< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = WOMENSTD
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 65 of 65
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
WOMENSTD 100 — Gender and Women's Lives in U.S. Society
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

WN 2007
Credits: 2

An innovative introduction to contemporary women's issues. In this course you will be an active member of an twelve week small discussion group, led by one or two advanced student facilitators. Together, your group will explore and discuss a range of topics in an environment that we hope will be challenging, stimulating, open, supportive and exciting. You will be learning about women's issues through reading, journal writing, discussion and experimental exercises. There is strong emphasis on developing analytic tools -taking a critical stance with respect to one's experience, to social issues, and to the assigned readings. Topics include: socialization, work, family, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and current movements for change.

WOMENSTD 150 — Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Gender and Music

Instructor: André,Naomi A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course explores how gender relates to music.

  • Can music be masculine or feminine?
  • Is there a gendered voice in music?
  • What is at stake in thinking about music and gender?

The course materials will incorporate different genres and styles of music from "classical" (e.g., opera and symphony) to "popular" (e.g., jazz and blues, rock and hip-hop). We will also discuss how gender and music interact in literature (readings include Ntozake Shange's novel Sassafrass, Cypress and Indigo and the poetry of Langston Hughes and Shakespeare). While gender and music will be the focus of this seminar, we will also consider how this topic intersects with sexuality, race, class and ethnicity.

This course is designed for first-year students. No previous musical background is required except that you be passionate about some type (any style or genre) of music. Grades will be based on class participation (discussion and short presentations) and written work.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 151 — Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Women's Lives in 20th-Century China

Instructor: Wang,Zheng

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This seminar will introduce you to recent scholarship on women's experiences in twentieth-century China, with an emphasis on a history of the Chinese feminist movement. We will focus on the emergence and development of feminist discourse in modern China, discuss its relations with rising nationalism, dominant political parties, and China's pursuit of modernity. We will highlight diverse Chinese women's multiple roles in the 20th century, study and compare women in and outside the Chinese revolution, and examine women's relations with the socialist state. The course will end by discussing Chinese women's activism today. All readings are in English. Personal voices and life stories constitute the majority of the reading. The reading materials will be supplemented by a variety of visual materials shown in class, such as excerpts from the documentary TV series "A Chinese Women's History in the Twentieth Century." The course is organized as a seminar, with emphasis placed on reading, writing, and lively class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 201 — Gender and Careers
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Vaughters,Sharon D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Gender and Careers explores the emerging and shifting role of women and men in the workplace from both historical and current perspectives. Emphasis will be placed on multicultural viewpoints and life experiences based on gender as men and women approach and influence the world of work.

Discussion of current issues including leadership, job search issues and strategies, career negotiation and decisions, networking, "the glass ceiling," sexism in the workplace, and images of women and men in work will enable students to increase their self-understanding and build skills necessary to effectively impact the world of work. The course will include discussion, classroom activities, guest speakers, films, readings (course pack), and Internet/library research.

WOMENSTD 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and socio-cultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risks for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors, which influence the physical, biological, and psychological well-being of women.

WOMENSTD 235 — From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Alsultany,Evelyn Azeeza

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course provides an overview of representations of Arabs and Arab-Americans in the U.S. media, and specifically Hollywood cinema. Through an examination of Hollywood films over the last century, such as The Sheik (1921), Harum Scarum (1965), and True Lies (1994), it traces a shift in stereotypes from the rich Arab sheik with a harem to the Arab terrorist. Through this process, the course examines the connection between representations and the historical and political moment in which they are created and disseminated, from European colonization of the Arab world, the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, the Iran hostage crisis, to 9/11. How have international relations, political events, and foreign policy influenced representations in Hollywood filmmaking? What is the impact of stereotypes? How do film representations become part of American culture? Through examining these questions, we analyze the changing landscape of race, gender, and politics in film. We also examine the counter-current of filmmaking via unusual Hollywood films, documentaries, low-budget feature films, short films, and other genres.

Intended audience: Undergraduate students with general interest in learning to analyze media, the impact of stereotypes, and the relationship between the U.S. and the Middle East.

Course Requirements: Weekly film screening and short response papers. Midterm take-home exam would ask students to select a film from a list and write about representations of Arabs and the Middle East in the film, applying some of the theories learned in class. Or it might ask them to write an essay that compares films from two different time periods that we have seen in class, analyzing how the representation has changed based on the historical and political era and drawing from the readings in class. A final exam would ask students to work on an art-as-resistance project.

Class Format: Class comprises 3 hours lecture per week, with a 1 hour discussion section with GSI support (graded component), plus weekly required film viewing.

WOMENSTD 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

A survey introduction to the critical, theoretical, and historical study of women and gender in America from a feminist perspective. Readings range across a wide body of feminist scholarship in order to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within the field. The course aims to sharpen critical awareness of how gender operates in institutional and cultural contexts, in students' own lives and the lives of others. Two questions are central to the course: How is gender created and maintained through social practices (e.g., ideology or media representations)? How do these gendered social practices intersect with other social categories, such as race and ethnicity, social class and sexuality? Because Women's Studies grew out of women's activism, this course explores the relationship between the generation of knowledge about women and gender, and how to bring about gender equity in a society where race and ethnicity matter. Most of the course materials are drawn from the U.S. context; however, several weeks' readings and lectures address feminist work in other parts of the world and transnationally. Attendance at both lectures and discussion sections is mandatory.

WOMENSTD 253 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Women, Gender, and Activism in Latin America

Instructor: Castillo,Victoria Anette

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of seven credits of WOMENSTD 252 and 253 may be counted toward graduation.

In this course we will explore reasons why women have engaged in activism in Latin America in the past three decades, and the strategies they have used to influence social or political change. Students will read about a variety of women's and feminist groups who have organized around issues of race, class, human rights, health, sexuality, and economic justice, and examine how these groups have interacted with the state and larger social movements, nationally and internationally. In recent years, many countries in Latin America have transformed from authoritarian to democratic governments, and we will theorize about the changing opportunities of women's movements as these transitions occurred and also how issues of gender were used to promote specific governmental ideologies and policies. We will also look at women's experiences in countries confronted by civil war and guerrilla movements. Specific cases will be drawn from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Central America. It is not necessary for students to have taken other courses on Latin America to enroll in this class, but it is requested that students be eager to learn about women's activism in a historically and politically complex region.

WOMENSTD 306 — Women of Color and Feminism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This class will provide you with an overview of the thinking of women of color and their views of feminism. A significant proportion of the time will be spent on readings by as wide a variety of women as possible. These will include Native American women, Asian women, Arab women and Hispanic women. The next section of the class will be devoted to African American women exclusively. The texts for this section will be Audre Lorde's Sister Outsider and Harriet Tubman: Road to Freedom. The basic text for the class is Colonize This: Young Women of Color on Today's feminism, edited by Daisy Fernandez and Bushra Rehman. These readings will serve as the basis for dialogue and analysis of the issues that address the very concept of women of color and feminism:

  • What is it?
  • Who defines it?
  • How is it different from western feminism and are the issues affecting Hispanic women and Arab women the same?
  • Is feminism one homogeneous construct or is it more diverse and heterogeneous?

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or CAAS

WOMENSTD 308 — Law and the Politics of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kirkland,Anna R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Theme

This course explores the legal regulation of sexuality in the contemporary U.S. We will explore how law both represses and encourages sexuality, examine how it does so, and ask why, and for whom? What kinds of sexual relationships or activities are illegal, and how do these legal statuses organize citizenship in our nation? We will study aspects of constitutional law, criminal law, family law, and employment discrimination law. Specific topics may include sexual orientation discrimination in employment, marriage and family, civil unions, sex work (prostitution), youth sexuality and statutory rape, social movement organizing, sexuality and citizenship in cross-national perspective, and the role of sexual morality in contemporary political debates.

WOMENSTD 315 — Women and Literature
Section 001, REC
On Being a Heroine in Twentieth Century Fiction

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course begins where my earlier course on fictional heroines of 19th century literature left off, although taking the earlier course is not a requirement for taking this one. The lot of the great heroines in 19th century fiction can be summarized in the frequency of courtship and marriage plots. Many social and economic factors prompted so many great writers of that time to portray their culture through this focus. How better to depict the uneasy relationship between the sexes! And how better to indicate the limitations imposed by the culture on roughly half its population than to demonstrate through repetition the narrowness of women's options. Even the most financially and psychologically independent of heroines, who insist they don't have to marry, do. That in most instances, the authors portray these choices as disastrous provides both the drama of these novels and their critique of the culture. But everything changes in the 20th century, right? Feminist movements bring women's right to vote and opportunities for advanced education and with these changes, women begin, in Toni Morrison's words, "to wrest choice from choicelessness." Yet, curiously, despite expanded choices, courtship and marriage plots continue to structure 20th century fiction that feature heroines. We will read Kate Chopin's The Awakening, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, Virginia Woolf's. Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse, a Ernest Hemingway and Milan Kundera short stories, Toni Morrison's Sula, Edith Konecky's Allegra Maude Goldman, Monica Ali's, Brick Lane, short works by Jhumpa Lahiri, Gish Jen, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Grace Paley, and Michael Cunningham's The Hours. . Using the heroine's place in these plots as our point of reference, we'll explore what constitutes a heroine and heroic action in 20th century fiction. Requirements: a 10-12 page annotated bibliography on some aspect of women in 20th century fiction, a 5-6 page essay, and a take-home final exam, regular attendance and active participation in class discussion.
This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement.

WOMENSTD 315 — Women and Literature
Section 002, REC
American Women Writers

Instructor: Sanchez,Maria

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course will provide a survey of women writers in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present, combining well-known authors with those who are not as well-known as they should be! We will also read works that range across fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Authors may include: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson, Zora Neale Hurston, Ana Castillo and Jhumpa Lahiri. Assignments will consist of weekly writing responses, two essays and a final exam.

This course meets the New Traditions and American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

WOMENSTD 315 — Women and Literature
Section 003, REC
Intersections: Fictions and Feminisms of the African Diaspora

Instructor: Sweeney,Megan L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Building on the idea of "intersections," this course will explore how works of fiction can contribute to an understanding of feminisms, and how various feminist perspectives can contribute to an understanding of fictional texts. Focusing on a wide range of fiction and essays by African American women, we'll examine the intersecting, often contradictory roles that race, gender, sexuality, class, and nationality have played, throughout U.S. history, in shaping how others have defined Black women and how Black women have attempted to construct their own identities through writing and creative expression. We'll situate African American women's fiction in relation to the development of feminist theory in the U.S., paying particular attention to intersections and points of tension between various forms of African American feminisms, and between the histories and aims of African American and Euro-American feminisms. As points of transnational comparison, we'll also discuss some fiction and essays by women from Senegal, Zimbabwe, and Ghana.

Addressing a spectrum of issues — including artistic expression, sexuality, violence committed by women and against women, welfare, imprisonment, religion, and genital circumcision — we'll reflect on the difficulties and possibilities entailed in trying to link women's experiences across racial, national, sexual, and class divides. We'll also consider how various texts complicate or unsettle the boundaries of categories such as "Black," "African American," "female," feminism," "authenticity," and "culture." Furthermore, we'll think about how Black women's fictional texts sometimes serve as forms of feminist theory themselves by analyzing women's varied experiences; by interrogating the political, historical, economic, social, and cultural forces that reinforce inequalities; and by imagining — and thereby helping to foster — a world in which all women can lead healthy, fulfilling lives.

Please be prepared for a challenging yet highly rewarding engagement with the course materials. Course requirements will include brief weekly writing assignments, three critical analysis essays, a group presentation, and active participation in class discussions. Registered students must attend the first two class meetings in order to remain in the class.

Required Texts:

  • Coursepack of required readings [available at Accu-Copy: 518 East William St.]
  • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself (1861)
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
  • Toni Morrison, Sula (1973)
  • Toni Morrison, Paradise (1998)
  • Gayl Jones, Eva's Man (1976)
  • Pearl Cleage, What Looks Like Crazy on an Ordinary Day (1998)
  • Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter (1983)
  • Tsitsi Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (1988)
  • Ama Ata Aidoo, Changes: A Love Story (1991)

This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

WOMENSTD 327 — The History of Sexuality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Puff,Helmut
Instructor: Spector,Scott D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Does sex have a history? This course proposes to respond to this provocative question by demonstrating how modern notions of sexuality have emerged historically. In that sense, sex is not part of nature, it is part of culture, or rather cultures and their histories.

This lecture course will introduce students to an exciting new field of historical research. We will cast our net widely. Our history will contain histories and cultures whose sexual orders differ greatly from what we know about the West. But also within Western societies, we will discover a wealth of sexual cultures and practices that will help us transform our understanding of modern societies.

Our approach will be both topical and chronological. We will cover fields such as homosexuality, matrimony, prostitution, pornography, and transvestism. We will also investigate the interaction of sexuality with race, class, and gender. We will explore these topics by canvassing a history from ancient times to the present.

Intended audience: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

Course Requirements: Attendance and active participation plus midterm and final exams. Two short essays (1-2 pages); a response paper to one of the required readings; student's comments on a source text of their choice.

Class Format: 3 hours of lecture per week with smaller group discussions from time to time during the term.

WOMENSTD 330 — Feminist Thought
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Naber,Nadine C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores multiple perspectives on feminism and feminist theory. Students will study the histories of feminist theories and practices within a U.S. context. We will highlight the significance of post-colonial, women of color, and transnational theories and practices to U.S. feminisms. We will also trace the relationship between feminist scholarship and activism. This is an interdisciplinary course that brings together artistic work and humanities and social science perspectives.

Advisory Prerequisite: AMCULT 240 and one additional WOMENSTD course

WOMENSTD 341 — Special Topics in Gendered Lives
Section 001, SEM
Social Development

Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the social, emotional and physical development of children in the broader social context. The class will identify the various influences on a child's development and socialization by looking at individual child factors (temperament, resiliency, gender); the role of parents and the extended family, as well as looking to the broader social network available to the child (schools, peers). The class will also investigate cultural and historical events which impact the socialization of the child. Specific topics to be covered include: bonding and attachment; sex-role development; peer relationships; the role of the media; children's literature; day-care and dual-career couples; divorce and single-parenthood; death; childhood illness; traumatic life-events and war.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 342 — Special Topics in Gender and Health
Section 001, SEM
Psychosocial Perspectives on Women, Exercise, and Health

Instructor: Segar,Michelle Lynn

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is broadly about women, physical activity/exercise, and health. We will address specific themes related to women, exercise, motivation and the body, as well as investigate physical activity within larger sociocultural and health contexts. This broad perspective will allow us to think critically about the role of exercise and physical fitness in women's lives. Additionally, this course includes an experiential learning component. We will engage in activities and analytical thinking related to our unique experiences and relationships with physical activity and exercise.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 220 or 240.

WOMENSTD 342 — Special Topics in Gender and Health
Section 002, SEM
At Increased Risk: Same-Sex Sexuality in Health Science Research

Instructor: Morales,Michele Elaine

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Health research on same-sex sexuality faces a double-bind. On the one hand, this work seeks to counter an invisibility — or what is perceived as a heterosexist refusal to recognize the specificity of LGB experience. On the other hand, when researchers find that LGB people are at increased risk for substance use, depression and suicide, they end up confirming the very stereotypes they sought to resist. In this course we will explore the history of empirical health sciences research on same-sex sexuality beginning at mid-century with the consolidation of substance abuse and mental health diagnoses in the DSM-III and moving through the depathologization debates of the late 1960s and early 1970s. The first half of the course will provide a context through which to move into primary epidemiological literature of the last decades and the manipulation and misuse of this work by anti-gay organizations. Readings will include Jennifer Terry's An American Obsession: Science, Medicine and Homosexuality in Modern Society, Henry Minton's Departing From Deviance, and empirical studies from epidemiology, nursing, social work, public health and psychology.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 220 or 240.

WOMENSTD 343 — Special Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Human Rights & Social Justice Organizing in the U.S.

Instructor: Smith,Andrea Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Recently, social justice organizations, particularly those with a racial justice focus, have begun to work within a human rights frame. They regard human rights as a framework that challenges U.S. hegemony, and also provides an opportunity for U.S. based social justice organizations to make transnational linkages with social justice movements globally. This course would focus on case studies of social justice organizations in the U.S. that are utilizing a human rights framework to assess how the human rights framework impacts organizing around disparate social justice issues. In some cases, this framework helps U.S.-based social movements develop linkages transnationally with non-U.S.-based human rights groups. In some cases, this framework has led to transnational organizing limiting itself to U.N. fora and advocacy at the expense of other forms of transnational organizing. This course will look at what have been the benefits and the costs of building a U.S. Human Rights movement in terms of furthering the cause of social justice. The course will explore how social justice organizations have changed in their stance on human rights, and how they have addressed these initial critiques within their movements. The course will also include guest speakers from diverse social justice movements.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 344 — Special Topics in Gender, Culture, and Representation
Section 001, SEM
Uses of Trash: Gender, Race & Class at the

Instructor: Hubbs,Nadine M; homepage
Instructor: Hubbs,Jolene Renee

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What are the uses of trash — of the word as applied to U.S. poor whites, and the people thus designated? Trash is a wide-ranging and adaptable representation: While "trash fash" is brandished to sell products from cookbooks and comedy routines to country songs, the term is deployed pejoratively to establish boundaries, to distinguish a normative "us" from a polluting "them" in terms of class, race, physiognomy, behavior, and taste. In this seminar we sift through a variety of cultural objects — literary and critical texts, films, popular music — to explore the origins and sites of trash as a construct, and its raced, classed, gender-entangled workings.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 344 — Special Topics in Gender, Culture, and Representation
Section 002, SEM
Thai Theater: Women's Lives in the Ramayana

Instructor: Damrhung,Pornrat

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will use stories of the life of Seeda (known in other forms of the Ramayana as Sita or Sinta) from old Thai sources as vehicles for students/performers to create and stage new versions of Seeda's life by working through and developing what is familiar to them in these old stories. In this way the project will introduce participants not just to a classical tradition from far away, but also to what such a tradition can teach them about their own arts and talents. The result will weave between old and new, between East and West, between Seeda's stories and their own, thereby helping audiences and performers alike to expand their own worlds.

The course's final project, a theater piece called "Stories of Seeda" will use English words and a modernized Thai / Southeast Asian setting to retell Seeda's life in a way that highlights its parallels and similarities to those familiar to the performers. By creating a space in between what is old and new, and in Thailand and in Michigan, performers can see how far — and how close — their lives are to that of Seeda and then relay this distance to audiences.

"Stories of Seeda" will be a contemporary production based on Thai classical stories, using classical Thai forms and motifs to let performers highlight both the importance of the old stories of Seeda's life and the importance of contemporary women's lives. The choice of Seeda — the reincarnation of the Goddess Lakshemi, who suffered so much in her life — is based on the many neglected parts of Seeda's life that are worth sharing as reminders of her experience as a powerful and precious woman who can touch everybody's heart, rather than as one who mainly honored her husband, Rama.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 350 — Women and the Community
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Welch,Leseliey Rose

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr

Women and the Community" aims to address the gaps and misconceptions that often exist between feminism as an academic discourse and feminism in practice. Through classroom engagement and community involvement, students will explore the intersection of academia and activism as it pertains to working to improve the lives of women and their communities. WS350 students commit to volunteering in an area community-based organization as well as to active participation in the classroom. The course will consider the writings and work of well- and lesser-known activists and feminists; local, national, and international activism efforts current and past; and the roles of necessity, inspiration, and/or choice in working towards social justice. Students will have the opportunity to dialogue with community activists from diverse backgrounds and learn about community activism from a variety of perspectives. The course will encourage students to see themselves as world citizens and to assess their own passions and potential contributions to creating a more just world. Through readings, written assignments, classroom participation, and service experiences this course endeavors to nurture and facilitate: critical thinking about community service, feminisms, and their relationships to social change; consideration of how feminist thought can be applied to work in communities and how communities can inform feminist thought; and the development of skills for working effectively within community-based organizations and with communities around issues that affect women's lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: 240/EQ.&P.I.

WOMENSTD 357 — Feminist Practices in a Global Context
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wang,Zheng

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Feminist activism has long been a global phenomenon. How do we understand feminist practices in various locations as well as the relationships between feminisms in the east and west, and the local and global? When racial relations, sexuality, and abortion right are important issues for feminists in the U.S., what are the major issues concerning feminists in other countries? Without assuming a universal course of development of women's activism, this course adopts a comparative approach to the investigation of particular historical processes of women's movements in the three countries, the United States, India, and China. Focusing on the feminist activism in the three countries, this course attempts to ground our understanding of globalization in local history, and to present in a concrete way that feminisms have histories and meanings that extend far beyond the North American continent. By comparison, we also hope to illuminate the cultural parameters of each location that have shaped various feminist practices.

Personal narratives (in both textual and visual forms) of feminist activists from the three locations constitute the main body of texts for this course. Other readings and documentaries will provide historical backgrounds to these personal narratives. Students will be encouraged to actively participate in analyzing and comparing the textual and visual material in the process of learning diverse feminist issues crossing national boarders and from the personal to the political. This course presumes a willingness to engage in hard thinking, questioning, and respectful listening to the voices (spoken and written) of others.

Course Requirements: Weekly 1-pg journal entry; two 4-pg essays; 10-pg term paper or 20 minute documentary of a local feminist group; class participation.

Intended Audience: Women's Studies students; students interested in activism and/or global issues.

Class Format: 3 hours per week in seminar format

Advisory Prerequisite: one course in Women's Studies

WOMENSTD 363 — Asian/Pacific American Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in the United States. Texts and films include an introduction to materials by and about Asian/Pacific Islander American (APIA) women, from historical, anthropological, sociological, psychological, musical, and literary perspectives, thereby allowing students to compare and contrast the experiences of different ethnicities and generations. Discussions and assignments will examine the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality in APIA women's lives. Learning critical theories about feminism, immigration, and globalization will show how APIA women have become agents of social change, publicly and privately, at home and in their communities. For the term project, students will have the option of writing an oral history research essay, OR doing a creative project, OR volunteering with New Visions: Alliance to End Violence in Asian/Asian American Communities.

WOMENSTD 370 — Women in American History to 1870
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Karlsen,Carol F

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the history of American women — as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes and regional, racial, and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early sixteenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's social relations; and to women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

WOMENSTD 371 — Women in American History Since 1870
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

WOMENSTD 380 — Special Topics
Section 001, LEC
Sociology of Sexuality.

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Human sexuality is often thought of as a realm of experience outside of or unmarked by society. In contrast, this course introduces students to the myriad ways in which sexual desire and sexual activity are structured by social relations, and to the ways that sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual identities vary in time and space. Social scientific theories of sexuality are considered, and cross-cultural and historical accounts of sexual practices are reviewed. Other topics include the historical emergence and elaboration of forms of sexual desire ("sexualities" and categories of sexual orientation/preference), sexual subcultures and communities; relationships between sexual identity and sexual behavior; sexual hierarchies; sexual ethics; the political manipulation of sexuality; the institutional nature of heterosexuality; and the ways in which sexuality as a social institution intersects with hierarchies of race, class, and gender.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 385 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 100 or 240, and one 300-level WOMENSTD course

WOMENSTD 386 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: W S 385

WOMENSTD 387 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: W S 386

WOMENSTD 389 — Junior Honors Writing Workshop
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Meisler,Richard A
Instructor: Rosen,Hannah

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This course is designed to help students develop the research and analytical skills necessary to complete an interdisciplinary Honors thesis. Through reading assignments and guest speakers, we will explore research methods, argument formulation, and standards of evidence in different disciplines. The bulk of our work, however, will focus on each student formulating her/his thesis topic, conducting a literature review, identifying sources, and writing a research proposal outlining the problem or hypothesis and research design for the thesis. In individual meetings, the instructor will assist each student in identifying an appropriate faculty member to advise her/his thesis research and writing during senior year. Students will also read and comment on each others research proposals.

WOMENSTD 400 — Women's Reproductive Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Johnson,Timothy R B
Instructor: Harris,Lisa H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course explores aspects of women's reproductive health from biomedical, social, cultural, public health, political and health policy perspectives. Topics include reproductive physiology, sexual health, contraception and family planning, sexually transmitted infections, infertility and reproductive technologies, pregnancy loss, pregnancy, childbirth, and breastfeeding. The course aims to teach the biomedical knowledge essential to understanding these topics, and in addition offers students the tools to critically evaluate this knowledge from a feminist perspective. Race and racial disparities in reproductive health and health care are also considered. While the initial focus of the course is on U.S. frameworks for health care, reproductive health in transnational and global contexts is also considered.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

WOMENSTD 415 — Studies in Gender and the Arts
Section 001, LEC
Women Artists in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from the Netherlands, England, Spain and elsewhere. We examine spaces and modes of production (primarily courts, convents, and cities), and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. We also consider the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

IV. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and one course in Women's Studies or History of Art.

WOMENSTD 416 — Women in Victorian England
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zemgulys,Andrea Patricia

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Focusing on the later Victorian and Edwardian periods in England (from about 1870-1920), this course will examine how women's lives were shaped by 'separate spheres' ideology — a set of powerful and rationalizing ideas that grew middle-class England in the Victorian period by preserving house and home as the 'proper' sphere of women, and preserving business and political life as the 'natural' sphere of men. We will explore topics ranging from marriage and household economy, to slum-reform, shopping, and the campaign for voting rights. Readings will include secondary sources in the history of the period, primary sources by political and social reformers (Octavia Hill and J.S. Mill), a cookbook, and several novels (by George Eliot, George Gissing, and Virginia Woolf). Students will be expected to write two papers, eight paragraphs, and two exams.


Approximate textbook cost: $80.


This course fulfills New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

WOMENSTD 419 — Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Robinson,Amorie Alexia

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the analysis of group work and facilitation using a multicultural perspective/context. Attention will be given throughout the course to the influence of the intersections between gender, race, attractional orientation, and other identities that can affect group process and facilitation. Theory, research, and cultural, personal, and life experiences of individuals and groups will be explored for the purposes of developing a fuller understanding and appreciation of varying populations that group facilitators may encounter. This course is designed as an experiential process in which what is learned is also experienced and using these experiences for the foundation for learning the concepts and principles presented. Upon completion of this course, you are expected to have built skills for effective analysis of and participation in group work in a multicultural context.

Through experiential learning and theoretical analysis, we will examine the impact and consequences of social norms, practices, inequities, personal experiences, and psychosocial stressors of those who have been historically stigmatized in American society such as women of color, gay men/lesbians, etc., in order to better understand and appreciate the psychological and emotional struggles they might bring with them into the group process. How best to effectively work with groups regardless of their composition is a goal of this course for each student. Focus will be on the experience of short term groups that are generally formed out of the need for support, education, and consciousness-raising.

This course is designed as a training course for students intending to facilitate small groups through WOMENSTD 420 (Group Facilitation in Women's Studies). It may also be used as supplementary training for other types of facilitation experiences (i.e., Intergroup Relations and Conflict, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center, Project Community, or Lesbian Gay Bi Affairs Office). As a student in WOMENSTD 419, you are encouraged to apply to participate as a facilitator in WOMENSTD 420 which is a direct application of the WOMENSTD 419 curriculum.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or Psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended.

WOMENSTD 420 — Group Facilitation in Women's Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Students apply knowledge and expertise with core concepts of the Women's Studies curriculum while facilitating small groups of 8-10 students in WOMENSTD 100, Gendered Lives in U.S. Society. Students will develop skills in group facilitation, feminist pedagogy, group problem-solving and program-planning. Supervision and group facilitation training is provided by faculty and in peer supervision groups throughout the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 419 and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 422 — Feminist Political Theory
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course offers an introduction to feminist theory as it enhances and complicates the study of politics. We will read alternative accounts of the politics of gender, accounts that situate different issues and concerns at their center: e.g., sexuality, domestic and reproductive labor; transnational differences in women's situation and experience, etc. Throughout the course we will be considering how feminist analyses shed light (and sometimes heat) on political concepts of enduring significance: freedom, power, obligation, citizenship, and justice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

WOMENSTD 440 — Issues and Controversies in the New Scholarship on Women
Section 001, SEM
Gender Discrimination

Instructor: Kirkland,Anna R; homepage
Instructor: Cortina,Lilia M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is an interdisciplinary, co-taught seminar required for all senior Women's Studies concentrators. The theme for WOMENSTD 440 in Winter 07 will be gender discrimination, with a particular focus on the employment context. We will examine this phenomenon through a variety of feminist perspectives, grounded in psychology, sociology, management, and the law. Through multidisciplinary reading and writing, the course will address such questions as: how do we define "discrimination," how is it defined for us (as in the law), and how well do those understandings fit together? What forms does gender discrimination take in the contemporary American workplace? How do representations of gender discrimination in popular culture compare with the picture of it established by academic researchers? Equally important, what can we do to combat discrimination, using individual, social, and legal action?

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 and 330.

WOMENSTD 447 — Sociology of Gender
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender that focuses on how gender is embedded in social life. At the individual level, gender is an essential aspect of personhood and personal experience; at the institutional level, gender is a major way that societies differentiate their members. At both the individual and institutional levels, gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality to structure identities, rights, privileges, and opportunities. Specific topics of study include gender identity, how children and adults "become" gendered and "do" their gender(s), gender and sport, gender and desire, the binary nature of the North American gender order, transgenderism, and intersexuality.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 200/301/443/PSYCH 405/WOMENSTD 405/permisson of instructor

WOMENSTD 470 — Gender & Sexuality in India
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Ramaswamy,Sumathi

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar considers the transformations of gender and sexual relations through time and across regions and social communities in different parts of India. The aim of the course is to examine the significance of gender and sexuality as historical constructs through which we might analyze Indian society and culture. We will begin the course by considering the historiographical and theoretical problems that confront scholars interested in women's history. We will next move to a broad survey of the history of women in the subcontinent from ancient times to the present. With this background, we will go on to consider in some detail the following topics: gender and religion; the impact of colonialism, nationalism and religious fundamentalism on the economic and cultural realities of women's lives; women, law and the state; women and politics; and the cultural politics of sexuality. Through an analysis of such issues, we will attempt to understand if there is something distinctly "Indian" about the gendered landscape of India.

WOMENSTD 481 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Senior Honors Seminar

Instructor: Ceballo,Rosario E

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 482 — Special Topics Minicourse
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

This course takes up a single topic of a very specific or contemporary nature.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 483 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Int'l Reproductive Health Policy

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

This class is focused on global reproductive and maternity health policy and how it shapes the local provision of women's health care services in developing countries emphasizing Latin America. The first portion of this course will build upon our current U.S. biomedical understanding of major conditions affecting women's reproductive health e.g., pregnancy, reproductive control, assisted reproduction and sexually transmitted infections and will raise challenges from a feminist perspective, encouraging expanded models that address the complexity of individual women's reproductive health within a domestic and transnational, global context. Understanding women's reproductive health within this context requires broader consideration of the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, class, culture, geography, economic status, nation and other identities. This will include considerations of access to health care personnel, resources and services as a background to opportunities to improve women's health status locally. The final portion of the course will take these expanded discussions from a health policy level to a focus on the World Health Organization's Millennium Development Goals related to women's reproductive health and Safe Motherhood policy initiatives that invoke a human rights argument for the promotion of maternal and infant health. As a case example, we will focus on the role of skilled birth attendants and midwives as key actors in the Safe Motherhood Initiative but whose role is defined through the lens of gender dynamics and authoritative knowledge that shapes how maternal child health policy is reviewed, considered and implemented.

For those students who are interested and who have Spanish Language speaking skills, there is a service learning study abroad component to this course where two weeks (June 17-June 30) are spent in a rural Honduras community focused providing reproductive and maternity health care education and services.

WOMENSTD 220 (Perspectives in Women's Health) is the prerequisite for this course rather than WOMENSTD 240 (Intro to Women's Studies).

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 483 — Special Topics
Section 002, SEM
Feminism in the Global Field

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

The pedagogy of action is the kernel of empowering ordinary people to act in their communities to address their own pressing problems. At the heart of this methodology is the philosophy that people can take responsibility for themselves if given the right tools, that literacy was not a requirement for education. Students will use this methodology to teach HIV prevention in groups of two or three depending on the size of the site. They will not only teach HIV prevention, but leave in place enough local persons who can continue this process. It is expected that the student, before leaving for their site in South Africa, will have completed teaching this module to a local community in his or her home community in the U.S. The process of the student's own transformation begins here. The idea is to give them new eyes so that they could see themselves and the world anew.

This class is designed to prepare the student for their work in South Africa. All students who are accepted in this program must attend this class. Readings and discussions about the issues, ideas, culture and politics of the young American student teaching in South Africa will be rigorously addressed.

  • What and where is South Africa?
  • What are the myths and perceptions of this African country?
  • Is this trip a chance to have a vacation or to take seriously this place as a site of cultural significance, a place of ideas and learning?
  • What does it mean to be an American in the world today?
  • How do South Africans see Americans?
  • What kind of American do you want to be and present to the world.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 485 — Gender, Mentoring, and Technology
Section 001, SEM
Mentoring Gender & Technology

Instructor: Marra,Tiffany Vera

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender, and technology and adolescent girl's development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the SmartGirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the Smartgirl.org project. This class will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender).

WOMENSTD 485 — Gender, Mentoring, and Technology
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Marra,Tiffany Vera

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender, and technology and adolescent girl's development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the SmartGirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the Smartgirl.org project. This class will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender).

WOMENSTD 490 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of WOMENSTD 490 and 491.

The Honors Thesis

The thesis may take a variety of forms, for example: an activism project, a research project, or a creative or performance piece. Whatever the form of the thesis, it must include a piece of scholarly writing that reflects the student's engagement with Women's Studies. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the Women's Studies Program, the honors thesis advisor has the responsibility of determining the appropriate methodology, length, and format of the thesis, based on disciplinary norms and expectations. These expectations should be established clearly, and the specific plans for the thesis (kind of supervision and form of thesis) should be discussed and agreed upon by the thesis advisor and the student early on.

Selection of an appropriate thesis advisor is crucial to the success of the Honors thesis. Only members of the Women's Studies faculty may serve as Honors thesis advisors in Women's Studies. Go to http://www.lsa.umich.edu/women/about/facultyalpha.htm for faculty listings.

During the senior year, honors concentrators register for WOMENSTD 490 the first term and WOMENSTD 491 the second term. In these independent study courses they conduct the research and writing for the thesis under the close faculty supervision of the thesis advisor. . At the beginning of the Fall Semester, the student should provide the thesis advisor with a Plan of Study that includes 1) a research proposal, 2) a list of research and writing goals for the Fall semester 3) a research schedule indicating when and how the student will accomplish his/her research and writing goals, and 4) a preliminary bibliography. The advisor should approve the plan of study no later than the 3rd week of the semester. At the end of the semester, both the student and the thesis advisor will submit reports on the student's progress to the Director of Undergraduate Studies for review.

To register for 490 and 491 the student should submit the independent study form signed by the thesis advisor to the Women's Studies office staff. The staff will then add an electronic override and the student may register for the course the following business day.

The student may receive a "Y" grade in WOMENSTD 490 until the thesis is completed. In the case of a "Y" grade, the thesis advisor submits a Supplemental Grade Report when the thesis is completed or the student formally exits the Honors Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators.

WOMENSTD 491 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of WOMENSTD 490 and 491.

During the senior year, honors concentrators register for WOMENSTD 490 the first term and WOMENSTD 491 the second term. In these independent study courses they conduct the research and writing for the thesis under the close faculty supervision of the thesis advisor. . At the beginning of the Fall Semester, the student should provide the thesis advisor with a Plan of Study that includes 1) a research proposal, 2) a list of research and writing goals for the Fall semester 3) a research schedule indicating when and how the student will accomplish his/her research and writing goals, and 4) a preliminary bibliography. The advisor should approve the plan of study no later than the 3rd week of the semester. At the end of the semester, both the student and the thesis advisor will submit reports on the student's progress to the Director of Undergraduate Studies for review.

To register for 490 and 491 the student should submit the independent study form signed by the thesis advisor to the Women's Studies office staff. The staff will then add an electronic override and the student may register for the course the following business day.

The student may receive a "Y" grade in WOMENSTD 490 until the thesis is completed. In the case of a "Y" grade, the thesis advisor submits a Supplemental Grade Report when the thesis is completed or the student formally exits the Honors Program.

The Second Reader

The second reader of the thesis is a faculty member chosen jointly by the student and the thesis advisor by the end of the fall semester of the senior year. The second reader need not be affiliated with the Women's Studies Program, but his or her area of expertise should be relevant to the thesis topic. The contribution of the second reader may vary, but the student should consult with the second reader while s/he is writing the thesis, and the second reader should comment on thesis drafts as well as contribute to the final evaluation of the thesis.

Completing the Honors Thesis

The thesis is to be submitted to both the thesis advisor and the second reader no later than the last day of classes in the term in which the student intends to graduate. (Graduating seniors will have already submitted their Honors Concentration Release form, Honors Card, and diploma application to the Honors Program, and completed a distribution worksheet with a General Advisor.) The student should also submit three copies of the thesis, with a cover sheet that includes the thesis title, student name, thesis advisor name and telephone number, and second reader name to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Women's Studies for the Undergraduate Committee.

The thesis advisor and the second reader determine whether the thesis should receive an Honors notation and may recommend what kind of notation it should receive. The faculty members of the Undergraduate Committee will read all theses that have been deemed worthy of an Honors notation and assign a notation of "Honors," "High Honors," or "Highest Honors," to each one. Not more than one week after graduation the Director of Undergraduate Studies will inform the student, the advisor, and the second reader of the Honors notation the thesis has been awarded. The Director of Undergraduate Studies then forwards the student name, thesis title, and Honors notation to the Honors Program.

The Honors notation is recorded on the student's diploma and transcript. There will be no notation on the diploma or transcript if the student receives no honors.

The student should provide one bound copy of the thesis to be kept on file in the Women's Studies Program Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators. Permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 530 — Theories of Feminism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Smith,Andrea Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores important trends and debates in feminist theory over the last three decades. We will examine various ways that feminist scholars across the disciplines have theorized power and difference with regard to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nation. We will also consider critiques of mainstream feminist theories from alternative feminist perspectives. And we will explore the relationship of particular theories to political practice and changing historical circumstances. Although our readings will focus on theoretical works, seminar discussion and writing assignments will encourage exploration of how feminist theories might enrich and illuminate participants' own research and scholarship.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 580 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 590 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

WOMENSTD 601 — Approaches to Feminist Scholarship in the Humanities
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hubbs,Nadine M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

What do feminist humanists do and how do they do it? This course explores these questions through comparative analysis of significant works of scholarship by feminists working in various disciplines, including literary studies, history, cultural anthropology and cultural studies. In particular, the course will investigate how experience is used to establish authority, how images and other cultural products function as evidence, why and how history matters, how theory enables the interrogation of knowledge production, and how various writing strategies are deployed for different aims. This course is aimed at graduate students interested in practicing as well as understanding feminist scholarship in order to enrich and deepen their disciplinary work through the use of feminist approaches and methodologies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 602 — Approaches to Feminist Scholarship in the Social Sciences
Section 001, SEM
Approaches to Feminist Scholarship in the Social Sciences

Instructor: Lal,Jayati

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course charts various feminist approaches to scholarship in the social sciences. It is designed to familiarize graduate students with the methodologies that are used to research questions of gender in the social sciences, as well as to understand the linkages between core theoretical movements (such as poststructuralism, postmodernism, and postcolonialism) that have influenced feminist scholarship, and the challenges that they pose for the practice of feminist inquiry. We will thus be engaged with learning how feminists have responded to questions such as:

  • How do we Know?
  • Who are the (assumed) Knower and the Known in canonical constructions of the disciplines?
  • What difference does it make when the Object and Subject of research are women?
  • What is the object of feminist knowledge and how do feminist politics affect the production of knowledge?
  • How does ‘experience' work as ‘evidence' in feminist epistemological frameworks?
  • What happens when the Knower/Subject of knowledge is not assumed to be ‘Woman' but is geographically sited and historically located as a classed, raced, and sexualized woman from a specific nation?
  • What happens to our notions of Objectivity, Truth, and Politics in feminist social science after postmodernism?

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 605 — Interdisciplinary Approaches on Women's Health Issues
Section 001, REC
Health Sciences Research from a Feminist Perspective

Instructor: Seng,Julia Schwartz S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides graduate students from any discipline, including humanists and social scientists, an opportunity to learn about health sciences research and consider future contributions to interdisciplinary research teams. We will complete a brief overview of the intellectual and practical contexts of health research, from epistemic commitments to funding considerations. We also will survey the major categories of research approaches (e.g., epidemiology, clinical/efficacy, exploratory/descriptive, and basic science models). The goal will be to enhance ability to influence interdisciplinary health research at all levels, from question formation, to study design, to conduct, to analysis and interpretation, and dissemination to broad stakeholders. Students will gain knowledge of the vocabulary, assumptions, norms, and methods in mainstream types of research. They will be competent to critique such work at the levels of internal coherence (e.g., epistemic consistency, internal validity) and external coherence (e.g., response to socio-political imperatives, external validity). They will apply this knowledge by proposing ways in which their own future scholarship could increase the validity and impact of health science projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 621 — Studies in Women's History
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Morantz-Sanchez,Regina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to explore the issues, controversies, theory, and paradigms developed in U.S. women's and gender history in the last twenty-five years. Emphasis will be placed on an introduction to the historiography, methodology, and theory of this rich field, and how it can further our knowledge and understanding of the past and the present.

There are four categories of obligation in this course:
1. The weekly "core" reading assignments along with a weekly email to the class of roughly one page summarizing and commenting on the themes. (due Mondays at noon)
2. One written book report which must also be summarized in a five minute presentation in class
3. A "think piece" paper on a topic you and I have chosen together
4. Leading a discussion for one session.

A one-page precise of your paper is due in class week seven; the final paper is due one week after the last class session. Students are expected to attend ALL class sessions and be prepared to participate in discussion. Category 1 & 2 each will make up 25% of the grade; discussion facilitation 10%, and the paper 40%.

Advisory Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors with permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 655 — The Psychology of Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cortina,Lilia M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will address key themes in contemporary scholarship on the psychology of women and gender. Samples topics include: women's mental health; sex roles, stereotypes, and discrimination; women's development across the lifespan; gender, work, and achievement; and violence against women. Throughout, we will examine epistemological and methodological issues as they affect the study of these and other psychological phenomena, and we will consider how gender intersects with race, class, sexuality, and other social dimensions. An effort will be made to ensure that coverage in this course links with that in related undergraduate courses (e.g., Psychology of Women; Gender and the Individual), to prepare graduate students for future teaching assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 690 — Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Gender, Politics, Autobiography

Instructor: Smith,Sidonie A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Explores in greater depth some of the topics offered at lower levels in the WS curriculum. The special topics rubric allows for research, readings, and/or discussions of the topic in greater depth.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 002, SEM
LGBT Identities & Health: Theory, Research and Practice

Instructor: Bostwick,Wendy

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the health status, health behaviors and health needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. While the major focus will be descriptive and epidemiologic, the course will also cover measurement and definitional issues, methodological considerations and concerns, theoretical explanations for disparities, and finally, we will review and critique prevention and intervention programs among LGBT populations.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 801 — Special Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Sex and Gender: A Developmental Perspective

Instructor: Ward,Lucretia M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar examines gender role development and sexual socialization, focusing on how children and adolescents come to acquire attitudes, behaviors, and identities related to gender roles and sexuality. Course content will address theories behind gender role development, processes of gender and sexual socialization, sexual identity development, and adolescent sexual behavior. Theoretical explanations of gender role development and sexual identity development will include biological, socialization/social constructionist, cognitive developmental, and gender schema theories. Discussions of agents of gender and sexual socialization will focus on the contributions of parents, peers, and the media. Course requirements include regular thought papers, a short critique, and a larger term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 890 — Advanced Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Every Women's Studies graduate certificate student is required to carry out a research project with a feminist perspective. The form of the project will vary with individual students and is subject to approval by the student's faculty advisor. This can be a chapter of a dissertation, a prelim, a master's thesis project or a project undertaken in the Women's Studies Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 891 — Joint Ph.D. Advanced Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In the interdepartmental doctoral program, students have the opportunity to work out an interdisciplinary approach to a research problem with a faculty committee from an early stage of their training. They benefit from the kind of interdisciplinary mentorship that is necessary to develop and complete an interdisciplinary dissertation.

The course is designed to culminate in the production of an interdisciplinary research paper. The process for achieving this goal will vary from year to year. However, students are encouraged, wherever possible, to build on the work they began in their first year, in the required courses on Feminist Theory (WOMENSTD 530) and Approaches to Feminist Scholarship (WOMENSTD 601 or 603).

The preliminary exam in Women' Studies is based on the research paper completed in the WOMENSTD 891. The student will defend the paper in an oral exam to the prelim committee. This prelim committee should include at least one member from Women's Studies, who is not also appointed in the English Department, and one from the English Department, who is not also appointed in Women's Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must be admitted to JT Ph. D in ENGLISH/WOMENSTD, PSYCH/WOMENSTD, HISTORY/WOMENSTD, or SOC/WOMENSTD

WOMENSTD 892 — Advanced Research, LGBTQ Certificate Students
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Every LGBTQ Graduate Certificate student will carry out a substantial culminating research project on an LGBTQ topic.

The project could be a dissertation chapter, a preliminary exam, a masters thesis or a large-scale independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 531

WOMENSTD 990 — Dissertation-Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced Doctoral Students.

WOMENSTD 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 65 of 65