Courses in Chemistry (Division 334)

108. 2.5 General Chemistry. Chem. 107. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of the 2 1/2 term sequence 107-108-109 which began with Chemistry 107 in the Fall Term, 1980. It is restricted to students who have already begun the sequence. Content is roughly parallel to the second half of Chemistry 123 and the first half of Chemistry 126. Some laboratory work will be included. (Hallada)

123. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Structure of Matter. Three years of high school mathematics or mathematics through 105. (3). (NS).

Chemistry 123 is the first term chemistry course in the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence. Chemistry 125 and 126 are taken second term. Chemistry 123 consists of three lectures and an optional help session with the professor, plus one discussion session with a teaching assistant per week. Topics covered include stoichiometry, periodic properties, gases, quantum theory, electronic structure, covalent bonding, introduction to organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. There are three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination (as listed in the Winter Time Schedule).

125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory. To be elected by students who have completed Chem. 123 or are eligible for (or enrolled in) Chem. 124. (2). (NS).

This course is a part of the (123 or 124)/125/126 sequence and is intended to be elected with Chemistry 124 (in the 124/126 sequence) or with Chemistry 126 (in the 123/126 sequence). The format consists of one lecture and one four-hour laboratory each week. Computer simulations implemented on the Commodore PET microcomputer are used to supplement the experiments. Part of the last hour of the laboratory period is used to discuss the laboratory work just completed. Special emphasis is placed on quantitative measurements, inferences from experimental observations, and properties of inorganic substances. Topics include gravimetric and volumetric analysis, equilibria, thermochemistry, kinetics, synthesis and qualitative analysis. There are two one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights).

126. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics. Chem. 123 or 124; prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 125. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 123 or 124 and should be preceded or accompanied by Chemistry 125. The course has three lectures and one discussion per week. Topics include thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, electrochemistry and coordination chemistry. There are three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination as listed in the Winter Time Schedule.

197. Honors General and Quantitative Analytical Chemistry. Chem. 196 or 124 and 125 and permission of instructor. (5). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 196 and is part of a two- term sequence for very well prepared science students. Almost all of the students in the Chemistry 196-197 sequence are in the Honors Program. Analytical chemistry is emphasized in Chemistry 197. Topics include statistics, chemical equilibrium (weak acid-base, complexation, solubility), potentiometry, phase equilibrium and chromatography, optical methods of analysis, and radioactive and kinetic methods of analysis. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Weekly short quizzes are given (12 total of which the two lowest for each student are omitted in the final total) in lieu of exams; no final exam. The text is Chemical Separations and Measurements by Peters, et al. A laboratory manual is also required and is available through the Chemistry Stores dispensing window on the Chemistry Building loading dock.

220. General and Organic Chemistry: Energetics and Properties of Matter. Chem. 120. (4). (NS).

This course is the second of a two term lecture sequence in the basic principles of organic chemistry. It is elected by preprofessional students and by some chemistry concentrators. Chemistry concentrators are encouraged to elect Chem. 294/295 (Honors); Inteflex students elect Chem. 220/221. Chem 225/226 requires skill in spatial relations, the ability to organize important concepts. There are three lectures each week and a one-hour discussion. The course grade is determined by a student's scores on three one-hour examinations and a final examination. Inteflex students are scheduled as two groups for discussion sections.

225. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 197 or 348. (4). (NS).

This course is the first of a two term lecture sequence in the basic principles of organic chemistry. It is elected by preprofessional students and by some chemistry concentrators. Chemistry concentrators are encouraged to elect Chemistry 294/295 (Honors); Inteflex students elect Chemistry 220/221. Chemistry 225/226 requires skill in spatial relations, the ability to organize information carefully and the ability to recognize important concepts. Chemistry 225, which establishes the conceptual framework upon which Chemistry 226 is based, describes the relationship between structure, energy and chemical reactivity. There are three lectures each week and a one-hour discussion. The course grade is determined by a student's scores on three one-hour examinations and a final examination.

226. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 225; and concurrent enrollment in Chem. 227. (3). (NS).

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 225 and emphasizes functional group chemistry. Some attention is given to biochemistry and to the chemistry of natural products, especially the chemistry of carbohydrates and proteins. The course format is three lectures each week, and the final grade is based on three one-hour examinations and a final examination.

227. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 225. (2). (NS).

This course is a one term introduction to organic laboratory techniques and enables students to experience organic chemistry as a real science. Chemistry 227 is elected concurrently with Chemistry 226 and reinforces concepts developed in Chemistry 225/226 lectures. Wet chemical methods are emphasized, but there is some opportunity to identify organic materials or components of mixtures with the help of spectroscopic information (IR and NMR). The course grade is based upon laboratory work and written examinations.

228. Organic Chemistry. Chem. 226 and 227. (2). (NS).

This course is a one term organic laboratory course which introduces students to certain synthetic and manipulative techniques not taught in Chemistry 227. Course topics include gas chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, reactions run in inert atmospheres and distillation under reduced pressures. The course also includes instruction and practice in the use of the chemical literature. The final grade is based on laboratory performance mainly.

295. Honors Organic Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 197 or 348, Math. 116 or 186, and permission of instructor. (5). (NS).

Chem. 295 is a continuation of Chem. 294. The relationship between structure and reactivity is explored for a variety of organic compounds. Emphasis in this term is on the chemistry of aromatic compounds and on polyfunctional compounds including the chemistry of carbohydrates and amino acids. The lecture material is supplemented by experience in the laboratory including spectroscopic methods for the determination of the structure of organic compounds. Special projects involving small research problems may also be started in the laboratory this term.

300. Principles of Chemical Instrumentation. Physics 240 and 241. (3). (NS).

This laboratory course introduces the components of modern chemical instrumentation. The major emphasis is on signal conditioning electronics and digital processing (wired logic microcomputer methods). The first 40% of the course consists of characterizations of discrete elements (resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transformers, and transistors) in student-constructed circuits. The next 30% treats more complex circuits (power supplies, operational amplifiers, and TTL integrated circuits). The last part treats other complex circuits (analog-to-digital conversion, wave shaping, digital interfacing and communication, and microcomputer operations) and may include special projects chosen by individual students. The circuits include several types of transducers but a systematic treatment of these elements is not attempted. Although lectures are given during the first eight weeks of the term (during the first lab meeting each week), the emphasis is on work in the laboratory. Evaluation is based on laboratory work (70%), written and oral reports on the last unit (15%), and work directly related to lecture (15%, primarily assigned problems).

319. Independent Study. Chem. 126 or 197 or 348; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits.

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Departmental faculty member. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credit hours awarded and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member.

346. Quantitative Analysis. Chem. 126; organic chemistry is recommended. (3). (NS).

This course in analytical chemistry is designed for nonchemistry concentrators and is elected primarily by zoology, medical technology, microbiology, and other biological and health science oriented students. The subject matter of the course is based on the practice of quantitative analytical chemistry which consists of a sequence of four basic operations: (1) selection of a representative sample; (2) preparation of the sample for measurement (which frequently involves physical separation); (3) measurement of the desired constituent; and (4) calculation, evaluation, and interpretation of the data obtained in terms of the objective for which the analysis was done. The lectures in the course emphasize the theoretical and practical fundamentals underlying (1) important types of solution equilibria including acid-base, complexation, and redox; (2) separation approaches including precipitation, chromatography, and extraction; and (3) measurement techniques including methods based on mass, chemical reactivity (e.g., titration), and electrical and optical properties. The manner in which these concepts and processes are applied to obtain useful information about the composition of materials is considered, including the problem of sampling and the statistical evaluation of analytical data. The course grade is usually based on performance in the best ten of thirteen weekly thirty minute examinations. Three lectures per week.

347. Experimental Methods of Quantitative Analysis. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 346. (2). (NS)

One lecture per week with two laboratory meetings per week. Work is self-paced on an individual and/or group basis. Experiments include the use of spectrophotometers, gas chromatographs, indicator methods, and potentiometric methods involving pH and ion-selective electrodes. A laboratory manual is required and is available through the Chemistry Stores dispensing window on the Chemistry Building loading dock.

348. Quantitative Analytical Chemistry. Chem. 125 and 126; or the equivalent. (4). (NS)

Chemistry 348 is identical to 197 and is elected by students with advanced standing or credit for Chemistry 123 (124), 125, 126 or its equivalent for 4 credit hours. Analytical chemistry is emphasized in Chemistry 348. Topics include statistics, chemical equilibrium (weak acid-base, complexation, solubility), potentiometry, phase equilibrium and chromatography, optical methods of analysis, and radioactive and kinetic methods of analysis. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Weekly short quizzes are given (12 total of which the two lowest for each student are omitted from the final total) in lieu of exams; no final exam. The text is Chemical Separation and Measurements by Peters, et al. A laboratory manual is also required and is available through the Chemistry Stores dispensing window on the Chemistry Building loading dock.

365(265). Principles of Physical Chemistry. Chem. 126 or 196; Physics 140 and 141 or 190; and prior or concurrent enrollment in Math. 215 or 285. (4). (NS).

The main topics of physical chemistry are presented in a manner slightly less rigorous than that employed in the Chemistry 468-469 sequence. Chemistry 365 is recommended for students interested in a one-term physical chemistry course. The topics are the theory of gases, the first and second laws of thermodynamics with application to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions, and kinetics of chemical reactions.

391. Honors Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 197, 300, or 348, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 397. (2). (NS).

The course has two principal objectives. The first is to acquaint the student with the laboratory aspect of physical chemistry in order to give a different perspective to the theoretical concepts discussed in the basic lecture course. The second is to improve the sophistication of the student with respect to the nature of physical measurements, the errors associated with the measurements, and how these errors may be treated in a systematic fashion.

392. Honors Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Chem. 391. (2). (NS).

Chemistry 392 is a continuation of Chemistry 391 with more advanced experiments. These experiments are often less structured than those in Chemistry 391 and thus offer a greater opportunity for individual initiative.

397. Honors Physical Chemistry. Chem. 396 and permission of instructor. (4). (NS).

Chemistry 397 is offered Winter Term, 1984.

The second of a two-term lecture sequence in physical chemistry primarily for students in Honors Chemistry degree programs. General scope: the study of matter from a microscopic viewpoint. Specific topics: kinetic theory of gases; statistical thermodynamics; chemical kinetics; quantum chemistry; molecular structure and spectroscopy; crystallography.

399. Honors Introduction to Research. Permission of a chemistry concentration adviser and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits during junior or senior year.

Same as Chem. 319 except that Chem. 399 is the Honors degree equivalent. Elected in the junior or senior year, this course culminates in the senior thesis, a requirement for the Honors degree.

403. Inorganic Chemistry. Chem. 197 or 348, or 346 and 347, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 469. (3). (NS).

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the development and use of various theories, concepts, and models useful in explaining reactivity and structures of inorganic systems. Descriptive chemistry will also be discussed systematically within such a framework. Students will be responsible for assigned material from the text as well as additional selections from reserved material in the Chemistry Library. Text: To be announced.

413. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 403. (2). (NS).

Chemistry 413 is designed to introduce the student to a variety of inorganic preparations and techniques, including high temperature solid state reactions, vacuum line techniques, electrochemical syntheses, air exclusion techniques, photochemical preparations, magnetic susceptibility, and mass spectral measurements. Compounds prepared include organo-transition metal derivatives, classical coordination complexes, magnetic solids, Lewis acid-base adducts, and main group compounds. Toward the end of the term, short research projects may be undertaken. Text: R. J. Angelici, Synthesis and Technique in Inorganic Chemistry.

419. Chemical Literature and Scientific Writing. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 468 or 396; or 469 or 397. (2). (Excl).

The course will be devoted to scientific information of importance to chemists: its generation, storage, and retrieval. The student will learn about the sources of chemical information in the form of primary and secondary printed material, abstracts and indexes, microphotographic alternatives, and computer banks, and will learn what is available and how to find required data. Some history of science and its impact on society will be interwoven. Scientific writing will be an important part of the course, especially in connection with the generation of scientific information, and about six written papers and two written examinations will be required. Instruction will involve lectures and library practice. This course is intended for those who are concentrating in chemistry or allied subjects.

425. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. Chem. 228 or 295. (5). (NS).

This is a course in the systematic identification of organic compounds by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Two lecture periods per week; heavy laboratory commitment. The laboratory gives experience in separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. There is heavy use of the primary chemical literature. A reading knowledge of German will be helpful. Grade is based on laboratory work, identification of compounds, and written examinations.

447. Physical Methods of Analysis. Chem. 197 or 348, and 225. (3). (NS).

The objective of the course is to acquaint students with the conceptual and methodological principles of contemporary analytical chemistry, beyond the level to which the students have been exposed in Chemistry 197 or 348, and to introduce the students to the utilization of these principles in solving the types of problems which are currently of interest in chemistry and allied areas. The course meets three times per week. Duplicated lecture outlines and illustrative material for each topic are distributed. Sets of numerical and other problems are assigned periodically; these are intended as a review and self-help mechanism and are not collected, but solutions and answers are distributed. The lectures generally emphasize the following: theoretical basis of the measurement and separation technics used in contemporary analytical chemistry; application of these technics to the study and solution of important classes of problems in science, e.g., ascertainment of compositional information, evaluation of interaction between chemical species and determination of molecular structure; basic features of the instrumentation used (details of instrument construction and operation, in so far as they should be covered, are left to other courses such as Chemistry 300 and 448). The treatment of an area is commonly unified with specific technics being used as illustrative examples, e.g., in photometry, which can be conveniently treated from a general approach, flame photometry, atomic absorption, emission spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence are briefly considered in a review of the origins of spectra as an example of means for determining elemental composition with differing independence of matrix composition. Chemistry 447 provides a good opportunity for the students to synthesize their previous experience and knowledge of chemistry, physics and mathematics into a coherent approach to the study of chemical species and systems, and to the resolution of chemical problems. The current text is Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Skoog and West; Saunders; 2nd ed. References to pertinent material in other books are provided; these books are placed on reserve in the Chemistry Library.

448. Physical Methods Laboratory. Chem. 300 and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 447. (2). (NS).

Chemistry 448 provides "hands-on" experience with a variety of modern analytical instruments and the chemistry which supports them. Procedures of importance in such areas as pollution control or clinical analysis are used to illustrate the application and operation of most instruments. Techniques employed may include UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electrophoresis, gas chromatography and polarography. An introduction to computer-aided experimentation is provided. Written reports are required for each procedure carried out. There are no midterm or final examinations.

468. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (NS).

This course is the first of a two-term lecture sequence in physical chemistry (Chemistry 468 and 469). The course is normally elected by students in programs requiring two terms of physical chemistry, such as Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Cellular Biology, etc. (A one-term treatment of physical chemistry on a somewhat lower level is given in Chemistry 365.) The topics covered in Chemistry 468 are properties of gases, equations of state, the laws of thermodynamics with application to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions and electrochemistry.

469. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and prior enrollment in three terms of chemistry. (4). (NS).

This course is the second of the regular two-term sequence in physical chemistry (Chemistry 468 and 469). The topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure and spectroscopy.

481. Physicochemical Measurements. Chem. 197 or 347 or 348 and 396 or 468. If advanced standing is granted for part of the work, Chemistry 481 may be elected for one credit with permission of instructor. (2). (NS).

The course has two principal objectives. The first is to acquaint the student with the laboratory aspect of physical chemistry in order to give a different perspective to the theoretical concepts discussed in the basic lecture course. The second is to improve the sophistication of the student with respect to the nature of physical measurements, the errors associated with the measurements, and how these errors may be treated in a systematic fashion. Prerequisite: Chemistry 468; the course should be preceded or accompanied by Chemistry 469. Text: Shoemaker & Garland, Experiments in Physical Chemistry, McGraw-Hill, 3rd Ed.

482. Physicochemical Measurements. Chem. 300 and Chem 481. If advanced standing is granted for part of the work, Chemistry 482 may be elected for one credit with permission of instructor. (2). (NS).

Chemistry 482 is a continuation of Chemistry 481 with more advanced experiments. These often are less structured than those in Chemistry 481 and thus offer a greater opportunity for individual initiative.

535. Experimental Methods for the Study of Solutions of Macromolecules. Chem. 469. (2). (NS).

Methods of studying natural and synthetic polymers, molecular weight distributions, and polymer dimensions. The methods include viscometry; osmometry; centrifugation; infrared and Raman spectroscopy; elastic, quasielastic, and inelastic scattering of light, neutrons, and x-rays; fluorescence depolarization, and electrophoresis. Kirkwood-Risemann model for polymer hydrodynamics. Micelles and their physical properties. Other special topics at the discretion of the instructor.

536. Laboratory in Macromolecular Chemistry. Chem. 535 or Phys. 418; or permission of instructor. (2). (NS).

Experimental techniques for the study of polymer properties in solution will include viscosity, light scattering, NMR, optical rotary dispersion and UV absorption; more complex methods such as dielectric behavior and ultracentrifugation will be illustrated by laboratory demonstration. Elasticity, solvent swelling and gas permeation will be used to characterize bulk polymerization and the fractionization of polymers by chromatophic techniques will supplement those on polymer characterization.

541. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Chem. 540. (3). (NS).

Synthetic organic chemistry. The scope and limitations of the more important synthetic reactions are discussed within the framework of multi-step organic synthesis.

547. Electronic Instrumentation for Chemistry. Chem. 481 or permission of instructor. (3). (NS).

Theory, practice and application of solid state electronics. Basic transistor theory and linear integrated circuit principles. Uses of negative feedback. Principles and application of logic circuitry. Noise sources and noise reduction. Emphasis throughout on devices and circuits commonly encountered in chemical instruments.

565. Nuclear Chemistry. Permission of instructor. Intended for graduate students and seniors. (3). (NS).

The properties of the nucleus and review of techniques for studying such properties; radioactive decay processes, nuclear models, nuclear reactions, and interactions of radiation with matter; applications of nuclear techniques to non-nuclear problems.

575. Chemical Thermodynamics. Chem. 469. (3). (NS).

Principles of classical thermodynamics with applications to phase equilibria, solutions and chemical equilibria and electrochemistry. Utilization of molecular and atomic spectra in statistical mechanical calculations. A brief treatment of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is usually included.


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