Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies (Division 325)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

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AAPTIS 102. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II.

Language Courses

Section Students enrolled in Sections 001, 002, or 003, must elect Lab section 004.

Instructor(s): Muhammad Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In Arabic 102, the focus on acquisition of the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures of Arabic is continued through grammar presentations, and oral and written practice based on short readings including simple news items, narration, and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading, and writing skills as well as focus on communicative drills and activities involving student-teacher, student-student, and group interactions. Daily written assignments are required involving short descriptions and narration utilizing vocabulary and structures covered in class. Grades are based on class participation, weekly achievement tests, periodic comprehensive tests, and a final exam including an oral component. Textbooks: Abboud et al., (1) Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, Part One (Lessons 13-25), (2) a course pack and achievement tests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 142. Elementary Persian, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Persian 141. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 143. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the continuation of Elementary Persian 141. All four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) will be emphasized. The class will be conducted in Persian with occasional recourse to English for grammatical explanations. There will be daily assignments and in-class conversation groups. By the end of the term, students will have acquired an adequate knowledge of all major points of Persian grammar. They will be able to conduct simple conversations in Persian, read non-technical simple prose, and write passages on a variety of topics. Grading will be based on attendance, homework, quizzes, a midterm and final examination. Incoming students may join the class pending examination and approval by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 152. Elementary Turkish, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Turkish 151. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 155. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the sequel to APTIS 151 and is the second half of Elementary Turkish. We will focus on speaking and writing the language of modern Turkey. Course topics include the phonological structure of Turkish, basic sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary. The aural-oral approach is emphasized and serves as the basic course format. There are tapes which accompany the text, Turkish for Foreigners. Student evaluation is based on written and oral quizzes, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 172(Slavic 172)/Armenian 172. Western Armenian, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 171. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A continuation of Western Armenian 171. Reading, writing, and speaking are equally emphasized. Homework assignments, frequent short tests, and a final examination are required. Overall performance throughout the year/term and in the final examination, and compliance with requirements will determine the grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 202. Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 201. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Primary goals are to have students develop the ability:

This course is taught in Arabic using a communicative approach. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, tests and quizzes, and a final exam. Required text: Abboud et al., Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part Two (Lessons 33-45), and achievement tests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 204. Intermediate Arabic for Communication II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 203. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the second half of Arabic 203. It continues the process of developing fluency and ease in the use of standard Arabic for both oral and written communication as well as appreciation and awareness of contemporary Arab culture. It includes situational topics pertinent to airport arrival and departure, checking in and out at hotels, using the telephone, making reservations and appointments, business lunch and talking business, ordering car shipment, renting an apartment, etc. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to perform well in a variety of situations, both social and business. Instruction includes a combination of video, audio, and text supported by multimedia interactive drill practice and in the language lab. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final examination. Textbook: Arabic for Communication: Language, Culture and Business (Lessons 11-21).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 242. Intermediate Persian, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Persian 241. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 243. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of Persian 241. The emphasis will be increasingly on reading, composition, and dialogue with the objective of achieving intermediate competency. The two main textbooks are Windfuhr-Bostanbakhsh, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level, I, and Windfuhr, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level II. Additional material include tapes and videos. Special needs or interests of the students will be taken into consideration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 252. Intermediate Turkish, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hatice Aynur (aynurh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Turkish 251. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 255. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish. The course is designed for students who have completed Turkish 251 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It provides further study of Turkish grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Comprehension and oral and written expression will be developed through translations and compositions. Readings will be emphasized. Evaluation will be determined on the basis of class quizzes and performance, or a midterm and final examination. Books cost $20.00 if not already purchased for fall term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 262/Rel. 204. Introduction to Islam.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sherman Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we will discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas as law, theology, science, philosophy, and mysticism. Our emphasis will be on the first thousand years of Islam, but modern developments will be covered as well. Quizzes, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 331. Introduction to Arab Culture and Language.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for undergraduate students who wish to explore social, religious, historical, and linguistic aspects of Arab culture through an exciting collection of videos, lectures, readings, and discussions. It includes an Arabic language component focusing upon Arabic sounds, letters, and basic communication needs. There will be an emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Evaluation is based on written reports (50%), monthly language tests (20%), term project (20%), and preparation and participation in class discussions (10%). Required text: course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 393/ACABS 393/Rel. 393. The Religion of Zoroaster.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 393.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 452. Introductory Ottoman Turkish, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hatice Aynur (aynurh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Turkish 451. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Second half of first-year Ottoman intended to sharpen skills in the handling of a variety of styles, topics, and scripts through the reading and analysis of specially selected texts. Quizzes and a final examination required. Materials cost: less than $10.00 worth of photocopied material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 462/Hist. 536. The Rise of Islam.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The rise of Islam is one of the great transforming events of world history. We begin with the Near Eastern and Mediterrean world in late antiquity, before focusing on west-central Arabia. While carefully examining the sources, we follow the life of Muhammad, the early conquests in the Near East and North Africa, the establishment of the unitary Caliphate, and the astonishing growth and flourishing of Islamic civilization. Main themes include contact and conflict between urban and nomadic populations; formation of a new religion and a new polity; relations with other religions and peoples; divisions along sectarian and other lines; travel for religious learning and for commerce; new forms in architecture, literature, and other areas. Most of the readings will be translations of original sources, including much of the Qur'an and al-Tabari's History of the Prophets and the Kings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 482. Classical Arabic II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 481. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course continues the acquisition of functional vocabulary and fundamental grammar and syntax of Classical Arabic. There will be increased focus on the development of reading and comprehension skills through the readings of short selections from the Qur'an and Classical Arabic-Islamic literature. As a content-based course, it provides familiarity with certain aspects of Medieval Arabic-Islamic society and culture in addition to specialized training in the use of an Arabic-English dictionary. By the end of the term, students should be able to read and comprehend Arabic texts with ease. The content of Classical Arabic passages is similar in content and length to the selections covered in the previous part of the course. Required textbook: Rammuny, Programmed Arabic Islamic Reader, Part Two.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 488. History of Arabic Literature in English.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor LeGassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa and encompassing moralistic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet will be examined in detail. Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists will illustrate the values and concerns of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arab culture over extended periods of time and place. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentation of essays to the class. Five essays will be required and will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 The Encounter Between Jews and Muslims in the Middle Ages. Meets with Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies 491.002

Instructor(s): Isaac Hollander (iholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many are conscious of the conflict between "Israel and the Arabs" those Arabs overruled by the sovereign Jewish state and those encompassing it. Less familiar is the encounter between Jews and Muslims during the Middle Ages, when a large majority of the Jewish people subsisted under Muslim rule. This course is an introduction to that fundamental encounter and to its treatment in the twentieth-century scholarly literature.

Setting the stage is an overview of the religious, political, communal, material, and intellectual settings of the Judeo-Muslim experience and the famous Cairo Geniza is introduced as a paramount source of information for the topic and period. In the second part of the course a series of issues within the cross-cultural equation is addressed, beginning with the questions of cross-pollination between the two traditions and how scholarship focusing on early Judeo-Muslim encounters reflects modern-day agendas. Other themes are the legal status of the Jews in theory and practice; religious polemics how Muslims viewed the Jews and how Jews viewed the dominant religion; and Messianic activity and religious unorthodoxy as arenas of interaction between members of the two denominations. The final theme is a thoroughly practical aspect of the encounter: the challenge posed to Jewish judicial autonomy by Jews who elected to solve family feuds in Muslim rather than in Jewish venues of dispute resolution.

This upper-level undergraduate course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the study of history and should engage students interested in Jewish history and culture, Islamic history and culture, ethnicity, religion, and law. An emphasis is placed on classroom analyses of translated primary source material, informed by preparatory readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 002 African American Religion Between Christianity and Islam. Meets with Religion 402.001 and Afroamerican and African Studies 458.004

Instructor(s): Sherman Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will begin by exploring the meanings of both African-ness and religion for Africans as they sought to come to terms with the reality of their involuntary existence in American as slaves. It will look at the extent to which African cultural and religious influences combined with various aspects of the American experience to shape the ways in which African Americans understood, related to the interpreted African-ness, on the one hand, and Christianity and Islam on the other. Especially as we move into the 19th and 20th centuries, a major focus of the course will be on the phenomenon of African-American reliance on Christianity and Islam to develop and sustain alternative definitions and modes of "Blackness". We will examine the Black Christian and Muslim communities' struggle to find and sustain its own "voice", its own distinctive religious expression and its self-determined socio-religious agenda in the context of the challenges and opportunities posed by American society, on the one hand, and broader "supertraditions" of Christianity and Islam on the other, supertraditions whose doctrines, history, and practices had already been determined by others. We will profile major figures from among the Black Christian and Muslim community and the manner and extent to which they influenced each other. We will close with a look at the present and future of African American Christian-Muslim relations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LSA Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 502. Advanced Arabic Readings in Special Subjects.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 501. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are required to read ten pages or more of Arabic text of their choice each week, prepare a short list of basic vocabulary and useful expressions along with an English translation to be distributed to other members of the class; a written summary report is required as well as an oral presentation to the class (not more than 10 minutes in duration); the presenter is asked to respond to questions raised by other class members during a follow-up discussion. General topics will be read by the entire class with an intensive and critical discussion to follow. In addition, lectures will be given in Arabic delivered by guest speakers, videocassettes and films in Arabic of special interest to the students will be viewed and discussed, and there will be group projects. This class should help develop analytical study skills, including critical reading and listening, outlining and note-taking, as well as effective writing and public speaking. The grade will be based on weekly written reports, class attendance and participation, a final group project, and an oral interview.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 531. Reading Modern Arab Authors in Arabic.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 501. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course (offered alternately with AAPTIS 569, Modern Arabic Poetry, every Winter) is meant to introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading, discussing, and writing about a text in the original language. A special emphasis will be put on styles, strategies and modes of narration, and on the literary and cultural contextualizations of a specific genre. The selected texts, in the course pack, will include novels, short stories, personal narratives, and critical essays, written by modern Arab authors in the Levant and North Africa in the last decade. Recent theories of narrative, and issues of gender and post-colonialism, will also be addressed. The list of authors may include, among others: Salwa Bakr, Huda Barakat, Najwa Barakat, Rashid al-Da'if, Rabi' Jaber, Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, Sahar Khalifeh, Edwar al-Kharrat, Elias Khoury, Ibrahim al-Kouni, Baha' Taher, Muhammad Shukri. The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, at an individual as well as a group level. At the individual level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific text of her or his choice, and present it in class. A substantial term-paper, in Arabic, is due toward the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 532. Arabic Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Some knowledge of Arabic. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Introduction to the linguistic analysis of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Arabic (literary and dialectal), with some attention to historical and sociolinguistic aspects. Topics include the modeling of derivational ablaut, the historical trend toward simpler word forms and more rigid phrasal syntax, the concept of creolization and its possible application to Arabic vernaculars, diglossia, and the mixing of literary Arabic and foreign material into modern vernaculars.

For students with some training in literary Arabic or significant exposure to any Arabic vernacular. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission. Aimed primarily at graduate students in NES, some of whom have strong linguistic interests, but it could accomodate interested students from Anthropology, Linguistics, History, etc. Also undergraduates who have done extensive coursework in Arabic and are developing linguistic interests. Not designed as a adjunct to basic language courses. Lecture/Discussion.

Class attendance and participation. Short assignments and two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 541. Classical Persian Texts.

Persian Literature and Culture in Persian

Section 001 Popular Epic Romances of the Iranian World

Instructor(s): Parvaneh Pourshariati (parvaneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Persian 242 or 243. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the middle of the twelfth century, for a period of more than a half a millennium, the Iranian world produced a rich and fantastic array of epic romances which in the range of the themes and topics that they cover remain unique in the Islamic world. These were clearly informed by a strong oral tradition, the development of which harks back to even earlier periods. The very scope of this genre, as well as their "popular" and "folkloric" characteristics, have rendered these works as unsuitable for "serious" study by an academic world that until recently eschewed the productions of the "non-literate" groupings in the Perso-Islamic societies. And yet the corpus remains one of the most fascinating venues for a systematic study of the ideas, mores, daily lives, and world views of the masses of the population. This course will examine a selective sample of these epic romances in the hope of acquainting the students with this wonderfully rich source for the study of Iranian culture and society in the medieval and early modern period. The primary readings will be in Persian. The course will be conducted in English, and readings will include secondary sources in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 556. Modern Turkish Prose Literature.

Turkish Literature and Culture in Turkish

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hatice Aynur (aynurh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Turkish 252 or 255. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Part of the sequence in required language courses for concentrators, M.A. and Ph.D. candidates. The objective is to continue to develop comprehension ease in modern Turkish through the reading of the literary products of modern Turks. Recitation type of course includes reading, translation, and discussion of content and style. Quizzes and a final examination are required. Cost: about $5.00 of photocopied material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 561. Modern Arabic Fiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor LeGassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic(3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic, and class discussions will be in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 565. Qur'anic Studies.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alexander Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 202. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Selected surahs of the Qur'an in Arabic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 Cultural Memory, Cyclical Time, and the Writing of History in Early Modern Iran. Meets with Humanities Institute 511.001 and History 449.001. Undergraduates may register with permission of the instructor (babayan@umich.edu)

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will focus on the language of apocalyptic movements that animated eastern Mediterranean landscapes as Islam was entering its second millennium (1591), particularly in its Persianate cultural sphere (Anatolia, Iraq, and Iran). Through case studies we will explore the ways in which memories of a past served as narratives for imagining the future. We will glance at the 'journeys actually made' by some who participated in the creation and enactment of these historical dramas. In this process we shall attempt to capture premodern ways of experiencing Time and History as cyclical. We will end with a look at how in the writing of history, dominant discourses came to marginalize these messianic movements, limiting and silencing whole cosmologies and oppositional practices in the process.

We will be reading primary texts in English translation as well as theoretical works on Time, Memory and History-writing to investigate broader historical questions.

Course requirements: Weekly commentaries on the readings, oral presentations, and a final research paper. There are no prerequisites. Undergraduates may register with permission of the instructor (babayan@umich.edu).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

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