Courses in Linguistics (Division 423)

180. English for Foreign GSTAs. Teaching assistants will be placed in 180 on the basis of pre-session testing. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for students who do not pass the special English Language Skills Test for Teaching Assistants. Instruction will be given twice a week in two hour sessions and in additional small group work. The course will focus on oral presentations in the student's own field of study. Extensive use of video-taping and critiquing will be included. Topics to be covered will include: (1) methods of organization for oral presentation; (2) public speaking skills; (3) classroom interactional skills; (4) intensive audio and video pronunciation workshop instruction. Students will be tested on pronunciation early in the course, and when necessary assigned to special self-study pronunciation work in the language laboratory in addition to the pronunciation workshops. Note that this course is designed to meet the needs of non-native speakers of English. (Ard)

211. Introduction to Language. (3). (SS).

This course is designed to acquaint students with the scope and methods of linguistic inquiry. It should enable students to acquire familiarity with the different branches of linguistics and to come to some appreciation of what linguists do. The course has two principal goals: to introduce many of the basic tools for studying language and to learn to use those tools to improve our understanding of language as we encounter it in our daily lives.

272(141)/Anthro. 272. Language in Society. Primarily for freshmen and sophomores. (4). (SS).

See Cultural Anthropology 272. (DeBarnardi)

340. Writing for Academic Purposes. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their writing skills to perform successfully in academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. There is instruction and practice in the writing of a range of texts for specific purposes, e.g., extended definitions, descriptions of processes, data commentaries, literature reviews. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. A student receives a passing grade if she or he has attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified writing assignments, and performed satisfactorily on a final evaluation task.

341. Term Paper Writing. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in writing term papers. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students are introduced to the steps for developing a well organized and properly developed term paper. These include an introduction to library resources, choosing and limiting topics, reading, notetaking, paraphrasing, summarizing sources, etc. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. A student receives a passing grade if she or he has attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified assignments, and satisfactorily completed a final term paper. (Soden)

343. Lecture Comprehension. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their listening and notetaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on listening skills within an academic context: (1) subject matter comprehension, (2) paralinguistic cues in academic interactions, (3) cross-cultural differences. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. Students receive passing grades if they have attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified assignments and performed satisfactorily on a final evaluation task.

344. Speaking in Academic Contexts. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their speaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on speaking skills within an academic context. Course material includes (1) oral presentation, (2) cultural aspects of American classrooms, and (3) interactions with professors/TAs. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. Students receive passing grades if they have attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified assignments and performed satisfactorily on a final assessment task.

345. Pronunciation. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their pronunciation in order to communicate successfully in their academic situations. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students receive instruction in the English sound system. Practice is provided in the form of small group tutorials as well as language laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluency, communicative competence with self-monitoring an important goal. Students will be evaluated on the basis on regular attendance, successful completion of assignments, tests, and video work.

412. Phonetics. Linguistics 312 or equivalent. (3). (NS).

Linguistics is not needed as a prerequisite for this course in Winter Term, 1986. This course treats the physiology, aerodynamics, and acoustics of human speech. Attention will be given both to articulatory and acoustic phonetics. There will be opportunity to learn to use the basic laboratory equipment of phonetics, and students will study and interpret various types of instrumental records of speech.

415. Syntax II. Linguistics 315 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This is a second term syntax course. There will be weekly readings and problem sets related to the readings. Readings aim to give an in-depth knowledge of types of linguistic problems and of the Theory of Government and Binding. A major goal of the course is to gain the skill of being a critical, active reader. We will consider the readings from the point of view of uncovering and testing assumptions, recognizing and testing forms of argumentation, and recognizing and testing predictions of the analyses given. There will be a final paper in addition to the weekly problem sets. (Napoli)

473/Anthropology 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art. Two courses in anthropology, linguistics or literature, or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term)). (HU).

See Cultural Anthropology 473. (Mannheim)

492. Topics in Linguistics. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
LANGUAGE IN USE.
This course is concerned with the study of language in everyday situations, especially situations involving face-to-face interaction. Among the questions we will explore are: what is the nature of face-to-face interaction? how can it be described? how do people use language to structure their face-to-face interaction? what is the basis of interpretation within face-to-face interaction? how does the context of face-to-face interaction influence the use of language? To explore these questions we will examine recent work in conversational analysis and recent work on the social organization of face-to-face interaction. In addition, we will engage in our own analyses of face-to-face events. (Bloome)


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.