choose from a list of topics either suggested by the instructor or by students in the class. A preliminary list of suggested topics will be available at the first meeting and it usually evolves during the first weeks of the seminar.

Students interested in enrolling in ECON 495 must submit an application. Applications are available on Economics Department's website.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 495 — Seminar in Economics
Section 002, SEM
Evaluation of Social Programs

Instructor: Smith,Jeffrey Andrew; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course will consider the evaluation of social programs, such as job training programs for the disadvantaged, marriage promotion programs and drug use prevention programs from an economic perspective. The first part of the course will consist of lectures that introduce the basics of econometric program evaluation. The remainder of the course will consist of seminar style presentations and discussions of academic papers and government reports.

Students will write a literature survey reviewing the evaluation literature on a specific program; in so doing, they will both learn how to write a serious analytic literature survey and learn about the particular program they choose to study.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 404 or 405

ECON 496 — History of Economic Thought
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course treats the development of economics from its origins to the near present. The aim of the course is to deepen understanding of some contemporary economic questions by examining how they have arisen and been answered and debated in the history of economic thought.

The first half of the course provides an overview of economic thought with the most attention paid to classical political economy from Adam Smith through Karl Marx, and to the neoclassical economics of W.S. Jevons, Léon Walras, and Alfred Marshall. The remainder of the course this term is devoted mainly to the history of macroeconomics beginning with John Maynard Keynes and through the twentieth century. The main textbooks for the course are The Ordinary Business of Life: A History of Economics from the Ancient World to the Twenty-First Century by R. Backhouse (Princeton 2002) and Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State by B. Snowdon and H. Vane (Elgar 2005).

The course situates the history of economics in broader contexts. Attention is especially focused on the scientific status of economic theories as well as on their relation to policy and normative questions.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 001, SEM
All Things Considered

Instructor: Kowalski,Rosemary Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

We write well when we write about subjects that interest us. We also write well when we write about subjects in which we have a fair amount of expertise. With these ideas in mind, this course, to a large extent, will be determined by the students in it. It will, of course, have page limits, deadlines, grades?, but the class readings and the paper topics will be decided by the students (with a lot of feedback and advice from me and other members of the class). Come prepared to state your special interest(s), suggest at least one substantial text (essay, book or film) for the class to read on that interest from which all of us can learn and profit, and propose a sequence of essay assignments for yourself and your area(s) of interest. Be prepared to do a lot of writing and revising of your work and to have your work reviewed by others in the class.


ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 003, SEM
Life-Stories

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

This course engages students in the practice of writing life-stories. Students read a range of autobiographical essays while developing their own versions of the form; smaller assignments culminate in a larger personal essay due by the course end. In addition, students facilitate life-writing exercises with a group of fifth-graders in a Detroit school; involving five trips total, from the 4th through the 9th week of the term, the school visits take place on Fridays (students choose either a morning or afternoon session; either way, the course requires a Friday time commitment). In class and in writing, students reflect deeply on this community work and their life-writing experiences, and comment on parallel essays by writers such as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How might differences in race, gender, ability, and sexual preference inform life-stories? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? How do writers shape the material of their lives into essay form? Course grade is based on a reflective journal of responses; three (4-page) analytical papers; three (4-page) personal writings; and the larger 10-page personal essay due by the course end; the final paper may be drawn from prior personal writing; it also goes through multiple drafts and is peer-reviewed by the class at large. Course readings are from a collection of personal essays (such as Phillip Lopate's or Dinty Moore's), and/or a supplementary course packet (estimated cost $50).

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 004, SEM
THE DWARF, THE DEMON, AND THE DIVIDED SELF

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during winter break. The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 005, SEM
THE DWARF, THE DEMON, AND THE DIVIDED SELF

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us to make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during winter break. The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 006, SEM

Instructor: O'Keeffe,Patrick P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 007, SEM
The Art of the Personal Essay

Instructor: Adler,Peggy Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

In this seminar, you will work to bring to the page what no other artist has: your own way of phrasing, your own way of observing, your own history that shapes your lens. What do you remember most vividly? What do you most vividly forget? Where does the line blur between fact and fiction, and how can you walk this line as a tightrope, mining deeper truth? As writers, you will be asked to use writing as a shovel, excavating meaning in your lives. This class functions as a workshop with an emphasis on revision, and is designed to give you the and tools you need to realize your own intentions and reach an audience. We will read as writers; contemporary essays are our texts, including works by Joyce Carol Oates, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Judith Ortiz Cofer, Amy Tan, John McPhee, David Sedaris, and many others. Because workshops are based on the responsibility we have to each other as writers, punctuality, attendance and participation are essential to your success in this class in which you will write four revised essays, exploring different forms of personal narrative.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 008, SEM

Instructor: Harp,Nicholas Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course, in advanced essay writing, pushes past the familiar academic genres of position papers and literary analysis and calls for students to develop significant works of narrative non-fiction (or creative non-fiction). Simply put, this writing style combines the obligations of essay writing (research, economy, accuracy) with the craft of literary writing (narrative, metaphor, and emotional resonance).

Using discussion, workshops, in-class exercises, and a variety of written examples, we will explore an array of techniques useful for creating and amplifying these works. Students should expect to write and revise (work through subsequent drafts) three essays of increasing length, complete and comment on regular readings, and be prepared to discuss each other's work in a demanding but spirited forum.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 009, SEM

Instructor: Ralph,Alexander Luria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 010, SEM

Instructor: Cicciarelli,Louis A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 011, SEM

Instructor: Talpos,Sara Kathleen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 012, SEM

Instructor: Hinken,Michael Allen

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Literature and the Law

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.

Book cost: under $100 for new copies and course pack; less for used.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Graphic Narrative

Instructor: Rabkin,Eric S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

Untitled Document

Graphic Narrative is a general term for Comic Books, Graphic Novels, Manga, Bandes Dessinées, Novelas Em Quadrinhos, Sequential Art, and even the Bayeux Tapestry. This seminar enrolls both advanced undergraduates (in ENGLISH 417 Senior Seminar, 4 credits) and graduate students (in ENGLISH 549 Contemporary Literature, 3 credits). We will use both primary and secondary readings to explore the modern history and theory of the field, the sociology of the field, and a rich assortment of excellent examples of many literary types within the field.

The written work consists of a daily reading journal, a shorter essay (1500-2400 words, which is approximately 5-8 double-spaced pages of text depending on font size and margins and excluding included images) and a longer essay (3000-4500 words, which is approximately 10-15 pages). In all three assignments, students are expected to consider both the form and the content of the materials read and to strive for insights that go substantially beyond the discussion in class. The shorter essay should be on a graphic (not chapter) children's book, and the longer essay should be either on some general aspect of graphic narrative (e.g., the use of framing, the use of thought bubbles, the use of color, the techniques of visual allusion, palimpsest, collage, the varieties of irony, the relations between drawing style and meaning, the handling of a specific theme, the uses of a specific image, cultural constraints on meaning, etc.) or on some aspect of the work of a single important graphic narrative artist, series, or genre. These essay projects require reading beyond that in the syllabus and consultation with and permission of the instructor. In the reading journal, students are expected to record

  1. any extrinsic details potentially relevant to a critical discussion of the work (including at least type of work, name and nationality of writer and/or illustrator, date and place of publication, publisher, format),
  2. observations as one reads, including page references and quotes (which may need to include photocopies), and
  3. conclusions and/or hypotheses and/or questions that seem noteworthy after reviewing (a) and (b) and perhaps the work as well.

The journals should be hand-written with two-inch margins all around because these journals will be exchanged at the beginning of each class meeting, read by a fellow student, and the contents commented on in the margins. The journal should be kept in a spiral-bound notebook into which can be glued copies of graphics if needed. Students should use these journals not only as a record of their reading of syllabus materials but also of any other course-related materials, and as a place to keep class notes and to record and sometimes work out essay topic ideas. When the journals are submitted at the end of the term, they should be accompanied by a printed, double-spaced, two-to-three page self-analysis of the worth (both educational and in terms of grade) of the journal to the student. The course grades will be based on participation (25%), journal + self-analysis (25%), children's book essay (20%), general essay (30%).

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Great American Novel

Instructor: Blair,Sara B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is designed to think about the novel in America: more specifically, how the novel, as a literary form and a cultural institution, has taken part in significant debates about the meanings of culture and citizenship over the course of the nation's history. Beginnings with the context of antebellum American and associated debates about slavery and ranging up through fiction in the contemporary U.S., we'll consider a number of novels whose matter and manner of telling stories raise questions about enfranchisement and belonging, political representation and self-representation, social being and the art of the novel. This not a survey of American novels; rather, we'll focus on an unusually small number of texts in order to make intensive exploration of the historical and aesthetic contexts to which they respond. More broadly, the course is designed to help students sharpen and develop particular skills: use of archival materials; engagement with literary critical traditions; close literary analysis.

Our texts will be drawn from among such nominees for the status of "great American" novel as: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Henry James, The Golden Bowl; William Faulkner, Light in August; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Susan Choi, American Woman; Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex.

Requirements will include a writing portfolio, comprised of four 5-7 page essays and exercises for developing them; discussion leading with other class members; and a final project or exam.

Please note: all students interested in enrolling must attend the first two class meetings. For further information, please contact sbblair@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 004, SEM
U.S. Language Politics and Literature

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course approaches literature and literary theory from the perspective of language politics. We'll read and discuss historical documents and literary criticism on the symbolic importance of language mixture and invention in literature and in national culture. We'll consider the literary significance of questions such as:

  • Is there an official language of the United States? What is a language "standard"?
  • How are languages and speech forms racialized?
  • Are there legitimate and illegitimate (forms of) languages?
  • Who or what lends prestige to certain forms of language and denies it to others?
  • Why are bilingualism and multilingualism often viewed as threatening?
  • What do vernacular speech forms convey and conceal?

We will read a range of historical and theoretical readings about language policy and literary cultures. These issues raised by these readings will inform our discussions on twentieth-century U.S. short stories, novels, films, and the literary politics of language. Course requirements will include brief reading responses, in-class presentations, and two essays (one short, one long). Students must attend the first two class meetings or contact the professor in order to remain in the class.

This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Writing from Life — Baldwin, O'Connor, Cheever, and Maxwell

Instructor: Byers,Michael Denis

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the interaction of life and art in the works of four twentieth century writers, James Baldwin, Flannery O'Connor, John Cheever, and William Maxwell. In addition to examining — and in some cases trying on — these authors' fictional techniques, we will also be investigating the ways in which the circumstances of each writer's life found themselves translated into, or excluded from, the fiction he or she produced. Reading will consist of fiction, essays, autobiography, biography, letters, and journals. Requirements include one finished short story in the style of one of the four authors, one major analytical essay, and reading responses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 428 — Senior Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Taylor,G Keith

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

This course is a thesis tutorial exclusively for undergraduate students who are in their last year of the Creative Writing Subconcentration and have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 223, 323, and 423/429. Permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 482 — Studies in Individual Authors
Section 003, REC
Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

ENGLISH 496 — Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis
Section 001, SEM
HONORS

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

This course meets once a week for an hour. It is designed to help the cohort of thesis writers with the kind of problems that are likely to arise in the late phases of thesis composition. While ENGLISH 496 is a comparatively informal continuation of ENGLISH 492, students are required to attend these sessions. The course is taught by a number of the faculty working in the Honors program, who take turns guiding each week's meeting.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 350 — The Built Environment: Introduction to Landscape Change
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Michener,David C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The content of this course is broad, but critically important for helping informed citizens learn to look at the things we build and the spaces we inhabit. Built environments affect our entire lives, yet we rarely focus on their influence. This course bridges the natural science, social science, and humanities realms anticipated in the Program in the Environment. Course lectures and readings emphasize breadth over depth. Student case study work, however, will develop depth in particular landscape topics.

This course is an introduction to the role of humans in shaping the built environment. It explores physical design and cultural meaning at various scales and contexts in the landscape. We explore the power of physical design and planning to enrich the human spirit, provide functional needs, interpret cultural history, and sustain natural systems. The course is concerned with exploring how Americans shape space and how, in turn, space shapes people. We take a topical approach, dealing with different aspects of landscape change, design, and planning. The course illustrates how humans have adapted and shaped landscapes for functional and aesthetic goals. A unifying theme is emphasized throughout: the important link between natural and social processes of landscape change. Landscape design and planning professional skills will not be taught directly; the goal is not to prepare students for landscape architecture practice. This course, however, is designed to encourage students to think about land from many different perspectives. Prepare to think, talk and write about villages, mobile homes, theme parks, shopping malls, freeways and farms, among other built forms. You will be asked to consider many aspects of these diverse places — economic, social, historical, political, and ecological.

Three exams per term. Five assignments, including a semester-long journal exercise and four other exercises that have two to five pages of writing each.

Intended audience: Sophomores and Juniors in the Program in the Environment, or elsewhere in LSA. The course should appeal both to students interested in environmental literacy generally, and to those following specific environmental career tracks.

FRENCH 461 — Reading of Old French Texts
Section 001, REC
Introduction to Medieval Literature, 12-13c

Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Crusades and courtly love, King Arthur and the grail — these are some of the subjects of twelfth- and thirteenth-century literature and of this class. We will read medieval epics, romances, poetry, and short narratives. Some of these are quite beautiful, some are quite weird. Readings and discussion in modern French, though some secondary reading assignments may be in English, and we'll study some Old French just for fun. We will also look at the ways in which some modern films understand and represent the French Middle Ages. Participation in class discussion is essential, and there will be a series of writing assignments.

Enforced Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 007, REC
German Youth Cultures

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Love Parade, Fettes Brot , and Lodown: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear fast. They stress difference, creativity, and-above all-individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetic are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class. This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities, and political orientations of youths within the 80s and 90s. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, publications), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this 'deutsche Besonderheit — der Mythos Jugend' (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, weekly essays, short grammar tests, motivated physical and oral presence.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

GERMAN 326 — Intermediate German
Section 008, REC
The World According to Alma

Instructor: Kyes,Robert L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

At the dawn of the 20th century, Alma Schindler was regarded as the most beautiful, talented and intelligent woman in all Vienna. As we read her autobiography, we survey the lives and works of the artists, writers, composers, musicians and political figures whom she influenced, including her several spouses (Gustav Mahler, Walther Gropius, Franz Werfel) and intimate friends and lovers (e.g., Gustav Klimt, Maurice Ravel, Oskar Kokoschka, Arthur Schnitzler, Arnold Schönberg). We try to understand how art, music and literature could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of impending chaos, as Vienna — the city of dreams — came to embrace German fascism. Readings from Alma's autobiography are supplemented by videos, paintings, musical compositions, and passages from works by contemporary authors.

Class time is devoted to students' oral presentations, viewing videos and paintings, listening to and discussing music (songs, symphonies and operas), discussing poems and novels, and surveying the political events of the time.

Required are at least three oral presentations in class, a one- to two-page essay every second week, a major project due at the end of the academic term, and active participation in class discussions. Matters of German grammar, style, pronunciation etc. will be treated according to the needs of the students. The entire course — including discussions, presentations and papers — will be conducted in German.

Required text:

  • Alma Mahler-Werfel, Mein Leben (available at Shaman Drum)

    Optional but recommended:

  • Martin Durrell, Hammer's German Grammar and Usage,
  • a good German-English/English German dictionary.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 230, 232, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor

  • GERMAN 426 — Advanced German
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

    All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

    Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

    GERMAN 449 — Special Topics in English Translation
    Section 002, REC
    Hans Christian Andersen

    Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: WorldLit

    If you are interested in fairy tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark, or Scandinavian literature, then this is the course for you!

    Hans Christian Andersen is one of the immortals of world literature. The fairy tales he wrote, such as "The Little Mermaid," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Emperor's New Clothes," are remarkable for their sense of imagination, descriptive power, and acute sensitivity. In contrast to the Brothers Grimm, who largely collected and retold folktales, Andersen distilled the earliest literary form of the fairy tale and the folktale into a genre that was uniquely his own.

    In this course, we shall read and analyze some of Hans Christian Andersen's best-known fairy tales, as well as a renowned Andersen biography and various critical texts. Our readings will primarily focus on his mastery of the genre and his complex narrative method, but the biographical aspects of his stories, his contributions to the visual arts, and the cultural setting of the tales will also be discussed. Furthermore, Andersen's fantastic fairy tales have often been adapted for the stage and screen, and we shall accordingly watch and analyze excerpts from some of these adaptations as well. This course will familiarize you with Andersen's works, especially his fairy tales, and will also help you increase your ability to think and work analytically, by developing the ability to analyze texts, voice criticism through coherent arguments, formulate good questions, and express your ideas in formal academic essays.

    Course requirements include attendance/participation, several brief essays, quizzes, and a final essay/project.

    For further details, contact the course instructor, Marc Pierce, at mpierc@umich.edu.

    All readings and discussions will be in English.

    GERMAN 492 — German Honors Proseminar
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Barndt,Kerstin

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors standing.

    HISTART 351 — The Art and Poetry of Michelangelo
    Section 001, LEC
    Art & Poetry of Michelangelo.

    Instructor: Willette,Thomas Chauncy; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature and cultural theory of Humanism. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention in order to grasp the rhetorical strategies and poetic "figures" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his eloquent marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the primary source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry — notably the sonnet, the madrigal and the epitaph — as well as the language employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. We will study a considerable portion of his production in sculpture, painting and architecture while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome.

    Course Requirements: Short assignments given in class; 4-5 short papers (2-3 pgs); midterm blue-book exam; substantial term paper, with preliminary draft.

    Intended Audience: Upper-class undergrads

    Class Format: 3 contact hours per week in seminar format

    Advisory Prerequisite: HISTART 102 or 251

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 001, SEM
    Social History of American Civil War

    Instructor: Vinovskis,Maris A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This is an undergraduate research seminar on the social history of the U.S. Civil War. In order to provide a brief overview of the Civil War, students will read several histories of that conflict with particular attention to the experiences of soldiers and civilians.

    The focus of the course is writing a 25-35 page research paper using primary and secondary sources. This is a challenging, but important opportunity to learn how to write an original, fully-documented research paper as well as contribute to our understanding of the Civil War.

    In preparation for writing their own papers, participants will read and critique previous student papers on the social history of the Civil War. Students, in consultation with the instructor, will select a topic for their research papers. They will then write a 5-10 page preliminary draft which includes an introduction to the overall papers, a brief review of the existing secondary literature on that topic, details about the primary sources to be used, and a description of the research design employed. After receiving detailed comments on that draft, students will revise and resubmit that portion of their paper.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 002, SEM
    Ideologies & Empires in Chinese History

    Instructor: Chang,Chun-Shu

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course will examine the major ideologies behind the rise, constitution, and fall of the powerful empires in Chinese history. It will focus on one empire: the Qin (Ch'in), 221-207 B.C., popularly known as the empire of the Great Wall and Terracotta Warriors. The first empire in Chinese history, the Qin Empire marked the end of China's Classical Age and the beginning of Imperial China. Founded by one great mystic hero, the First Emperor (Ying, Zheng, r. 221-210 B.C.), its short life of fourteen years actually charted the course of Chinese history for the next two thousand years. This course will look into the complex ideological forces behind the enigmatic personality of the First Emperor and the founding and developing of the Qin Empire. Finally, through this study, some "big questions" in the current historical scholarship will be raised:

    • Do ideologies matter in the rise and fall of powerful empires?
    • Do powerful empires lead to the "end of history"?
    • Do history-making heroes "live" forever?

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 003, SEM
    History of Human Experimentation

    Instructor: Howell,Joel D

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Experimenting on human beings has always raised a set of complex social, ethical, and political questions. Some of those issues have persisted over the centuries; some have been specific to a given time and place. Much of contemporary medical practice is based on knowledge created by experiments done on human beings. In this class we will examine several histories of human experimentation. We will ask how people at different times and in different places answered questions about whether it was acceptable to use human beings as research subjects. We will examine which human beings were the subjects of the experiments, and what limits were placed on the conduct of the experiments. Reading assignments will include both primary source material and some of the latest scholarship on the subject. No prior background in medicine is necessary.

    The class is discussion format, with occasional short lectures. Students will be guided in choosing a topic for a research paper, finding sources, crafting a historical argument, and writing (and re-writing) drafts. The goal is to complete a full-length paper on a topic relevant to the class and (one hopes) of specific interest to the student. There will be other, smaller writing assignments.

    Overrides for non-history concentrators will be allocated on the first day. Anyone absent from the first class without advance permission may not take the course. Evaluation will be based on discussions, oral presentations, and the student's writings.

    Readings will include:

    • Coursepack of readings (cost estimated to be about $70)
    • David Feldshuh, Miss Evers' Boys
    • Susan E. Lederer, Subjected to Science: Human Experimentation in America before the Second World War
    • Susan Reverby, Tuskegee's Truths: Rethinking the Tuskegee Syphilis Study
    • Ignaz Semmelweis, trans K. Codell Carter, Etiology, Concept and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever

     

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 004, SEM
    Emergence of U.S. Mass Culture

    Instructor: Cook Jr,James W

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course is designed as an intensive historical examination of U.S. popular and mass culture over two centuries. We will begin the academic term with the very first "cultural industries" of the 1830s and 40s (e.g., P.T. Barnum's museum exhibitions, dime novels, and blackface minstrel shows), and then follow the expansion and evolution of U.S. commercial entertainment through the dawn of electronic media and globalization. Probable weekly topics include: the commodification and distribution of localized vernacular forms; the rise of corporate structures, national markets, and syndication; the consolidation of new publics and modes of spectatorship; the mechanics of marketing and promotion; the politics of mass cultural representation and consumption; and the manifold impacts of U.S. mass culture, both at home and abroad.

    Our scope will be deliberately broad and comparative, cutting across many different eras and cultural media: from museum exhibitions, theater, dance, and literature to radio, film, television, and perhaps even the internet. We will also make extensive use of 19th and 20th-century primary source materials (e.g., playbills, newspaper reviews, trade periodicals, pop songs, and video clips), in order to gauge the shifting meanings of mass culture according to historical context. Because this is an advanced writing course, students should expect approximately 25-30 pp. of assigned essays, with multiple opportunities for critical feedback and rewriting.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 005, SEM
    Time and History

    Instructor: Trautmann,Thomas R

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Ideas about the age of the earth and the human race, the nature of time, and the beginning and destiny of human history, have varied greatly at different periods and across different cultures. This cultural and historical variability of time-concepts seems to defy the sense we have that time is the same for everyone, everywhere. With this problem in mind, this course will explore ideas of time and history comparatively, examining such issues as the anthropology and philosophy of time; the cultures of time to be found in the Biblical religions and in Hinduism and Buddhism; science and the Time Revolution of the 1860's; and the idea of progress and its critics.

    This is a colloquium, with readings, class discussions, and papers. There is no examination. There will be one short essay and one long research paper. You will be asked to develop a prospectus of the research paper, a draft for discussion with the instructor, and to present the substance of it to the class before submitting the final version for grade.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
    Section 006, SEM
    Partition of British India, 1947: History, Literature, Film

    Instructor: Mir,Farina

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    In 1947, Britain's colonial rule over India came to an end after almost 200 years. At the same time, India was partitioned along religious lines into two countries, India and Pakistan. This course examines the history that led to the partition, the violence that accompanied it, and its continuing legacy in the Indian subcontinent. We will engage the partition through three different genres: history, literature, and film.

    This course has no prerequisites.

    Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in seminar discussions and 3 writing assignments.

    Texts include:
    Urvashi Butalia, The Other Side of Silence: Voices from the Partition of India. Ritu Menon and Kamla Bhasin, Border and Boundaries: How Women Experienced the Partition of India. Bhisham Sahni, Tamas. Khushwant Singh, Train to Pakistan.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

    HISTORY 398 — Honors Colloquium, Junior
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sheehan,Jonathan L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior thesis project.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 398 — Honors Colloquium, Junior
    Section 002, SEM

    Instructor: de Pee,Christian

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior thesis project.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students; junior standing, and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 399 — Honors Colloquium, Senior
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Hoffnung-Garskof,Jesse E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    Senior honors seminar for thesis writers.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students, HISTORY 398, senior standing, and permission of instructor.

    HISTORY 481 — Topics in European History
    Section 003, LEC
    Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and Arts

    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The course spans over two hundred years of Jewish cultural activity in Russia. At the theoretical level, the course will address such issues as multilingualism, minority culture in an imperial context, relationships between culture and ethnicity and culture and religion. At the practical level, we will discuss a wide variety of works of literature, criticism, essays, visual arts and cinema. Structurally the course consists of four section: a historical introduction, two case studies of the cities of St. Petersburg and Odessa as major centers of Jewish cultural production in the Russian Empire, and an overview of the Soviet period.

    JUDAIC 417 — Topics in Judaic Studies
    Section 001, SEM
    Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and Arts

    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The course spans over two hundred years of Jewish cultural activity in Russia. At the theoretical level, the course will address such issues as multilingualism, minority culture in an imperial context, relationships between culture and ethnicity and culture and religion. At the practical level, we will discuss a wide variety of works of literature, criticism, essays, visual arts and cinema. Structurally the course consists of four section: a historical introduction, two case studies of the cities of St. Petersburg and Odessa as major centers of Jewish cultural production in the Russian Empire, and an overview of the Soviet period.

    LING 315 — Introduction to Syntax
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course investigates the syntax (sentence structure properties) of human language. It addresses the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. The focus here is on human language as a specific cognitive capacity restricted to humans, rather than on the individual languages (e.g., English, Arabic, Hindi) that are made possible by the existence of this capacity. For this reason, the course explores in detail many structural properties that are common across different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words — ‘who', ‘what' and so on — as most languages do). In order to explain this and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Korean or Turkish as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to. It is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in this short description (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say ‘Who do you like?' in English, instead of ‘You like who?', a possible word order similar to the one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language — which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task — can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience.

    Prerequisites: Although there are no official prerequisites, students usually take one introductory course in linguistics (LING 111, 200, 210, 212) before taking this course. P>

    Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

    MATH 310 — Elementary Topics in Mathematics
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Montgomery,Hugh L; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    Background and Goals: The Elementary Topics course may focus on any one of several topics. The material is presented at a level appropriate for sophomores and juniors without extensive coursework in math. The current offering of the course focuses on game theory.

    Content: Students study the strategy of several games where mathematical ideas and concepts can play a role. Most of the course will be occupied with the structure of a variety of two person games of strategy: tic tac toe, tic tac toe misère, the French military game, hex, nim, the penny dime game, and many others. If there is sufficient interest students can study: dots and boxes, go-moku, and some aspects of checkers and chess. There will also be a brief introduction to the classical Von Neuman/Morgenstern theory of mixed strategy games.

    Alternatives: none

    Subsequent Courses: none

    Advisory Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics.

    MATH 327 — Evolution of Mathematical Concepts
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Uribe-Ahumada,Alejandro; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    Background and Goals: This course examines the evolution of major mathematical concepts form mathematical and historical points of view. The course's goal is to throw light on contemporary mathematics by retracing the history of some of the major mathematical discoveries.

    Content: This course follows the evolution of three mathematical ideas in geometry, analysis and algebra. Typical choices of subject are: Euclid's parallel postulate and the development of non-Euclidean geometries, the notions of limit and infinitesimals, and the development of the theory of equations culminating with Galois theory.

    Alternatives: none Subsequent Courses: none

    Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116 or 186.

    MATH 422 — Risk Management and Insurance
    Section 001, LEC
    If you are interested in this class, please put your name on the waitlist and email Prof. Huntington (chunt@umich.edu).

    Instructor: Huntington,Curtis E; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    Background and Goals: This course is designed to allow students to explore the insurance mechanism as a means of replacing uncertainty with certainty. A main goal of the course is to explain, using mathematical models from the theory of interest, risk theory, credibility theory and ruin theory, how mathematics underlies many important individual and societal problems.

    Content: We will explore how much insurance affects the lives of students (automobile insurance, social security, health insurance, theft insurance) as well as the lives of other family members (retirements, life insurance, group insurance). While the mathematical models are important, an ability to articulate why the insurance options exist and how they satisfy the consumer's needs are equally important. In addition, there are different options available (e.g. in social insurance programs) that offer the opportunity of discussing alternative approaches. This course may be used to satisfy the LSA upper-level writing requirement.

    Alternatives: none Subsequent Courses: none

    Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, junior standing, and permission of instructor.

    MEMS 444 — Reading of Old French Texts
    Section 001, REC
    Introduction to Medieval Literature, 12-13c

    Instructor: McCracken,Peggy S

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    Crusades and courtly love, King Arthur and the grail — these are some of the subjects of twelfth- and thirteenth-century literature and of this class. We will read medieval epics, romances, poetry, and short narratives. Some of these are quite beautiful, some are quite weird. Readings and discussion in modern French, though some secondary reading assignments may be in English, and we'll study some Old French just for fun. We will also look at the ways in which some modern films understand and represent the French Middle Ages. Participation in class discussion is essential, and there will be a series of writing assignments.

    Enforced Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above.

    MEMS 491 — Honors Senior Colloquium
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Taylor,Karla T; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1 — 6
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    The centerpiece of the MEMS concentration is the senior Honors thesis, which is meant to be the single most meaningful piece of work you will do as an undergraduate at Michigan. This course is designed to guide you in this difficult and rewarding process, from first glimmerings, to conceiving the project, doing the research, and writing your honors thesis. We will spend some time each week working together on learning techniques and methods generally applicable to academic research in the humanities. We will also discuss what makes an honors thesis different from a long end-of-term paper. The honors thesis is a major essay, composed over the course of at least two semesters. The thesis should not be merely an extended survey of the relevant critical or scholarly literature; nor should it be a record of your private musings on a given topic. The thesis should display extended evidence of the author's searching, creative, well-articulated thoughts about his/her subject. It should also be built on a substantial amount of original research, and display a strong conceptual grasp of the issues it raises.

    This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions. The course will meet in a seminar format for 3 hours per week. Students will elect a total of 6 hours for the course but may divide this into two terms. Students will write a 60-100 page Honors thesis.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Honors student and senior standing.

    MODGREEK 325 — Athens, Present and Past
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Leontis,Artemis S
    Instructor: Bhattacharyya,Sayan

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit


    Old cities are not just monuments to past glory. They are incubators for new ideas and sites of dynamic change. Athens has always been a city in transition, from ancient times, when it was a center of art, politics, philosophy, and commerce to the modern era, when it reemerged as a modern capital city. In this class, we will explore Athens neighborhood by neighborhood through photographs, films, travel descriptions, maps, poetry, plays, political writing, and fictional and non-fictional narrative. We will work through important moments in Athens' long history, as we also make stops at some of the city's contemporary hot spots — from the Acropolis to the Plaka and Kolonaki Square to beachfront scenes of Athens' modern night life — in order explore the different ways that Athens has reinvented itself.

    Optional Study Abroad trip to Athens, Greece: April 30-May 13, 2007
    This is an ISAC (Integrating Study Abroad into the Curriculum) course with an optional study abroad trip to Athens, Greece, April 30-May 13.

    Cost of travel to Greece will be about $800 plus the cost of air travel and some meals. Eligibility for trip: The instructor requires students interested in the study abroad trip to contact her (aleontis@umich.edu) for an interview as soon as possible. The Study Abroad trip to Athens is supported through an ISAC grant and the LSA Citizenship Theme Year.

    PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
    Section 002, SEM
    VALUES AND THE ARTS

    Instructor: Walton,Kendall L

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This seminar will address a cluster of related issues concerning values of various kinds and the arts. We will investigate the nature of aesthetic value, how (and whether) aesthetic value differs from value of other kinds (e.g., moral value), how it is related to other kinds of value (e.g., Do moral failings of a work of art affect its aesthetic value?), and what other-than-aesthetic values works of art, or some of them, might be especially well suited to serve. We will also consider worries about dangerous effects that works of art may have. Readings will be taken from a variety of mostly contemporary and recent sources.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

    PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
    Section 005, SEM
    Freedom of the will.

    Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This is a seminar-format course for students with some experience in philosophy. The purpose is to provide advanced training in reading and interpreting philosophical texts and in developing, organizing, and presenting original philosophical ideas.

    This term, the seminar will concentrate on the problem of the freedom of the will; we will read texts by St. Augustine, Jonathan Edwards, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

    Requirements: four short writing assignments and one long research paper. Students may be asked to revise papers in light of comments.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

    PHYSICS 441 — Advanced Laboratory I
    Section 002, LAB

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instruction. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course.

    PHYSICS 442 — Advanced Laboratory II
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Amidei,Dante Eric; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instruction. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course.

    PHYSICS 442 — Advanced Laboratory II
    Section 002, LAB

    Instructor: Amidei,Dante Eric; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instruction. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics.

    Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course.

    POLSCI 336 — Comparative Politics
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Woo,Meredith Jung-En; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    Theory and research in the comparative study of political systems. Emphasis on theoretical approaches to comparative politics, models of political change, and empirical cross-national research.

    Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

    POLSCI 358 — Politics of the European Union
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Theme

    The course explores the historical development, political-philosophical justifications & the current political structure and institutional design of the enlarged European Union. The class also deals with theories on European integration, European political competition, parties and selected policy areas, as well as the role of EU member states. Particular attention will be paid to implications of the emerging EU polity for a supra-national European identity and for questions of democratic legitimacy.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

    POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
    Section 002, REC
    Comparative Elections

    Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course examines the problem of how politicians and policies are selected by citizens. The mechanics of elections (rules, procedures) have enormous impact on what sorts of choices voters are offered, what sorts of coalitions politicians form, whose interests get represented in the policymaking process, and, ultimately, what policies are chosen. For this reason, politicians fight tenaciously to shape the rules under which they compete. This course will investigate what rules matter, and why, and will draw from a broad array of cases to examine the most important issues at stake in current electoral reforms, both in the United States and abroad.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

    POLSCI 400 — Selected Topics in Political Theory
    Section 001, REC
    Work, Virtue, Citizenship

    Instructor: Manuel,Anne M; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Theme

    What is the relationship between the work you do and your capacity to be a good citizen? How does work shape citizenship in the contemporary liberal democratic context? We will look at political theory texts and a range of other kinds of texts (films, memoirs, etc.) to analyze this question. Linked to the LSA citizenship theme semester.

    Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 101 or 301 or 302.

    POLSCI 401 — Feminist Political Theory
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course offers an introduction to feminist theory as it enhances and complicates the study of politics. We will read alternative accounts of the politics of gender, accounts that situate different issues and concerns at their center: e.g., sexuality, domestic and reproductive labor; transnational differences in women's situation and experience, etc. Throughout the course we will be considering how feminist analyses shed light (and sometimes heat) on political concepts of enduring significance: freedom, power, obligation, citizenship, and justice.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

    PSYCH 303 — Research Methods in Psychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This writing-intensive course provides an overview of the how's and why's of research in psychology as a social science, and it covers such topics as ethics, library research, case studies, observations, surveys and questionnaires, laboratory experiments, APA-style writing, and statistics. It consists of a weekly 75-minute lecture on Monday, in which general ideas about research will be presented, and a weekly 75-minute lab in which research projects will be planned and presented.

    Prerequisites: A 'gateway' course in psychology as a social science. A basic statistics course (e.g., STAT 350) is required. You should not take this course if you have already taken one of the psychology as a social science lab courses (e.g., organizational, personality, psychopathology, social).

    Grades: Final grades are based on three 'objective' quizzes covering terms and concepts covered in class and readings (15% each) and written assignments for the lab (70% total). Each written assignment will be weighted more-or-less by its page length. We encourage you to write drafts of any and all assignments prior to the due dates. If you wish to avail yourself of this option, you will need to work out a mutually-agreed timetable with your lab instructor well in advance of the due date. Attendance per se at lab is not graded but is required: A student cannot pass this course without participating in lab activities and exercises.

    Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

    PSYCH 331 — Laboratories in Biopsychology
    Section 001, LEC
    Applications for Psych 331 are available in 4017 EH and 1343 EH.

    Instructor: Mahoney,Megan Marie; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    The purpose of this course is three-fold:

    (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the Biopsychology Program or in the Cognition and Perception Program with his/her on-going research;

    (2) to introduce students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior) or cognitive science;

    (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists or cognitive scientists in laboratory research.

    Grades are based on a student's: (1) performance in an individual faculty member's lab; (2) an oral presentation; and (3) term paper that describes the student's research experience.

    Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab.

    Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4017 East Hall). Students concentrating in Biopsychology and Cognitive Science will receive priority.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. STATS 350 or 425 and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

    PSYCH 341 — Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

    This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research. The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises

    Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240 or 345; and STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425

    PSYCH 351 — Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Evans,Evelyn Margaret

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course provides students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture, discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual, group, and class research projects. Students are provided with hands-on research opportunities, conducting observational studies with preschool children, and experimental studies with school-aged children. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement. Course grades will be basedon: three quizzes, an article critique, completion of PEERRS modules, one oral and three written research papers and reports. Attendance at both the lecture and lab sections is required.

    Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

    PSYCH 361 — Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology
    Section 001, LAB

    Instructor: Wierba,Elizabeth E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed: to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience; to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

    Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

    Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

    Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 260

    PSYCH 400 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, LEC
    Experimental Learning & Memory

    Instructor: Baron,Scott P

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    Course Goals:

    This course is focused on the many aspects of experimental methods of learning and memory, particularly methods of classical and operant conditioning. This course will also prepare students to continue in psychology studies at the under-graduate and graduate levels; it would also be appropriate for neuroscience majors. Students will learn and understand the tenants of Learning Theories and the tools to study such behaviors through textbook readings, original literature, class discussion and exercises and several writing assignments. At the end of the course students should be able to cogently discuss and write research/academic papers and review scientific papers and be able to begin writing their own journal papers.

    Writing Assignments:

    There will be writing assignments throughout the course.

    1. short, in-class assignments will be graded and comments provided by the instructor. Content and organization will be the primary focus of comments.
    2. semi-weekly discussion papers — comments and grades will be based upon clarity of language, language mechanics, as well as content and organization. These will be returned for single revisions which will then be further graded and commented upon.
    3. One Research/Academic Paper: a relatively long (2000 -3000 word) paper to focus on the empirical study of learning. Comments will be made and papers returned for revision. APA format will be used. This paper will be assigned within the first 1/3 of the course.
    4. Experimental Poster: Students will work in groups of two or three to construct posters for in-class presentation. Data will be provided to students from studies similar to those discussed in class. APA journal format will be used. Comments will be made and a revision turned in prior to presentation to the class. Because so much of scientific presentations are done in poster format.

    Writing Instruction:

    Students will be using the APA publication manual, Strunk & White, a text for writing for science as well as tools provided by Sweetland Writing Center to aid in the mechanics and basics of writing. The instructor will be reviewing papers and guiding writing through in-class examples and discussions of students' papers provided anonymously by the students. Comments from the instructor will be provided for each writing assignment. In addition, extra-class discussions with the instructor will be available and the instructor will schedule these if students are not meeting expectations.

    Faculty Role:

    The instructor for this class will provide lectures and reading materials. The instructor will also lead discussions, facilitate small-group discussions, guide writing and comment on writing assignments.

    Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115; and 230, or 240

    PSYCH 426 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Reqs: ULWR, BS
    Other: Honors

    Primary focus is the implementation of an Honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 424 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

    PSYCH 427 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2 — 4
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: Honors

    The primary focus of this course is the writing of an honors research thesis on the honors project.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 425 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

    PSYCH 442 — Perception, Science, and Reality
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. Since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do, the course is a broadly based course that examines the study of perception from a number of different perspectives: Cognitive psychology and information processing; philosophy of mind and phenomenology; history of psychology and philosophy of science. Particular topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation. The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade. Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu. Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

    RCHUMS 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RCHUMS 333 — Art and Culture
    Section 001, SEM
    Art & Poetry of Michelangelo.

    Instructor: Willette,Thomas Chauncy; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature and cultural theory of Humanism. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention in order to grasp the rhetorical strategies and poetic "figures" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his eloquent marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the primary source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry — notably the sonnet, the madrigal and the epitaph — as well as the language employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. We will study a considerable portion of his production in sculpture, painting and architecture while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome.

    Course Requirements: Short assignments given in class; 4-5 short papers (2-3 pgs); midterm blue-book exam; substantial term paper, with preliminary draft.

    Intended Audience: Upper-class undergrads

    Class Format: 3 contact hours per week in seminar format

    RCHUMS 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
    Section 001, LEC
    Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

    Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

    PLEASE NOTE:Only RC Creative Writing Concentrators can use RCHUMS 425 to fulfill the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

    RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
    Section 002, SEM

    Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

    PLEASE NOTE:Only RC Creative Writing Concentrators can use RCHUMS 425 to fulfill the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

    RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
    Section 005, SEM

    Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

    RCSSCI 315 — International Grassroots Development
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR, SS
    Other: Theme

    What does "good development" mean to you? Do impoverished communities around the world need democracy? High quality "Western" medicine for all? Spiritual enlightenment? Debt forgiveness? High tech education? Liberation from U.S. corporations? Gender equality? A return to ancient values and practices? Equality on the world stage? Or to just be left alone?

    In this course we will look at how different assumptions about the Global South drive conflicting solutions proposed by governments, aid agencies, religious groups, human rights activists, the business community, rebels, idealists, and grassroots organizations. Be prepared for lively discussion, a deep, personal examination of your own beliefs and values, lots of writing — and lots of help with your writing.

    Junior or Senior status required. Some previous courses in economics, political science, anthropology, and/or lived experience in the Global South may be helpful.

    RUSSIAN 348 — Survey of Russian Literature
    Section 001, LEC
    Survey of Russian Literature from 1870 to 1900

    Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU
    Other: WorldLit

    This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Amongst the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov. We will also read some of Chekhov's and Leskov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, utopia, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature, language, or history is prerequisite

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    RUSSIAN 479 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years
    Section 001, LEC
    Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

    Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

    Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Russian is not a prerequisite (all readings in English).

    SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU

    Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

    Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

    SAC 376 — Digital Media Theory
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Murphy,Sheila C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU

    Surveys the major theories of digital media culture from theories of media convergence to "cyberfeminist" analysis of identity politics and accounts of the formal properties of digital media.

    Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

    SCAND 421 — Modern Scandinavian Literature in English
    Section 001, REC
    Hans Christian Andersen

    Instructor: Pierce,Marc Edward

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR
    Other: WorldLit

    If you are interested in fairy tales, Hans Christian Andersen, Denmark, or Scandinavian literature, then this is the course for you!

    Hans Christian Andersen is one of the immortals of world literature. The fairy tales he wrote, such as "The Little Mermaid," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Emperor's New Clothes," are remarkable for their sense of imagination, descriptive power, and acute sensitivity. In contrast to the Brothers Grimm, who largely collected and retold folktales, Andersen distilled the earliest literary form of the fairy tale and the folktale into a genre that was uniquely his own.

    In this course, we shall read and analyze some of Hans Christian Andersen's best-known fairy tales, as well as a renowned Andersen biography and various critical texts. Our readings will primarily focus on his mastery of the genre and his complex narrative method, but the biographical aspects of his stories, his contributions to the visual arts, and the cultural setting of the tales will also be discussed. Furthermore, Andersen's fantastic fairy tales have often been adapted for the stage and screen, and we shall accordingly watch and analyze excerpts from some of these adaptations as well. This course will familiarize you with Andersen's works, especially his fairy tales, and will also help you increase your ability to think and work analytically, by developing the ability to analyze texts, voice criticism through coherent arguments, formulate good questions, and express your ideas in formal academic essays.

    Course requirements include attendance/participation, several brief essays, quizzes, and a final essay/project.

    For further details, contact the course instructor, Marc Pierce, at mpierc@umich.edu.

    All readings and discussions will be in English.

    Advisory Prerequisite: JR/SR/G/P.I.

    SLAVIC 312 — Central European Cinema
    Section 001, LEC
    Race, Ethnicity & Gender Issue

    Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR, HU, RE
    Other: WorldLit

    During four decades of Communist Party rule, the film industries of Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia were under state control. One positive result of this was ample funding for serious films about social and political topics; one serious drawback was the existence of a censorship apparatus which made criticism of the policies of the existing regimes very difficult (though not impossible). Nonetheless, in certain thematic areas, particularly those dealing with racial and ethnic intolerance and with the plight of women in patriarchal societies, filmmakers in East Central Europe were able to be more incisive, frank, and provocative than is generally possible within the profit-driven, entertainment-oriented Hollywood film industry. This is not to say that the Communist regimes themselves gave priority to ameliorating the living conditions of their ethnic minorities or of women. But talented and committed filmmakers were able to take advantage of the progressive official pronouncements of these regimes with regard to ethnic and gender issues in order to craft powerful films, films which the regimes had no grounds to suppress or censor.

    This course will study some of the most important films made in four thematic categories:

    1. the Holocaust — the reactions of people in East Central Europe to the genocidal plans of the Nazis, from indifference and collaboration to heroic acts of altruism
    2. ethnic discrimination and its consequences in more recent years — the depressed economic status of the Roma (Gypsies); animosity among Croats, Serbs, Moslem Bosnians and Albanians, leading to Yugoslavia's past and present civil wars — as well as the countervailing examples of a commonality of humanistic values and peaceful coexistence among people of these ethnicities
    3. women's lives under state socialism — women in the work force in large numbers, but plagued by a "double" or "triple" burden, with continued primary responsibility for domestic work and child care, as well as by persistent patriarchal attitudes toward sex and marriage in society as a whole
    4. the response of Central Europe's leading women filmmakers, who, in different contexts and with different stylistic approaches, have presented heroines who rebel and struggle against the patriarchal order

    We will view and discuss films from Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, the former Yugoslavia, Bosnia, and Macedonia dealing with the above issues. We also will give attention to the artistic structure of the films — how they go about transmitting their themes with power and emotion. Evaluation will be based on class participation and three short (5-6 page) papers; all students must write a paper for Unit I, and then for two of the remaining three units (the course is divided into four units).

    Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required.

    SLAVIC 470 — Topics in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe
    Section 003, LEC
    Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and Arts

    Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    The course spans over two hundred years of Jewish cultural activity in Russia. At the theoretical level, the course will address such issues as multilingualism, minority culture in an imperial context, relationships between culture and ethnicity and culture and religion. At the practical level, we will discuss a wide variety of works of literature, criticism, essays, visual arts and cinema. Structurally the course consists of four section: a historical introduction, two case studies of the cities of St. Petersburg and Odessa as major centers of Jewish cultural production in the Russian Empire, and an overview of the Soviet period.

    SOC 305 — Introduction to Sociological Theory
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: McGinn,Terence James; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 4
    Reqs: ULWR

    Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

    This course provides an introduction to the works of eminent figures in sociological thought and their analysis of various issues in social organization. The historical and intellectual factors that gave rise to sociology as a distinct academic discipline are examined. Attention is also given to the way in which the concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research. Classical theorists including Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Cooley, and Mead are studied, as well as the theories of contemporary sociological schools. The course asks how these thinkers understand the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization; how they account for social change; and how their social location influenced their thinking. In the context of this analysis, students are introduced to various uses of such theoretical concepts as conflict, structure, function, stratification, exchange, etc.

    Advisory Prerequisite: One Sociology course.

    SPANISH 308 — Workshop in Academic Writing
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Ros,Ana

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1
    Reqs: ULWR

    Credit Exclusions: SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305.

    This course completes the third-year sequence of practical Spanish. It is designed to round out each student's experience in the language. Particular care is taken to develop fluency and correctness of expression.

    Enforced Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276; or SPANISH 290 and 310; or SPANISH 276 and 290; or RCLANG 324

    SPANISH 308 — Workshop in Academic Writing
    Section 002, LEC

    Instructor: Ros,Ana

    WN 2007
    Credits: 1
    Reqs: ULWR

    Credit Exclusions: SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305.

    This course completes the third-year sequence of practical Spanish. It is designed to round out each student's experience in the language. Particular care is taken to develop fluency and correctness of expression.

    Enforced Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276; or SPANISH 290 and 310; or SPANISH 276 and 290; or RCLANG 324

    STATS 404 — Effective Communication in Statistics
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Ritter,Mary A

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR, BS

    This course focuses on the principles of good written and oral communication of statistical information and data analyses. Participants study communication principles and apply them in writing assignments and oral presentations of statistical analysis. Topics include giving constructive feedback and rewriting to improve clarity and technical correctness.

    Advisory Prerequisite: STAT 470 or 480, and permission of department

    SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
    Section 001, SEM

    Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This Seminar aims to help students become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. Students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include: reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs)to lengthly exposition (e.g., seminar papers); workshopping each other's papers; conferencing with the instructor; observing OWL Tutorials; observing SWC 301 students in the Peer Tutoring Center and Sweetland faculty during Writing Workshop; practicing peer tutoring onsite and online; and sharing (online and off) our experiences as writers and tutors.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

    SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
    Section 002, SEM

    Instructor: Cooper,George H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This Seminar aims to help students become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. Students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include: reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs)to lengthly exposition (e.g., seminar papers); workshopping each other's papers; conferencing with the instructor; observing OWL Tutorials; observing SWC 301 students in the Peer Tutoring Center and Sweetland faculty during Writing Workshop; practicing peer tutoring onsite and online; and sharing (online and off) our experiences as writers and tutors.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

    SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
    Section 003, SEM

    Instructor: Silver,Naomi E

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This Seminar aims to help students become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. Students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include: reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs)to lengthly exposition (e.g., seminar papers); workshopping each other's papers; conferencing with the instructor; observing OWL Tutorials; observing SWC 301 students in the Peer Tutoring Center and Sweetland faculty during Writing Workshop; practicing peer tutoring onsite and online; and sharing (online and off) our experiences as writers and tutors.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

    TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Johnson,Rodney Char

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR

    Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

    Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

    TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
    Section 003, LEC

    Instructor: Nagourney,Peter J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR

    Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

    Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

    TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
    Section 004, LEC

    Instructor: Ward Jr,Fred C

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR

    Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

    Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

    TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
    Section 005, LEC

    Instructor: Nagourney,Peter J

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR

    Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

    Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

    TCHNCLCM 497 — Advanced Technical Communication for Computer Science
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Johnson,Rodney Char

    WN 2007
    Credits: 2
    Reqs: ULWR

    Advanced technical communication for computer science. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, specifications, proposals, reports and documentation, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentations and written project reports.

    Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300 or 215 or 281 with a C- or better

    WOMENSTD 400 — Women's Reproductive Health
    Section 001, LEC

    Instructor: Johnson,Timothy R B
    Instructor: Harris,Lisa H

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course explores aspects of women's reproductive health from biomedical, social, cultural, public health, political and health policy perspectives. Topics include reproductive physiology, sexual health, contraception and family planning, sexually transmitted infections, infertility and reproductive technologies, pregnancy loss, pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. The course aims to teach the biomedical knowledge essential to understanding these topics, and in addition offers students the tools to critically evaluate this knowledge from a feminist perspective. Race and racial disparities in reproductive health and health care are also considered. While the initial focus of the course is on U.S. frameworks for health care, reproductive health in transnational and global contexts is also considered.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

    WOMENSTD 422 — Feminist Political Theory
    Section 001, REC

    Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

    WN 2007
    Credits: 3
    Reqs: ULWR

    This course offers an introduction to feminist theory as it enhances and complicates the study of politics. We will read alternative accounts of the politics of gender, accounts that situate different issues and concerns at their center: e.g., sexuality, domestic and reproductive labor; transnational differences in women's situation and experience, etc. Throughout the course we will be considering how feminist analyses shed light (and sometimes heat) on political concepts of enduring significance: freedom, power, obligation, citizenship, and justice.

    Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

     
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