Courses in Linguistics (Division 423)

111. Languages of the World. (4). (SS).

We try to answer the following questions: (1) What is language; how languages work; languages and writing; the decipherments (understanding) of extinct languages: recent discoveries. (2) How languages resemble each other: the bricks of which all languages are built. Meanings and their components (elementary parts). Universal rules. (3) How languages differ from each other: the different types of the languages of the world. The advance of linguistic typology. (4) How languages are related to each other: the great language families of the world. (5) How languages change: parent and daughter languages. How we reconstruct ancient languages which don't have written records. Recent discoveries in the prehistory of language: how the ancient people talked; how far into the past can we go. (6) Where were the parent languages spoken: recent work on prehistoric migrations of peoples and their languages. Readings will be provided in a course pack. Students will be evaluated by homework assignments and one exam. (Shevoroshkin)

211. Introduction to Language. (3). (SS).

The purpose of this course is to provide a sampling of interesting topics in the study of language. It is not a technical introduction to the field of linguistics. The goal of the course is to help students see that language is both a significant and interesting part of our lives. Some of the questions we are likely to cover include: Where does language come from? How/why did writing originate? Is human language unique? How do we learn to talk? How are languages related? How does language affect society? Can machines use language? Should we all speak the same language? Can everybody learn a second language? Are there universal properties of language? There are likely to be frequent brief assignments examining some aspect of language behavior or some issue in the study of language. One or two exams are also likely. (Keller-Cohen)

272/Anthro. 272. Language in Society. Primarily for freshmen and sophomores. (4). (SS).

Language in Society investigates the various ways that language is used to accomplish social and cultural activities and structures, the ways that language reflects social and cultural organization and content, and the diversity of language across social and cultural groups. Requirements include a midterm and a final examination, two papers (about five pages each), and participation in a research/study/field project. The course involves a lecture section (held two times a week) and a discussion section (held once a week). (Bloome)

330. Term Paper Writing. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in writing term papers. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students are introduced to the steps for developing a well organized and properly developed term paper. These include an introduction to library resources, choosing and limiting topics, reading, notetaking, paraphrasing, summarizing sources, etc. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. (Soden)

332. Text Processing and Academic Vocabulary Building. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in reading strategies appropriate for processing academic texts and in the structure of English academic vocabulary. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students will be evaluated on their successful completion of regular assignments and a final exam. (Reinhart)

334. Lecture Comprehension. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their listening and notetaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on listening skills within an academic context: (1) subject matter comprehension, (2) paralinguistic cues in academic interactions, (3) cross-cultural differences. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. (Brennan)

336. Speaking in Academic Contexts. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their speaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on speaking skills within an academic context. Course material includes: (1) oral presentation, (2) cultural aspects of American classrooms, and (3) interactions with professors/TAs. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final assessment task. (Guice)

338. Pronunciation. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their pronunciation in order to communicate successfully in their academic situations. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students receive instruction in the English sound system. Practice is provided in the form of small group tutorials as well as language laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluency, communicative competence with self-monitoring an important goal. Students will be evaluated on the basis on regular attendance, successful completion of assignments, tests, and video work. (Morley)

340. Writing for Academic Purposes. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their writing skills to perform successfully in academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. There is instruction and practice in the writing of a range of texts for specific purposes, e.g., extended definitions, descriptions of processes, data commentaries, literature reviews. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified writing assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final evaluation task. (Swales)

361. ESL Theory, Methods, and Tests II. Linguistics 360. (3). (HU).

This course is a continuation of Linguistics 360, which (or its equivalent) is a prerequisite. It is designed to provide students with a sound theoretical and practical basis for language teaching. The background of knowledge and experiences it provides is intended not only for those interested in finding out about teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESL), but is also applicable to English teaching in general, and to foreign language teaching as well. It focuses on a detailed analysis of the skill areas (e.g., listening, speaking, reading, writing) involved in second language instruction and the development of various second language curricula. An additional emphasis of this course is on construction, administration, and scoring of various language tests. The relevance of classroom testing to classroom teaching will be highlighted. Students will learn about the latest trends in both language teaching and testing, and about their relationships. (Selinker)

366. Observing Teaching and Learning of ESL. (2). (Excl.).

This course has essentially two parts. In the first, we will focus on classroom interaction. Students will observe a wide range of language classes, focusing on aspects of the teaching-learning relationship. In particular, we will examine ways in which teachers interact with students, ways in which students interact with other students, ways in which teachers encourage/hinder learning (verbal and non-verbal actions, attitudes, use of materials, etc.), and ways in which students interact with materials. In the second part, students will have hands-on teaching experience. Under supervision they will develop lesson plans, develop and/or select materials and teach English to non-native speakers. In addition, they will gain experience in administering an English as a Second Language Program. The course will provide students with an opportunity to analyse classroom behaviors within different frameworks and will acquaint students with different styles and techniques for language teaching. Prerequisite: Linguistics 360 or permission of instructor. (Gass)

406/English 406. Modern English Grammar. (3). (HU).

See English 406. (Cureton)

411. Introduction to Linguistics. Not open to students with credit for Ling. 211. (3). (SS).

An introduction to the theories and methods of linguistics. The first section of the course will cover phonetics and phonology (the nature and organization of the sounds of language) and morphology and syntax (the construction and organization of words and sentences). The second part of the course will focus on the way languages vary, from one time to another, one social situation to another, and one language family to another. Students can expect to develop an understanding of the organization of language and of methods by which linguists learn about language. (Myhill)

412. Phonetics. (3). (NS).

This is an introductory course in phonetics (the study of the nature of speech sounds). Emphasis will be placed on how speech sounds are produced and transcribed. Other topics to be covered include: features of sounds, phonetic universals, phonetic motivation of phonological processes, and acoustic phonetics. Grading will be based on homework, exams, and a project. There are no prerequisites, but an introductory linguistics course is strongly recommended. (Davis)

492. Topics in Linguistics. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.
Section 001 VERB SEMANTICS.
This is a research seminar, that is, it will involve basic research in verbal semantics as well as surveying current work in the area. We will begin with the assumption that inherent aspect (Aktionsart), causal structure and a "commonsense" classification of actions determine much of the case and voice properties of verbal structures. We will attempt to build a semantically organized lexicon of verbs and verb types useful for both theoretical and field work. (Croft)


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