Romance Languages and Literatures

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Students with prior study of French may elect this course only on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the Department, and in the sections specified for them. The sequence French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar and vocabulary which students need (1) to understand the French of everyday life when spoken at moderate speed; (2) to be understood in typical situations of everyday life; and (3) to read non-technical French of moderate difficulty. French structures are taught in class through many communication exercises stressing listening and speaking. Readings on subjects dealing with French culture and civilization are introduced toward the end of French 101, with an increased amount in French 102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20 to 25 students. Homework consists of studying grammar, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (1- ^ to 2 hours per week) on pronunciation, structural exercises, dialogues, and listening comprehension. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations and listening comprehension and speaking tests.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

See French 101. French 102 is not open to students who have begun instruction elsewhere.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

Students elect this course on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the Department. It is for those with previous study of French (normally 2-3 years in high school) whose proficiency is not yet sufficient for second-year work. The course objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. It moves with a rapid pace, covering about 60 per cent of the French 101 material by mid term, and about 60 per cent of the French 102 material by the end of the term. Classes meet five times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, but its daily amount is up to 60 per cent more than in either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

122. Elementary: Alternate. French 121 or equivalent and permission of department. (3). (FL).

This course is part of the alternate first-year sequence 121-122-102. The first-year material, covered in 101-102, is spread over three consecutive terms beginning with fall term. The course objectives and method of instruction are the same as in the regular first-year sequence. Classes meet six times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Special permission by the Department is required to enroll in the sequence 121-122-102. (Contact person: Neu)

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent. French 206 may be elected prior to French 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.
Section 001.
French 206 is an informal mini-course with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. The amount of homework is minimal. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 18-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Pass-Fail only, determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year French. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and plays. In addition, French 232 has outside reading: students read a book on their own, discuss it in class, and take a reading comprehension test. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversations on such topics, and to read unedited French text at sight with a high degree of direct comprehension. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (30 minutes per week). There are weekly quizzes as well as midterm and final examinations. Both courses also have listening comprehension and speaking tests, and 232, in addition, has an outside reading test.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

See French 231.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LSA language requirement.

112. Second Special Reading Course. French 111 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward mid term students select several articles or a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 18-20 students. They meet four times per week until mid term, and three times per week thereafter (supplemented by individual conferences with the instructor on outside reading). There are weekly quizzes, as well as midterm and final examinations.

Other Language Courses

306. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. French 306 may be elected prior to French 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 306 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. The amount of homework is minimal. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 18-24 students. There are no examinations, but homework, attendance, and participation in classroom activities determine the Pass/Fail grades.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).
Section 005.
The purpose of this course is to help students develop a proficiency in the spoken language and improve their writing skills. French grammar is reviewed, and a discussion of readings on various aspects of contemporary French life permits participants to expand vocabulary, to practice speaking French and to increase their understanding of French daily life. Outside readings in connection with the basic cultural themes are studied. Press articles, interviews and the like are used to stimulate discussions. Classes meet twice a week in sections varying between ten and sixteen students. All classes are taught in French. Laboratory activities (listening comprehension program), simulations, one novel, one play. Weekly essays. Two examinations, one final composition. Also, one weekly lecture on some linguistic problems and cultural aspects of modern France for all sections together, as part of the three hours per week required. (M. Gabrielli)

362. Advanced French. French 361. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to develop communication in spoken French and to increase familiarity with French culture and social life. Also, through an analysis of interviews with French people from all walks of life, students are able to distinguish among various styles of expression and to understand how language reveals social class, political leanings, and other relevant cultural characteristics. Although there is no formal teaching of French grammar, some class time is devoted to grammatical difficulties as revealed through the weekly essays. Course emphasis, however, is on conversation and discussion. Classes meet three times each week and are taught in French. All sections take three common examinations. Laboratory activities, one novel and one play, simulations, weekly essays. (Gabrielli)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c)development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays (at least one a week). Final course grade is based on the level of proficiency achieved at the end of the term, with important consideration given to the quality of the work throughout the term. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students majoring in French. (Muller)

372. Problems in Translation. French 371 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

This is a course in ENGLISH to FRENCH translation. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic prerequisites of translation, helping them to develop a proper attitude toward the original and the target language and to give them some practical training. Basic tools of the art are discussed. Linguistic theory is not the main goal of the course, however, some class time may be occasionally devoted to theoretical problems. Students work on a variety of texts of different levels: newspaper articles or magazines, technical texts, literary texts. Students are evaluated on the basis of their class work each time (contribution to class), homework, quizzes and a final examination. The course is viewed as a continuation of French 371 with the specific constraints of an English text. (Mermier)

416. Advanced Business French. French 380 (Intermediate Business French). (3). (Excl).

As a follow-up to Business French 380, we will look further into economic and commercial matters in France whether they apply to businesses or to individuals or both, with emphasis on functional and conceptual generalities. Three or four case histories will serve as a basis for oral group presentations in class. They will involve such themes as launching of a product or service, mergers and acquisition, union conflicts, etc. These problems will have to be handled by participants as if they were consultants in various fields (becoming more familiar with technical and human factors will be further developed). In addition, some other topics will be touched upon such as the analysis of commercials, export marketing in French, financing and investment, and the Paris Stock Exchange. All classes are conducted in French. Some students may be entitled to apply for an internship with a French firm in France. One paper after the first three weeks, simulation and a final. No auditors. (Gabrielli)

Civilization

385. Civilisation française, Continued. French 361. (3). (HU).

Taught in French, this course describes French culture and society today. The general approach is comparative: American students learning about French culture are in a situation of "intercultural communication," and must assimilate a new code. Objectives : (a) to study factual data: geography, population, social structures, economic system, standards of living, cultural consumption, political institutions etc...; (b) to discover what it means to be French and to live in France in 1985: What are the problems? How are they confronted? Within what kind of value system? Lectures and discussions alternate. Three papers, a midterm and a final exam. (Carduner)

Literature

331(431). French Literature in Translation. Not open to French concentrators. (3). (HU).
Section 001 Power and Desire. The French Novel and Society.
Why are the themes of seduction and adultery so frequent in the novel; and what do they tell us about the power structure of society? Why are novelistic heroes so often ambitious adventurers or romantic dreamers, and what does "love" mean to them? How should we "read" the situation of the romantic heroine? If power and desire are "written into" the novels, are there also investments of power and desire in the narrative act, or in the novelistic writing, itself? These and similar questions will be explored in a reading of some influential French novels, from Mme de Lafayette to Proust. The aim in lectures and discussions will be to start trains of thought (about society and interpersonal relations, about the art of narrative and its relation to "life") rather than to provide cut and dried answers. But some influential hypotheses about the nature of romantic love (Girard, Rabine), about realism (Lukacs), and about the affinity of the novel with Oedipal "family romance" (Robert) will be discussed. Students will mainly need reading-time (approximately five-eight hours per week). No knowledge of French is required. Written work: either a journal of the course or a fifteen page paper. Special assignments for English composition requirement. No exams. Textbooks (available from Shaman Drum): LaFayette, The Princesse de Cleves; Laclos, Les Liaisons Dangereuses; Stendhal, The Charterhouse of Parma; Balzac, Selected Short Stories; Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Proust, Swann's Way. (Chambers)

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

In this introduction to literature in French we shall focus on selected poems by Hugo, Baudelaire and Rimbaud as well as Rene by Chateaubriand, Un coeur simple by Flaubert and excerpts from Le Rouge et le noir by Stendhal. Le Pere Goriot by Balzac will be read in its entirety. Since the goal is "to encourage a critical and imaginative reading of literary texts" rather than just reading for the sake of reading, a premium will be put on class discussions and student participation. The final grade will be determined on the basis of two short papers (5 pages each), an exam and student participation. (Ngate)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This Winter 1985 we will read the following major works from the novel and the theatre: (1) Gide, L'Immoraliste; (2) Proust, Combray; (3) Camus, La Peste; (4) Sartre, Huis Clos; (5)Ionesco, Les Chaises; and (6)Beckett, En attendant Godot. In addition we will read a selection of poems of Supervielle, Aragon, Eluard and Reverdy. Students are asked to read carefully the works assigned and to be able to discuss them in French. They should examine the situations, the characters, the ideas as well as the expression. There will be one paper assigned after each of the major texts are read (six papers, three-five pages typed, double space). No midterm. One final examination. Grades are based on class performance (25%), papers (50%) and the final examination (25%). (Mermier)

410. Le cinéma français. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

The course is conducted in French and is based upon seven or eight French films to be shown in class. The list usually includes two or three classic films from the 1930's (Vigo, Clair, Renoir, etc.), two or three "new-wave" films from the late fifties and early sixties (Truffaut, Resnais, Godard, etc.) and a modern film. Lectures usually concern directors' interests and technical innovations, while discussions concern the application of directors' theories to the particular films seen. Students are encouraged to see and discuss other French films that are being shown in Ann Arbor. Work includes a midterm examination, a course paper and a final examination (concentrators are expected to complete this written work in French). The course seeks to improve students' sensitivity to motion pictures in general, to improve their ability for intelligent viewing of films made in the French cultural context, and to provide insights into the contribution of French directors to cinematographic art. Readings from Eisenstein, Mitry, and other critics and theoreticians, as well as from selected film scripts. (Nelson)

433/Afroamerican Studies 433. African/Caribbean Francophone Literature in Translation. A literature course or any course dealing with the Black experience in Africa or the Americas. (3). (HU).

In this advanced introduction to the works of the poet, dramatist, essayist and statesman Aime Cesaire of the Martinique, we shall read and discuss the poems (in a recent and splendid English translation) and two plays: The Tragedy of King Christopher and A Season in the Congo. His Discourse on Colonialism and the open letter to Maurice Thorez will provide the necessary theoretical framework for looking into Aime Cesaire's relationships with other writers of the Negritude group and with younger writers like Fanon (a student of his), Glissant and Placoly. We shall also look into possible explanations for Cesaire's continuing popularity in Africa at a time when he is being seriously challenged in the West Indies. A series of short papers and students' contributions to class discussions will form the basis for assigning grades for undergraduates. A final paper is an option that will be discussed at the beginning of the term. Graduate students will be encouraged to compare Cesaire with other writers of the African, Caribbean, Latin American and Afro-American traditions. (Ngate)

438/MARC 444. Introduction to the Reading of Old French Texts. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU).
The Poetic JE in Old French Texts.
Early medieval texts are said to speak anonymously. The text's voice is a collective voice, not a vehicle for an author. Later medieval works, such as those of Rutebeuf in the thirteenth century, Christine de Pisan, and Francois Villon in the fifteenth century, are considered to be autobiographical. This course will reconsider the supposed absence of author in early texts, and the creation of a personal voice in later works, exploring who or what speaks when the medieval text says "je." Students will be encouraged to bring their knowledge of modern criticism to bear on medieval texts. The course will function also as an initiation to the Old French language (syntax, vocabulary, declensions). As much reading as possible will be in Old French, but modern translations will be available. Two or three short papers (to be summarized in class), and an extensive paper on a text not read in class, will be required. No exams. Lectures and discussions in French. The course will present a survey of important medieval writers (Marie de France, Gace Brule, Guillaume de Lorris, Rutebeuf, Christine de Pisan, Villon) as well as an introduction to the principal genres of medieval literature (chanson de geste, romance, hagiography, pastourelle, lyric poetry, the epistolary, and the theater). (Gravdal)

488. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course, conducted in French, will focus on those writers who emerge around 1660, on the classical generation per se. We shall examine Boileau's critical position in an effort to determine the nature of French classicism and will then proceed to read four of Racine's tragedies, viewing them in the light of recent critical commentaries (Barthes, Goldmann, Odette de Mourgues). In addition we shall study La Fontaine's Fables, Bossuet's Oraisons funebres, and La Bruyere's Caracteres as examples of classical poetry, prose and social criticism. Careful reading of texts under discussion is expected. Students will be required to write three papers in French of three or four pages in length. Each paper will be corrected for grammar, construction, choice of vocabulary and, more especially, for content. The final grade will be based on the results of the written work and on student participation in the classroom. There is no final exam. (Gray)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (FL).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with emphasis as well on conversation. Text for the course is Lazzarino's Prego with workbook and lab manual; Italian 101 covers the first half of this text (Chapters 1-11). Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm or hour examinations, and a final examination. (Vitti-Alexander)

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden student knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also encouraged. The course covers the second half of Lazzarino's Prego (Chapters 12-22) with workbook and lab manual; a cultural reader supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm or hourly examinations, and a final examination. (Vitti-Alexander)

112. Second Special Reading Course. Italian 111 or equivalent. (4). (Excl.).

Continuation of Italian 111. Open only to students who have completed Italian 111. Tutorial. (Olken)

Other Language and Literature Courses

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a brief review of grammar, and the elements of composition are stressed. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Occasional oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

380. Italian Cinema and Society. A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU).

A survey of Italy's greatest postwar films with special attention to issues and problems in Italian society as treated by major directors such as Fellini, DeSica, Rossellini, Antonioni, and others. Lectures on cultural background to individual films will introduce discussion of the following topics: national unification, fascism and World War II, post-war boom and crisis, the South and the Mafia, modern politics and ideology. Readings and lectures are supplemented by film viewings. No knowledge of Italian is required. (A. Vitti)

420. Topics and Themes in Modern Italian Literature. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Italian Literature of Power, Politics and Persuasion: 1940-1960.
The final years of Fascism, the Second World War, the post-war economic boom and alienation all these are woven into the fabric of modern Italian fiction with violence and subtlety, harsh polemic and artful allusion. Each with a distinctive style, the major writers of the period reflect the impact of these phenomena, and it is in their works that one finds the crucial cultural implications underlying the enigmatic Italian ethos. A nostalgic prince-astronomer, a family of degenerate upper bourgeois, a Turinese intellectual sent as a political prisoner to the south, a young Ligurian split in half by a cannon ball; these are some of the protagonists whose cryptic adventures inform the serious realities of the world in which their authors, and we, live. Readings will include novels and short stories by Elio Vittorini, Carlo Levi, Alberto Moravia, Ignazio Silone, Giuseppe Tomaso di Lampedusa and Italo Calvino. Introductory lectures, class discussion, individual and group projects. (Olken)

476. Dante. Italian 475. (3). (HU).

Study of the Divina Commedia within the context of its diverse figural and allegorical implications and the historical realities of the time. The course is conducted in Italian. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. (Budel)

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

503/Class. Ling. 503. History of the Latin Language I: 600-1 B.C. Latin 221 or equivalent. (2). (HU).

See Classical Linguistics 503. (Pulgram)

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction.

101. Elementary Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and reading Spanish. Grade based on three departmental evening exams, three oral exams, other quizzes and written work, daily oral work. (Spanish 101 and 102 are the equivalent of Spanish 100.)

Section 003 Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). This CSP section, which covers the complete course syllabus, is designed for students who want to be certain that they are highly prepared for Spanish 102 and are willing to devote the effort necessary to be so. Beyond the five hours a week (see schedule) of regular class, another hour (to be scheduled) will be provided for detailed explanations of central concepts, for additional practice, and for reviews. Also, small group tutoring will be arranged according to individual needs.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental evening exams, three oral exams, other quizzes and written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who completed 101 at the University of Michigan.

Section 019: Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). This CSP section is designed for native speakers of Spanish who have some degree of aural-oral fluency in the language but lack basic reading and writing skills. The class will meet five hours a week.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish l02 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

206. Conversation for Non-concentrators. Spanish 102 or the equivalent. Spanish 206 may be elected prior to Spanish 205. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.
Section 001.
The purpose of this one credit hour course is to develop confidence in the use of the spoken language and to encourage development of listening comprehension and oral skills. Most of the course work is done in class, but outside readings which are later discussed in class are sometimes assigned. Often the class is divided into small groups which then pursue activities of special interest to the group. These classes meet two hours each week; grades are based solely on class performance. There is no standard text. One section of 206 is usually reserved for students who plan to participate in the Summer Study in Spain program. Class content and activities are designed to prepare students for the experience of living and studying abroad. This course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements.

230. Intensive Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 100 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 112, 231, or 232. (8). (FL).

This course covers in one term the same material that Spanish 231 and 232 cover in two terms. Normally, only students with grades of "A" or "B" in first year Spanish (101, 102 or the equivalent) are encouraged to take this course. Students receive eight credit hours, and the class meets two hours per day, four days per week. Arrangements are frequently made for interested class members to meet during the noon hour for informal conversation in Spanish. The course is designed for students whose interest in Spanish goes beyond the level of merely satisfying the foreign language requirement.

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 100, 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students; and to provide some insight into the literature, history, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on midterm and final exams, oral exams, other quizzes and written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 112. (4). (FL).
Section 001.
This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. The course centers around discussion in Spanish of selected Spanish and Spanish-American works of literature. Course grade is based on midterm and final exams, oral exams, other written work (including compositions) and oral participation in class.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

Other Language Courses

306. Practical Spanish. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 306 may be elected prior to Spanish 305. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purposes of this course are (1) to apply Spanish to real-life situations and (2) to acquire the linguistic habits (phonological, morphological, and syntactical) necessary for mastery of conversational Spanish. While the instructor serves as the leader in determining classroom activities, the class is often divided into small groups of three or four students. Students share their knowledge with one another, and more advanced students help to maintain the continuity of the course as well as to encourage and to motivate less proficient class members. The class meets two hours each week, and the course grade is based primarily on class work. There is no standardized text. The course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements.

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: translations, presentations, readings in Spanish (short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Compositions of at least two pages will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and by the students. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Sections 001 and 003 - Gali-Corredor; Section 002 Brakel; Section 004 Fraker)

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 361. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: translations, presentations, readings in Spanish (short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Compositions of at least two pages will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and by the students. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Mignolo)

454. Spanish Grammar for Teachers. Spanish 361 and 362. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 454 is an advanced review of the Spanish grammar from the viewpoint of both modern linguistics and traditional grammar. The student will get information on the organization and function of phonology (phonetics), morphology, and syntax of modern Spanish. Throughout this course, emphasis is placed on current usage and main problems encountered by learners of Spanish so that the students may increase both their general language knowledge and their understanding of Spanish. A general comparison between English and Spanish is made. Traditional Spanish grammar will be reviewed and specific topics of the Spanish grammar, such as, problems in learning the sound system of Spanish, ser and estar, past tenses, compound tenses, prepositions, word formation, adjective placement, agreement, subjunctive, subordinated and coordinate clauses, etc., in the light of modern grammar approaches. All students are expected to participate actively in the class and periodic quizzes. Course requirements include a midterm examination, a final examination, and one short paper. (Dvorak)

Literature

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

El curso es una introduccion a la problematica de la literatura espanola anterior a 1700: ideas, movimientos, estilos, generos. El curso se dcita en espanol. Se leeran y analizaran poemas filosofico de la edad media y del Renacimiento (Rabi Sem Tob, Jorge Manriques, Luis de Leon), piezas de teatro popular del Renacimiento (Pasos de Lope de Rueda) y dos Novelas Ejemplares de Cervantes. Es necesario el curso Spn 362. La evaluacion se hara por medio de trabajos de investigacion, participaciones en clase y examenes. Al comienzo del curso se dedicaran unas clases a explicar la tecnica del comentario de textos literarios que se aplicara en las obras obras estudiadas. (Lopez-Grigera)

372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

The Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, the Generation of '98, and the years around the Spanish Civil War are the periods represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems, and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, and an effort is made to show how they exemplify their historical and cultural context. Some of the authors to be studied are Larra, Zorrilla, Espronceda, Becquer, Galdos, Unamuno, and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lectures and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of quizzes, a term paper, and a final examination. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Hafter)

382. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

Covers the main Spanish American contemporary authors in poetry, narrative, theatre and essay (Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia Marquez; Vicente Huidobro, Pablo Neruda, Cesar Vallejo; Rodolfo Usigli, Octavio Paz). The concentration is on reading a selection of literary texts. Lecture and discussion will be the format of the course. Conducted in Spanish. The student's performance will be evaluated through grades obtained in: (a) reports (b) midterm exam, and (c) final examination. There will be a course pack available at the beginning of the term. (Goic)

425. Spanish Romanticism. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).

Spain, the most "Romantic" of countries for the rest of Europe, has not always been able to judge clearly its literature and art in the first half of the nineteenth century. Cutting through myths of a colorful, exotic, violent, passionate, fanatically religious Spain, we will analyze carefully what is unique in her Romantic literature and what it shares with other European literatures. Readings include plays by Rivas and others, poetry by Espronceda and Becquer, prose works by Larra, Donoso Cortes, and Blanco White, and a novel. Conducted in Spanish with papers, class exercises, and final examinations. (Hafter)

488. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).
La novela de la revolucion mexicana.
El curso se concentra principalmente en las novelas contemporaneas que tienen por asunto global o parcial la revolucion mexicana en su proceso desde 1910 en adelante. Mariano Azuela, Los de abajo, como punto de partida y Agustin Yanez, Al filo del agua, Juan Rulfo, Pedro Parama y Carlos Fuentes, La muerte de Artemio Cruz, seran las principales novelas consideradas. Los objetivos del curso son: el analisis individual de las obras; su modo de representacion de la realidad; los aspectos que permiten incluirlas en el conjunto de las novelas de la revolucion como en un sub-genero.El metodo de la clase sera de leccion magistral y de discusion. Los estudiantes deberan escribir cuatro informes, hacer exposiciones orales y algunos ejercicios. La evaluacion se hara sobre la base de los informes y de la participacion en clase. (Goic)


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