Romance Languages and Literatures

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Students with prior study of French may elect this course only on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the Department, and in the sections specified for them. The sequence French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar and vocabulary which students need (1) to understand the French of everyday life when spoken at moderate speed; (2) to be understood in typical situations of everyday life; and (3) to read non-technical French of moderate difficulty. French structures are taught in class through many communication exercises stressing listening and speaking. Readings on subjects dealing with French culture and civilization are introduced toward the end of French 101, with an increased amount in French 102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20 to 25 students. Homework consists of studying grammar, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (60 minutes per week) on pronunciation, structural exercises, dialogues, and listening comprehension. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Students with previous French study in high school are not permitted to enroll in sections 001-006.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

See French 101. French 102 is not open to students who have begun instruction elsewhere.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

Students elect this course on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the Department. It is for those with previous study of French (normally 2-3 years in high school) whose proficiency is not yet sufficient for second-year work. The course objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. It moves with a rapid pace, covering about 60 per cent of the French 101 material by mid term, and about 60 per cent of the French 102 material by the end of the term. Classes meet five times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, but its daily amount is up to 60 per cent more than in either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

122. Elementary: Alternate. French 121 or equivalent and permission of department. (3). (FL).

This course is part of the alternate first-year sequence 121-122-123. The first-year material, covered in 101-102, is spread over three consecutive terms beginning with fall term. The course objectives and method of instruction are the same as in the regular first-year sequence. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Special permission by the Department is required to enroll in the sequence 121-122-123. (Contact persons: Neu, Mahler, or Hagiwara)

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent. French 206 may be elected prior to French 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.
Section 001.
French 206 is an informal mini-course with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. The amount of homework is minimal. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 18-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Pass-Fail only, determined on the basis of attendance and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year French. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).
Regular Track.
The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and plays. In addition, French 232 has outside reading: students read a book on their own, discuss it in class, and take a reading comprehension test. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversations on such topics, and to read unedited French text at sight with a high degree of direct comprehension. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (30 minutes per week). There are weekly quizzes as well as midterm and final examinations. In addition, French 231 has a speaking test, and 232, an outside reading test, both given toward the end of the term.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).
Regular Track:
see French 231.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LSA language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed 100, 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

112. Second Special Reading Course. French 111 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward mid term students select several articles or a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 18-20 students. They meet four times per week until mid term, and twice per week thereafter (supplemented by individual conferences with the instructor on outside reading). There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Other Language Courses

306. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. French 306 may be elected prior to French 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 306 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. The amount of homework is minimal. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 18-24 students. There are no examinations, and attendance and participation in classroom activities determine the Pass/Fail grades.

325. Practical French Phonetics. French 232 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. (2). (Excl).

This course is designed to help students improve their pronunciation of French. A brief theoretical overview of vowel and consonant systems, syllable structure, intonation, liaison, and "mute" will be included, but the majority of class time will be spent on auditory discrimination of sounds and pronunciation exercises. Group and individual corrections will be given. Students will take a diagnostic "test" during the first week and suggestions for specific review will be given to each student. Several short written or oral assignments and quizzes will be given throughout the term. There will be a written and an oral final examination where students must demonstrate ability to use the International Phonetic Alphabet, knowledge of basic phonetic concepts in theory and in practice, and improvement and proficiency in their own pronunciation of French. Materials will be available on tape in the language lab for students to practice on their own. Classes meet three times a week and are taught in French. Regular attendance and participation are required. (Neu)

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).
Section 005.
The purpose of this course is to help students develop a proficiency in the spoken language and improve their writing skills. French grammar is reviewed, and a discussion of readings on various aspects of contemporary French life permits participants to expand vocabulary, to practice speaking French and to increase their understanding of French daily life. Outside readings in connection with the basic cultural themes are studied. Press articles, interviews and the like are used to stimulate discussions. Classes meet three times a week in sections varying between ten and sixteen students. All classes are taught in French. Laboratory activities (there is a new listening comprehension program), simulations, two novels, one play. Weekly essays. Two examinations, one final composition. Also, one weekly lecture on some linguistic problems and cultural aspects of modern France is tentatively scheduled for all sections together, as part of the three hours per week required. (M. Gabrielli)

362. Advanced French. French 361. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to develop communication in spoken French and to increase familiarity with French culture. Also, through an analysis of interviews with French people from all walks of life, students are able to distinguish among various styles of expression and to understand how language reveals social class, political leanings, and other cultural characteristics. Although there is no formal teaching of French grammar, some class time is devoted to grammatical difficulties and to the correction of common mistakes which are revealed through the weekly compositions. Course emphasis, however, is on conversation and discussion. Recordings are used in class in an effort to develop an understanding of spoken French of various levels of difficulty. Classes meet three times each week and are taught in French. All sections take three common examinations. Occasional laboratory activities, outside readings, and simulations.

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c)development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays (at least one a week). Final course grade is based on the level of proficiency achieved at the end of the term, with important consideration given to the quality of the work throughout the term. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students majoring in French. (Zoubir)

372. Problems in Translation. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This is a course in ENGLISH to FRENCH translation. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic prerequisites of translation, helping them to develop a proper attitude toward the original and the target language and to give them some practical training. Basic tools of the art are discussed. Linguistic theory is not the main goal of the course, however, some class time may be occasionally devoted to theoretical problems. Students work on a variety of texts of different levels: newspaper articles or magazines, technical texts, literary texts. Students are evaluated on the basis of their class work each time (contribution to class), homework, quizzes and a final examination. (Mermier)

380. Intermediate Business French. French 361 and 362. Students may be permitted to take 380 and 362 concurrently. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the language of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is built around a fictitious company: EUROSPORT, whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world: banking, advertising, exports, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, etc. The activities of EUROSPORT will need constantly to be revitalized so as to serve as a point of reference in facilitating the creation of actual business situations in class through various techniques, especially simulations. The writing will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French. There will also be a number of translation exercises. Students will write three medium length papers and take a final exam. Course-pack. Twenty students only. (M. Gabrielli)

408. Advanced Translation, French-English. French 372 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Texts to be translated will be drawn from literature, newspapers, technological, diplomatic and economic reports. Literature : (7 weeks). Short excerpts from Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Buffon, Stendhal, Balzac, Baudelaire Poemes en prose, Gide, Colette, Camus, Sartre, Levi-Strauss, Barthes. Journalism : (3 weeks) Le Monde, Le Figaro, Le Point, Le Nouvel Observateur, L'Express. Technology and Finance : (3 weeks). L'Expansion, technical reports from the U. N. Economic and financial forecasts from international agencies, banks, brokers, etc. Instruction: Students will prepare for each class a translation of some 20 to 30 lines for possible variants. We shall then go over this work in class calling on as many students as possible. Each student will pick a topic of his/her choice for one major translation which will count as the final exam. By the end of the term the student should: (1) Be able to translate from French into an English which is idiomatic and smooth flowing while conveying the message with clarity and accuracy; (2) Be able to discern when an expression in French, whether technical, idiomatic, a coinage, a witticism, a literary allusion or whatever lies beyond his knowledge of the French language, and be able to inform himself adequately for resolving the problem; (3) Be able to propose variant translations, all permissible, of key phrases and to choose among them according to the accuracy of the rendition and the achievement of a tone fitting to the source text. The course will be given in English. (Morton)

416. Advanced Business French. French 380 (Intermediate Business French). (3). (Excl).

As a follow-up to Business French 386, we will look further into economic and commercial matters in France such as accounting, banking, insurance, distribution, taxes, whether they apply to businesses or to individuals or both, with emphasis on functional and conceptual generalities. Three or four case histories will serve as a basis for oral group presentations in class. They will involve such themes as launching of a product or service, relocation and closing-up shops, mergers and acquisition, union conflicts, etc. These problems will have to be handled by participants as if they were professional consultants in various fields (becoming more familiar with technical, commercial, and human factors will be further developed). In addition, some other topics will be touched upon such as the analysis of commercials, export marketing in French, financing and investment, and the Paris Stock Exchange. All classes are conducted in French. Some students may be entitled to apply for an internship with a French firm in France in the Spring of 1984. One paper after the first three weeks, simulation and a final. (Gabrielli)

Civilization

385. Civilisation française, Continued. French 361. (3). (HU).

The course studies French culture and society today. It is taught in French. One objective is to study facts (statistics about population, social classes, cultural consumption, industry etc...). What does it mean to be in France in 1984, when a Socialist government is trying to cope with the economic crisis? Lectures, discussions, three papers, a midterm and final. (Carduner)

Literature

387/388/389 Introduction to French Literature. The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. French 387, 388, and 389 are offered Winter Term, 1984. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course will introduce students to French literature of the 19th century. Its aim is to familiarize them with the literary genres and techniques prevalent at the time, the cultural and ideological contexts in which the particular works were produced, and to introduce them to appropriate methods of literary analysis. The class will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be responsible for the following texts: Balzac, Le Pere Goriot, Flaubert, Trois contes, Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal, Zola, Therese Raquin, Maupassant, Yvette . Grades will be based on short papers on each of the works studied and on class participation. There will be no final examination. The course will be conducted in French. (Gray)

410. Le cinéma français. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

The course is conducted in French and is based upon seven or eight French films to be shown in class. The list usually includes two or three classic films from the 1930's (Vigo, Clair, Renoir, etc.), two or three "new-wave" films from the late fifties and early sixties (Truffaut, Resnais, Godard, etc.) and a modern film. Lectures usually concern directors' interests and technical innovations, while discussions concern the application of directors' theories to the particular films seen. Students are encouraged to see and discuss other French films that are being shown in Ann Arbor. Work includes a midterm examination, a course paper and a final examination (concentrators are expected to complete this written work in French). The course seeks to improve students' sensitivity to motion pictures in general, to improve their ability for intelligent viewing of films made in the French cultural context, and to provide insights into the contribution of French directors to cinematographic art. Readings from Eisenstein, Mitry, and other critics and theoreticians, as well as from selected film scripts. (Nelson)

442. Topics and Themes in French Literature. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 002 Narratives of History in Modern France.
This course will first trace a brief history of the art of historical writing in modern France, highlighting the most important seventeenth-twentieth century historians and theoreticians of histography. However, our main goal will be to study closely, with the aid of modern theories of narrative, the expression of historical texts, (1) attempting to discover their underlying ideologies and relationship between these and the literary and rhetorical conventions and structures used and (2) comparing them as texts to fictional works treating similar themes. To make this close examination possible, we will concentrate on a single period that has become legendary in French history, that of the Old Regime terminating violently in the French Revolution, and consider various presentations of its story by authors including Voltaire, Michelet, Toqueville, and Febvre. We will then compare their presentations of the themes "the court" and "revolution" to those found in fictional works of the period composed by authors such as Fenelon, Montesquieu, and Voltaire who were also writers of histories. The course will be conducted in English, but readings will be primarily in French. In addition to one oral presentation, three medium-length papers will be required for 400 level credit, and two medium-length papers and one research paper for 600 level credit. (O'Meara)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (FL).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with emphasis as well on conversation. Text for the course is Lazzarino's Prego with workbook and lab manual; Italian 101 covers the first half of this text (Chapters 1-11). Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm or hour examinations, and a final examination.

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden student knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also encouraged. The course covers the second half of Lazzarino's Prego (Chapters 12-22) with workbook and lab manual; a cultural reader supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm or hourly examinations, and a final examination.

107. Italian for Voice Majors. Open only to students enrolled in the School of Music. (4). (Excl).

An elementary Italian course stressing basic comprehension and pronunciation of the language, especially as it is used in musical literature (libretti, etc.).

Other Language and Literature Courses

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a brief review of grammar, and the elements of composition are stressed. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Occasional oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

363. Advanced Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Intended to polish the skill students have acquired through the 101-232 language sequence. The organization of the class is flexible in order to accommodate the varying needs and interests of students in each term. Generally, the material presented will concentrate on the culture and the literature of modern Italy; occasional lessons on grammar review.

380. Italian Cinema and Society. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU).

A survey of Italy's greatest postwar films with special attention to issues and problems in Italian society as treated by major directors such as Fellini, DeSica, Rossellini, Antonioni, and others. Lectures on stylistic and cultural background to individual films will introduce discussion of the following topics: national unification, fascism and World War II, post-war boom and crisis, the South and the Mafia, modern politics and ideology. Readings and lectures are supplemented by film viewings. No knowledge of Italian is required. (Marsh)

433/MARC 439. Dante in Translation. A knowledge of Italian is not required. Not open to Italian concentrators. (3). (HU).

Through lectures and slide talks, this course provides an introduction to the world of Dante and to his masterpiece, the Divine Comedy, read in the contemporary American translation by John Ciardi. After a survey of the culture and history of the later Middle Ages, the course will develop as a critical reading of Dante's poetic allegory. Slides of Italy will be shown to illustrate the art and civilization of Dante's world as an essential means to understanding this highly visual poet. Some attention will be given to Dante's literary influence in English poetry, and students with some knowledge of Italian will have the opportunity to read excerpts in the original. (Marsh)

475, 476. Dante. Italian 232 or equivalent is prerequisite for 475; Italian 475 is prerequisite for 476. (3 each). (HU).

Italian 476 is offered Winter Term, 1984.

Study of the Divina Commedia within the context of its diverse figural and allegorical implications and the historical realities of the time. The course is conducted in Italian. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. (Budel)

486. Petrarch's Canzoniere. Italian 232 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

Study of Petrarch's Canzoniere within the context of its paronomastic structure provided by the Laura myth. Undergraduates will write two short papers three-four pages in length, graduates one research paper from ten-fifteen pages. The course is conducted in Italian. (Budel)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101, 102. Elementary Portuguese. Portuguese 101 is a prerequisite for 102. (4 each). (FL).

Portuguese 102 is offered Winter Term, 1984.

Portuguese 102 is an introductory course in the Portuguese language as spoken in Brazil and is designed for beginning language students. The approach is audio-lingual and cognitive with oral and written exercises, weekly examinations. Required text: Ellison et al., Modern Portuguese. (Brakel)

231, 232. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102 or equivalent is prerequisite to 231; Portuguese 231 or the equivalent is prerequisite to 232. (4 each). (FL).

Only Portuguese 232 is offered Winter Term, 1984. It is designed to enhance and develop students' speaking, reading, writing, and understanding modern Portuguese beyond the level obtainable in 231. Students will read selected short stories, essays, and articles by modern Portuguese authors, as well as a modern Portuguese novel. They will write short essays and translations, from Portuguese to English and English to Portuguese. They will also study oral texts of varying complexity. There will be bi-weekly examinations. (Brakel)

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

481/Spanish 481. Background of Modern Spanish. A thorough reading knowledge of Spanish. (3). (HU).

See Spanish 481. (Dworkin)

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental evening exams, other quizzes and written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who completed 101 at the University of Michigan.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish l02 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. Spanish 102 or the equivalent. Spanish 206 may be elected prior to Spanish 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.
Section 001.
The purpose of this one credit hour course is to develop confidence in the use of the spoken language and to encourage development of listening comprehension and oral skills. Most of the course work is done in class, but outside readings which are later discussed in class are sometimes assigned. Often the class is divided into small groups which then pursue activities of special interest to the group. These classes meet two hours each week; grades are based solely on class performance. There is no standard text. One section of 206 is usually reserved for students who plan to participate in the Summer Study in Spain program. Class content and activities are designed to prepare students for the experience of living and studying abroad. This course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements. (Dvorak)

230. Intensive Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 100 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 112, 231, or 232. (8). (FL).

This course covers in one term the same material that Spanish 231 and 232 cover in two terms. Normally, only students with grades of "A" or "B" in first year Spanish (101, 102 or the equivalent) are encouraged to take this course. Students receive eight credit hours, and the class meets two hours per day, four days per week. Arrangements are frequently made for interested class members to meet during the noon hour for informal conversation in Spanish. The course is designed for students whose interest in Spanish goes beyond the level of merely satisfying the foreign language requirement.

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 100, 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to provide conversation practice in the language structures learned during the first year; to improve the reading ability of students; and to provide some insight into the literature, history, culture, and outlook of Spanish-speaking peoples. Class readings include cultural selections and short stories. Course grade based on midterm and final exams, other written work (including compositions), oral class participation, and an oral/written course project.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 112. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. The course centers around discussion in Spanish of selected Spanish and Spanish-American works of literature. Course grade is based on midterm and final exams, other written work (including compositions) and oral participation in class.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

112. Second Special Reading Course. Spanish 111 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

This course is a continuation of Spanish 111. Students continue to review the basics of Spanish grammar and build vocabulary for the purpose of reading comprehension. In Spanish 112, more attention is given to reading in the particular area of interest of the individual students enrolled in the course. Spanish 111 is not a prerequisite to 112, but is encouraged. (Dvorak)

Other Language Courses

306. Practical Spanish. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 306 may be elected prior to Spanish 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purposes of this course are (1) to apply Spanish to real-life situations and (2) to acquire the linguistic habits (phonological, morphological, and syntactical) necessary for mastery of conversational Spanish. While the instructor serves as the leader in determining classroom activities, the class is often divided into small groups of three or four students. Students share their knowledge with one another, and more advanced students help to maintain the continuity of the course as well as to encourage and to motivate less proficient class members. The class meets two hours each week, and the course grade is based primarily on class work. There is no standardized text. The course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements.

331(431). Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).

This course will be devoted to "Linguistic and Cultural Dimensions in Modern Latin American Narrative." Through a reading of about eight novels and short stories (Borges, Bioy Casares, Garcia Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Manuel Puig and Guimaraes Rosa), it will attempt to underlie the semiotic dimensions of texts related to (linguistic and cultural) universes of meaning. Non-specific background is required, although it will help if the student has already some familiarity with the literary world. The course is not part of a departmental sequence. It is, though, a course that may help Spanish concentrators, although not specifically designed for inter-departmental curriculum. The course will combine lecture, discussions and oral presentations or workshop, depending on the number of students enrolled. Evaluation will be based on oral participation and on two written reports. (Mignolo)

361, 362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or the equivalent is prerequisite to Spanish 361; Spanish 361 is prerequisite to 362. No credit granted for 361 or 362 to those who have completed 360. (3 each). (Excl).

Both Spanish 361 and 362 are taught Winter Term, 1984.

Spanish 361 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Spanish (short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Compositions of at least two pages will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and by the students. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Vaquero)

Section 003 Advanced Conversation And Contemporary Culture. This Section Cannot Be Taken To Fulfill The 361-362 Major Requirement In Spanish. This course will emphasize the strengthening of skills in oral expression in Spanish, listening comprehension and the development of vocabulary. Students will be expected to do some individual review of grammar and vocabulary at home, along with preparation of selected texts. Classwork will include conversation based on the readings, oral presentations, debates, group and individual oral projects; listening practice based on radio broadcasts and other taped materials. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their performance in class and also through oral exams with the instructor.

362. Sections 001 and 005. The course is designed to develop communication in spoken Spanish and to improve the student's skills in writing correct, fluent Spanish. Although there is no formal teaching of grammar some time will be devoted to review of grammatical and syntactic difficulties. This course introduces students to standard modern Spanish through the reading of short stories, plays, and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Spanish. The final course grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Martinez)

481/Rom. Ling. 481. Background of Modern Spanish. A thorough reading knowledge of Spanish. (3). (HU).

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, and literary background against which the Spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history (historical grammar) of the Spanish. The topics treated include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian and English. Although the course is taught in English, the ability to read Spanish with ease is essential. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a written report. English or Spanish can be used for the exams and report. (Dworkin)

Literature

371, 372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3 each). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

A study of Spanish literature in the Medieval and Golden Age periods (1000-1700). Students will read several texts of Spanish literature including "Leyendas epicas," Poema de Fernan Gonzalez, "romances," El Abencerraje y la hermosa Jarifa, and Lazarillo de Tormes. The discussions will center around a broad cultural background including moral and political themes as well as formal aspects of the texts. There will be one short report to be given orally in class, two 3-4 page papers in Spanish on the texts, and one final exam consisting of essay questions on readings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of papers, exams and class discussion. Methods: lecture/discussion. (Vaquero)

376. Latin American Civilization. Spanish 232. Spanish 375 and 376 may not both be included in a concentration plan in Spanish. (3). (HU).

This course is designed to give students a panoramic view and analysis of aspects of the cultures of Latin America. The roles of race, gender, ethnicity, wealth, and nationality in human relations will be examined and analyzed in lectures and readings. This course presupposes no prior knowledge of Latin America other than that which would be acquired through the extended study of Spanish, although students with extensive knowledge and first hand experience are encouraged to enroll. Students should be able to follow lectures, converse, and read sophisticated material in Spanish. However, all of the reading will be available in English. Classes during the four weeks I dedicate to Brazil will be in English. Students will contract a specific level of involvement in this class. There will be three examinations, three book reviews, and a project (a paper or an in-class oral presentation). Students expecting a "C" need only take the tests and receive "C" grades on them; "B" students, "B's" on tests, and three "B" level book reviews; "A" students, "A's" on tests, three "A" book reviews, and a project. Textbooks: Octavio Paz, El labirinto de la soledad; Oscar Lewis, Cinco familias, Jorge Amado, Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon; Carl Degler, Neither Black nor White; Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Cien Anos de Soledad. (Brakel)

381, 382. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3 each). (HU).

Spanish 382 is offered Winter Term, 1984.

Covers the main Spanish American contemporary authors in poetry, narrative, theatre and essay (Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez; Vicente Huidobro, Pablo Neruda, Cesar Vallejo; Rodolfo Usigli, Octavio Paz). The concentration is on reading a selection of literary texts. Lecture and discussion will be the format of the course. Conducted in Spanish. The student's performance will be evaluated through grades obtained in: (a) reports (b) midterm exam, and (c) final examination. There will be a course pack available at the beginning of the term. (Goic)

467. Spanish Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-378. (3). (HU).

This course presents the intellectual and literary awakening of Spain in the first century under the Bourbons. Lectures and class discussions will focus on such questions as the rise of a critical spirit in a country deeply sensitive to its decline and intensely suspicious of foreign thought; the attempts to define the national culture in conservative or progressive terms, and to create literature in accord with those tendencies; Neoclassicism as art and problem; the development of sensibility, and early Romantic stirrings. Authors to be studied include Feijoo, Forner, Huerta, Jovellanos, Ramon de la Cruz, Cadalso, and Moratin. Hour and final examinations, term paper and an occasional class exercise. (Hafter)

470. The Spanish Comedia. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).

An introduction to the most popular literary genre of the Spanish Golden Age. Representative plays by the most talented authors are read and discussed according to their literary, social and political context. Students are expected to participate actively in these discussions. The work for the course includes reading supporting bibliography, presenting brief reports, writing short papers, and taking a final examination. (Casa)

487. Latin American Poetry of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).

Este curso tiene por fin principal la lectura de una serie importante de poemas de los mas importantes poetas hispanoamericanos contemporaneos. Entre otros, se leera a Vicente Huidobro, Cesar Vallejo, Pablo Neruda, Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz. Los poemas seran estudiados y analizados dando relieve a sus rasgos propios y estableciendo su replacion con el contexto teorico explicito de los autores y de las tendencias de la poesia hispanoamericana contemporanea. El metodo del curso sera de leccion magistral y discusion. Los estudiantes tendran actividades que incluiran lectura, exposicion oral, pequenos trabajos escritos y un trabajo final. El curso se dicta en espanol. Habro una seleccion de textos (Course pack) disponsible al inicio del semestre. (Goic)


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