Courses in Religion (Division 457)

202/Buddhist Studies 220/Asian Studies 220. Introduction to World Religions: South and East Asia. (4). (HU).

Intended primarily for freshman and sophomores, this course is an introduction to the philosophical, contemplative, ritual and institutional heritage of the major Asian religious traditions. Hinduism (India), Confucianism and Taoism (China), Shinto (Japan), and Buddhism (India, Tibet, China, Japan) will be considered against their historical/cultural backgrounds, and against the background of human religiousness in general. To lend coherence to the vast and highly diverse field of study known as "Asian religions," in dealing with each religion we will focus on certain universal themes, such as death and the afterlife, world denying vs. world affirming ideals, and modes of religious expression in the so-called "great" (philosophical) vs. "little" (popular) traditions. There will be two lectures and one discussion section a week, with use of slides and films. There is no prerequisite for the course, which is itself a prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in Asian religions, especially Buddhism. It also is required for concentration in the Program on Studies in Religion. There will be two brief quizzes, and a midterm and final exam. (Foulk)

203. Introduction to the Christian Tradition. (4). (HU).

A survey of the institutions, doctrine, political involvement, and culture of the Christian Churches of the West from Apostolic times to the 20th century. A textbook and two lectures a week will provide students with the necessary historical continuity. Two sections a week will be devoted to discussion of selected documents (such as creeds and confessions, papal encyclicals, monastic rules, and religious tracts) and some "literary classics" of the tradition (by such authors as St. Augustine, St. Benedict, St. Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Wesley, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.) This is an introductory course with no prerequisites; and although previous religious education might obviously prove helpful, the staff will not assume that students have any background in the history or doctrine of the Christian Church. (Graf)

204/GNE 204. Islamic Religion: An Introduction. (3). (HU).

See General Near East 204. (Mir)

350/ABS 350. History of Christian Thought, I: Paul to Augustine. (4). (HU).

This course is an introductory intellectual history of early Christianity in the first five centuries of the common era. It will include discussion of (a) Pauline and Paulinist theologies; (b) the religious thought of the major figures both 'orthodox' and 'heretical' of the early church; (c) the social teachings of the church fathers, with special reference to matters of contemporary ethical and practical concern, e.g., war and peace, social justice, equality, abortion; (d) the development of the Christian creed and canon of scripture, and the Christological controversies of the ancient church. Enrollment limited to 100 students. (Hoffmann)

369/Psych. 370. Psychology and Religion. Introductory psychology or senior standing. (4). (SS).

See Psychology 370. (R. Mann)

375/MARC 375/German 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology. (3). (HU).

The course will deal with several cycles of myths and sagas, including Beowulf in the Anglo-Saxon literature, Roland, the Nibelungenlied, the Lancelot cycle, Tristan and the Isolde cycle in Celtic and Germanic literature, the Tain in Irish literature which includes the Conchobar and CuChulainn tales, the Welsh Mabinogi tales of Pwyll, Branwen, Culhwch and Olwen, Tales of Gwion Bach and Taliesin, the Arthurian Welsh Tales, such as the Lady of the Fountain, Peredur and Gereint, and many sagas of the Prose Edda in the world of the Nordic gods. Readings will incorporate literature based on these myths, such as Gray's ode "The Fatal Sisters," which deals with the Valkyries as messengers of Odin, Longfellow's poem "Tegner's Drapa" which bemoans Baldur's death, and perhaps also Wagner's Ring Cycle in music and literature. Grades will be based on several short papers, a midterm and a final exam. (Beck)

387. Independent Study. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Only one course from Religion 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

This course is designed to accommodate students who may be unable to take listed offerings or have special reasons for undertaking directed readings. Course content and requirements are worked out individually between the student and the instructor. Credit may vary from one to three hours.

424/Psych. 403. Personality and Religious Development. Introductory psychology. (4; 3 in the half-term). (HU).

See Psychology 403. (J. Mann)

440/GNE 440. The Lord's Supper. (1). (HU). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This will be a mini course centering around the main topic of The Lord's Supper; Communion with Israel, with Christ, and among the guests, with John 6 as the central discussion of the final lecture. It will focus on a multi-cultural approach. The instructor will be Markus Barth from the University of Basel, and it will be taught for four days the first week in April 1986, while he is on campus on leave from Basel, Switzerland. (Barth)

455/Soc. 455. Religion and Society. (3). (SS).

See Sociology 455. (Heirich)

483/Buddhist Studies 481. Zen (Ch'an) Buddhism. Rel. 202 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

See Buddhist Studies 481. (Foulk)

487. Independent Study. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Only one course from Religion 387 and 487 may be elected in the same term.

This course is designed to accommodate students who may be unable to take listed offerings or have special reasons for undertaking directed readings. Course content and requirements are worked out individually between the student and the instructor. Credit may vary from one to three hours. This course is also approved for graduate students.


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