Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Comparative Literature (Division 354)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Comparative Literature.

To see what has been added or changed in Comparative Literature this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Comp. Lit. 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 Mysteries and Enigmas

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown (mcbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comp. Lit. 240 recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The stories we will read in this course are woven of mysteries and enigmas. They want very much to answer questions of life and death (what went wrong? who done it? why?), but often pose more questions than they answer. Some of our questions, then: What makes a detective? What does she or he want? What does it mean to solve a problem? How do we know when it's completely solved? We will explore these questions, working under the hypothesis that asking questions is as important as answering them. Readings will include:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Comp. Lit. 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

Section 001 Natural, Supernatural, Cultural: New Sciences of the Material and the Metaphysical in the Nineteenth Century

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The nineteenth-century saw the rise of a number of new "sciences" claiming to reveal the truths and secrets of things and powers far and near, visible and invisible. Many educated Europeans devoted their lives to the pursuit of knowledge of not only wondrous ancient worlds and exotic places; they were also discovering or inventing new ways to explain the reality that surrounded them. Today, some of those "discoveries" are accepted as cogent and scientific (e.g., Faraday on electricity, Pasteur on microbes), some are regarded as mistaken ideas or downright frauds (mesmerism, galvanism, spiritualism, phrenology), and still others remain highly controversial (theories of race, Marx on labor and value, Freud on dreams and sexuality).

In this course we will read some novels and "scientific" treatises dating from the period between the late 18th century and the early 20th century. We hope to understand something of the excitement, hope, fear, and anxiety that the possibility of such new knowledge presented to the people of the time. We will pay particular attention to their views and speculations on those phenomena supposedly caused, influenced, or ruled and regulated by some invisible material entities, including electricity, psychical forces, and wealth, and value.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

Section 002 Shooting the Mob: Film and Narrative

Instructor(s): Lauri-Lucente

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course treats the rapport between literary and cinematic versions of organized crime in Italy and the United States. We will begin with Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's The Leopard and Luchino Visconti's cinematic version of the novel. Although The Leopard does not deal with the Mafia as such, it nonetheless contains the most lapidary expression of Sicilian identity in relation to the dominant power. Then we will focus on the central core of the course Mario Puzo's The Godfather (and Coppola's the Godfather trilogy); Pileggi's Wiseguy (and Scorsese's Goodfellas). There will also be a course-pack with additional reading material including excerpts from novels, short stories, and newspaper articles. Several segments of films, TV documentaries, and interviews that are closely related to or based on the readings will be shown (The Sicilian, Salvatore Giuliano, The Untouchables, Once Upon A Time in America, Gotti, The Last Don, and The Flight of the Innocent). These readings and video materials will help trace the historical background, the development, and the current drama of the Mafia as it continues to unfold and to wield its undeniable influence in terms of politics, social organization, and economic power. Cultural identities will be examined through three privileged thematic categories: language, religion, and the concept of family.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

Section 003 Middle Eastern Responses to Modernity.

Instructor(s): Meyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to comparative strategies in reading literature, and specifically to compare literature of the Middle East with Western texts. The course will be divided into five units, each focusing on a different problem of modernity. Each unit will pair a reading from the Middle East with one from the West.

To what extent does the Middle Eastern literature mirror or echo the Western literature? In discussing this question, we will consider the historical and cultural context of these works as well as the nature of their literary response. The Middle Eastern readings will represent Egypt, Sudan, Lebanon, Israel, Iran, and Turkey. The requirements for the course include class participation 25%, short reader response papers 25%, and a single term paper of at least 10 pages 50%.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 424. Literature and Other Disciplines.

Section 001 The Psychology of Literary Experience. Meets with Psychology 501.001.

Instructor(s): George Rosenwald (gcro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing and one course in literary studies. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 001 Literature of Metamorphosis

Instructor(s): Timothy Bahti

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literature transforms things, experiences, and desires into words. At the limit, it transforms other arts, and our languages themselves. This seminar will study the literature of metamorphosis in three stages. First, we will study selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and the tradition that follows this seminal Western text, from Chaucer and Shakespeare to such contemporary poets as Jorie Graham and Alice Fulton. Next, we will study two masterly stories of ghostly and grotesque transformations, Kleist's "The Foundling" and Kafka's "The Metamorphosis." Finally, we will study instances of transformations of visual art into literature, and of literature into film in the latter instance, the radical metamorphosis that occurs between Flaubert's tale "A Simple Heart" and Peter Handke's film "The Left-Handed Woman." Students will be evaluated by their regular classroom participation, an oral presentation, and a final paper. Texts to be purchased will include three paperback books (available at Shaman Drum) and a course pack. First class meeting, Monday, January 10th.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 496. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comp. Lit. 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2361

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Lit. 498. Directed Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Page


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999-2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 7:29 AM on Fri, Nov 12, 1999.