Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Chinese.

To see what has been added or changed in Chinese this week go to What's New This Week.

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Waitlist policy for all courses is 1 get on the waitlist and go to the first day of class and talk to the instructor.

Students wanting to begin language study in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, at a level other than first year, must take a placement exam to be held on Tuesday, January 4, 1-3pm. Test locations will be posted outside of the Department office in 3070 FB.


Chinese 102. Beginning Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Hilda Tao (htao@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~htao/syllabus.html

Chinese 102 is a continuation of Chinese 101. The class meets five hours a week two hours of lectures and three hours of recitations. In this course, we do two lessons from the Beginning Chinese Reader each week. Readings are longer than those in Chinese 101 and will take much of the student's time outside of class. Students are required to do "question-answer" sheets twice a week in addition to the character sheets. Students will also need to prepare the Illustrative Sentences in every lesson of the Beginning Chinese Reader and will be asked to read aloud in class and will be graded. Much more emphasis will be put on conversations this term. It is our goal that at the end of the term, students should be able to carry on simple conversations with each other. Towards the end of the term each student and his/her conversation partner will prepare a six-minute conversation that will be videotaped and evaluated by the instructors. There will be a written test or a quiz every week on Thursdays. In general, the workload in Chinese 102 is much heavier than that in Chinese 101. Textbooks: (a) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese (Yale Univ. Press) and (b) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese Reader, Parts I and II (Yale Univ. Press). No visitors are allowed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 202. Second-Year Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Laura Grande (lsgrande@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 201. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of work begun in Chinese 201. Students electing the course should have mastered the material presented in the first 10 lessons of Integrated Chinese (Cheng & Tsui, Co. 1997); Lessons 11-22 from that text constitute the focus of this course. The primary goals are (a) continued improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence and (b) achievement of a basic level of reading competence. These goals are approached through classroom drills, oral presentations/skits, out-of-class exercises, and work in the language laboratory. Daily class attendance is required. Students who are native or near-native Mandarin Chinese speakers are not eligible for this course; they should enroll in Chinese 302 (Reading and Writing Chinese), which covers all of the material presented in Chinese 201/202 and is offered in the Winter Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 221/Great Books 221/Asian Studies 221. Great Books of China.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 225. Calligraphy.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Chen Li

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 101. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

To explore the richness of Chinese calligraphy, this course is designed to include a series of fundamental introductions to the history of Chinese calligraphy, and a brief theoretical framework for evaluation and appreciation; in addition, a practice session will be held in each class to facilitate a hands-on learning process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 302. Reading and Writing Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Miao-ling Hsieh (mlhsieh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Chinese 201, 202, or 362. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for student with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese and who know approximately 400 characters. Meeting four hours per week, Chinese 302 focuses on reading and writing Chinese and covers the regular 201/202 reading material. Students will be graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, daily quizzes, periodic tests, and homework assignments. The text is Oh China!: Elementary Reader of Modern Chinese for Advanced Beginners.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 391. Honors Course in Chinese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 392. Honors Course in Chinese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 393. Honors Course in Chinese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 394. Honors Course in Chinese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 399. Directed Readings.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the Department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual work and directed readings for undergraduate concentrators. Must be arranged with an instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 406. Third-Year Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Wei Wang

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 405. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All four basic skills reading, writing, listening, and speaking are stressed. In this course, students learn to read various styles and genres of modern Chinese, including fiction, essays, and occasionally poetry. Course readings are selected from a large variety of genuine Chinese materials; there is no textbook. On completing third-year Chinese, students should (with the aid of a dictionary) be able to read and discuss most non-technical subjects in modern Chinese. This course meets five hours per week. Of these, three hours are devoted to understanding and discussing the reading material. The fourth hour is reserved for oral presentations, discussions, and skits. The fifth hour is used for taking quizzes or tests. Student work is evaluated on the basis of daily attendance, exercises, one dictation every second day, and one quiz or test per week. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 416. Chinese for the Professions.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 406. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~chenq/416.html

Chinese for the Professions (i.e., Business Chinese) focuses on practical language skills that are most helpful in actual business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. Classroom activities, largely in the form of real world simulation, will be based on authentic documents and correspondence as well as a textbook. Some highlights are: business negotiation in international trade, business letter writing, business documents comprehension/translation, business oral presentation, commercial language, and word processing. Through intensive practice in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing of the Chinese language for business purposes, students will enhance their cultural awareness and acquire vocabulary, phrases, and sentence patterns commonly used in typical Chinese business contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 417. Mandarin for Cantonese Speakers I.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 406. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is specifically designed to help Cantonese-speaking students who have advanced Chinese reading and writing skills but lack oral Mandarin (Putonghua) competence. Classroom activities, based on intensive pinyin drills, are exclusively guided oral practice and corrections. Cantonese native speakers without an advanced level in reading and writing are encouraged to attend Chinese core courses or, if qualified, Chinese 378.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 452. Literary Chinese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 202 or 362. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literary Chinese is the gateway to the vast treasures of Chinese literature, history, and culture. One cannot really come to know traditional China, or even modern China, without the ability to read literary Chinese. It is the language for the overwhelming majority of whatever was written in Chinese from the very beginnings to this century. Although there are some similarities and continuities between literary and modern Chinese, a course of this type is really necessary to help you open up the riches that lie waiting there. The course is designed to serve the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students, of both specialists (or would-be specialists) and those who are just curious about the Chinese literary heritage. Reading materials include a textbook, A First Course in Literary Chinese, and handouts especially picked to reinforce the material in the textbook. In this second half of a two-term sequence, the student will be introduced to many famous works of Chinese literature, the kind of pieces that have been memorized and chanted by Chinese down through the ages. There are brief weekly exercises, as well as a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 462. Readings in Modern Chinese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 461. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~chenq/461-2.html

Chinese 461-462 is a two-term Chinese language course sequence with graded readings at an advanced level. Texts chosen from a variety of sources in both Mainland China and Taiwan include 20th-century fiction and essays on various topics. While students are helped to further improve command of structure and vocabulary in a range of language styles, the primary emphasis of the sequence is on reading comprehension with the aim of enabling students to read original materials with less reliance on a dictionary. Development of speaking and writing skills will also be stressed through discussions on the readings. In the second term (i.e., in 462), more longer texts will be used, and efforts will be made to improve reading skills and speed. At times when Chinese 431-432 (Contemporary Social Science Text) is not offered simultaneously, a social science component may be arranged to accommodate to the demand of students. Daily attendance, weekly assignments and vocabulary quizzes as well as unit tests are required. There is no final exam. Classes are conducted largely in Chinese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 466/Asian Studies 466/Phil. 456. Interpreting the Zhuangzi.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Ivanhoe (ivanhoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 263 or another introductory philosophy course is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of different interpretations of the early Daoist classic, Zhuangzi. We will examine both traditional and modern interpretations, but we will focus on modern interpreters and approaches. The class will meet twice a week for lectures that introduce the material covered and suggest possible lines for further inquiry. On the third weekly meetings, students will have the opportunity to explore issues raised in lectures and readings.

An additional section will be dedicated to examining textual issues of interpretation in the original (offered as an directed readings course). An advanced level of classical Chinese is required for this last section which is not required for the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 472/Asian Studies 472. Traditional Chinese Drama and Fiction in Translation.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course is the development of drama and fiction in premodern China. Written in vernacular Chinese, these works expand the permissible subjects and modes of literary expression giving the reader an intimate "backstage" view of traditional Chinese culture unavailable elsewhere. Course requirements are several short papers, a final exam, and participation in class discussion. Readings include, depending on availability, plays: Chinese Theater in the Days of Kublai Khan, The Lute, and The Peach Blossom Fan; short stories: Stories from a Ming Collection, Silent Operas; autobiography: Six Records of a Floating Life; and novels: The Plum in the Golden Vase (cc. 1-20), The Tower of Myriad Mirrors, The Story of the Stone (v. 1), and The Travels of Lao Ts'an.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Phil. 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This interdisciplinary course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, and literature. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on history, language, and cosmology will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Mencius) and Taoism (Chuang-Tzu); themes in Chinese religiosity, Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism; classical narratives; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China.

Course format: lectures and discussions by Baxter (language); Crump (theater); Feuerwerker (modern fiction); Ivanhoe (philosophy); Lam (music); Lin (poetry); Powers (art history); Rolston (traditional fiction); Sharf (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476/RC Hums. 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alexander DesForges

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century Chinese literary texts with reference to contemporary Chinese theories of literature. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer, changing views of gender and sexuality, the relationship between literature and film, and the interplay of aesthetics and politics in theories of literature. Some questions to be considered in this course include: What is literature? What role does politics play in the production of literature? Is "modernity" a useful concept in studying twentieth-century Chiense literature? Is there a meaningful relationship between literary theory and literary practice? Readings will include stories by Lu Xun, "Sea of Regret" (Wu Jianren), "Miss Sophie's Diary" (Ding LIng), "Love in a Fallen City" (Eileen Chang), "Shanghai Express" (Zhang Henshui), as well as more recent works from Taiwan and the People's Republic. Readings in literary criticism and theories of literature will include essays by Liang Qichao, Lu Xun, Eileen Chang, Mao Zedong, and critics writing in the 1980s and 1990s. We will also consider parallel developments in cinematic production through such films as "Yellow Earth" and "Chungking Express". Requirements: Weekly short response (one paragraph), short paper, and long paper. No final exam; no knowledge of Chinese required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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