Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in RC Interdivisional (Division 867)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Interdivisional.

To see what has been added or changed in RC Interdivisional this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Interdiv. 222. Quantitatively Speaking.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Burkham

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is "quantitative reasoning" and how does such reasoning differ in form and content from other types of reasoning? This course is neither a traditional math course nor the usual statistics course, but deals with both areas. This course, intended for first- and second-year students, will include a rigorous and critical introduction to various modes of quantitative reasoning, all the while maintaining an accessibility for students in all fields. The majority of topics, however, will be drawn from the Social Sciences. There are no formal prerequisites for this course, but students should have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

We will begin with a discussion of what is typically meant by "quantitative reasoning," and then focus on how such reasoning is implemented (sometimes appropriately, sometimes not). One of the main goals of the course is to learn "basic survival skills" for today's number-intensive world: how to critique conclusions drawn from a survey, a graph, a table of numbers, etc., using Huff's How to Lie with Statistics. We will learn about the nature and meaning of opinion polls, and explore some of the vast literature on gender and ethnic differences. We will read Gould's The Mismeasure of Man, and Bowen & Bok's recently debated book on affirmative action, The Shape of the River.

Requirements will include regular, extensive reading assignments from texts and course pack. In addition, students will be expected to: (1) Participate fully in class discussions; (2) Maintain an annotated journal of articles, graphs, etc., collected from newspapers, magazines, and other sources that present responsible and irresponsible uses of quantitative information; (3) Write occasional, brief papers; (4) Complete a midterm exam; and (5) Complete two research projects. As a class, we will conduct and analyze a brief survey. Each student will be required to produce a formal write-up of the entire procedure. For an individual project, students will select a topic of interest to them for further reading and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 001 Art and Narrative. (1 credit). Meets Feb. 8-24

Instructor(s): Materson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The old adage states that "A picture is worth a thousand words." In this class, we will explore that idea by creating art from mostly found or improvised objects and then share the story behind our creations in narrative form. We will examine the relationship between storytelling and art from the viewpoint of artist as well as audience and will spend some time considering the works of folk and outsider artists; a genre known as being remarkably rich in narrative theme. A tour of a collector's home is planned. Various methods will be employed in developing individual stories including; keeping journals, improvisational theater exercises and games. Individual presentations will serve as the culmination of this group learning experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 001 Character Studies: Psychological and Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Moral Lives

Instructor(s): Henry Greenspan (hgreensp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Discussion of public morality is back in vogue. While Americans express optimism about the country as a whole, "a decline in morality" is cited as a serious problem in virtually every poll. Commentators across the political spectrum repeat the theme. Still, the traditional language of morality does not come easily to modern tongues. What do "conscience," "character," "corruption," "confession," and "reconciliation" mean in the context of contemporary (mostly secular) lives? More particularly, what do they mean at the end of a century that has been marked, arguably, both by an expansion of humane values and by the most horrific enactments of moral indifference and human destructiveness? And how does this history and what we learn from this history connect with the much more private recesses of individual moral lives?

The goal of this course is to think in fresh and clear-headed ways about contemporary moral experience, conscience and character in the forms, and in the worlds, in which they are actually lived. We will draw on very diverse materials including: psychological writing on the development of identity, integrity, and character; social-psychological studies of perpetrators and rescuers during the Holocaust; studies on conformity and obedience more generally (especially the famous Milgram experiment); sociological studies on "narcissism" and competitive individualism in contemporary America; writing on the role of confession and "facing history" in both individual and collective contexts (e.g., South Africa's "Truth and Reconciliation" hearings); and a range of selections from films, plays, and memoirs. IN ORDER TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, ATTENDANCE AT THE FIRST CLASS-JANUARY 5, 2000-IS REQUIRED.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 003 Creativity and Consciousness. Meets with Jazz and Improvizational Studies (Music School) 455

Instructor(s): Ed Sarath (sarahara@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What might the engineer, biologist, and athlete have in common with the sculptor, the poet, and the jazz improviser? This course explores the idea that creative processes in seemingly disparate disciplines may share a common basis in the transformation in consciousness also termed "peak experience", or "transcendence" which is reported by individuals engaged in a wide range of activities. We examine a model from the Eastern Vedantic tradition which delineates the mechanics of this transformation. We also consider a variety of philosophies of consciousness, ranging from the "materialist" and "reductionist" perspectives which are in vogue in the academic world, to the "idealist" and "panexperientialist" philosophies whose roots can be traced to such thinkers such as Jung, Whitehead, Plato and various Eastern sources. Course activities will include readings and discussions, an assortment of creative exercises, and some exploration of contemplative methodologies for invoking heightened awareness. Open to students in all concentrators. To reserve a spot in the class, contact Professor Ed Sarath (sarahara@umich.edu), Chair, Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation. Indicate class, concentration, and briefly describe your interests as related to the subject.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 004 Anton Chekov as Dramatist

Instructor(s): Ivanitskaya

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This mini-course will give students an opportunity to explore the world of the great Russian dramatist, Anton Chekhov, by studying some of his plays in the original Russian and doing some scene performance in Russian. Classes will be taught partly in Russian and partly in English, and they will be devoted both to the understanding of Chekhov's plays and to the learning of techniques of Russian theatre. Students should have enough background in the Russian language to be able to read Russian texts and understand spoken Russian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 450. Science and Social Responsibility.

Section 001 History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare Disarmament. Meets with Political Science 498.002

Instructor(s): Susan Wright (spwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The political problems of chemical and biological warfare and disarmament have achieved salience as the result of several developments since the end of the Cold War. The most spectacular have been the discoveries that both Iraq and the former Soviet Union developed large BW capabilities, both countries stockpiling daunting quantities of biological and toxin agents, and both largely eluding discovery, if not strong suspicion, until the revelations of the weapons programs provided by well-informed defectors.

Also in the 1990s, the Aum Shinrikio attack in the Tokyo subway underscored the dangers of terrorists acquiring and using, or threatening to use, chemical or biological weapons in cities. On the disarmament side, the completion of the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1992 signified the willingness of major states to provide relatively high levels of transparency and to submit their military and industrial establishments to intrusive inspections under a regime designed to deter development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical weapons. But efforts to develop a parallel regime for biological weaponry confront thorny problems, especially how to provide sufficient transparency for credible assurance concerning disarmament in the face of strong military and industrial interests in maintaining secrecy.

This seminar provides historical and political perspectives on these and other developments in this area. It begins with analysis of the efforts in the UN General Assembly and the Eighteen-Nation Conference on Disarmament to rein in the expanding chemical and biological programs of the two super-powers and to establish a norm of commitment to chemical and biological disarmament in the 1960s. It ends with a focus on the problems and challenges today, with emphasis on the Gulf War and international responses to Iraq's chemical and biological weapons programs, on linkages between biological and chemical weaponry and nuclear weapons, and on the global politics of the present CB disarmament regime. Specific themes throughout the seminar will be the roles of science and of scientists in the biological and chemical fields; secrecy and reliable reassurance about national intentions; linkages between biological and chemical weaponry and nuclear weapons and the problem of controlling weapons of mass destruction in general; and the importance of understanding non-Western perspectives. This seminar also aims to develop theoretical and methodological awareness in approaching and dealing with these questions.

The introductory sessions will discuss some of the principal types of framework used in political science (e.g. realism, political economy, regime theory, feminism), the importance of choices concerning perspective and of understanding political issues in relation to a specific regional setting, and the problems posed by a positivist orientation to the questions under discussion. The seminar also provides training in research techniques and strategies, with emphasis on strategies to find and use primary source materials. Primary sources will be used as course readings where possible and approaches to interpreting these materials will be emphasized.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Page


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999-2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 7:45 AM on Fri, Nov 12, 1999.