Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in College Honors (Division 395)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

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Honors 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 Organizational Behaviors, Structures, and Dynamics.

Instructor(s): John Tropman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines behavior in organizations, as well as the behavior of organizations. We all work in "organizations." How does the organizational environment affect what we do and how we act? What are the main kinds or organizational cultures, and how do we fit into them? Four cultures will be specifically explored the clan culture, the hierarchy culture, the market culture, and the advocacy culture. Implications for us personally will be considered. But organizations are also actors. Organizations make, or do not make decisions. They need to contend with rapidly changing environments. Organizations which fail to contend and adapt appropriately become "boiled frogs." We will examine conditions, which distinguish those organizations, which adapt from those which are rigid and die. Students will have the opportunity to assess their own "style" and its fit with organizational styles. Issues of leadership, gender, and race in organizations will be a special theme.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 003 Alternative Realities: Science and the Study of Human Perception.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will investigate a number of broad, highly subjective, inherently interesting questions about the nature of human perception. The broadest of these will be the question of cultural relativism: Do people from widely different cultures experience immediate reality in fundamentally different ways? The alternative realities to be explored will be those attributable to cultures, subcultures, cults, historical eras, substances (i.e., drugs), and mental illness. Most importantly, the scientific reality will also be presented in this context. Grades will be determined entirely by writing papers, which will be individually developed and evaluated through individual tutorial meetings held every three or four weeks at the instructor's office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 004 Law and Psychology

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt, as well as some fictional accounts e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues such as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome. Eash student will write a weekly commentary as well as a closing argument that will be presented to the class for one of the cases under consideration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 Numbers and Reasons

Instructor(s): Fred Bookstein (flb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (NS).

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Measurement in the natural sciences typically deals with true values (constants); measurement in the behavioral and social sciences, with problems of managing social systems. Measurements in sciences on the boundary, like neuropsychology or medicine, attempt with variable success to capture stable latent aspects of individual hidden states or histories. In this course we try to untangle some of this confusion by careful attention to the proper role of quantification in the versions of reality constructed by the various disciplines we consider, from astrophysics through, perhaps, literary history. Our approach is by various methods, including logic, arithmetic, history of science, and the careful analysis of instrument readings, answers to questions, and various visual representations of same. Three specifically statistical themes are covered in brief lectures, but there is no associated "homework." The most extensive reading this year, I think, will be Herrnstein and Murray's The Bell Curve. Assignments: four short papers and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 Earthlike Planets

Instructor(s): Peter Van Keken (keken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (3). (NS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This first-year seminar introduces in a small class room setting the terrestrial planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Physical and chemical studies of the solid planets allow for a better understanding of the evolution and future of our own world. This class combines an historical perspective with modern scientific approaches, augmented by the wealth of very recent planetary studies. The class grade is based on class participation, two exams, and a final project, which consists of a written report and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Honors 290. Honors Introduction to Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 292. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 390. Junior Honors Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 490. Senior Honors Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Honors 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 The Complexity and Emergence. (2 Credits)

Instructor(s): John Holland

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many of our most perplexing problems inner city decay, trade balances, control of epidemics, and effective education, to name a few arise when a large number of individuals interact and, in the process, adapt to each other. Such systems are called complex adaptive systems. Simple reduction, where we sum up the activity of the parts to get the behavior of the whole, does not work for these systems. The whole is genuinely more than the sum of the parts for complex adaptive systems, a phenomenon called emergence.

The object of this course is to give a broad understanding of complex adaptive systems, both the form of the problems that attend such systems and the ways of approaching such problems. Along the way we will look into the creative process, particularly as it occurs in the "two great P's of human intellectual endeavor, Poetry and Physics."

Readings: Roughly 200 pages selected from HIDDEN ORDER and EMERGENCE (both books authored by Professor Holland and published by Addison-Wesley).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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