Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

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A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 1999 is January 14, 1999.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By connecting the two terms of its title, Writing and Literature aims to help prepare the student to produce the range and quality of expository prose expected in college courses. Works of literature will be considered for their effective use of language and argument. They will serve as reference points for thinking and writing strategies. Characteristically, sections of English 124 will involve the writing of 20-30 pages of revised prose, with considerable attention given to the preparation of drafts and to revision. The literary works which will serve as points of reference will vary from section to section and from term to term.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english) as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english) as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar, we will be reading both Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean Renaissance drama and using our encounter with these rich plays to develop tools useful to future literary study. Close attention to language, imagery, and characterization will be combined with an examination of historical conflicts and issues disputes over gender, class, power, and many more which are of continuing relevance in today's world. In addition, we will be emphasizing the performance of the plays, viewing recorded productions and experimenting in class with our own ideas for their staging. The plays to be read will be The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Titus Andronicus, The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, and The Revenger's Tragedy (all available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be weekly, brief writing assignments as well as two longer essays.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 The Making of Race, The Making of Fiction

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar we will discuss close readings and critical analyses of a variety of fictional texts that engage with historical and contemporary understandings of race in the US. Through a combination of fiction writers from 19th and 20th centuries, including Octavia Butler, Herman Melville, Toni Morrison and Mark Twain, we will explore genre and narrative elements in order to assess how these texts say what they say about slavery, racial identity, history and literature. For example, how have US writers shaped their diverse fictions in response to the debates over the meanings of race? And how have these meanings changed over time? In addition to seminar discussion, class assignments will include intensive writing work in the form of short responses, peer review of drafts and paper revisions.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 Literature and the Law

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive readings of works by or from Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, Duerrenmatt, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study some films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 003 Women in the Jazz Age: Literature and Film

Instructor(s): Kelly Ritter (kritter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar, we will study women's writing and art produced during the "Jazz Age" (1918-1929). An influential era in American art and literature, the Jazz Age witnessed the end of World War I and the return of its shell-shocked soldiers; the end of the Gilded Age and its industrial innovations; the beginning of "modern" definitions of gender, sex, and culture; and the 1929 stock market crash which ushered in the Great Depression. We will focus mainly on literature written by women during this period, as well as silent film features and shorts which showcase women in roles of cultural power or change. But we will also look at a male-authored text or two which puts narrative focus on a woman or group of women. Literature titles tentatively include Passing by Nella Larsen; Gentlemen Prefer Blondes/Gentlemen Marry Brunettes by Anita Loos; Twilight Sleep by Edith Wharton; The Portable Dorothy Parker; The Collected Writings of Zelda Fitzgerald; The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald; as well as selected films featuring Mary Pickford, Clara Bow, the Gish sisters, and Louise Brooks (screened both in and outside class). Overall, we will examine cultural and historical factors in the production and reception of Jazz Age art and literature, and ask ourselves with what lenses we now view this influential group of artists who shaped our notions of the "modern" woman.

Work for the course includes weekly reading responses of 1-2 pages each, three papers of 3-6 pages each, and one final 7-9 page paper utilizing independent research. Regular attendance and participation are also expected. Since this course is a seminar, students will also occasionally lead or direct discussion as the course progresses. Students majoring in women's studies, American studies, and/or women's history are especially welcome.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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Engl. 227/Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Gordon (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

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Engl. 229/LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 003.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 004.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 005.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will want to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones from the River thinks: Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone. As the academic term continues and we discuss various 20th-century literature works (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to speak to us. Although the complete syllabus decisions are yet to be made, I'm sure we will want to select from the following authors: J. Irving, M. Atwood, G. Naylor, I. Allende.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will serve as an introduction to a broad range of approaches to the study of literature. The course will focus on three texts that represent three important moments in literary history: Shakespeare's play Hamlet, Shelley's novel Frankenstein, and Pater's art-historical treatise The Renaissance. In each case we will begin with a close structural analysis of the text followed by an examination of the way the text itself represents the act of artistic production. We will then bring to bear on the text a variety of critical approaches, discussing the piece's relation to its historical context, the allusive connections it establishes with other pieces of literature, and its representation of economic, political, familial, and gender relations. As we follow these various lines of inquiry, we will read a selection of relevant literary, philosophical, historical, and critical writings, in addition to studying related dramatic and pictorial material.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In asking the question "What is Literature?" we will be more interested in exploring boundaries and characteristics of different types of writing than in arriving at a specific answer. In that process of exploration we will look back upon our experiences as readers and writers, as well as examine closely a variety of texts. Texts will include fiction, drama, film, poetry, and critical essays, drawn from a wide range of cultures and historical periods. Among other works we will read Dorris, A Yellow Raft in Blue Water; Morrison, Beloved; Woolf, To The Lighthouse; a Shakespeare play, and Twain, Huckleberry Finn. There will be frequent writing of short pieces and a final examination.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Phoebe Jackson (pjack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of "What is Literature?" we will consider three separate but related issues. First, how do we define literature? To that end, we will read a variety of texts, including a play, a novella, a few novels, and the comic book, Maus. In addition, we will examine some of the broader issues that impact the study of literature; for example, who decides if Maus is a canonical or non-canonical work and under what circumstances are those decisions made. Finally, we will consider how we read text. For example, what do we as an audience bring to the text itself? How and why might texts be read in multiple ways? In order to answer those last questions, we will briefly delve into some theoretical readings. Your grade in class will be determined by active class participation, weekly reading responses, and short critical papers.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 005 World Literatures in English

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English is spoken and written in India and Ireland, in the Caribbean and in the USA; so too in Africa, New Zealand and Australia. The same is true of England, of course. In addition, certain "master texts" of the language have traveled and continue to travel world-wide. They exert influence on and are in turn influenced by Africans and Australians; by Indians and Caribbeans no less than by New Zealanders and North Americans. Such "master texts" include the plays of Shakespeare and the tales of Chaucer, the fiction in Daniel Defoe and the poetry of William Wordsworth. This is all in addition to the language of commerce in Coca Cola, Big Macs and Kentucky Fried Chicken. The Bible in English (King James version), the journalese of CNN World News, and the rhythms of North American mass culture (radio and rock-n-roll; Hollywood movies; television talk show; MTV's hip-hop, etc.) have all been of some consequence.

We'll look into a variety of "English" contexts to see what such contacts and transformations have produced. Our interest will thus lead us into, say, Mulk Raj Anand (Caliban and Gandhi), Dorothy Allison (Bastard Out of Carolina), and Austin Clarke (Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack). Other contexts will take us into the worlds of E. M. Forster (A Passage to India) and Raja Rao (Kanthapura); into Ama Ata Aidoo (Our Sister Killjoy) and Earl Lovelace ("Joebell and America"). We will add other "push-pull" instances of language-in-action by way of Shakespeare (Merchant of Venice) and Walt Whitman (excerpts from Leaves of Grass), Mark Twain (A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court) and Aldous Huxley (Brave New World). Note: Preceded by small reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the major assignment for this course will be a Final Project (10 pages) which compares/contrasts any two texts from any two of our English-speaking regions, e.g., West Africa & North America; Caribbean and Australia, etc.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will consider the question asked in the course's title by attempting to understand "literary" works in relation to "home". The novels and plays we will read by Rudolfo Anaya, Bapsi Sidwa, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Andrea Barrett, August Wilson, and Anna Deveare Smith all explore, in part, how humans and their relationships are shaped and misshaped by home and loss of home.

We'll enrich our understanding of the authors' cultural, historical, and spiritual homes by also considering "non-literary" texts/essays, films, art, music, etc. that investigate or that originate in the times and places the authors write about.

In addition to doing a substantial amount of reading for the course, you'll be asked to write at least two short papers (4-6 pages) or their equivalent. There will also be regular graded in class activities.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 Literatures of the United States

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will be looking at a number of short stories, a few novels and films to answer the questions: What is literature? and What is American that is, United States literature? We will be looking at some critical and theoretical pieces to determine what constitutes "literature" (how do we decide what is and isn't "literature"?) and what constitues "United States literature" (is it US literature simply because it was written by someone in the United States? can an expatriate William James comes to mind write US literature? or is there some "thing" some element in the text that makes a piece "American"? Is there a mainstream canon of United States literature with other streams of "minority literature" running alongside or behind it or ahead of it? or does it consist of all streams running together, merging into a single current?) Our readings will consist of a variety of texts representing many American voices, and novels may include Cold Mountain, Underworld, and Ceremony. Requirements include one short paper, a final exam, an oral presentation as well as participation in class discussions and in a class computer conference.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Scotti Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For this course, we will be drawing on texts and films that deal with North America during the period between early British colonization and the middle of this century. In order to get at the question "what is literature?" (or "what is film?"), we will, in each segment of the course, commence with a non-fiction document and then move through fictional renditions of this document and the events it describes. In one section, for example, we will begin with accounts of the witch trials of 1692 (court documents and ministerial sermons); we will then read Hawthorne's tale, "Young Goodman Brown," and finally, Arthur Miller's The Crucible. In this and other sections, we will also read commentary from the periods about "what is literature" and current criticism about the formation of canonical literature. In traversing history and genres and criticism, we will think about the following: how does each period define literature? What is the difference between reporting and narrating? How does a given genre change one's understanding and experience of an original event? How do we decide what is "great" or "American"? You will write short responses to the texts/films and to your peers' papers; one short and one long paper, one brief creative piece (to experience literature from another side), and we'll do some dramatization in class. Texts/Films: William Strachey, A True Reportory (1610); William Shakespeare, The Tempest (1611); Sir Philip Sidney, "An Apology for Poetry" (1595); Filmed version of The Tempest; Cotton Mather, from Wonders of the Invisible World (1692); Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown" (1835); Arthur Miller, The Crucible (1953); Richard Chase, from The American Novel and its Traditions (1957); Amaso Delano, from Narrative of Voyages and Travels (1817); Herman Melville, Benito Cereno (1855) read in installments as published in Putnam's Magazine; Robert Lowell's stage version of Benito Cereno (1964); Steven Spielberg, Amistad (1998); Virginia Woolf, "Character in Fiction" (1924); James Agee and Walker Evans, from Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941); John Berger, from On Looking (1980); William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (1930).

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine gender and narrative experiment in prose fiction texts from the 19th and 20th centuries. Among other questions, we'll ask what counts as experiment, inquire into strategies writers might use to enable boundary-crossing, and investigate the parts writers', characters', and readers' gender may play in allowing or disallowing certain forms of experiment. Of course, in order to understand some texts or textual moments as experimental, we'll also have to clarify our understanding of literary conventions, including generic distinctions. Students can expect emphasis on writing in this course. In addition to formal writing (two short papers and one longer, researched paper), you'll engage in frequent informal writing, both in class and out. This writing will include participation in a web-based discussion in which weekly participation will be required. Readings for the class will include Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Joyce's "The Dead", Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway. This list is subject to change.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL239w99.html

What is literature? In this class, we will read, discuss, and write about six American texts, probably Frederick Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave; Mary Austin's Stories from the Country of Lost Borders; Gertrude Stein's Three Lives; Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man; Walker Percy's The Second Coming; and Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon. Though the texts are quite varied, each of course uses language to express ideas and shape meanings. Who has access to such a powerful tool? Who doesn't? How does the way something is expressed for example, its style, the patterns of the language, a particular narrative focus shape the meanings we make? And why does any of this matter? In our exploration of these issues, students will participate in class discussions and work on their own writing, producing two brief analyses (2-3 pages each) and two longer papers (4-5 pages each).

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What a story means has a lot to do with how it's told. In this section of "What is Literature," we will explore some essential questions of contemporary literary discourse through the consideration of narrative and the delights and implications of story-telling. Using as our main source what D.H.Lawrence called "the great book of life," the novel, we will look at the varied strategies authors employ to present their stories to their readers and how those strategies reflect the writers' ideology and culture. Talking about the narrator and modes of narration in a text can also lead to new ways of thinking about character and plot and to a new understanding of the reader's role in shaping the meaning of texts. I have chosen some of my favorite stories from some of my favorite authors such as Woolf, Spiegelman, Hemingway, Brontë, O'Brien, Morrison, Alexie, and Doctorow. Requirements: a five page essay in two drafts, one 6-8 page essay, a final exam, regular attendance, and active class participation in class discussion.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will divide into two parts. First, a study of prosody: that is how poems are put together and function, their technical elements, such matters as figurative language, allusion, symbolism, tone, genre. Second, a study of some of the most important English and American poems that defined their period or style e.g., renaissance, Romanticism, modernism. The text for the course will be The Norton Anthology of Poetry, whatever the current edition. There will be frequent short written responses to some of the poems, some in-class, some take-home, and two exams. Two 4-6 page analytical papers will be required.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use The Norton Anthology of Poetry. Formal writing will include four (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to poetry: its traditional forms, themes, techniques and uses of language; its historical and geographical range; and its twentieth century diversity. The course will include discussion of oral and written traditions, and the place of performance in contemporary poetry; the kinds of power (from the magical to the political) which have often been associated with poetry; the relationships between secular and sacred traditions in poetry; and the varying roles of audiences and readers in the traditions of poetry. There will be discussion of the function of historical and national categories, as well as those of race and gender and class.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Ejner Jensen (ejjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, a prerequisite for concentrators in English, is an introduction to English and American poetry. In this section, students will read a wide variety of poems from the sixteenth century down to the present day. The concluding section of the course (2-3 weeks) will involve a close study of the work of a single poet. I shall be organizing the course according to poetic kinds or themes, working chronologically within each category. Occasional brief lectures will serve to direct and focus discussion, which will be the primary method of instruction. Student responsibilities in the course include the following: a number of in-class writing exercises (some of them quite brief), one or two oral reports, a long end-of-term essay, and a final examination. Regular class attendance is required, and each student's contribution to class discussion will be a factor in the assignment of grades.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to acquaint you with writers, works, poetic forms, styles, and themes that until quite recently defined the "tradition" of British poetry. In order to appreciate the specificity of the nontraditional literatures studied in many courses today, one must know the literature against or in relation to which those maverick or marginal forms defined themselves. I plan to highlight the self-critical effects in the mainstream poetries we'll be studying that is, their way of critically foregrounding many of the values and positions they undertake to endorse. In the end, you will see that the difference between canonical and non-canonical texts can often be a function of how we read and position them what work we ask them to do and not a result of internal features, either ideological or formal. Selections will be taken from the Norton Anthology of British Poetry; requirements to consist of short (3-5 pages) weekly papers and oral, group-presentations.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students interested in reading poetry with increased pleasure and understanding. We will read specific poems closely to illustrate questions of voice, narrative, diction, rhythm and meter, sound, figures of speech, the line, form, authorship, audience, and context. Students will also learn something about the historical development of poetry in English. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a brief but detailed study of the work of one author, perhaps Elizabeth Bishop. We will also explore how poetry can help create communities and stimulate moral and political thinking and feeling. I expect to ask students to write four short papers and a midterm. Other requirements for the course are regular attendance and active participation in class. Final grades will reflect all the requirements. Texts: Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms, and The Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of English 240, we will focus on the meaning of poetic form. Reading a wide variety of poems, from different periods and places, we will explore the following questions: how do poems ask us to read them? what do poems do to ordinary language? how do the forms in which poems are written become meaningful? We will begin our reading in and around The Norton Anthology of Poetry, moving through a series of units designed to raise and explore some of the questions above; we will then read several short volumes of twentieth-century poetry together, including perhaps Elizabeth Bishop's Geography III and Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah. Students will be expected to read carefully, participate enthusiastically in class discussion, and write four papers.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at and hear poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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Engl. 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will concentrate on the movement and development of Shakespearean tragedy by studying "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so we will also consider the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm, a final, and a series of short written assignments

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Engl. 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will undertake an intensive study of four of the major American novels of the 19th century: Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Melville's Moby Dick, Twain's Huckleberry Finn and Henry James' Portrait of a Lady. We will read some other works (important in themselves), but primarily to help illuminate the "big four": e.g., some of Hawthorne's tales of the Puritans, Twain's Tom Sawyer, James' Daisy Miller. There will be frequent short written reading responses, some in-class, some take-home; two 4-5 page papers; and two exams.

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Engl. 274/CAAS 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the tradition of African American literature as divided into four historical phases: (1) slavery and the slave narratives; (2) Reconstruction and the question of "passing"; (3) the Harlem Renaissance and the black urban novel, in light of the Great Migration from farm to city; and (4) the civil rights movement and recent "Second Renaissance" of women's writings. How do the writers in each period use recurrent imagery to express their identities and often ambiguous relationship to the dominant culture, the ravages of racism? How are themes such as love, money, and family the roles of elders and mothers and fathers portrayed? Course evaluation will be based on class participation and the writing assignments which include some in-class work, four short papers, a midterm, and a final. Students will do two oral reports: one on an African American poem/poet of choice, and the other on a relevant historical topic such as the blues, the minstrel show, the "Negro spiritual." If possible, we will also take a field trip to the Museum of African American History, in Detroit. Readings may include excerpts from Gates' Classic Slave Narratives and Three Negro Classics, as well as Larsen's Passing, Petry's The Street, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and Morrison's Paradise.

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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Engl. 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators and satisfies the requirement for a course in language for English concentrators in the Teaching Certification Program

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 The "New Negro" Renaissance. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Also known as the "Harlem Renaissance," the "New Negro" Renaissance benefited from the mass migration cityward and northward of black people from the southern U.S. and the West Indies during and after World War I. Promoted as a campaign to fight Jim Crow by providing political, economic, and cultural opportunities, the Renaissance movement brought unprecedented global attention to the literature, art, music, dance, and folklore of people of African descent living in the "New World." Relying on and resisting the patronage of white avant-garde modernists, the New Negroes, as they called themselves, created uplift organizations, social networks, and cultural media to experiment with new modes in literature, sociology, anthropology, and the performing arts. We'll explore works by such leading figures as W. E. B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Anne Spencer, Gwendolyn Bennett, Wallace Thurman, Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, and Aaron Douglas. Two short papers and a final exam.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 006 The Beat Generation. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix.

That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by the work being done by Action Painters and jazz musicians from the Bebop school. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, read poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch, etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings. Students are encouraged to attend live jazz performances. The course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Expect brief weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final, plus two three- to five-page papers. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to English majors.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 Lesbian Fictions. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Suzanne Raitt (sraitt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The end of the nineteenth century saw the emergence of a "new" sexual identity, the homosexual woman. In this course we shall read a variety of fictional texts prose, poetry, and drama to explore the ways in which that identity has been imagined, debated, and experienced. It will not be our aim to establish what a lesbian "is", but rather to explore the imaginative opportunities opened up by the possibility of such an identity. Authors will include Christina Rossetti, Radclyffe Hall, Ann Bannon, Audre Lorde, and Judy Grahn. Requirements include several short papers, a group presentation, and a take-home final.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 Platonic Love, Ancient and Modern

Instructor(s): David Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Erotic desire seems to fix upon objects persons, bodies, body parts and yet the mere possession of those objects fails to satisfy the erotic desires fixed upon them. Why? What is lacking in the objects of desire that causes us to find them ultimately unsatisfying? What, if anything, does erotic desire intend, above or beyond its immediate objects? Is that ultimate object real, or imaginary, and how, if at all, can it be attained? What sort of relation is the proper relation to have with it? Is erotic desire doomed to disappointment and frustration, or is there a way to fulfill it? What is the connection between erotic desire and sexual desire or sexual pleasure? between erotic desire and beauty? between erotic desire and love? Is there such a thing as eroticism without sex? Are there other activities besides sexual activities that can qualify as properly erotic?

Over the course of the term, we'll look at how these questions have been answered in a particular way by Plato in the ancient world and by Proust in the modern world, as well as by a number of other writers who inquire into the transcendental nature of desire, its tendency to seek an object above and beyond the objects of immediate gratification. We'll begin with a close reading of the Dialogues of Plato that deal with erotic desire, principally the Symposium and Phaedrus, and will go on to consider some other writers who rework the Platonic tradition. But we'll also consider some transcendental accounts of erotic desire by writers who reject Plato's analysis. Can we make sense of a desire that presents itself as transcendental, in its very structure or in our experience of it, if we don't believe in transcendence? What is the place of transcendental desire in a non-transcendental, material, scientific world?

Here is one last set of questions. Plato's theory of desire is couched in a male, homoerotic context. To what extent is his model of desire a male model? Is erotic desire gendered, and, if so, how? What is the relation between Platonic love and male homosexuality? Is homosexual desire somehow more likely than other sorts of desire to express itself in a transcendental form? Why might modern gay men have found themselves attracted to the Platonic tradition?

Authors to be read will include Plato, Augustine, Dante, Michelangelo, Shelley, Proust, Cavafy, Freud, Millay, Nabokov, Updike, Ashbery, and Dennis Cooper.

Two short essays, a longer final essay, and an exam.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 Gothic Myth in Literature and Film

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Each age has its own myths, reflecting its aspiration and its fears. We will examine some Gothic myths, mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries, which are embodied in horror literature and films and represent changing cultural attitudes. Readings will include, but not be limited to these key texts: Dante's Inferno, Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness. In addition to film versions of these books, we will view some of these other films: Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast, The Company of Wolves, An American Werewolf in London, King Kong, Freaks, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Apocalypse Now. Six hours a week are scheduled to accommodate a few longer films, but most meetings will be shorter. The format of the class will combine mini-lectures with class discussion. There will be several short papers and a final examination.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 Victorian Genders and the Novel: Masculinities

Instructor(s): Pamela Gilbert

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on Victorian genders with a special emphasis on masculinities, especially as manifested at mid century (mostly the 1840s-1870s) in the novel. Additionally, we will spend time reading and thinking about secondary works which interrogate and historicize our principal terms. We often think of the Nineteenth century as a time when "The Woman Question" was a central cultural issue, and this is true. Yet, just as our ideas about feminine identity are profoundly influenced by developments in this period, so is masculine identity defined against those emerging constructions of femininity. New definitions of masculinity emerged as class mobility, industrialization, and the emergence of the British Empire redefined male roles and destabilized older identities. These masculinities, as they were constructed in the late 18th through the mid-nineteenth century, have become central to twentieth century modernity and constructions of subjectivity in the West.

The course will focus mainly on novels. Authors may include Carlyle, Gaskell, Kingsley, Hughes, Ouida, Pater, Darwin, Meredith, Wilde, and Haggard. Class discussion will be tailored to (and by) the class members, so you if need to know more about something, please ask. I would also like to emphasize that, although the course will focus on masculinity, that topic cannot be discussed without reference to female identity, class, and sexuality, among other issues. The use of the plural in the course title is not simply a convention; it reflects the imbrication of gender with other identity categories and the fact that the masculinities of, say, an Irish bricklayer and an English MP are understood, represented, and lived quite differently, despite the increasing sense of a widely shared masculine essence which marks the period and which it left as a legacy. In short, I expect discussion to be rather wide-ranging.

Tentative requirements: Requirements include regular attendance and substantive participation in discussion, three short papers or one short and one long paper (I'll finalize this requirement before class begins), and weekly or bi weekly reading quizzes.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 Women, Autobiography, and the Medical Body. Meets with Women's Studies 483.003. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sid Smith (sidsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 483.003.

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Engl. 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 Theatre and Social Change

Instructor(s): Pilar Anadon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Coldwater, Detroit, Jackson, Ionia, Ypsilanti, Saginaw, and Plymouth, or at Henry Ford High School in Detroit, or at one of four juvenile training schools or centers. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the course is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Poetry

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a poetry section; we will spend the academic term, in the workshop and in tutorials, discussing the craft and techniques of verse. There will be assigned exercises, but for the most part each student will work independently to develop the voice and style(s) most congenial to his or her talent. Students will keep a journal devoted mainly to their reading of poems and essays about poetry. At least one anthology will provide opportunities for conversations about contemporary poetics. Active participation in class discussion is an essential requirement of this course.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002 Poetry

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help aspiring poets to develop their own voices. It will introduce them to new ways of seeing and shaping into poetry the everyday wonders which influence our lives. It will also suggest new ways of using literary and local language as part of the poetic craft.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003 Fiction

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Fiction

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately fifty pages.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005, 006 Fiction. Section 005 satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement; Section 006 does not.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 007 Creative Writing and the Other Arts

Instructor(s): John Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in mixed media composition, especially combinations of poetry, drama, and fiction with graphic arts, painting, music, dance, and photography. Prerequisite: experience with one or more of these art forms and interest in exploring their relations with other forms of art. Requirements include maintaining a journal of varied writing and other forms of composition and completing a series of weekly composition projects, individual and collaborative.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

No Description Provided

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling," says T.S. Eliot. In some significant ways a literary text may serve its reader similarly to a past life remembered, a memory, a dream. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, changing world out of print and paper? How do we carve our lives out of past lives our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what "to forget"?

We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "what actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts and films we read and view, respectively. It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it. There will be 5 essays and a weekly response required.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 The Mask

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our writing class will be responding to some of the strategies enacted by our favorite, most effective, writers. I hope we will come to see "the mask" as less manipulative and negative a feature in our lives and our writing and more as a creative and artful agency of freedom. But whatever the outcome, we want to make the analysis of the concept of the mask an enlightening journey. Each student will be responding to that journey by writing exploratory essays; the nature of the subject of those essays will be determined by the student. Reading selections will be chosen from the following authors: J.Irving, M. Atwood, M. Cunningham, G.Naylor, and T.Obrien. There will be 5 essays and a weekly response required.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Herold (fogh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As we all know, there is more to good writing than following the rules. The purpose of this section is to help you find your voice, to rise above mere competence, whether your subject matter is your grandmother, the expanding universe, or human rights abuses in Sierra Leone. To that end, we will read a wide range of professional essays as well as, most importantly, the work of students in this class. Come prepared to think, talk, and write (about 35 pages of polished prose). Expect a student-centered class with lively discussions, in-class writing, and group assignments. Required texts: Strunk and White, The Elements of Style, 4th ed. Edward Hoagland, ed., The Best American Essays 1999, and a small course pack from Accucopy.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004 Living the Writing Life

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren (abergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do professional writers do and how do they do it? Where does their material come from? How do they use diaries or journals? How do they develop their ideas? What advice do they give to other writers? How do they deal with editors and audiences? Are they creative geniuses or do they just revise more carefully than those who aren't professional writers? And what is creativity anyway? How do you discover it and develop it in yourself?

In this class, we'll explore how writers such as Margaret Atwood, Ernest Hemingway, Alice Walker, Joan Didion, George Orwell, Patricia Williams, and others live with and answer these questions. We'll analyze their work and try out their tactics and techniques as we develop essays, sketches, memoirs, investigative articles, experimental forms, and mixed genres.

Requirements include: Commitment to writing; Extensive journal writing, drafting, experimenting, and revising; Engagement with other writers through class workshops; 35 pages of revised and polished writing.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course (1) that gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers), (2) that allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing, (3) that offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and (4) that keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term. Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006, 007.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course in Persuasive Writing will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to bust ass for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

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Engl. 327/Theatre 327. Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 327.001.

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Engl. 340. Reading and Writing Poetry.

Section 001 Conversation Poems

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The phrase, "conversation poem," comes from S.T. Coleridge, who used it to describe a style of poetry that presents its themes and values as "happened upon" in the course of a conversation with a real or imagined interlocutor. I use Coleridge's term to signal the "intertextual" interests of this course. The aim is to show you how poems bring themselves into being and define their peculiar identity by engaging with other poems (and also non-poetic writing). Sometimes these "dialogue texts" are clearly identified and sometimes they are indirectly referenced by means of stylistic or thematic or imagistic echoes. Latelv, we are learning about the ways that even the most self-absorbed or aesthetically preoccupied poetries are also "about" very specific matters in the world outside: the world of politics, history, cultural conditions. Unlike novels and the more mimetic discourses, however, poetry typically develops its commentaries on the world outside by way of its intertextual moves. You've heard the cliche, "the medium is the message." I would amend that to "the medium becomes the message only for readers who are able to hear the conversations conducted in that medium." The debates that poetry carries on with itself are the means whereby poetry conducts its arguments with the world. I'll try to teach you how to eavesdrop on these "subtler languages" or buried conversations through the study of linked texts from the Renaissance through the modern period. Basic readings from the Norton Anthology of British Poetry, supplemented by course pack of more contemporary intertext poems. Requirements: short critical exercises due every other week, focussing on matter and method. Longer project: construction of your own cluster of intertextually linked texts.

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Engl. 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 Originality and the Modern Self

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course treats British literary history since the late 17th century. We learn about traditional period designations like Restoration, Romanticism, and Modernism, and we follow developments in literary genres, especially the rise of the novel at this time. The lectures explore a specific thematic claim as well namely, that the idea of originality is linked to an idea of modern selfhood. For students who feel any concern about being themselves original, or who feel that originality is an obvious and unproblematic value, the course is an occasion to think again about those feelings. In this respect, the course celebrates literature's capacity to help us reflect on our values and our aspirations. Texts by Behn, Defoe, Austen, Wordworth, Mary Shelley, Mill, Dickens, Wilde, and Woolf; possibly a film. Exams and two papers.

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Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The family, its formation, tenderness, strains, collapse, and reformation, is perhaps Shakespeare's favorite form, social and symbolic, for the construction of meaning and evocation of feeling. We will especially observe his ceaseless exploration of the dynamics of the family in our reading of a selection of history plays, comedies, tragedies, and romances, from the whole span of his career. Other foci for discussion will include his dramaturgy, and his matchless way with words. Plays to be read will include: Richard II, I&II Henry IV, Henry V, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, Othello, King Lear, Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, A Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. Course requirements will include lively engagement in discussion, three essays (4-6 pp. each), and two examinations.

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Engl. 368. Shakespeare and his Contemporaries.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of major dramatic works by contemporaries of Shakespeare, along with a few Shakespearean plays selected to highlight the energetic dialogue between very different playwrights. Designed along the lines of English 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of the stage with cultural controversies of the period. The plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 From Beowulf to Gawain: The Alliterative Tradition. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Laurence Beaston (beaston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The poetic tradition linking the Old English epic Beowulf and the Middle English Arthurian romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight includes some of English literature's finest works. Though related by a common feature, alliterative verse, poems in this tradition are generically diverse, and the gulf separating the Old English poetry from that of the Middle English Alliterative Revival is wide indeed. We shall look at continuities in the tradition as well as changes in literary conventions, subject matter, values, and especially the relationship of these poems to their literary and historical contexts. Besides Beowulf and several shorter Old English poems, which we shall read in translation, the tentative reading list includes Wynnere and Wastoure, The Parlement of the Thre Ages, Pearl, Patience, "The Pistel of Swete Susan," Piers Plowman, and Sir Gawain, all in Middle English. Two short papers (2 pages), one longer paper (5-7 pages), two examinations, and some in-class exercises along with active participation in class discussions will be expected.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Voices of Desire in Medieval and Renaissance Literature. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Stephen Whitworth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do the major texts of the medieval and Renaissance periods express sexual, political, and religious desires? Does pre-modern literature think about "selfhood," the body, and "psychology" the same way we think about those terms in the twentieth century? If not, what are the characteristic assumptions behind pre-modern discussions of sexuality, identity, and religious feeling? And what role can modern psychology play in the interpretation of medieval and Renaissance literature? These are some of the questions we'll be asking this academic term, as we survey English literature from its inception up to 1660. Readings from The Norton Anthology of English Literature Vol. 1 will include selections from Anglo-Saxon verse, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, Chaucer, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton. Students will be asked to write three 5-8 pp papers. There will also be a midterm examination.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 Honors: The Passion for Form: Literature and Science in the Renaissance. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Carla Mazzio (mazzio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the relationship between scientific and literary form in the poetry, prose, and drama of early modern England. Authors will include Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Spenser, Herbert, Milton, Brown, du Bartas, Hobbes, and Cavendish. We will also read selected critical essays on form, the history of form, the history of science, and the limits and possibilities of interdisciplinary study. Some of the questions we will consider include: what are the relationships between formal dimensions of poetry and world, between literary and scientific ways of measuring (from basic arithmetic and geometry to specific ways of calculating money, land, and the physical world), and between practical and contemplative aspects of quantification in this period. More broadly, what are the relationships between formal models integral to both scientific paradigms of order and literary expressions of passion. There will be weekly assignments for this course, one seminar presentation, and one paper due at the end of term.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 Honors: The Culture of Romanticism. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will serve as an intensive introduction to Romantic-era culture. In addition to reading poems by both canonical and non-canonical writers, we will read political and philosophical writings, examine other arts, such as painting, and read modern historical accounts of the period. We will work toward an interdisciplinary, historically-grounded understanding of the literature we read, linking both the thematic issues and the formal characteristics of that literature to the political, social, and aesthetic concerns of the age. Course requirements include class participation, several short papers, a group presentation, and a major final paper.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 Victorian Children's Literature and Modernist Experiments

Instructor(s): Jennifer Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many things." "The question is," replied Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master that's all." New readers of modern texts those written in the period 1890 to 1940, roughly may find themselves seconding the question Alice so sensibly posits in Through the Looking Glass. They may also, though, discover a certain affinity with Humpty Dumpty's reading strategy. Is reading a contest, as Humpty Dumpty implies? If so, who are the contestants, and how does one determine a winner? And if it's a contest, is it playful, or deadly earnest?

Somewhere between a traditional survey course and a theme course, this class will sample literature in a number of genres from the period. Included in the preliminary reading list are such texts as Alice in Wonderland, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, To the Lighthouse, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Travesties. We'll also read a selection of poetry. (The texts are drawn from the period 1865-last week, but expect emphasis on the modern period and on British and Irish writers.) Writing requirements include two formal papers, one short (5-6 pages) and the other longer (10-12 pages), participation in a web-based discussion, ad hoc informal writing, and an essay exam.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 Experimental Modernism

Instructor(s): John Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The immense shift in ideas of culture during the early twentieth century prompted by such developments as World War I, the "woman question," the Harlem Renaissance, Freudian psychoanalysis, and Einsteinian physics led to a corresponding array of literary experiments, inspired by Ezra Pound's slogan, "Make it new!" This class will read closely the new forms of fiction, poetry, and drama, and their revisions of realism and tradition. Texts and authors to be studied may include: Gertrude Stein, Tender Buttons; T. S. Eliot, "The Waste Land"; William Carlos Williams, Spring and All; Alain Locke's collection, The New Negro; Rudolph Fisher's The Conjure Man Dies; James Joyce's Ulysses; Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts; and shorter pieces by Pound, Mina Loy, F.T. Marinetti, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Laura Riding, Susan Glaspell, and May Sinclair. Course requirements include class participation, a short paper, a longer paper, and a final exam.

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Engl. 384/CAAS 384/Amer. Cult. 406. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Section 001 Contemporary Caribbean Diasporan Literature. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course centers on literature, music, and film produced out of Caribbean descended communities in the United States, Canada, England, and Central American (Panama and Costa Rica in particular). The writers (and musicians and filmmakers) we will engage have roots in a variety of Caribbean sites including Jamaica, Haiti, and Puerto Rico and relate to those roots in equally varied ways. Whereas some of the writers come out of relatively recently migrated communities, others are from communities that have been in North or Central America or England for generations. Our focus will be on the ways in which they craft identities and art by juggling their multiple cultural backgrounds and national origins. Specifically, we will explore such questions as:

  1. How is home defined in their works? As a place in the Caribbean, as the nation of residence, or as an imagined place that is neither?
  2. How is home recreated or maintained? Through memories? Through return visits? Through carnival?
  3. What differences between Caribbean diasporan communities in racial, cultural, or ethnic self-definition are apparent do they all define themselves as "Black" across the board or do they define themselves based on nation of origin, nation of residence, language, depending on where they live? Why or why not?

The class, then, is an exploration of the meanings and perceived relevance of Caribbeanness to people of Caribbean descent in the Americas and Europe. Course requirements: one 6-page essay, two exams, group presentation, and occasional quizzes.

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Engl. 387/Amer. Cult. 327. Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.

Section 001 Chicano/a Narrative. This course satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): John Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider the relationship between Chicana/o literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production since the early '60s. Topics will include: cultural nationalism as a response to structural racism, the articulations of literary form and cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance and after, the fate of both texts and their producers within various institutions, the gendered division of literary labor and the feminist critique of nationalist aesthetics, and queer transformations of the Chicano/a literary landscape.

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Engl. 401/Rel. 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse. Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

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Engl. 408/Ling. 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 Reading Early Varieties of English. Meets with English 502.001. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in English 407 (reading Old English), 407 is not a prerequisite.]

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Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 001 Stanley Kubrick

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Stanley Kubrick died in 1999. The body of work he left is a truly remarkable achievement. This course will devote its entire attention to a retrospective of Kubrick's films, emphasizing their cinematic "languages," dramatic themes and the relationship between what they say and how they say it. One film per week; three lecture hours; mandatory small discussion groups. Course may be repeated if content differs from previous election; no prerequisites, but the course is not "An Introduction to the Movies." Previous film study couldn't hurt. The course's reading, Giannetti's Understanding Movies, will give beginners a solid foundation [alternate text for those familiar with Giannetti]. Purchase of a pass admits you to all screenings, mostly at the Michigan Theater. Rigorous writing with high standards for analytical/critical prose. Two 2-page papers; two 5-page papers; final exam; no "Incompletes" except under catastrophic circumstances. Those who insist that "media" takes a singular verb flunk.

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Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 002 A2

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Robert Altman and Woody Allen, two of the most respected and critically acclaimed American film directors, creatively came of age in the 1970s and continue to produce films. While their work owes a certain debt to mainstream cinema, they work independently of the Hollywood studio system and are interestingly and delightfully outside and, sometimes, beyond it. This course will trace the development of the oeuvre of each, highlighting many of the seminal films in their careers and considering some of their "failures." We will watch one film per week, read pieces about them, and discuss both the films and the readings. Students are expected to keep a viewing and reading journal and to participate in class discussions and in a computer conference. One formal paper; one final exam. Film showings will include M*A*S*H, The Player, Sleeper, and Purple Rose of Cairo.

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Engl. 416/Hist. 487/WS 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001 This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Martha Vicinus (vicinus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an interdisciplinary course using historical documents and literature to explore the changing position of women in Victorian England. The Victorian age (1837-1901) saw some of the most culturally repressive attitudes toward women, but also some of the strongest efforts to emancipate women. These extremes coincided with the first industrial revolution, and a time of great disparities in wealth and poverty. We will examine the stereotypes of the ideal woman, and the many responses to them; the struggle to improve women's education and to open the professions; the living conditions and lives of working women; and such general issues as sexuality, crime and prostitution. Readings will include a volume of primary sources, Charlotte Brontë's Villette, Elzabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton, Lewis Carroll's Alice tales, as well as, poetry, critical essays and a course pack. Requirements: one critical paper, one annotated bibliography of primary sources; and one final exam.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 The Language of Poetry

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much of the achievement of a poem derives from its distinctive language its visual shaping, sound, intonation, meter, rhythm, diction, syntax, rhetoric, etc. In this course, we will explore the structure and effect of this distinctive language. Our special focus will be on how different aspects of language can come to cooperate/conflict within a poetic style how rhythm can support rhetoric, how syntax can conflict with intonation, etc. Our major hypothesis will be that poetic language closely follows the contours of our sensibilities and acquires its internal consistencies/conflicts from these subjective forms. These subjective forms, we will discover, are closely connected with the structure of language itself and with the structure of other aspects of cultural formation, including cultural history. Readings will be drawn from various sources linguistics, poetics, stylistics, literary criticism, aesthetics, and cultural theory. The course requirement will be a substantial research paper on some aspect of the organization and use of poetic language, either in general or in a particular poem, poet, or poetic style.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Native American Literature. This course satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Lincoln Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar our main focus will be on a selection of eight or nine novels written by major, mostly contemporary, Native American writers: James Welch, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Louise Erdrich among them. We will begin with Black Elk Speaks, to "warm up" our critical skills and to gain some sense of the background against which Native American novelists have had to work. In their efforts to present accurate, appropriate and forceful accounts of Native American life, Native American writers have had to contend with stereotypes promoted by "Indian-lovers" as well as "Indian-haters." Our study of their writing should complicate if not explode these stereotypes; in some ways students electing this course will emerge from it "knowing" a lot less about Native Americans than they did before, the first step, of course, to acquiring some real knowledge about the highly various cultures, histories and current experience of the first inhabitants of this land. Students choosing to enroll should be ready to participate vigorously in class discussion, to make oral reports, and to write reaction papers each week plus one or more short papers and a long research paper. As all texts will have been written in English, no knowledge of Pikuni, Keres, Ojibwa, Lakota or other indigenous languages will be required. Nor will any dancing with wolves.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 An Experience of Black Literatures in the Americas. This course satisfies both the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Note the plurals involved in this term's approach to the issue of "Blackness in Human Form" in the lands of the "New World." Our readings during the term will come out of the South and Central America of, say, Brazil (Abdias do Nascimento and Antonio Olinto) and the Panama, Costa Rica, and Uruguay of Cubena, Quince Duncan, and Virginia Brindis de Salas. The Caribbean will be represented by the likes of Martinique's Aime Cesaire (The Tragedy of King Christophe and A Tempest), Cuba's Nicolas Guillen (in poetry) and Alejo Carpentier (The Kingdom of This World). Elsewhere, our Caribbean circuit will pass through the Calypso and Carnival of Earl Lovelace's The Dragon Can't Dance into the Rastafarianism in Roger Mais' Brother Man (1950s), in Orlando Patterson's Children of Sisyphus (1960s) and in Derek Walcott's O Babylon!. This will be in addition to the Jamaica that we find in Louise Bennett's poetry and the Saint Lucia in Derek Walcott's poetry. So too Marys Conde's Guadeloupe and the post-European temptation that "Amurca" represents in Austin Clarke's Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack. To this mix, we will add comparative instances from North America's slave narratives and from W.E.B. Du Bois (Souls of Black Folk). Key readings here will also include poetry (e.g., Countee Cullen's "What Is Africa To Me?" and Robert Hayden's "Middle Passage"), Paule Marshall's short-story revision of Shakespeare's The Tempest ("Brazil"), Ishmael Reed's Japanese by Spring, and James Baldwin's Go Tell It On the Mountain. We will also work with excerpts from periods (1920s-40s) of more or less parallel developments involving the USA's Harlem Renaissance, Negrismo in the Hispanic Americas, and Negritude in the French-speaking Caribbean.

Note: Preceeded by short reports (1-2 pages) for each reading, this Seminar's Final Project will require a 15-page comparative essay on writers from any two areas of the "Black Americas": Brazil & Cuba; North America & Uruguay; Canada & Haiti; Canada & Puerto Rico, etc., etc.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 Nature In American Literature and Culture. Meets With American Culture 498.001. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read a generous selection of Whitman and Dickinson, both poetry and "prose," as well as exploring the nineteenth-century context of the two writers and some of the critical literature. After Whitman and before Dickinson we'll devote a few classes to Emerson, who influenced them both. We will compare as well as contrast the two major poets. Whitman writes in expansive "free verse," advertises his masculinity and sociability, and celebrates America as well as himself, while Dickinson's style is distilled, her persona private and feminine, and her approach to society selective and apparently apolitical. Yet both write an endless, generically mixed text; to both the erotic brings danger as well as delight; and both treat the unknown as a "need of the intellect" as well as a source of dread. Two short papers and a longer paper, plus class participation.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 The Environmental Imagination in America. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Susan Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will look at how the various environments of North America have been imagined from the time of Spanish contact up through the present. A section will be devoted to each of the following places/concepts: the tropics, the wilderness, the desert, the river, the swamp, and the farm. For the tropics, for example, we will read Columbus and Sir Walter Raleigh on European anticipations of an earthly paradise as well as the contemporary poet Derek Walcott on landscape-centered meditations of colonial Caribbean history. For the swamp, we will read or see three narratives that figure this landscape as a place of physical trials and male fellowship: the travel account of 18th-Century Virginia rake William Byrd, William Faulkner's novella The Bear, and Jim Jarmusch's (hilarious) film Down By Law. There will be one short and one long paper as well as an in-class presentation and an ongoing creative meditation on an environment of your choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 American Authors: Journeys. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Eileen Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ever since Goodman Brown set out through the forest and Huck and Jim boarded their raft, American writers have been sending their heroes on journeys that have more point than getting from place to place. In the second half of the twentieth century, the modes of transport might be more sophisticated, but American authors are still using the journey as a structure and theme to explore important questions of national and personal identity. Paying close attention to each text, we will travel On the Road with Kerouac's Sal Paradise, with Nabokov's Humbert Humbert and Lolita on their tour of America's motels, with Bellow's Henderson the Rain King on his bizarre safari to Africa, with James Alan McPherson to buy Crabcakes in Baltimore, with Cynthia Kadohata's adolescent narrator Livvie through The Floating World of the 1950s MidWest, and with other characters on journeys yet to be announced. Students will write a response to each text, lead a discussion, and present a creative response to a journey taken during the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 008 Introduction to Cultural Studies

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E417.html

"Culture" is a concept that floats between extremes, pitting civilization against primitiveness, table manners against toolmaking, high art against popular art. What does it mean to have "culture"? What impact has culture had as an ideal used to distinguish between the good, the bad, and the ugly? between "savages" and "sophisticates"? between men and women? This course will begin by tracing the history of the idea of culture in the writings of various 19th and 20th century thinkers: Marx, Freud, Edward Tylor, and Émile Durkheim. We will continue by asking how these ideas influence cultural and interpretation theory. Finally, we will look at the loose collection of thinkers doing Cultural Studies. Our texts will be painting, the sculpture of George Segal and Jackie Winsor, films Aliens and Metropolis, advertisements, and literary works. Some topics include natural versus cultural man, woman and culture, technology and the human, aesthetics and democracy. One major project plus participation in the debate project on art and politics in America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A workshop course in the nature and technique of prose fiction. Classroom discussion will focus on student work with an average expectation of 10,000 words to be submitted during the term. Revision, written critiques of the work of other seminar participants; attendance at the Visiting Writer Series of readings will also be expected. Permission of Instructor required. Students who wish to enroll in the course should get on the Wait List at CRISP, then bring a manuscript for review to the first class session. A list of admittees will be posted soon thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with fifty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the course should get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course in Persuasive Writing will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to bust ass for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL425w99.html

The signers of the United States Constitution declared our freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in the United States. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. These were ordinary people doing extraordinary things with language. What about you? Do you aspire to extraordinary things, or do you simply hope to land a great job or appeal a parking ticket? Either way, you'll need to use persuasive writing. This academic term, we will increase our awareness of, respect for, and facility with persuasive writing. But our enthusiasm for and understanding of argumentative writing can grow only if we care about what we're doing (and even have some fun), so usually you will choose your own topics as we play with, analyze, and practice argumentative writing. To guide us in these challenging but rewarding enterprises, we'll use a textbook, Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students. We'll write almost daily, in the form of short exercises, rhetorical analyses, and longer essays; plan on lots of informal writing and about a half-dozen formal essays of 2-6 pages each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In common usage, the term "creative writing" refers to fiction and poetry, something made-up. What I find disturbing in this usage is the implication that creative is one thing essay-writing isn't. In this course in essay writing, we will operate on the premise that those distinctions are false. We will approach the writing of essays as a creative, imaginative process, in which the writer works with a mixture of "facts" and things "made-up" (another distinction that is not so easy to make). It takes imagination to read one's own mind well enough to know what one thinks; it takes imagination to read the mind of others; and it takes imagination to read those minds in relationship as we develop our ideas and find the language to express them. As we work imaginatively, we will discredit another unspoken assumption: that creativity is an ability only artists have. Our class will be run as a workshop in which we read imaginative texts by professional writers (Thernstrom, O'Brien, Rosellen Brown, Russell Banks, and others) and the writers in the class, and our discussions of them as a springboard for our own writing. You will write four essays, weekly questioning of the texts and their writing strategies, and constructive responses to each other's writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, 323, and 423/429. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a thesis tutorial for undergraduate students who are in their last year at Michigan, have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops and have been accepted into the Creative Writing Subconcentration. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript of fiction and/or poetry and an essay exploring a specific question about writing or the writer's life that perplexes them. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public. All students should attend the first class meeting; thereafter, biweekly tutorials will be scheduled according to the convenience of the instructor and students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, 323, and 423/429. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alice Fulton (slippage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced workshop for those who have written and read a significant amount of poetry. English 223 or 323 are recommended preliminaries. The class will focus on student poems and discussion of six assigned books by contemporary poets. Everyone must make thoughtful contributions to all discussions and lead one or two sessions. Other requirements included weekly poems, exercises, and short written responses to the assigned books. To be considered for admission, please leave the following in the mailbox outside 3151 Angell Hall before Wednesday, January 5th: five to ten pages of your poetry; your name, concentration, year of study; previous exposure to poetry; a brief explanation of why you love to read poetry and why you want to take this course. Prospective students must attend the first class meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on poetry written in English from 1945 to the present. Some experience of "modern" poetry written in the first decades of this century would be very useful, but is not essential. We shall examine two full careers, those of Elizabeth Bishop and Donald Hall (the Hopwood Lecturer in April), as well as key volumes of the contemporary period such as Robert Lowell's For the Union Dead, Sylvia Plath's Ariel (with Ted Hughes' responsive volume Birthday Letters), Seamus Heaney's Field Work, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, Adrienne Rich's Dream of a Common Language and two or more volumes from the 1990s. A course pack of prose and poetry by other figures will also be included. Two papers, a midterm and a final examination, as well as a reading journal, constitute the course requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 461. English Romantic Literature.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will explore the diversity of writing poetry, fiction, autobiography, experimental prose of the Romantic period (1780-1830), with particular emphasis on the later part of the period. We will read Dorothy and William Wordsworth, both Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, Keats, Byron, Austen, Thomas De Quincey, and others. Topics will include: formulations of freedom, scandal and irony, gender and romanticism. Students will write one paper, one annotated bibliography which will allow them to do advanced research on a topic of their choosing, and one take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 462. Victorian Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela Gilbert

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course samples key developments in the British novel through the nineteenth century. We will examine the novels within three contexts: historical, literary-historical, and critical. The Victorian period was the great age of the novel's emergence as a dominant popular form within a newly extensive literary marketplace, and Victorian novelists were consummate entertainers driven to sell widely and well. They were also preoccupied with the condition of their own culture; to paraphrase Richard Altick, rarely is the Present so much present in literature as it is in the novel of this period. Victorian novelists considered it their duty and pleasure to criticize, praise and generally comment upon current issues, and they developed new forms and genres to accommodate their purposes. These issues represent the formative phases of social concerns which we have inherited and which still define us: the role of mass media, the ethics of capitalism, gender roles, the responsibilities of liberal govermnment, the welfare state, pollution, the role of nation in the global community... We will read a range of representative genres and consider them not only in the light of the emergence of the novel as a dominant form, but as documents of a culture's attempts to represent and work out these issues of contemporary importance aesthetically and ethically and consider the ways in which Victorian ideas resonate for us today.

Tentative reading list: Nancy Armstrong, Desire and Domestic Fiction; Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (Selections); Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton; Charles Dickens, Bleak House; M.E. Braddon, Lady Audley's Secret; George Eliot, Mill on the Floss; Olive Schreiner, Story of an African Farm; Rudyard Kipling, Kim.

Due to the nature of the material, there is a considerable amount of reading. Carefully consider your reading speed and the expectations of the other courses you are taking before committing to this course. Tentative requirements include regular attendance and substantive participation in discussion, three short papers or one short and one long paper (I'll finalize this requirement before class begins), and weekly or bi-weekly reading quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 465/MARC 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English. One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 American Literature of Trauma. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Vincent O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Using Arthur Neal's National Trauma and Collective Memory as a sociological overview, we will explore several questions about how twentieth-century American literature, particularly fiction, has helped to shape the nation's collective memories of two World Wars, the Great Depression, and the Vietnam War, as well as the legacies of slavery and violence on the frontier. How do individual, intergenerational, and collective memories of trauma interrelate? What are the significant differences between more documentary approaches to representing trauma and more aesthetic or stylized treatments? The tentative reading list includes Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, Spiegelman's Maus, Silko's Ceremony, O'Brien's Going After Cacciato, Welch's Fools Crow, and Morrison's Beloved. Assignments include active participation, two short papers (4-5 pages), a longer paper (8-10 pages), and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 479/CAAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 The Slave Narrative. This course satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 274 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the early emergence and development of the autobiographical slave narrative, a central genre in the African American literary tradition. Through close readings of familiar and less familiar narratives Jea, Equiano, Douglass, Truth, and Jacobs, for example we will consider the ways in which former slaves' representations of slavery both referred to and shaped the northern abolitionist contexts in which they were embedded. What opportunities did the slave's narrative offer previously-excluded Black voices for representing their lives, as well as their ideas on equality and freedom? Under what constraints did these former slaves labor as they penned their way into the North's public conscience? In conjunction with our close study of these various autobiographies, we will read a wide range of historical and theoretical texts to help us critically interrogate the assumptions about race, history, and literature that readers, both antebellum and modern-day, have brought to their interpretations of these texts of survival. Requirements include student-led discussion and presentations, midterm paper and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 James Joyce

Instructor(s): John Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course for students who desire to be part of an intensely focused group of readers that will work its way through what has repeatedly been called the greatest novel of this century: James Joyce's Ulysses. As I trust we will all discover, Ulysses is a book that is best read in such a group. And though Ulysses will constitute the central object of our study, this course will challenge and reward you with an exploration of a great deal of Joyce's prose, including Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist, and selected poetry and essays as well. At the end of the term we will make several brief excursions into Finnegans Wake. We will supplement our investigation of Joyce's novels with readings from a course pack containing essays (by Joyce and his critics) and excerpts from books on Joyce. The course pack should assist you in understanding the novels; it will also comprise a sampling of the enormous diversity of interpretive approaches that Joyce's work has inspired. We will spend some time studying the interpretive history that frames Joyce's prose. Course requirements will include three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's about ten pages long). You will also give brief, in-class reports. The course will conclude with an unforgettable final exam. Class participation is crucial: this is not a lecture course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 William Blake's Illuminated Works. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): John Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course studies the (scripictorial) arts of William Blake's illuminated works and other literary and artistic inventions in relation to his times and the traditions leading to and from them. Written work will include journal writing with detailed commentary on individual illuminated designs and a longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E486.html

This will be an introductory survey of the developments in literary theory during the past two centuries with special emphasis on the dramatic changes that have taken place in the past thirty years. Major moments will include romanticism, modernism, new criticism, deconstruction, feminism, and multiculturalism. How has the nature of the literary text changed over time? What types of reading are permissible, when, why, and by whom? Is literature capable of providing insights into life? Or is literature the product of blinding ideologies that seek to control us? Can a text be gendered, and what happens when a reading is cross-gendered? Is a multicultural reading possible, if a reader is monocultural? The course will combine lecture and discussion, but the heaviest emphasis will be on student participation, with one class per week turned over entirely to students. Requirements are weekly short think sheets, two mid-size papers, and ardor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu) , John Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course meets once a week for an hour. It is designed to help the cohort of thesis writers with the kind of problems that are likely to arise in the late phases of thesis composition. While 496 is a comparatively informal continuation of 492, students are required to attend these sessions. The course is taught by a number of the faculty working in the Honors program, who take turns guiding each week's meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 19th Century American Literature. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Kerry Larson (klarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of nineteenth-century American fiction, non-fiction, and poetry up until the Civil War. The course will identify important cultural dilemmas and opportunities facing American writers of this period, most notably the emergence of a national culture, the question of a truly "democratic" literature and what this means, the impact of slavery as well as other explosive issues of the time. Authors to be studied include Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Stowe, Thoreau, Whitman, and Dickinson. In addition to a series of shorter assignments, students will be expected to develop a longer paper over the second half of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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